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Outcomes

GEOGRAPHY
Assignment 1
Abstract
The following assignment is about Global Issues and the Role of Citizenship. It
includes three lesson plans complete with scope and sequence, concept
map, assessment schedule, assessment task and a unit outline. As well as an
academic justification of the development of the lesson plans.

18300808
Jo-Ann Carder
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Scope and Sequence

Assignment Cover Sheet

School of Education

Student name: Jo-Ann Carder

Student number: 18300808

Unit name and number: 102087 Geography Curriculum

Tutorial group:

Tutorial day and time: Wed 5:30pm

Lecturer/Tutor: Tracey McMillen

Title of assignment: Assignment 1

Length: -

Date due: 14/8/15

Date submitted: 14/8/15

Campus enrolment: Penrith

Declaration:

I hold a copy of this assignment if the original is lost or damaged

I hereby certify that no part of this assignment or product has been copied from any other
students work or from any other source except where due acknowledgement is made in the
assignment

No part of the assignment/product has been written/produced for me by any other person
except where collaboration has been authorised by the subject lecturer/tutor concerned

I am aware that this work will be reproduced and submitted to plagiarism detection software
programs for the purpose of detecting possible plagiarism (which may retain a copy on its
database for future plagiarism checking)

Signature Jo-Ann Carder

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Lesson Plans

Contents

Lesson Plan 1 ............................................................................................................ 4


Lesson Plan 2 .......................................................................................................... 11
Lesson Plan 3 .......................................................................................................... 19
Justification ............................................................................................................ 32
Appendices............................................................................................................ 37
Outcomes............................................................................................................................................. 38
Concept Map ..................................................................................................................................... 41
Assessment Task .................................................................................................................................. 43
Marking Criter ...................................................................................................................................... 44
Unit Outline ........................................................................................................................................... 45
Lesson Outline ..................................................................................................................................... 46

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Lesson Plans

Lesson Plan 1

Topic area: Global Issues and Stage of Learner: Stage 4 Syllabus Pages: 32 - 33
the Role of Citizenship

Date: 15/2/15 Location Booked: Classroom Lesson Number: 7 /30

Time: 60 minutes Total Number of students Printing/preparation


26 Laminated quote or Computer
Google earth
Internet pages open - ABC

Outcomes Assessment Students learn Students learn to


about

Global
G4.2 - organises Mind map geograp Recognise
and interprets Observation hical global
geographical Future book issues, geographical
information checking including issues
G4.8 - describes Tourism. Describe the
the nature of
Life Skills
interrelationships global
between people geographical
and issues
environments
GLS.4 - Explores the
interrelationships
between peoples
activities and
physical
environments

Cross Curriculum themes & General capabilities Explicit subject specific concepts and
skills

Civics and citizenship Maps


Environment Virtual Fieldwork
ICT Interconnection
Life Skills Environment

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Lesson Plans
Quality Teaching Elements (lesson focus) Highlight the appropriate areas

Intellectual Quality 1.1 Deep knowledge 1.4 Higher-order thinking

This refers to pedagogy focused on producing deep understanding of 1.2 Deep 1.5 Metalanguage
important, substantive concepts, skills and ideas. Such pedagogy treats understanding
knowledge as something that requires active construction and requires 1.6 Substantive
students to engage in higher-order thinking and to communicate 1.3 Problematic communication
substantively about what they are learning. knowledge

Quality Learning Environment 2.1 Explicit quality 2.4 Social Support


criteria
This refers to pedagogy that creates classrooms where students and 2.5 Students self
teachers work productively in an environment clearly focused on learning. 2.2 Engagement regulation
Such pedagogy sets high and explicit expectations and develops positive
relationships between teacher and students and among students. 2.3 High Expectations 2.6 Student direction

Significance 3.1 Background 3.4 Inclusivity


knowledge
This refers to pedagogy that helps make learning more meaningful and 3.5 Connectedness
important to students. Such pedagogy draws clear connections with 3.2 Cultural
students prior knowledge and identities, with contexts outside of the knowledge 3.6 Narrative
classroom, and with multiple ways of knowing all cultural perspective.
3.3 Knowledge
integration

How are the quality teaching elements you have identified achieved within the
lesson?

Teaching Indicators of presence in the lesson


element

1.6 Substantive Communication

1.6 Students are expected to engage in many discussions with both the teacher and other
students. They are not given a definition of a tourist until the students come to their own
conclusions with the use of a mind map.

2.2 Engagement

2.2 Students are expected to engage in many different ways. They will be encouraged to
participate in discussion, engage with a video on tourism as well as with google earth, where
they become in charge of what they see and look at to examine the Yucatan context.

3.1-3.3 Knowledge and background Integration

3.1 Students are expected to integrate their own knowledge into the classroom setting. They are
also expected to use the life skills and geographic knowledge and integrate it into their own
lives. This will encourage active citizenship within the classroom.
3.3

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Lesson Plans

Time Teaching and learning actions Organisation Centre


d

T/S

5
Students enter the classroom.
Unpack bag and get out last lessons Teacher: Question is written on
reflection question. Why do you think is the board ready.
ecological sustainability important?
Mark the roll Student: Unpacking of bag and
homework reflection ready. Mixed

Resources: Whiteboard

10
Discussion of the reflection question.
Teacher: Facilitating discussion

Student: Discussing question

Resources: Whiteboard may be Student


required.

15
Lesson outline
o Discussion What is a tourist. Teacher: Teacher explaining
o Information. What? Where? How? lesson outline. Facilitating mind
o Thinking map Teacher
o Google Earth
Discussion
Student: Active istening. Thinking
What is a tourist? Make a classroom
and answering
definition with a mind map. Check it Student
against the dictionary meaning. Have Resources: Whiteboard or IWB
you been a tourist? Where have you
been?

20
Information
o What types of tourism is there. Teacher: Facilitation. Showing
Natural, Cultural, Man-made. picture.
Whiteboard will be set up in a
table with the above as headings. Student: Writing answers on the
Students will be asked to suggest board (White or Interactive) and
tourist locations and say what explaining why.
type of tourism it is. Some sites
may be a combination such as Resurces: Whiteboard or IWB
the Sacred rock at the Isle of
Student

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Lesson Plans
Pines as it is natural and cultural.
Shows picture of the Sacred Rock.

25
Thinking
o Puts a quote on an IWB or bring in Teacher: Sets up quote. Asks
in a laminated copy of the students to think or write down
attached quote. what they think the quote
o Tourism carries a tremendous
means. Then ask them to talk to
potential that must be
acknowledged as essential for the the person next to them. Then
future of world heritage. But Share. Prompts students to think
without proper management, we deeper about the implications of
30 can easily get out of control. tourism
o Does a think/pair/share with the
quote.
Student: Thinking/writing down
Extension Thinking.
o Follows on from previous activity. what they think the quote
Gets students to think about: means. Then sharing.
o Who is affected by tourism
o How are they impacted Resources: A digital or physical
copy of the quote.
Mixed

35
Video
o Watch video on tourism at the Teacher: Scaffolding and telling
Yucatan Peninisula. students what to concentrate
o Beforehand ask students to make on.
notes on how the environment is
being effected and how they are
Student: Watching the video and
being resolved. Students who
have problems writing their own making notes.
notes may need extra scaffolding.
With specific questions such as Resources: Video (Link below),
40
How is the environment being Computer/IWB, Internet.
effected?
Students

45 Google Earth
o Find the Yucatan Peninsula on
google earth and as a class Teacher: Prompting thinking.
investigate the location. Get
students to navigate google Student: Writing notes and
earth. Discuss the context of the
participating in discussions.
location ->Who and why do
tourists go there. Get the students Navigating google earth.
to use the knowledge they

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Lesson Plans
50 learned from the video. Students Resources: Computer/ IWB, Mixed
writing notes. internet.

60 Set reflection question Why is Teacher: Writing question on the


understanding tourism important? Pack up board.

Student: Writing question in their


books. Packing up. Students

Resources: Whiteboard and


books.

Reflection

What have I learned about the teaching and learning process when preparing this
lesson?

I found designing this lesson to be difficult because it brings back many memories of my
own high school experience. I was taught using a very traditional teacher centred
approach. Therefore, I tried to create a lesson plan where students were in charge of
finding their own knowledge in a supportive social environment where a teacher
facilitates and promotes learning instead of dictating learning.

How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?

Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording

G4.2 Creates a mind map. Interprets google earth


information.

G4.8 Explains how tourism influences both people and


environments.

GLS.4 Explains how tourism affects both people and


environments.

Other considerations

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Lesson Plans
Graduate Evidence within this lesson
Standards

2.6 Information Students are using google earth to acquire and integrate
and knowledge. Then applying that knowledge to a real life
Communication example of tourism.
Technology
(ICT) There is an option to use an interactive board as well if
available.

3.4 Select and Various resources have been selected. A thought provoking
use resources quote, an educational video on the Yucatan Peninsula and
Google earth

4.1 Support Students are encouraged to participate in various


student discussions. It starts with questions about their own
participation experiences and then advances to reflective and inquiry
based questions.

WHS

Tables and chairs are evenly spaced. Exits are not blocked. Students are not
staring at the computer screen to long.

Resources Attached:

You must list all the resources that you have created or found in this space.

Yucatan Peninsula Video

ABC Foreign Correspondent. (2012) 'Sustainable tourism', ABC Splash.


Retrieved from http://abcspla.sh/m/525203

Google Earth

Coordinates for Yucatan Peninsula - 18.8450 N, 89.1256 W

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Lesson Plans

Quote:

Burnham, B. (2006) [Quote] retrieved from http://www.quotehd.com/Quotes/bonnie-


burnham-quote-tourism-carries-a-tremendous-potential-that-must-be-acknowledged-as

Sacred Rock:

Wilkinson, J. (2008). Isle of Pines. Pacific Cruise 2008. Retrieved from


http://members.ozemail.com.au/~joywilkinson/PacificCruise2008/photos/ph
oto38.html

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Lesson Plans
Lesson Plan 2

Topic area: Global Issues and Stage of Learner: Stage 4 Syllabus Pages: 32 - 33
the Role of Citizenship

Date: 13/2/15 Location Booked: Classroom Lesson Number: 8/30

Time: 60 minutes Total Number of students Printing/preparation


26 5x Colour UNWTO
26x maps
26x worksheets

Outcomes Assessment Students learn Students learn to


about

Global
G4.2 - organises Book collection geograp Recognise
and interprets hical global
geographical issues, geographical
information Life Skills including issues
G4.4 - uses a Tourism. Describe the
range of nature of
geographical global
tools geographical
GLS.4 - Uses issues
geographical
tools and skills

Cross Curriculum themes & General capabilities Explicit subject specific concepts and
skills

Civics and citizenship Maps


Environment Virtual Fieldwork
ICT Interconnection
Life Skills Environment
Numeracy Numeracy

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Lesson Plans
Quality Teaching Elements (lesson focus) Highlight the appropriate areas

Intellectual Quality 1.1 Deep knowledge 1.4 Higher-order thinking

This refers to pedagogy focused on producing deep understanding of 1.2 Deep 1.5 Metalanguage
important, substantive concepts, skills and ideas. Such pedagogy treats understanding
knowledge as something that requires active construction and requires 1.6 Substantive
students to engage in higher-order thinking and to communicate 1.3 Problematic communication
substantively about what they are learning. knowledge

Quality Learning Environment 2.1 Explicit quality 2.4 Social Support


criteria
This refers to pedagogy that creates classrooms where students and 2.5 Students self
teachers work productively in an environment clearly focused on learning. 2.2 Engagement regulation
Such pedagogy sets high and explicit expectations and develops positive
relationships between teacher and students and among students. 2.3 High Expectations 2.6 Student direction

Significance 3.1 Background 3.4 Inclusivity


knowledge
This refers to pedagogy that helps make learning more meaningful and 3.5 Connectedness
important to students. Such pedagogy draws clear connections with 3.2 Cultural
students prior knowledge and identities, with contexts outside of the knowledge 3.6 Narrative
classroom, and with multiple ways of knowing all cultural perspective.
3.3 Knowledge
integration

How are the quality teaching elements you have identified achieved within the
lesson?

Teaching Indicators of presence in the lesson


element

1.3 Problematic knowledge

1.3 In this, skills based lesson the children will be expected to find their own answers to problems set to them.
They must use comprehension, numeracy and creativity to answer the questions and fulfil the lesson
outcomes and life skills.

2.3- High expectations

2.3 It is important to have high expectations of your students. It helps motivate them and let them know they
can achieve something. At the same time, it is also important to make sure you have realistic expectations
as well. This does not mean they will not need help but they will feel comfortable enough to ask for help.

3.1-3.3 Knowledge and background Integration

3.1 Students are expected to integrate their own knowledge into the classroom setting. They are also
expected to use the life skills and geographic knowledge and integrate it into their own lives. This will
encourage active citizenship within the classroom.
3.3

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Lesson Plans

Time Teaching and learning actions Organisation Centre


d

T/S

5
Students will be forewarned to bring their
own technology device. Teacher: Question is written on
Students enter the classroom. the board ready.
Unpack bag and get out last lessons
reflection question. Why is understanding Student: Unpacking of bag and
tourism important? Mixed
homework reflection ready.
Mark the roll
Resources: Whiteboard

10
Discussion of the reflection question.
Teacher: Facilitating discussion

Student: Discussing question

Resources: Whiteboard may be Student


required.

15
Lesson outline
o Geography Skills Teacher: Teacher explaining
o UNWTO lesson outline.
o Latitude and Longitude Teacher
Student: Listening. Thinking and
answering
Discussion
o Georgraphy Skills. Student
Resources: Whiteboard or IWB
The importance of
geographic skills
What geographic skills do
we know?

20
Talk about UNWTO ( World Tourist
Organisation) Teacher: Writes questions on the
o What is UNWTO board.
o Give students the pdf link to the
booklet. (Share on moodle or
write up address) Teacher
o Go through the booklet. Highlight Student: Writing answers in their
important relevant information
books.
such as most travelled tourist
destinations. Current tourist trend-
How are people travelling. Where
are they travelling. How is this
25 Resources: Bring your own Student
effecting the economies of
certain places. Eg Africa. device. Link to Article.

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Lesson Plans
o Students are then given the
questions to answer in their books

1. Globally how many


international arrivals in
were there in 1950? -25
30 Million
2. Globally how many
international arrivals were
there in 2014? -1133
Million
3. How many more tourists
were there in 2014 than
1950? -1108 Million
4. Tourism employs how
many people? -1/11
people
5. What is the most popular
mode of travel? Air
6. Which country has the
highest number of
International tourist
arrivals? France
7. How many international
tourist arrivals did Japan
and Mexico have in
2014?- 13,413 29Million
8. Is Australia receiving
more tourists every year
(2010-2014)? Whats the
difference between 2010
and 2014? No -78
9. Describe which trend did
you find interesting and
why?
10. Assess the significance of
Tourism in 2014.

35
Latitude and Longitude
o Inquire how confident students Teacher: Laminated picture of
are. Then determine how much the earth or IWB picture. Using
detail you put into the the picture to explain the lines
explanation of latitude and
and point out important lines. If
longitude
o Latitude- Horizontal lines. IWB is available, getting the
North/South. 90, 0, -90 students to draw coloured lines
o Longitude- Vertical lines. 0 -180 on the map is a good idea.
40 o LAT IS FLAT- Mnemonic. LA/LO.
Remember which one is which Student: Active listening.
and in what order they go in.
Teacher
o Important lines. Equator, Tropics of Resources: Picture of a map.
cancer and Capricorn, Arctic
circle and Antarctic circle.
Greenwich Meridian Timeline.
o
45
Latitude and Longitude activity.
o Map1 is handed out. With
instructions.

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Lesson Plans
Colour the Equator blue Teacher: Instructions written on
Colour the Tropic of the board. Worksheets are
Cancer red
handed out together. Students
Colour the Tropic of
Capricorn orange are given choice, which one
Colour the Antarctic they do first. If not finished
50 circle in dark blue becomes homework. Mixed
Colour the Arctic circle in
light Blue.
Colour in Greenwich
Meridian Time green. Student: Colouring and writing
o Worksheet1
coordinates. Google earth
Students are asked to
stick in book and Activity.
complete. Will be marked
when book is collected.
o On google earth- students pick 3
tourist locations and give the Resources: Map and Worksheet
lat/long in degrees and minutes
and mark it on their map. Google earth.

60 Set reflection question Is tourism Teacher: Writing question on the


beneficial or harmful? Collect workbooks. board. Collect workbooks.
Pack up
Student: Writing question in their
books. Packing up. Students

Resources: Whiteboard and


books.

Reflection

What have I learned about the teaching and learning process when preparing this
lesson?

I learned there are many different elements that go into teaching geography skills.
What they already know, what you want them to know, and how you get them to that
stage. I thought latitude and longitude would be good to teach because I found it hard
writing the correct GPS location, which is why I came up with my own mnemonics.

How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?

Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording

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Lesson Plans
G4.2 Students will read the UNWTO booklet and
interprets words and statistics to gain
geographical understanding.

G4.4 Students use numeracy and geographical tools


and information to answer a series of questions
and complete latitude and longitude maps and
worksheets.

GLS.11 Students use numeracy and geographical tools


and information to answer a series of questions
and complete latitude and longitude maps and
worksheets.

Other considerations

Graduate Evidence within this lesson


Standards

1.5 - Differentiate I have added and extension activity for those who feel confident already
teaching to meet with latitude and longitude. Where they look up 3 global tourist sites on their
the specific devices (Google map) and write the exact location.
learning needs of
students across
the full range of
abilities

2.5- Literacy and When students are answering the questions on the UNWTO booklet they are
numeracy expected to use numeracy to complete the questions. Numeracy could
strategies also be used with latitude and longitude.

5.2 Provide At the end of the lesson the teacher is collecting books to mark the skills
feedback to book to make sure the students have understood and to provide feedback.
students on their
learning

WHS

Tables and chairs are evenly spaced. Exits are not blocked. Students are not
staring at the computer screen to long.

Resources Attached:

You must list all the resources that you have created or found in this space.

| 16
Lesson Plans
UNWTO Booklet

UNWTO. (2015). UNWTO: Tourism highlights. Retrieved from http://www.e-


unwto.org/doi/book/10.18111/9789284416899

Longitude and Latitude Map

Unknown. (2013). Longitude and latitude map. Retrieved from


http://www.survivalworld.com/maps/longitude-latitude-map.html#.VciuvvmYEoU

Longitude and Latitude

Unknown. (2014). Worksheet1.


Retrieved from

http://www.oncoursesystems.com/school/webpage/467213/937679

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Lesson Plans
UNWTO WORKSHEET

1. Globally how many international arrivals in were there in 1950?

2. Globally how many international arrivals were there in 2014?

3. How many more tourists were there in 2014 than 1950?

4. Tourism employs how many people?

5. What is the most popular mode of travel?

6. Which country has the highest number of International tourist arrivals?

7. How many international tourist arrivals did Japan and Mexico have in
2014?

8. Is Australia receiving more tourists every year (2010-2014)? Whats the


difference between 2010 and 2014?

9. Describe which trend did you find interesting and why?

10. Assess the significance of Tourism in 2014.

Created by Jo-Ann Carder

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Lesson Plans
Lesson Plan 3

Topic area: Global Issues and Stage of Learner: Stage 4 Syllabus Pages: 32 - 33
the Role of Citizenship

Date: 16/2/15 Location Booked: Classroom Lesson Number: 11/30

Time: 60 minutes Total Number of students Printing/preparation


26 6x each article

Outcomes Assessment Students learn Students learn to


about

Different
G4.2 - organises Case Study perspectives Identify
and interprets relevant to perspectives
geographical the issue. and bias
information Life Skills about the
G4.7 - identifies issue.
and discusses
geographical
issues from a GLS.4 - Uses
range of geographical
perspectives tools and skills

Cross Curriculum themes & General capabilities Explicit subject specific concepts and
skills

Civics and citizenship Maps


Environment Virtual Fieldwork
ICT Interconnection
Life Skills Environment
Numeracy Literacy

| 19
Lesson Plans
Quality Teaching Elements (lesson focus) Highlight the appropriate areas

Intellectual Quality 1.1 Deep knowledge 1.4 Higher-order thinking

This refers to pedagogy focused on producing deep understanding of 1.2 Deep 1.5 Metalanguage
important, substantive concepts, skills and ideas. Such pedagogy treats understanding
knowledge as something that requires active construction and requires 1.6 Substantive
students to engage in higher-order thinking and to communicate 1.3 Problematic communication
substantively about what they are learning. knowledge

Quality Learning Environment 2.1 Explicit quality 2.4 Social Support


criteria
This refers to pedagogy that creates classrooms where students and 2.5 Students self
teachers work productively in an environment clearly focused on learning. 2.2 Engagement regulation
Such pedagogy sets high and explicit expectations and develops positive
relationships between teacher and students and among students. 2.3 High Expectations 2.6 Student direction

Significance 3.1 Background 3.4 Inclusivity


knowledge
This refers to pedagogy that helps make learning more meaningful and 3.5 Connectedness
important to students. Such pedagogy draws clear connections with 3.2 Cultural
students prior knowledge and identities, with contexts outside of the knowledge 3.6 Narrative
classroom, and with multiple ways of knowing all cultural perspective.
3.3 Knowledge
integration

How are the quality teaching elements you have identified achieved within the
lesson?

Teaching Indicators of presence in the lesson


element

1.4 Higher order thinking.

1.4 In this lesson based around perspectives, students are expected to analyse
and evaluate different perspectives in order to create something new.

2.5- Students self regulation

2.5 Students are expected to manage their own groups and participate fully.
They must regulate their own behaviour to ensure that the group achieves
their goal.

3.3 Inclusivity

3.4 All students are expected to participate with the groups. Each member will
have a role.

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Time Teaching and learning actions Organisation Centre
d

T/S

5 Teacher: Question is written on


Students enter the classroom. the board ready.
Unpack bag and get out last lessons
reflection question. Is tourism beneficial or Student: Unpacking of bag and
harmful? homework reflection ready.
Mark the roll
Resources: Whiteboard Student

10 Teacher: Facilitating discussion


Discussion of the reflection question.
Student: Discussing question

Resources: Whiteboard may be Student


required.

15
Lesson outline
Discussion Teacher: Teacher explaining
lesson outline. Writes each
Impact on the board and asks Teacher
o Focus Question Is tourism harmful for more examples.
or beneficial
o Geographical impacts - MEEPPS
o Collaborative source activity Student
o Bias
o Class table Student: Listening. Thinking and
o Debate answering

MEEPPS
o Discussion on what MEEPS means.
Individually explains what each Resources: Whiteboard or IWB
one means and examples.
Moral Culling of Sharks
Environmental -
Sustainability
Economic - Business
Physical Back burning
Political Transnational
corporations
Social Access to rural
resources

20 Organising groups
o Ask if they want to make their
own groups or teacher to Teacher: sorts out groups and
pick. (If you are a new explains roles.
teacher to the classroom,
preferably let them use their
groups as collaborative Teacher
learning is difficult without
strong relationships)

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o Roughly 5 to a group. Explain Student: Move into their groups.
the roles of each person.
Leader Elects who in their group will be
Time keeper each role.
Scribe
Diplomat
Speaker
Extra speaker
Resources: Whiteboard

25 Collaborative source study Teacher: Hands out sources


o Each group will be given an
article on Pompeii outlining
different perspectives.
(Students are not told this) Student: Read. Discuss. Answer
Tourist caught
stealing
Pompeii rises again
House of the
Resources: 6x each article Student
Gladiators collapse
Whats new in Pompeii
30 6x questions sheet
Down Pompeii
o They must:
Read the article
Discuss the article
Answer the questions

35 Class Table Teacher: Facilitate discussion.


o As a class, each speaker will Write answers on board.
outline his or her article.
o Then discuss the answers to the Student: Outline articles and
questions write a table MEEPPS. Student
discuss questions. Write table into
book.

Resources: Whiteboard

40 Bias
o Ask the class if they know what
bias is. Teacher: Asks questions, helps if
o If no one knows. Answer for them. gap in knowledge. Write notes
o Can you see bias in your
on board
articles
o Why is bias important?
o Using the table, give examples of
groups, individuals, or
governments who would Student: Answers.
concentrate on the impacts. Eg.
Mixed
The government cares about
economic gains.
Resources: Whiteboard.

45 Debate
o The students will then be split into
4 new groups for a debate. The Teacher: Facilitating debate
debate is Using what you know
and have learnt about Pompeii is
Tourism positive or negative.

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groups for positive two groups for Student: Organising own debate.
negative. 1 student will be
speaker. 1 student will be
timekeeper.1 student will be
50 diplomat. Resources: postitnotes Student
o Each group will have 3 mins to
come up with an argument. Each
person in the group must
contribute one point. All points
will be written on a postitnote The
two positive groups and the two
negatives will join together and
add postitnotes.
o Each side will then get 2 minutes
to consolidate answers and
choose a speaker. There will be 5
minutes left for the speaker to
read out and explain each
postitnote.

60 Set reflection question ? Collect Teacher: Writing question on the


workbooks. Pack up board. Collect workbooks.

Student: Writing question in their


books. Packing up. Students

Resources: Whiteboard and


books.

Reflection

What have I learned about the teaching and learning process when preparing this
lesson?

Through readings done in another unit I was weary of doing group work. While the
evidence suggests group work is a valuable part of learning and building social skills,
some evidence suggests that the environment has to be right. Right school context and
positive relationships between students and the teacher. Personally, I love group work
and strongly believe in student- centered learning.

How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?

Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording

G4.2 Students will be interpreting sources and organising it into a


debate.

G4.7 Students will be examining a range of different perspectives


and discussing them.

GLS.4 Students discuss how human activities such as tourism


impacts the environment.

| 23
Other considerations

Graduate Evidence within this lesson


Standards

1.1- Know Students tend to achieve more and feel more confident when
students and group work occurs. However, it is important know the
how they learn dynamics of your own class and gauge how well
collaborative learning will work in your classroom.

3.1- Establish At the beginning of this lesson, the teacher will introduce a
challenging focus question whereby at the end of the class the students
learning goals will be able to answer confidently.

3.4 Select and This lesson required the use of a variety of resources relevant
use resources to the topic. I believe I achieved this.

WHS

Tables and chairs are evenly spaced. Exits are not blocked. Students are not
staring at the computer screen too long.

Resources Attached:

You must list all the resources that you have created or found in this space.

Article 1

Tourist caught stealing tile from Pompeii to buy an iphone.

In the latest act of dumb tourist moves, a teenage boy from the Netherlands
was caught stealing a priceless artifact from the ancient city of Pompeii.

According to Italian news site Il Mattino, translated via The Local, an


American tourist witnessed the 16-year-old placing a Roman roof tile in his
backpack and attempting to smuggle it out of the site currently under
renovations.

| 24
Police on the scene stopped the teenager before he was able to leave with
the item. He reportedly later said he wanted to sell the tile on eBay to buy the
latest iPhone. But experts say he would have been disappointed by the
resale value.

A simple terracotta tile actually has a very low value, we don't even trade
them, Roman artifacts dealer Carole Elena told The Local.

Being a tile from Pompeii, its provenance might have given it some extra
value, but I'd say it's worth a maximum of 400 [about $443]... but obviously
items like this are priceless in terms of their historical value.

Though the tile was given back to Pompeii staff, neither the teenager or the
American tourist who caught him trying to take the item could remember the
original location of the piece so it may take some time before its properly
restored.

Unknown. (2015). Tourist caught stealing tile from Pompeii to buy an iPhone. Fox News.
Retrieved from http://www.foxnews.com/travel/2015/08/13/tourist-caught-stealing-tile-
from-pompeii-to-sell-on-ebay/

Article 2

Pompeii rises again

The longest lines start at the ancient brothel, where tourists ogle the erotic
frescoes and terracotta sculptures. Up and down Pompeii's stone streets,
hordes of visitors crowd around the restored ruins of elegant villas, examine
the chipped remains of fading mosaics and plod through the fabled city that
nearly 2000 years ago met its death under volcanic ash, lava and poisonous
gas.

A few years ago, the ancient metropolis risked extinction again - crushed this
time not by the majestic Mount Vesuvius but by the trample of tourists and
the ravages of rain, heat and other natural elements.

Today, Pompeii, a pillar in Italy's tourism-based economy, is by no means out


of the woods. But there are promising signs of recovery, according to
archaeological experts and what meets the eye.

One key change involves an experiment in a form of self-government, a


radical departure from Italy's tradition of state custodianship. After the
appointment of an energetic, respected new superintendent for all Pompeii-
area archaeological sites, Pietro Giovanni Guzzo, Italian authorities in late
1997 agreed to allow all ticket- and tourism-related revenue to stay in
Pompeii's budget. As well, Guzzo was given permission to seek private
investment.

| 25
Guzzo says Pompeii takes in about 20 million ($35 million) a year and the
European Union has contributed 30 million for a five-year program. That's in
addition to several restoration projects being sponsored by international
foundations.

"We have much more money than before," Guzzo says, adding quickly, "but
it's always too little." Guzzo shifted the focus of Pompeii to preserving what
has been discovered rather than seeking to unearth other parts of the vast
site. The policy is not without its detractors in the highly political world of
archaeological scholarship. But he sees as folly the urge to expose additional
wonders when those accessible are decaying.

"Pompeii is an ancient city that died," Guzzo says. "We are not trying to make
new life here. That is impossible. We can only conserve what's there. And
work to make the public understand."

Conditions had deteriorated so badly by the mid-1990s that only 14 per cent
of the excavated site was open to the public; today, open areas are twice
that, says Guzzo. Still, that's only about 25 villas. Forty years ago, visitors had
access to 64.

Roping off houses and rotating those that are accessible might not please
the tourists, but it does ward off some of the damage, Pompeii's
administrators argue. And if this kind of managed tourism works in Pompeii, it
can serve as a model for other sites in treasure-rich Italy.

In 1996, the World Monuments Fund in New York declared Pompeii one of the
world's most endangered sites. And in 1998 UNESCO put Pompeii on its World
Heritage list.

Mount Vesuvius erupted on an August afternoon in AD79, spewing fiery ash


and stone onto Pompeii, a seaside summer resort and playground for the
elite, and surrounding villages. Many fled, but thousands were killed as the
valley was buried. The result was a near-perfect picture, frozen in time, of
imperial Rome.

Pompeii was rediscovered in 1748, when systematic excavations began and


explorers frequently made off with treasures. Priceless frescoes and mosaic
tile floors were exposed to haphazard digs and uncontrolled tourism, with no
protection from the elements. What the ash of Vesuvius had preserved for
nearly 17 centuries was steadily battered, neglected, vandalised or
destroyed.

A third of what was the ancient city of Pompeii has not been excavated and
remains covered in scrub, dirt and stones.

| 26
The debate today, at Pompeii and other sites buried by Vesuvius, as well as
throughout the archaeological world, is whether to dig or preserve. Guzzo
sides with preserving.

According to the Italian Culture Ministry, nearly 2.2 million people visited
Pompeii in 2001, more than twice the number two decades earlier when
much more of the site was open to the public.

The 150 or so guards at the site are, apparently, still not enough. In October
thieves broke into Pompeii at night and made off with a 33-kilogram piece of
marble from a fountain in the House of the Ceii. It was the second major theft
in six months. Two detailed frescoes stolen in April were, however, recovered.

Andrew Wallace-Hadrill, the director of the British School at Rome and an


expert on the Pompeii area, praised the preservation efforts but said it might
be a losing battle. As fast as stucco is repaired in the corner of one villa, it falls
in another. And he says support from the Italian Government might be
fleeting, pointing out that authorities in Rome have not always appreciated
the importance of cultural heritage to the national economy. "Pompeii is a
household name and the Italian authorities have to believe in it," he says. "It
could crumble away in our lifetime."

Wilkinson, T. (2003). Pompeii rises again. Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved


from
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/12/11/1071125590432.html?from=storyr
hs

Article 3

House of the Gladiator collapses in Pompeii

A house in the ancient Roman city of Pompeii has collapsed, raising concerns
about Italy's state support for its archaeological heritage.

The House of the Gladiators was found in ruins when curators came to open
the site to visitors early on Saturday.

Partially rebuilt after it sustained damage during World War II, it had not been
thought at risk of collapse.

Culture Minister Sandro Bondi said some of the frescos on the house's lower
walls might have survived.

He said that the collapse showed the need for "adequate resources" to
preserve Italy's "immense historic artistic heritage".

Italian President Giorgio Napolitano said it was "a shame for Italy".

| 27
Antonio Varone, director of excavations at the site, said officials were "trying
to preserve the last fragments" of the building.

Heavy rains

The house, which is not normally open to the public but can be viewed from
the outside, was cordoned off after the collapse.

There was speculation that recent heavy rains might have made the
structure unstable.

The house, known as the Schola Armaturarum, was used by gladiators for
training before fights in the nearby amphitheatre.

Pompeii was destroyed in AD79 when a volcanic eruption from nearby Mount
Vesuvius buried the city in ash. It was not uncovered until the 18th Century.

Tsao Cevoli, president of Italy's National Association of Archaeologists, called


the collapse "an irreparable wound to the world's most important
archaeological site".

Extra funds were made available two years ago, and special measures put in
place, to improve conservation at Pompeii, but critics say the plan was badly
managed.

Unknown. (2010). House of the Gladiators collapses in Pompeii. BBC news.


Retrieved from http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-11704720

Article 4

Whats new in Pompeii?

Pompeii and its neighbour Herculaneum are among the oldest


archaeological sites in the world, but today they risk destruction by exposure
to the elements, tourist traffic, and time. Yet these are not new problems. As
early as the 18th century, excavators applied varnish to wall-paintings in an
attempt to prevent their decay; different types of conservation work have
taken place on site ever since. However, the collapse of part of the Schola
Armaturarum in 2010, and subsequent minor collapses, have highlighted the
problem to the world and today it has become a politically important issue.
The challenge now is to ensure the preservation of these sites while
continuing investigations into the town, its inhabitants, and its history. How
can we preserve Pompeiis past for our future? And what more is there to
learn?

Large-scale open-air excavations at Pompeii came to an end in the 1960s


because the authorities recognised that further excavation would only make
the conservation problem worse. But at the same time, funding cuts and

| 28
other management problems meant that day-to-day maintenance halted.
Conservation took place in the best decorated houses, but elsewhere on site
was conducted on an emergency basis. Consequently the conservation
problem worsens each year. Now, as the EU steps in with a conservation
grant of 105 million, the hope is that Pompeiis decay will be slowed.

In the meantime, scholars continue their work at Pompeii and at other nearby
sites, but, partly in reaction to the conservation crisis and to site-management
issues, the way that they study these sites has changed.

In the 1990s teams were given an excavated insula (housing block) to study
its evolution through stratigraphic excavation beneath the AD 79 floor levels,
its architectural development through examination of its walls and paintings,
and its contents through study of the original excavation reports and
inventories. As a result our understanding of Pompeiis development as a
Roman city has increased: it is no longer seen as a city frozen in time, but as
a settlement with a long and interesting history before its destruction by
Vesuvius in AD 79.

Most of the research carried out at Pompeii today is smaller in scale, informed
by conservation and with the explicit aim of studying and recording as much
as possible before it disappears forever.

While stratigraphic excavations beneath the AD 79 levels are possible, many


teams now adopt non-invasive methods of study. The result is that the aims
and results of these projects are more varied than those of the past, and
reflect on a wider range of aspects of the citys life.

Watts-Plumpkin. (2012). Whats new in Pompeii. World Archaeology.


Retrieved from http://www.world-archaeology.com/issues/pompeii.htm

Article 5

Down Pompeii

Collapses at the ancient site of Pompeii underline what experts have been
warning for years: Italy's priceless cultural heritage is slowly but surely
disintegrating and the famous archeological site's decay is a metaphor for
the nation.

Outrage greeted news last month of the collapse the 2,000-year-old House of
the Gladiators at Pompeii. For years, art historians have complained that the
archaeological site just south of Naples was falling to bits. Inevitably,
opposition newspapers such as La Repubblica, called the collapse a "world
scandal" and blamed the conservative government of Prime Minister Silvio
Berlusconi for cutting funding and putting "unqualified people" in charge of
Italy's cultural heritage. For "unqualified people" read: Sandro Bondi, the
widely criticised Berlusconi loyalist and Culture Minister.

| 29
"We're stunned when some walls fall down. But these are ruins not
systematically maintained, so the miracle is that so few of them collapse,"
said Andrea Carandini, a world-renowned archaeologist who leads a panel
of professional consultants in the Cultural Ministry. Even some members of the
government were alarmed. Roberto Cecchi, undersecretary at the Culture
Ministry, said there had been no effective, continuous maintenance at
Pompeii in half a century.

He admitted that ad hoc measures, such as the appointment of


commissioners a trick Mr Bondi repeated on Thursday this week in face of
mounting anger after fresh collapses were no substitute for the constant
monitoring worthy of a world treasure. Mr Bondi insists that decades of
neglect and poor management, rather a paucity of funds, are to blame.

Giovanna Melandri, the Culture Minister from 1998 to 2001 for the centre-left
government of Massimo D'Alema, said lack of funding is directly linked to the
problems. She said: "We doubled the budget on arts and culture in two years.
There was a national plan for restoration of sites large and small. That all
stopped with the first Berlusconi government. It was ridiculous of them.
Investing in culture creates wealth; economic wealth through tourism,
employment and spiritual wealth."

Professor Clementina Panella, an archeologist at Rome's La Sapienza


University, said that a more intelligent management of Italy's historic sites is
also vital. She said: "Having millions of visitors just stamping around Pompeii or
Venice each year causes its own destruction. Tourists need to be directed to
other less-known places."

But this would require national planning and money. The lack of state
financial support seems perverse given that Italy earns so much from foreign
tourism on account of its heritage. France, which has rather less to preserve
and restore, spends 1 per cent of its GDP on culture compared with just 0.2
per cent in Italy. Restoration experts and engineers frequently note that even
economically hamstrung Greece does a better job of caring for its antiquities;
despite the severe economic crisis, it continues with painstaking restoration
work on the Acropolis.

Il Sole 24 Ore, Italy's respected business newspaper, said the only solution for
Pompeii was a private sponsor, which would be allowed to place its logos at
the entrance. "Precisely because it belongs to all humanity, its management
should be taken away from a state that has shown itself incapable of
protecting it," the newspaper said. Currently, there are conflicting reports on
whether businessman Diego della Valle, the man behind the Tod's footwear
brand, will provide 20m to fund the clean-up and restoration of the
Colosseum.

| 30
So who should pay for the upkeep of Italy, the giant open-air museum? Mr
Berlusconi's government would say: "not the tax payer." Ms Melandri, a
member of the parliamentary culture commission, said that while public-
private partnerships and international funding should be welcomed, primary
responsibility for preserving Italian culture falls to the Italian state: "It's our
greatest asset."

And it is not only the high-profile sites such as Venice and Pompeii that need
protecting. Across the country, there are hundreds or thousands of other
smaller sites, or single buildings being left to rot, from landmark 20th century
rationalist factories in Turin to Norman churches in Sicily.

La Repubblica newspaper recently called on its readers to flag neglected


landmarks in their areas and campaign for their restoration. Pompeii, the
newspaper said, in its cultural importance and criminal neglect stood as a
metaphor for all of Italy.

Day, M. (2012). Down Pompeii. The Independent. Retrieved from


http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/down-pompeii-the-ruin-of-italys-
cultural-heritage-2150976.html

Questions Sheet

1. Identify what type of tourism impacts are covered in your article.


2. Describe these impacts in detail.
3. Name the types individuals, groups or governments in the article.
4. Paraphrase their response to the impacts.
5. Identify where you think your article was found eg. Tourist website.
6. Evaluate the usefulness of your source.
Table

Moral Environment Economic Physical Political Social

| 31
Justification

The purpose of this justification is to validate various choices made while

composing three sequential lessons for a stage four topic, Focus area four; Global Issues

and the Role of Citizenship. The chosen global geographical issue was tourism (Board

of Studies, 2003, 32-33).

This justification will demonstrate how Gardners theory of intelligences and VARK

model; Blooms Taxonomy; and the combination of ICT and collaborative learning have

been cohesively incorporated into three sequential lesson plans to promote effective

teaching. These approaches are from a personal teaching philosophy whereby

effective teaching is student centric and involve a range of teaching strategies to

encourage individuality and accommodate learning preferences.

The three lesson plans come from the initial three lessons of the scope and

sequence focus area four tourism. They assume the teacher has already covered the

overview of alternative global issues from the syllabus, e.g. access to water (Board of

Studies, 2003, 32-33). These lessons cover a variety of cross curriculum themes and

general capabilities such life skills, civics and citizenship, virtual fieldwork, literacy and

numeracy, and ICT use. Furthermore, they strengthen the understanding of the

geographical threshold concepts such as the interconnection of people and place

(Lesson 3). For the purpose of the lesson plans, the school context was stipulated as a

mixed ability comprehensive year 8 class.

The first of the theories and models used within the lesson plans is Gardners

theory of multiple intelligences and the VARK model. These approaches are strongly

intertwined as they both acknowledge the assortment of ways students learn and

demonstrate the need for differentiation in the classroom. Gardners theory asserts there

| 32
a number of modalities that illustrate different learning styles such as musical, verbal and

interpersonal. Gardner elucidates further

only if we expand and reformulate our view of what counts as human intellect

will we be able to devise more appropriate ways of assessing it and more effective ways

of educating it (Gardner, 2011, 4).

This suggests that unless education evolves from traditional methods those who do not

learn or achieve through verbal-linguistic intelligence will be left behind. This explains a

major shift in education to more creative methods, giving everyone a more equitable

chance.

The VARK model is the combination of visual, aural, reading/writing and

kinaesthetic learning styles. This model contends that an amalgamation of teaching

strategies will satisfy the needs of modern students. Prithishkumar and Michael (2014)

asserts that there is a strong diversity in the process of student learning. Therefore, to

achieve effective teaching, a variation of the mode in which information is delivered

within the classroom is essential to the engagement of students. These two approaches

support a student centric approach as the teacher must know and be aware of how

their students learn.

The Gardner theory and VARK model has been integrated into the lessons

through a mixture of learning activities. In each of the lessons, there is a discussion,

reading or writing activity, an activity involving moving and a thinking activity.

Additionally, the use of mind maps caters to visual learners, while thinking activities

stimulate those who are intrapersonal and discussions are favoured by the interpersonal.

These strategies also promote a student centric approach of effective teaching.

The second of the approaches informing the lesson plans is Blooms taxonomy.

Blooms taxonomy is heavily used with education to distinguish the higher order thinker

| 33
from the lower order thinkers. David Krathwohl, (2010) who revised Blooms states this can

be done by the splitting Blooms taxonomy into two processes. The first being lower order

activities that involve the handling of knowledge the second being cognition which

promotes higher order thinking. Lorin Anderson another mentee of Blooms further revised

the taxonomy by the exchange of nouns into verbs. This in turn made it more accessible

for teachers attempting to differentiate their teaching (Forehand, 2010).

Blooms taxonomy was utilised extensively with the lesson plans. The lessons

started with low-level discussion activities involving previous knowledge and plateaued

as fun engaging activities where students applied their knowledge (Lesson 3 debate,

Lesson 2 maps, and Lesson 1 google earth activity). Students were expected to think

about the activities in front of them and act appropriately. This further promotes a

student centric approach.

Lastly is the importance of ICT and collaborative learning within the classroom.

Clarke and Pittaway (2015, 187) state that teachers who welcome technology based

strategies into their classrooms are likely to engage their students for longer periods.

Furthermore, Cavanagh and Prescott (2015, 107), goes as far to say that ICT is simply

indispensable to student centric learning as it provides easier methods of differential

instruction. ICT can also encourage students to develop higher order skills (Blooms

Taxonomy). Cavanagh and Prescott (2015, 105) also suggest that collaborative learning

is a tool that can improve student problem solving and engagement within the

classroom. It is directly linked to Vygotskis theories of social interaction whereby students

help each other learn.

ICT and collaborative learning were used in a number of ways in the lesson plans.

In lesson 1, there is extensive use of google earth to achieve geographical outcomes

such as interpreting geographical information. In lesson 3, students are expected to work

| 34
together as a team to problem solve. These approaches evidently support student

centric approach to teaching.

In conclusion, the above theories, approaches and practices have been

explored to demonstrate how they academically inform three sequential lesson plans on

tourism. Gardners theory of multiple intelligences and the VARK model, Blooms

taxonomy as well as ICT and collaborative learning have been utilised within the lesson

plans to support a student centred approach for effective teaching. These methods

focus primarily on differentiated learning styles and the attainment of outcomes, giving

students the best chance for success.

| 35
Referencing

Board of Studies NSW, (2006). Geography 7-10 Syllabus. Sydney NSW: Board of Studies NSW

Cavanagh, M., & Prescott, A. (2015). Your professional experience handbook: A guide for
preservice teachers. Frenches Forrest, NSW: Peasron

Clarke, M., & Pittaway, S. (2014) Marshs becoming a teacher (6th Ed.). Frenches Forrest, NSW:
Peasron.

David R. Krathwohl (2002) A Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy: An Overview, Theory Into practice,
41:4, 212-218, DOI: 10.1207/s15430421tip4104_2

Forehand, M. (2010). Blooms taxonomy. Emerging perspectives on learning, teaching and


technology, 41-47.

Gardner, H. (2011) Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences. New York, USA: Basic
Books.

Prithishkumar, I., & Michael, S. (2014). Understanding your student: Using the VARK model.
Journal of Postgraduate Medicine, 60(2), 183. DOI: 10.4103/0022-3859.132337.

| 36
Appendices
Outcomes

Scope and Sequence

Concept map

Assessment Schedule

Assessment Task

Unit Outline

Lesson Outline

| 37
Outcomes
Objectives Stage 4 Outcomes

Students will develop: A student:

skills in acquiring, processing and 4.1 identifies and gathers geographical information
communicating geographical
information 4.2 organises and interprets geographical information

4.3 uses a range of written, oral and graphic forms to communicate geographical
information
skills in choosing and applying 4.4 uses a range of geographical tools
appropriate geographical tools

knowledge and understanding about 4.5 demonstrates a sense of place about global environments
the characteristics and spatial
distribution of environments

knowledge and understanding about 4.6 describes the geographical processes that form and transform environments
how people and communities modify,
and are affected by, the environment 4.7 identifies and discusses geographical issues from a range of perspectives

knowledge and understanding about 4.8 describes the interrelationships between people and environments
how physical, social, cultural, economic
and political factors shape communities, 4.9 describes differences in life opportunities throughout the world
including the global community

knowledge and understanding about 4.10 explains how geographical knowledge, understanding and skills combine with
civics for informed and active citizenship knowledge of civics to contribute to informed citizenship

Outcomes

| 38
Scope and Sequence

Scope and Sequence For Stage 4


Semester 1
TERM 1 TERM 2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Investigating the World Global Environments


Focus: An introduction to the discipline of Geography and the Focus: The geographical processes that form and transform
nature of geographical inquiry. global environments, and human interactions within
environments.
The Nature of Our World World Heritage Geographical Types of Coral Reefs Pacific Islanders and
Geography Sites Research Environments coral reefs
Outcomes Geographical tools Outcomes Geographical tools
4.1 4.5 Maps 4.1 Maps
4.2 4.6 Fieldwork 4.2 4.6 Graphs and Statistics
4.3 4.10 Photographs 4.3 4.8 Photographs
4.4 4.4 4.10

Fieldwork Assessment Fieldwork Assessment


Local area excursion World heritage sites N/A Skills Test
Week 9 25% 25%
Due week 8 Due week 6

Scope and Sequenc

| 39
Scope and Sequence

Scope and Sequence For Stage 4


Semester 2
TERM 1 TERM 2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Global Issues and the Role of Citizenship Global Change


Focus: Global geographical issues and appropriate methods of Focus: The changing nature of the world and response to these
citizenship for their management. changes.

Global Tourism Threatened Habitats Changing Global Inequalities Global Organisations


Geographical nature of our Ecological
Issues world Sustainability
Outcomes Life Skills: Geographical tools Outcomes Geographical tools
4.2 Maps 4.1 4.5 Maps
GLS.1
4.3 Fieldwork 4.2 4.7 Graphs and Statistics
GLS.4
4.4 Graphs and Statistics 4.3 4.9 Photographs
GLS.6
4.7 Photographs 4.4 4.10
GLS.11
4.8
4.9
4.10

Fieldwork Assessment Fieldwork Assessment


Threatened Habitats Tourism N/A End of Year Exam
Homebush 20% 30%
Week 9 Due Term 3 Week 6 Due Term 4 Week 5

| 40
Concept Map

Concept Map

| 41
Assessment Schedule

Assessment Schedule for Stage 4

Assignment 1 Weighting Outcomes Due Date


World Heritage Sites 25% - 4.1 Term 1 Week 8
Project/Problem based inquiry - 4.2
- 4.3

Assignment 2 Weighting Outcomes Due Date


Global environments and Skills 25% - 4.1 Term 2 Week 6
Test - 4.2
Coral reefs and geographical - 4.3
skills - 4.4
- 4.6

Assignment 3 Weighting Outcomes Due Date


Tourism 20% - 4.2 - 4.8 Term 3 Week 6
Planning a holiday and its - 4.3 - 4.10
impact. Problem based inquiry. - 4.7

Assignment 4 Weighting Outcomes Due Date


End of Year Exam 30% - 4.1 - 4.6 Term 4 Week 5
Content and skills exam - 4.2 - 4.8
- 4.3 - 4.10
- 4.4

| 42
Assessment Task

Spartan High School for Children

Stage 4 Geography

Assessment Task

Due Date: Term 3 Week 6 Assessment Name: Tourism


Mark: /40 Weighting: 20%

Outcomes to be assessed
- 4.2 - organises and interprets geographical information
- 4.3 - uses a range of written, oral and graphic forms to communicate geographical
information
- 4.7 - identifies and discusses geographical issues from a range of perspectives
- 4.8 - describes the interrelationships between people and environments

Task Description

You must: Pick a country you would like to travel to and research an important tourist site
located within that country and create a multimedia presentation including the
following:

a) Initial Investigation |12

Locate and mark your tourist site on a map. Include the latitude and longitude.
Create an annual climate/temperature graph of your chosen site.
Identify and describe some geographical issues found at your site (eg. pollution, stray
dogs and tourist populations.)

b) List and discuss the positives and negatives for tourism at your chosen site. | 12

c) Investigate and discuss the responses of individuals, groups and governments. | 12

d) Pick two (2) individuals, groups or governments and compare their perspectives on an
issue found at your site. | 16

e) Why you would like to visit your site. Evaluate how can you can be a respectful tourist.

f) Presentation must be engaging and relevant. Flash cards can be


used however, eye contact is important. Time limit : 5 mins | 8

NOTES:

The presentation can be done in PowerPoint, Nearpod, or Prezi and


can contain props.
Students will need to write information in their own words.

| 43
Marking Criteria

Marking Criteria

1. A 12 Marks

Correctly locates site on map. 2


Gives correct latitude and longitude to the minute. 2
Climate/ temperature graph is correct and
explained. 4
Identifies and thoroughly explains at least two
geographical issues 4

2. B 12 Marks

Lists and eloquently discusses at least three positives 6


of tourism
Lists and eloquently discusses at least three negatives 6
of tourism

3. C 12 Marks

Sophistically discusses the responses of two 4


individuals.
Sophistically discusses the responses of two groups. 4
Sophistically discusses two responses of governments 4

4. D 8 Marks

Outlines the argument made by two individuals, 4


groups or governments.
Exceptional comparison of the arguments 4

5. F 4 Marks

Presentation is engaging. 2
Information is relevant. 2
Presentation goes for 5 minutes. 2
Presenter makes eye contact. 2

Marking Criter

| 44
Unit Outline

Global Issues and the Role of Citizenship


Year 7 (Stage 4) 3 lessons Number of
Weeks: 10

Key Concepts/ Big Ideas The importance of this learning


Tourism To help students to understand
Threatened habitats their role as an active global
Ecological sustainability citizen to combat global issues.
Responses by individuals, groups and
governments
Unit context within Scope and Sequence Targeted Syllabus Outcomes
Focus: Global geographical issues and
appropriate methods of citizenship for their A student:
management.
G4.2
Geographical Tools: G4.3
Maps G4.4
use an atlas G4.7
use various types of maps: physical, G4.8
political, topographic, thematic
G4.9
locate features on a map using latitude
and longitude, area and grid references G4.10
use the points of a compass to
determine direction
Life Skills:
construct a sketch map
Fieldwork
use geographical instruments GLS.1
collect and record data in the field GLS.4
Graphs and Statistics
GLS.6
identify and calculate maximum, total,
GLS.11
range, rank, and average
construct and interpret bar column, line,
climatic and proportional graphs
Photographs
draw a line drawing
collect and interpret photographic
images

Literacy Targets Numeracy ICT Targets Cross Assessment


Targets Curriculum
1 1 1 Life Skills 3
Literacy
Numeracy

Unit Outline

| 45
Lesson Outline

UNIT TITLE

Week 1 Period 1 Period 2 Period 3

Key Outcomes G4.2 G4.4 G4.3


GLS.1 GLS. 11 GLS.4
GLS.6

Key Concepts Interconnection Skills Literacy


Place Numeracy
Environment
Lesson
Learning Experiences Brainstorming Skill based learning Case study
See, think, wonder Worksheets Literacy study
Think, pair, share Reflection Collaborative
Reflection learning
Reflection

Evidence of Learning Synthesis of Marking of Reflection


information into a worksheets Evaluation
product Observation

Resources Whiteboard Skills workbook Newspaper Articles


Marker Whiteboard Case study
Google earth questions
Computer
Outline

| 46