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MAHATMA GANDHI UNIVERSITY

SCHEME AND SYLLABI

FOR

M. Tech. DEGREE PROGRAMME


IN

ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING


WITH SPECIALIZATION IN
POWER ELECTRONICS

(2011 ADMISSION ONWARDS)


SCHEME AND SYLLABI FOR M. Tech. DEGREE
PROGRAMME IN ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS
ENGINEERING WITH SPECIALIZATION IN
POWER ELECTRONICS

SEMESTER - I

Hrs/week Evaluation Scheme (Marks)


Sl. Sessional Credit
No. L T P Sub ESE Total (C)
Course No. Subjects TA CT
Total
1 MEEPE 101 Optimization Techniques 3 1 0 25 25 50 100 150 4
Advanced Power
2 MEEPE 102 3 1 0 25 25 50 100 150 4
Semiconductor Devices
3 MEEPE 103 Power Converters 3 1 0 25 25 50 100 150 4
Industrial Control
4 MEEPE 104 3 1 0 25 25 50 100 150 4
Electronics
5 MEEPE 105 Elective I 3 0 0 25 25 50 100 150 3
6 MEEPE 106 Elective II 3 0 0 25 25 50 100 150 3
Power Electronic
7 MEEPE 107 0 0 3 25 25 50 100 150 2
Laboratory
8 MEEPE 108 Seminar I 0 0 2 50 0 50 0 50 1

Total 18 4 5 225 175 400 700 1100 25

Elective I (MEEPE 105) Elective II (MEEPE 106)

Digital Simulation of
MEEPE 105-1 MEEPE 106-1 High Voltage DC Transmission
Power Electronic Circuits
MEEPE 105-2 Robotics and Automation MEEPE 106 - 2 Power System Operation and Control
Industrial Control
MEEPE 105-3 MEEPE 106 - 3 Advanced Power System Stability
Electronics
MEEPE 105-4 Estimation theory MEEPE 106 - 4 Flexible AC Transmission System

L Lecture, T Tutorial, P Practical


TA Teachers Assessment (Assignments, attendance, group discussion, Quiz, tutorials,
seminars, etc.)
CT Class Test (Minimum of two tests to be conducted by the Institute)
ESE End Semester Examination to be conducted by the University

Electives: New Electives may be added by the department according to the needs of
emerging fields of technology. The name of the elective and its syllabus should be submitted to the
University before the course is offered.

1
SEMESTER - II

Hrs/week Evaluation Scheme (Marks) Credit


Sl. Sessional
No. L T P Sub ESE Total
Course No. Subjects TA CT (C)
Total
Solid state DC and AC
1 MEEPE 201 3 1 0 25 25 50 100 150 4
drives.
2 MEEPE 202 System Theory 3 1 0 25 25 50 100 150 4
Electrical Energy
3 MEEPE 203 conservation and 3 1 0 25 25 50 100 150 4
Management
Modeling and Analysis
4 MEEPE 204 3 1 0 25 25 50 100 150 4
of Electrical Machines
5 MEEPE 205 Elective III 3 0 0 25 25 50 100 150 3

6 MEEPE 206 Elective IV 3 0 0 25 25 50 100 150 3


Power Electronics
7 MEEPE 207 0 0 3 25 25 50 100 150 2
Simulation Laboratory
8 MEEPE 208 Seminar II 0 0 2 50 0 50 0 50 1

Total 18 4 5 225 175 400 700 1100 25

Elective III (MEEPE 205) Elective IV (MEEPE 206)


Advanced Microprocessors and
MEEPE 205 - 1 Fuzzy Systems MEEPE 206 - 1
Microcontrollers
Digital signal Processing and its
MEEPE 205 - 2 Renewable Power Generation systems MEEPE 206 - 2
Applications
MEEPE 205 - 3 Dynamics of Electrical Machines MEEPE 206 - 3 Network Principles and Protocols

MEEPE205 - 4 Electric drives MEEPE 206 - 4 Analysis and design of Artifial Networks

L Lecture, T Tutorial, P Practical

TA Teachers Assessment (Assignments, attendance, group discussion, Quiz, tutorials,


seminars, etc.)

CT Class Test (Minimum of two tests to be conducted by the Institute)

ESE End Semester Examination to be conducted by the University

Electives: New Electives may be added by the department according to the needs of
emerging fields of technology. The name of the elective and its syllabus should be submitted to the
University before the course is offered.

2
SEMESTER - III
Hrs / Week Evaluation Scheme (Marks)
Sl. Credits
Course No. Subject Sessional
No. ESE** (C)
L T P Total
Sub (Oral)
TA* CT
Total
1.Industrial Training OR
1 MEEPE 301 2. Industrial Training and Mini 0 0 20 50 0 50 100 150 10
Project
2 MEEPE 302 Masters Thesis Phase - I 0 0 10 100*** 0 100 0 100 5

Total 0 0 30 150 0 150 100 250 15

* TA based on a Technical Report submitted together with presentation at the end of the
Industrial Training and Mini Project

** Evaluation of the Industrial Training and Mini Project will be conducted at the end of the third
semester by a panel of examiners, with at least one external examiner, constituted by the
University.

*** The marks will be awarded by a panel of examiners constituted by the concerned institute

SEMESTER - IV
Hrs / Week Evaluation Scheme (Marks)
Sl.
Course No. Subject Sessional ESE** Credits
No. (Oral (C)
L T P Total
Sub &
TA* CT
Total Viva)
1 MEEPE 401 Masters Thesis 0 0 30 100 0 100 100 200 15

2 MEEPE 402 Masters Comprehensive Viva 100 100

Total 300 15

Grand Total of all Semesters 2750 80

* 50% of the marks to be awarded by the Project Guide and the remaining 50% to be awarded
by a panel of examiners, including the Project Guide, constituted by the Department

** Thesis evaluation and Viva-voce will be conducted at the end of the fourth semester by a panel
of examiners, with at least one external examiner, constituted by the University.

3
MEEPE 101 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES L T P C
3 1 0 4
Module 1: Linear programming

Statement and classification of optimization problems overview of optimization


techniques, standard Linear programming standard form of linear programming
problems-definitions and theorems- simplex method Revised simplex method-Duality
and dual simplex method.

Module 2: Unconstrained one dimensional optimization techniques

Necessary and sufficient conditions search methods (unrestricted Fibonacci and


golden) Interpolation methods (Quadratic, cubic and direct root methods)

Module 3: Unconstrained n dimensional optimization techniques

Direct search methods Random search pattern search and Rosen broochs hill
claiming method- Descent methods-Steepest descent, conjugate gradient, quasi Newton
and DFE method.

Module 4: Constrained optimization Techniques and Dynamic Programming

Necessary and sufficient conditions Equality and inequality constraints-Kuhn-


Tucker conditions-Gradient projection method-cutting plane method- penalty function
method(Interior and exterior ). Dynamic Programming- Principle of optimality-
recurrence relation computational procedure-continuous dynamic programming.

References:

1. Rao,S.S.,`Optimization :Theory and Application Wiley Eastern Press, 1978.


2. Dantzig, Optimization theory with applications, John Wiley and sons,1969
3. Dantzig, `Linear Programming and Extensions, Princetion University press, 1963.
4. Fox, R.L., `Optimization methods for Engineering Design, Addition Welsey, 1971.
5. Hadely, G., `Linear Programming, Addition-Wesley, 1962.
6. Gottfried, B.S., 'Introduction to Optimization Theory, John Weisman, Prentice Hall
Inc., 1973.
7. Walsh, G.R., 'Methods of Optimization, John Wiley & Sons, 1979.
8. Beightier, C.S., `Phillips D.J., Wilde, D.J., `Foundation of Optimization, Prentice Hall
of India, 1982.
9. Bazaara and Shetty, `Non-linear Programming.

4
MEEPE 102 ADVANCED POWER SEMICONDUCTOR L T P C
DEVICES 3 1 0 4

Module 1: Power switching devices overview


Power handling capability-(SOA); Device selection strategy- On state and switching
losses- EMI due to switching- Power Diodes- Types, forward and reverse characteristics,
switching characteristics-rating Schottky diode

Module 2: Current Controlled Devices.


BJTs- Construction, static characteristics, switching characteristics- Negative temperature
coefficient and secondary breakdown- Power Darlington- Thyristors- Physical and
electrical principle underlying operating mode- Two transistor analogy Effect of and
Ico on Ia- concept of latching-Gate and switching characteristics- Converter grade and
inverter grade and other types, series and parallel operation-Comparison of BJT and
Thyristor Steady state and dynamic models of BJT and Thyristor.

Module 3: Voltage controlled Devices


Power MOSFETs and IGBTs- Principle of voltage controlled devices, construction, types,
static and switching characteristics Steady state and dynamic models of MOSFET and
IGBTs; Basics of GTO, MCT,FCT,RCT and IGCT.

Module 4: Firing and Protecting Circuits


Necessity of isolation-pulse transformer-opto-coupler; Gate drive circuit for SCR,
MOSFET,IGBTs and base driving for power BJT-overvoltage, over current and gate
protections, Design of snubbers.
Thermal Protection: Guidance for heat sink selection- Thermal resistance and impedance-
Electrical analogy of thermal components, heat sink types and design Mounting types.

References:

1. B. W. Williams, Power Electronics- Devices, Drivers, Applications and passive


components, Macmillan,(2/e)1992.
2. Rashid M.H., Power Electronics Circuits, Devices and Applications, Prentice Hall
India, Third Edition, New Delhi 2004.
3. M.D. Singh and K B Khanchandani, Power Electronics, Tata McGraw Hill, 2001.
5
4. Mohan, Undeland and Robins, Power Electronics- Concepts, Applications and
Design, John Wiley and sons, Singapore, 2000.

6
MEEPE 103 POWER CONVERTORS L T P C
3 1 0 4

Module 1: Analysis of switched circuits

Ideal models power switches analysis of thyristor controlled half wave rectifier- R, L,
RL, RC load circuits load circuit with electromotive force- thyristor specifications- heat
sink calculations- surge currents- limitation on di/dt, dv/dt, classification and analysis of
commutation, MOSFETs and IGBTs.

Module 2: Controlled Rectifiers

Continuous and discontinuous modes of single phase half and full wave rectifiers half
controlled configurations- RL circuit with electromotive force. Effect of transformer
leakage reactance- operating domains of three phase full converters and semi converters.

Module 3: DC- DC switch mode converters

DC- DC converter systems- control of DC-Dc converters. Buck converters- continuous


and discontinuous modes. Boost converters- continuous and discontinuous modes. Buck
Boost converters continuous and discontinuous modes., Cuk converters continuous and
discontinuous modes. DC-DC converter comparison.

Module 4: Choppers and Inverters

Classification of DC chopper circuits- analysis of type A chopper and type B chopper-


voltage,current and load commutation of choppers- step up chopper- pulse width
modulated A.C. Choppers- Circuit topologies and Harmonic elimination methods.
Invereters: Characteristics- output voltage and waveform control- bridge inverters single
phase and three phase versions- MOSFET, IGBT inverters, Mc Murray Inverters- Current
source inverter with induction motor load.

Reference:
1. Ned Mohan, Undeland and Robbin, Power Electronics: converters, Application and
design John Wiley and sons.Inc, Newyork, 1995.
2. Rashid M.H., Power Electronics Circuits, Devices and Applications ", Prentice Hall
India, New Delhi, 1995.

3. P.C Sen.," Modern Power Electronics ", Wheeler publishing Co, First Edition,
7
New Delhi, 1998.
4. M.D.Singh and K.B.Khanchandam,Power Electronics, Tata Mc Grew Hill
Publishing Company, New Delhi, 1998
5. P.S.Bimbra, Power Electronics, Khanna Publishers, Eleventh Edition, 2003

8
MEEPE 104 INDUSTRIAL CONTROL ELECTRONICS L T P C
3 1 0 4
Module 1: Industrial power controllers
Uninterrupted power supplies- switch in regulators and switched mode power supplies-
solid state tap changing of transformers (solid state circuit breakers) programmable logic
controllers.
Module 2: Analog controllers
Error amplifiers-on/off controllers-proportional controllers-Integrated controllers-
proportional integrated controllers-derivative controllers-PID controllers cascaded control-
Feed forward control- Data acquisition systems.
Module 3: Opto-electronic devices and control
Introduction to light- industrial light sources-photoconductive cells, photodiodes and
phototransistors optoisolatiors, optocouplers and interrupt modules-applications of light
barriers, interrupter modules and photo sensors Bar code and bar code readers-video
acquisition systems.
Module 4: Servo-systems and servo controllers
Introduction to servo systems and microcomputer based servo amplifiers-block diagram of
servo systems and servo amplifiers-functional description cascde control circuits-velocity
loop amplifier-current loop amplifier-PWM control circuits-input and output signal for the
control circuits-programming and operation of microcomputer based servo controllers.
References:

1. James Maas, Industrial Electronics, Prentice Hall, 1995


2. Michael Jacob, Industrial Control Electronics Applications and Design
Prentice Hall, 1988.
3. Murthy, D.V.S., Tranducers And Instrumentation; Prentice Hall Of India,
1995
4. Charles A. Schuler And William L. Mc Namee, Industrial Control Electronics
And Roboties; Mcgraw Hill, 1986

9
MEEPE 105-1 DIGITAL SIMULATION OF POWER L T P C
ELECTRONIC SYSTEM 4 0 0 4

Module 1: Review of numerical methods.


Application of numerical methods to solve transients in D.C. Switched R, L, R-L,
R-C and R-L-C circuits. Extension to AC circuits.

Module 2: Modeling of diode in simulation


Diode with R, R-L, R-C and R-L-C load with ac supply. Modelling of SCR, TRIAC,
IGBT and Power Transistors in simulation. Application of numerical methods to R, L, C
circuits with power electronic switches. Simulation of gate/base drive circuits, simulation
of snubber circuits.

Module 3: State space modeling and simulation of linear systems.


Introduction to electrical machine modeling: induction, DC, and synchronous
machines, simulation of basic electric drives, stability aspects.

Module 4: Simulation of Converters and Inverters


Simulation of single phase and three phase uncontrolled and controlled (SCR) rectifiers,
converters with self commutated devices- simulation of power factor correction schemes,
Simulation of converter fed dc motor drives, Simulation of thyristor choppers with
voltage, current and load commutation schemes, Simulation of chopper fed dc motor.
Simulation of Inverters: Simulation of single and three phase inverters with thyristors
and self-commutated devices, Space vector representation, pulse-width modulation
methods for voltage control, waveform control. Simulation of inverter fed induction motor
drives.

Reference:

1. Simulink Reference Manual , Math works, USA.


2. Robert Ericson, Fundamentals of Power Electronics, Chapman & Hall, 1997.
3. Issa Batarseh, Power Electronic Circuits, John Wiley, 2004

10
MEEPE 105-2 ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION L T P C
3 0 0 3

Module 1: Introduction
Geometric configuration of robots Manipulators Drive systems Internal and external
sensors- End effectors Control systems Robot programming languages and
applications
Introduction to robotic vision

Module 2: Robot Arm Kinematics


Direct and inverse kinematics Rotation matrices Composite rotation matrices Euler
angle-representation Homogenous transformation Denavit Hattenberg representation
and various arm configurations.

Module 3: Robot Arm Dynamics


Lagrange Euler formulation, joint velocities Kinetic energy Potential energy and
motion-equations Generalized DAlembert equations of motion.

Module 4: Planning of Manipulator Trajectories


General consideration on trajectory planning joint interpolation & Cartesian path
trajectories.-Control of Robot Manipulators-PID control computed, torque technique
Near minimum time control Variable structure control Non-linear decoupled feedback
control Resolved motion control and adaptive control.

References:
1. Fu K S, Gonazlez R C and Lee C S G, Robotics (Control, Sensing, Vision and
Intelligence), McGraw-Hill, 1987.
2. Wesley, E Sryda, Industrial Robots: Computer Interfacing and Control. PHI, 1985.
3. Asada and Slotine, Robot Analysis and Control, John Wiley and Sons, 1986.
4. Philippe Coiffet, Robot Technology, Vol. II (Modeling and Control), Prentice Hall INC,
1981.
5. Saeed B Niku, Introduction to Robotics, Analysis, Systems and Applications, Pearson
Education, 2002.

11
6. Groover M P, Mitchell Wesis, Industrial Robotics Technology Programming
andApplications, Tata McGraw-Hill, 1986.
7. Sciavicco L, B Siciliano, Modeling & Control of Robot Manipulators, 2nd
Edition,Springer Verlag, 2000.
8. Gray J O, D G Caldwell (Ed), Advanced Robotics & Intelligent Machines, The
Institution of Electrical Engineers, UK, 1996.
9. Craig John J, Introduction to Robotics: Mechanics and Control, Pearson, 1989

12
MEEPE 105-3 INDUSTRIAL CONTROL ELECTRONICS L T P C
3 0 0 3

Module 1
Review of switching regulators and switch mode power supplies-Uninterrupted power
supplies- solid state circuit breakers programmable logic controllers.Analog Controllers
- Proportional controllers, Proportional Integral controllers, PID controllers, Feed
forward control

Module 2
Signal conditioners-Instrumentation amplifiers voltage to current, current to voltage,
voltage to frequency, frequency to voltage converters ; Isolation circuits cabling;
magnetic and electro static shielding and grounding.

Module 3
Opto-Electronic devices and control , Applications of opto isolation, interrupter modules
and photo sensors Fibre optics Bar code equipment, application of barcode in industry.

Module 4
Stepper motors and servo motors- control and applications. Servo motors servo motor
controllers servo amplifiers selection of servo motor applications of servo motors.

References:
1. Michael Jacob, Industrial Control Electronics Applications and Design, Prentice
Hall, 1988.
2. Thomas, E. Kissel, Industrial ElectronicsPHI, 2003
3. James Maas, Industrial Electronics, Prentice Hall, 1995.

13
MEEPE 105-4 ESTIMATION THEORY L T P C
3 0 0 3

Module 1: Elements of Probability Theory


Random variables-Gaussian distribution-stochastic processes-characterizations and
properties-Gauss-Markov processes-Brownian motion process-Gauss-Markov models

Module 2: Optimal Estimation for Discrete-time Systems


Fundamental theorem of estimation-optimal prediction

Module 3: Optimal Filtering


Weiner approach-continuous time Kalman Filter-properties and implementation-steady-
state Kalman Filter-discrete-time Kalman Filter-implementation-sub-optimal steady-state
Kalman Filter-Extended Kalman Filter-practical applications

Module 4: Optimal Smoothing


Optimal fixed-interval smoothing, optimal fixed-point smoothing, optimal fixed-lag
smoothing stability-performance evaluation

References:
1. James S Meditch, Stochastic Optimal Linear Estimation and Control, McGraw-Hill,
New
York, 1969.
2. Jerry M Mendel Lessons in Estimation Theory for Signal processing, Communication,
and Control, Prentice-Hall Inc, New Delhi, 1995.
3. Mohinder S Grewal, Angus P Andrews, Kalman Filtering; Theory and Practice,
Prentice-Hall Inc, Englewood Cliffs, 1993.
4. Grimble M J, M A Johnson, Optimal Control and Stochastic Estimation; Theory and
Applications, Wiley, New York, 1988.
5. Peter S Meybeck, Stochastic Models, Estimation, and Control, Volume 1 & 2,
Academic
Press, New York, 1982.

14
6. Papoulis Athanasios, Probability, Random Variables, and Stochastic Process, 2nd
Edition,
McGraw-Hill, New York, 1984.
7. Frank L Lewis, Optimal Estimation, Wiley, New York, 1986.
8. Mcgarty J P, Stochastic Systems and State Estimation, John Wiley, New York, 1974.

15
MEEPE 106-1 HIGH VOLTAGE DC TRANSMISSION L T P C
3 0 0 3

Module 1: General aspects and converter circuits


Historical developments- HVAC and HVDC links-comparison-economic, technical
performance-reliability-limitation-properties of thyristor converter circuits-assumptions-
choice of best circuit for HVDC converters-transformer connections.

Module 2: Bridge converters-analysis and control


Analysis with gate control but no overlap-with overlap less than 60 degrees-operation of
inverters-basic means of control-power reversal desired features of control-actual control
characteristics.

Module 3: Misoperation of converters and protection


Converter disturbance-by pass action in bridges-commutation failure-basics of protection-
DC reactors-voltage and current oscillations-circuit breakers-over voltage protection.

Module 4: Harmonics, filters and converter charts


Characteristic and uncharacteristic harmonics-troubles due to harmonics harmonic filters
converter charts of direct current and voltage-active and reactive power. Interaction
between a.c. and d.c. systems:voltage interaction-harmonic instabilities-d.c. power
modulation design considerations of thyristor converter m- transformers-smoothing
reactions-overhead lines-cable transmission-earth electrodes-design of back to back
thyristor converter system.

References:

1. Kimbark, E.W., Direct Current Transmission-Voi.1, Whley Interscience, New


York, 1971
2. Arrilage, J., High Voltage Direct Current Transmission, Peter Pereginver Ltd.,
London, U.K. 1983.
3. Padiyar, K.R., HVDC Transmission Systems., Wiley Eastern Ltd., New Delhi,
1992.

16
MEEPE 106-2 POWER SYSTEMS OPERATION L T P C
AND CONTROL 3 0 0 3

Module 1: Economic operation


Load forecasting-Method of last square curve fit-unit commitment-constraints in unit
commitment solution methods-The economic dispatch problem of thermal units-Gradient
method-Newtons method-Base point and participation factor method-Unit commitment
versus economic dispatch.
Module 2: Hydro-thermal co-ordination
Hydroelectric plant models-scheduling problems-short term hydrothermal scheduling
problem-gradient approach-Hydro units in series pumped storage hydro plants-hydro-
scheduling using Dynamic programming and linear programming
Module 3: Automatic generation control (AGC)
Review of LFC and economic dispatch control (EDC) using the three modes of control
viz. Flat frequency-tie-line control and tie-line bias control-AGC implementation-AGC
features static and dynamic response of controlled two area system.
Module 4: MVAR control Power system Security
MVAR control voltage monitoring- application of voltage regulator-synchronous
condenser- transformer taps static var compensators-Thyristor switched capacitors-
Thyristor controlled reactors. Power system security: Factors affecting system security
contingenecy analysis linear sensitivity factors-AC power flow methods-contingency
selection-concentric relaxation-bounding-security constrained optimal power flow-interior
point alg9orithm-bus incremental costs.

References:

1. Allen J. Wood And Wollenberg B.F., Power Generation Operation and Control,
John Wiley & Sons, NY, 1996
2. Kirchmayer L.K., Economic Operation of Power System, John Wiley & Sons,
1953
3. Nagrath, I.J. and Kothari D.P., Modern Power System Analysis, TMH, New
Delhi, 1980

17
MEEPE 106-3 ADVANCED POWER SYSTEM STABILITY L T P C
3 0 0 3

Module 1: Power system stability considerations

Definitions-classification of stability-rotor angle and voltage stability-synchronous


machine representation classical model-load modeling concepts-modeling of excitation
systems-modeling of prime movers.

Module 2:Transient stability

Swing equation-equal area criterion-solution of swing equation-Numerical


methods-Euler method-Runge-Kutte method-critical clearing time and angle-effect of
excitation system and governors-Multi machine stability extended equal area criterion-
transient energy function approach.

Module 3: Small signal stability

State space representation eigen values- modal matrices-small signal stability of


single machine infinite bus system synchronous machine classical model representation-
effect of field circuit dynamics-effect of excitation system-small signal stability of multi
machine system.

Module 4: Voltage stability AND Stability

Generation aspects - transmission system aspects load aspects PV curve QV


curve PQ curve analysis with static loads load ability limit - sensitivity analysis-
continuation power flow analysis - instability mechanisms-examples. Methods of
improving stability: Transient stability enhancement high speed fault clearing steam
turbine fast valving-high speed excitation systems- small signal stability enhancement-
power system stabilizers voltage stability enhancement reactive power control.

18
References:

1. Kundur, P., Power System Stability and Control, McGraw-Hill International


Editions, 1994.
2. Anderson, P.M. and Fouad, A.A., Power System Control and Stability, John Wiley,
second edition .2003
3. Van Cutsem, T. and Vournas, C., Voltage Stability of Electric Power Systems;
Springer Science and Business Media 2008.

19
MEEPE 106-4 FLEXIBLE AC TRANSMISSION SYSTEMS L T P C
3 0 0 3

Module 1. Power transmission problems and emergency of facts solutions


Fundamentals of ac power transmission, transmission problems and needs, emergence of
FACTS- FACTS controllers-FACTS control considerations

Module 2: Shunt compensation


Principles of shunt SVC-TCR, TSC, combined TCR and TSC configurations, static
synchronous compensator (STATCOM) configuration and control, application of SVC
and STATCOM

Module 3: Series compensation


Principles of static series compensation, application of TCSC for damping
electromechanical oscillations and for mitigation of sub-synchronous resonance, static
synchronous series compensator (SSSC).

Module 4: Phase shifters and UPFC


Principles of operation Steady state model and characteristics of a static phase shifter-
power circuit configurations applications of SPS-steady state, small signal and large signal
dynamics. Unified power flow controller (UPFC): Principles of operation and
characteristics, independent active and reactive power flow control, comparison of UPFC
to the controlled series compensators and phase shifters, control and dynamic
performance.

References:

1. Song, Y.H and Allan. T. Johns, Flexible Ac Transmission Systems (FACTS);


Institution Of Electrical Engineers Press, London, 1999
2. Hingorani, L Gyugyi Concepts and Technology Of Flexible Ac Transmission
System, IEEE Press New Yourk, 2000 Isbn- 078033 4588.
3. IEE Tutorials on Flexible Ac Transmission Systems Published in Power
Engineering Journal, IEE Press, 1995

20
MEEPE 107 POWER ELECTRONICS LABORATORY L T P C
0 0 3 2

Objective: To develop practical skills in design of power electronic converters and


applications to electric drives

To provide an opportunity to experience the theory portions covered in various subjects in


the laboratory

LIST OF EXPERIMENTS

A) HARDWARE
1. Single Phase Semi-converter with R-L load for continuous & discontinuous
conduction modes
2. Single Phase Full-converter with R-L load for continuous & discontinuous
conduction modes
3. Digital firing circuit
4. Three Phase Full-converter with R-L-E load
5. Controlled and Uncontrolled rectifier with different types of filters - continuous &
discontinuous modes of operation
6. Transformer and Inductor design
7. Current & voltage commutated thyristorized chopper
8. MOSFET/ IGBT/Transistor based DC Choppers (Buck & Boost)
9. Half bridge square wave inverter
10. Single-phase Sine triangle PWM inverter
11. Single Phase AC Voltage Controller
12. Transfer function of armature controlled DC Motor
13. Microcontroller and DSP based control of dc-dc converters
14. Study of harmonic pollution by power electronics loads using power quality
analyser

B) SIMULATION
1. 3-phase full converter and semi-converter with R, RL and RLE loads
2. 3-phase ac voltage controller
3. Closed loop control of DC-DC converter

21
4. 3-phase sine PWM inverter
5. Measurement of THD of current & voltage waveforms of controlled &
uncontrolled 3-phase rectifiers.

MEEPE 108 SEMINAR I L T P C


0 0 2 1

Each student shall present a seminar on any topic of interest related to the core / elective
courses offered in the first semester of the M. Tech. Programme. He / she shall select the
topic based on the references from international journals of repute, preferably IEEE
journals. They should get the paper approved by the Programme Co-ordinator / Faculty
member in charge of the seminar and shall present it in the class. Every student shall
participate in the seminar. The students should undertake a detailed study on the topic and
submit a report at the end of the semester. Marks will be awarded based on the topic,
presentation, participation in the seminar and the report submitted

22
MEEPE 201 SOLID STATE DC AND AC DRIVES L T P C
3 1 0 4

Module 1: Single phase dc drives


Single phase drives-motor and input supply performance parameters separately excited
d.c. motor drives basic equations waveforms-power factor improvement semiconductor
operation of full converters.

Module 2: Three phase dc drives


Three phase drives-operation of semi conductors and full converters-dual converters-non
circulating current and circulating current mode-dual mode dual converters-reversible
drives armature current reversal field current reversal drives selection

Module 3: Chopper fed dc drives


Single quadrant, two quadrant and four quadrant choppers chopper details performance
characteristics- separately excited d.c. motor d.c. series motor input filters, multiphase
choppers-dynamic and regenerative braking of chopper controlled drives.

Module 4: Inverter fed induction motors


Voltage control operation of induction motor with non- sinusoidal waveform-air gap
mmf-hamonic behavior motor losses-harmonic torques-vector control of induction motors.
Module 5: Phase control of induction motors
Stator voltage control schemes-slip power recovery schemes rotor resistnce control-cyclo
conveters principle of operation-cyclo-converter fed drives.

References:

1. Sen, P.C.Thyrisore DC Drives; John Wiley % Sons, 1981.


2. Murphy, J.M.D & Turnbull, F.G., Power Electronic Control Of Ac Motores,
Pergamon Press, 1988.
3. Shephered, W. & Hulley, L.N., Power Electronics and Motor Control, Cambridge
University Press, 1988.
4. Remamoorthy, M., An Introduction To Thyristors and Their Applications, East
West Press, 1977

23
MEEPE 202 SYSTEM THEORY L T P C
3 1 0 4

Module 1: Linear Systems


Fundamentals concept about systems state, the input and output- State space modeling of
physical systems determining of STM controllability and observability of time
invariant linear system.

Module 2: Non linear systems


Describing functions for various types of non-linearities describing function analysis of
non linear control systems.

Module 3: Phase plane analysis


Method of constructing phase trajectories- phase plane analysis of linear and non-linear
systems Bang-bang system.

Module 4: Liapunov stability analysis and Pole placement Techniques


Definitions- first and second method of Liapunov- Different methods of constructing
Liapunov functions for linear and non-linear continuous systems stability analysis. Pole
placement Techniques: Pole placement technique by state feedback for linear SISO time,
invariant system Theory of high-gain feedback-advantages Pole placement technique
along with high-gain feedback control

References:

1. Gopal, M., `Modern Control Systems Theory, Wiley Eastern Ltd., 1990.
2. Ogata, K., `Modern Control Engineering, Prentice Hall of India, 1981.
3. Kuo, B.C., `Automatic Control Systems, Prentice Hall of India, 1983.
4. Dasgupta, S., `Control Systems Theory, Khanna publishers, New Delhi, 1975.
5. Vanikov, `Tranisent Process in Electrical Power Systems, Mir Publishers, Moscow,
1981

24
MEEPE 203 ELECTRICAL ENERGY CONSERVATION L T P C
AND MANAGEMENT 3 1 0 4

Module 1: Electrical Energy and safety audit


Overview of Electricity Act Energy conservation act - Electrical energy audit tools for
electrical energy audit - billing elements - tariff system, energy and demand charge,
electrical demand and load factor improvement, power factor correction, power demand
control, demand shifting Electrical Safety Auditing.

Module 2: Electric motors


Motors efficiency, idle running - motor selection factors affecting motor performance,
efficiency at low load high efficiency motors - reduce speed/variable drives, load
reduction - high-starting torque, rewound motors, motor generator sets, energy efficiency
in transformers - Case studies.

Module 3:Electrical energy conservation in driven equipments


Input electrical energy requirements in pumps fans and compressors load factor
estimation in the equipments different types of VFD, energy conservation potential
electrical energy conservation in refrigeration and A/C system, operation and maintenance
practices for electrical energy conservation case studies.

Module 4: Electrical Energy conservation in industrial lighting and demand


management

Choice of lighting - energy saving - control of lighting - lighting standards light


meter audit - methods to reduce costs summary of different lighting technologies Case
Studies. Energy efficiency and demand management: Basic concepts Co-
generation importance of demand side management virtues of DSM efficiency gains
- estimation of energy efficiency potential, cost effectiveness, payback period, barriers for
energy efficiency and DSM Case Studies.

References:

1. Openshaw Taylor E., Utilisation of Electric Energy, Orient Longman Ltd, 2003

25
2. Donald R. Wulfingoff, Energy Efficiency Manual, Energy Institute Press, 1999.
3. Tripathy S.C., Electrical Energy Utilization and Conservation, TMH, 1991.
4. Cyril G. Veinott, Joseph E. Martin, Fractional & Sub Fractional HP Electric Motor,
McGraw Hill, 1987.
5. Abhay Jain, How to Achieve Energy Conservation, Electrical India, Feb04, pp.48-
53.
6. Ashok Bajpai, Key Role of Energy Accounting and Audit in Power System,
Electrical India, Apr04, pp.38-47.
7. Sasi.K.K. & Isha.T.B., Energy Conservation in Industrial motors, Electrical India,
Apr04, pp.48-51.
8. Sreejith.P.G., Electrical Safety Auditing, Electrical India, May04, pp.38-46.
9. Sreejith.P.G., Electrical Safety Auditing, Electrical India, Jun04, pp.38-45.
10. Thokal.S.K., Electrical Energy Conservation by Improvement of Power factor,
Electrical India, Jul04,pp.38-41.
11. Dr.Omprakash G. Kulkarni, Load End Energy Management, Electrical India
December Annual Issue, 2004.pp.58-67.

26
MEEPE 204 MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF ELECTRICAL L T P C
MACHINES 3 1 0 4

Module 1: Introduction
Principles of Electromagnetic Energy Conversion, General expression of stored magnetic
energy, co-energy and force/torque, example using single and doubly excited system.

Module 2: Rotating Machines


Basic Concepts of Rotating Machines-Calculation of air gap mmf and per phase machine
inductance using physical machine data; Voltage and torque equation of dc machine.

Module 3: Induction machines


Three phase symmetrical induction machine and salient pole synchronous machines in
phase variable form; Application of reference frame theory to three phase symmetrical
induction and synchronous machines, dynamic direct and quadrature axis model in
arbitrarily rotating reference frames.

Module 4: Synchronous Machines


Determination of Synchronous Machine Dynamic Equivalent Circuit Parameters, Analysis
and dynamic modeling of two phase asymmetrical induction machine and single phase
induction machine.

References:

1. Charles Kingsley,Jr., A.E. Fitzgerald, Stephen D.Umans, Electric Machinery, Tata


Mcgraw Hill, Fifth Edition, 1992.
2. R. Krishnan, Electric Motor & Drives: Modeling, Analysis and Control, Prentice Hall
of India, 2001.
3. Miller, T.J.E., Brushless permanent magnet and reluctance motor drives, Clarendon
Press, Oxford, 1989.

27
MEEPE 205-1 FUZZY SYSTEMS L T P C
3 0 0 3

Module 1: Introduction
Different faces of imprecision-inexactness, Ambiguity, Undecidability, Fuzziness and
certainty, Fuzzy sets and crisp sets, probability & Fuzzy logic Fuzzy control and
knowledge based systems.

Module 2: Fuzzy sets and operations


Imprecise concepts, fuzziness & imprecision, properties of fuzzy sets, fuzzy
representations, conventional set operations, intersections of fuzzy sets, union of fuzzy
sets, the complement of fuzzy sets.

Module 3: Fuzzy reasoning


Linguistic variables, fuzzy propositions, fuzzy compositional rules of inference the minx-
max rules implication and fuzzy additive rules of implication, methods of decompositions
and defuzzification- composite moments, composite maximum, average of maximum
values and centre of maximums.

Module 4: Methodology of fuzzy design and Applications


Direct & indirect methods with single and multiple experts, construction from sample
data-least square methods, adaptive fuzzy controllers-membership function turning using
gradient decent. Rule based design via dynamic response analysis. Applications: Typical
fuzzy logic applications to electrical engineering power systems, renewable energy
sources, power electronic drives and control fuzzy decision making, neuro fuzzy systems,
fuzzy genetic algorithms.

References:

1. Zimmermann, H.J., Fuzzy Set Theory and its Applications, Allied Publishers
Limited, Madras, 1966
2. Klir, G.J and Folger, T. Fuzzy Sets, Uncertainty and Information; PHI, New
Delhi, 1991
3. Earl Cox, The Fuzzy Systems Handbook, AP Professional Cambridge, MA
02139, 1994

28
4. D. Driankov, H. Hellendoon, M. Reinfrank, An Introduction to Fuzzy Control,
Narosa Publishing House, New Delhi, 1996
5. R.C. Berkon, S.L.Trubath, Fuzzy Systems Design Principles, IEEE Press
Standard Publishers Distributors, New Delhi, 2000.

29
MEEPE 205-2 RENEWABLE POWER GENERATION L T P C
SOURCES 3 0 0 3

Module 1: Photo-Voltaics
Basic characteristics of sunlight-solar energy resource- photovoltaic cell-characteristics-
equivalent circuit- photovoltaic fort battery charging- charge regulators- equipments and
systems.

Module 2: Winid Turbines


Wind source wind statistics-energy in the wind aerodynamics-rotor types- forces
developed by blades- aerodynamic models- braking systems- tower- control and
monitoring system- power performance.

Module 3: Embedded Generation


Wind driven induction generators-power circle diagram-steady state performance-
modeling-integration issues impact on central generation- transmission and distribution
systems wind farm electrical design.

Module 4: Isolated Genration and Renewable Sources


Wind-diesel systems-fuel savings-permanent magnet alternators- modeling-steady state
equivalent circuit-self-excited induction generators integrated wind solar systems.
RENEWABLE SOURCES: Micro-hydel electric systems power potential scheme
layout generation efficiency and turbine part flow-isolated and parallel operation f
generators- geothermal tidal and OTEC systems.

References:-
1. John F. Walker & Jenkins, N., Wind Energy Technology, John Wiley and sons,
Chichester, U.K., 1997.

2. Van Overstraeton R.J. and Mertens R.P.,Physics, echnology and use of


Photovoltaics, Adam Hilger, Bristol,1996

3. Freries LL, Wind Energy Conservation Systems, Prentice Hall, U.K., 1990.

4. Imamura M.S. et.al. Photovoltaic system technology, European hand book, H.S.
Stephen & Associates, 1992.

30
MEEPE 205-3 DYNAMICS OF ELECTRICAL MACHINES L T P C
3 0 0 3

Module 1: Stability considerations


Dynamic modeling requirements-voltage and angle stability-equal area criterion effect of
damper winding-effect of AVRs and Governors -critical fault clearing time and angle
numerical integration techniques.

Module 2: Synchronous machines


Parks transformation-Flux linkage equations-formulation of normalized equations-state
space current model-subtransient inductances and time constants-simplified models of the
synchronous machine-turbine, Generator-steady state equations and phasor diagrams-
calculation of machine parameters from manufacturing data.

Module 3: Dynamics of synchronous machines


Mechanical relationships- electrical transient relationships-saturation in synchronous
machines-adjustment of machine models parks equation in the operational form

Module 4: Induction machine modeling


Induction motor equivalent circuits and parameters-free acceleration characteristics-
dynamic performance-changes in load torque-effect of three phase short circuit-effect of
three phase short circuit effect of unbalanced faults.

References:

1. Krause, P.C., Analysis of Electric Machinery, Mcgraw Hill International Editions,


1986.
2. Anderson, P.M. and Fouad, A.A., Power System Control and Stability, Galgotia Publ,
New Delhi, 1981.
3. C. Concordia, Synchronous Machines, Wiley, 1951
4. E.W Kimbark, Power System Stability, Vol. 1 To Iii, John Wiley, 1950
5. O.I. Elgerd, Electric Energy Systems Theory Tmh, New Delhi, 1991, 2 nd Edition.

31
MEEPE 205-4 ELECTRIC DRIVES L T P C
3 0 0 3

Module 1: Choice of Electrical Drives


Dynamics of Electrical Drives, Stability, Concept of Multi quadrant operation,
Components of load torques, Effect of gearing, Selection of motor power rating.

Module 2: Review of conventional DC drives:


Different methods of speed control and methods of breaking of series and separately
excited dc motor, Ward Leonard speed control. Converter control of dc motors: Analysis
of separately excited dc motor with single phase and three phase converters, dual
converter. Analysis of chopper controlled dc drives. Modeling of drive elements
Equivalent circuit, transfer function of self, separately excited DC motors; Linear Transfer
function model of power converters; Sensing and feed back elements - Closed loop speed
control current and speed loops, P, PI and PID controllers response comparison.
Simulation of converter and chopper fed DC drive.

Module 3: Stator voltage control of induction motor


Torque slip characteristics, operation with different types of loads, Operation with
unbalanced source voltages and single phasing, analysis of Induction Motor fed from Non-
sinusoidal voltage supply.
Stator frequency control: variable frequency operation, V/F control, controlled current and
controlled slip operation, Effect of harmonics and control of harmonics-PWM inverter
drives, Multi-quadrant drives.

Module 4: Rotor resistance control and speed control of synchronous motors


Slip-torque characteristics, rotor choppers, torque equations, constant torque operation.
Slip power recovery scheme: torque equation, torque slip characteristics, power factor,
methods of improving power factor, limited sub synchronous speed operation, super
synchronous speed operation. Speed control of synchronous motors: Adjustable
frequency operation of synchronous motors principles of synchronous motor control
Voltage Source Inverter Drive with open loop control self controlled synchronous motor
with electronic commutation self controlled synchronous motor drive using load
commutated thyristor inverter. Principle of Vector control

32
References:
1. R. Krishnan, Electrical Motor Drives, PHI-2003
2. G.K.Dubey, Power semi conductor controlled drives, Prentice Hall- 1989
3. G.K.Dubey, Fundamentals of Electrical Drives, Narosa- 1995
4. S.A. Nasar, Boldea , Electrical Drives, Second Edition, CRC Press - 2006
5. M. A. ElSharkawi , Fundamentals of Electrical Drives , Thomson Learning -2000
6. W. Leohnard, Control of Electric Drives,-Springer- 2001
7. Murphy and Turnbill, Power Electronic Control of AC motors, Pergamon Press
8. Vedam Subrahmaniam, Electric Drives, TMH-1994
9. P C Sen; Thyristor D C Drives, John Wiley
10. Bimal K Bose; Modern Power electronics and A C Drives, Person Education Ltd.

33
MEEPE 206-1 ADVANCESD MICROPROCESSORS AND
L T P C
MICROCONTROLLERS
3 0 0 3

Module 1: 80286 Processor


Overview of Microprocessors - Arthitecture Evolution of 16 and 32 bit processors.
Functional block diagram-modes of operation-real and protected mode-memory
management and protection features.

Module 2: 80386 Processor


Functional block diagram programming model addressing modes and instruction set-
address translation-modes of operation-80486 processor-functional block diagram-
comparison of 80386 and 80486 processors.

Module 3: Pentium Microprocessor


Introduction to Pentium processor-special Pentium registers memory management.

Module 4: 68HCII Microcontrollerand 8096 controller


Block diagram of 68HCII-modes of operation-features of I/Q ports- Interrupt structure-
programmable timer and serial peripheral interface- A/D interface. 8096 CONTROLLER
: Architecture of 8096-modes of operation-interrupt structure-timers-high speed
inputs Other Peripheral Functions of 8096 Analog interface- PWM output Watching
timer-serial ports-I/Q expansion methods- Memory expansion Serial port expansion.

References:
1. Barry, B. Brey, The Intel Microprocessor 8086/8088, 8086/8088, 80286, 80386,
80486, Pentium and Pentium preprocessor architecture, programming and
interfacing, PHI, 4th edition, 1997.
2. John B. Peatman, Design with microcontrollers, Mcgraw Hill, Singaore, 1998.

34
MEEPE 206-2 DIGITAL SINGAL PROCESSING L T P C
3 0 0 3

Module 1: Linear Shift Invarant Systems


Linearity, shift invariance Unit sample response characterization - Convolution
summation causality, linear difference equations with constant coefficients and tjheir
solution using Z transform system function concept.

Module 2: Discrete fourier transform and Fast fourier transform


Fourier transform of a sequence, frequency response of a system-frequency response of
first order and second order systems-circular convolution discrete fourier transform and its
properties-linear convolution of two finite length sequence through circular convolution.
Sectioned convolutions-relationship between z transform. Fourier transform and the
discrete Fourier transform. Digital filter sampling. And Fast Fourier transform. Fast
Fourier transform: Introduction to radix-2 FFT-Decimation in time and decimation in
frequency radix 2 algorithm FFT FORTRN program.

Module 3: Finite impulse response (FIR) filters


Amplitude and phase response of FIR filters-Linear phase filters-windowing technique for
the design of linear phase response of fir filters-rectangular hamming and kasier windows
frequency sampling technique introduction to optimal filters

Module 4: Infinite impulse response (IIR) filters


Properties of IIR digital filters-design of IIR filters from continuous time filters-impulse
invariance and bilinear transformation technique-Finite word length effects-Elementary
ideas of the finite word length effects in digital filers.

References:
1. Oppenheim And Schaffer, Discrete Time Signal Processing, PHI 1992
2. Johny R. Johnson, Introduction To Digital Signal Processing, PHI 1994

1. Leudemann, L.C. Fundamentals Of Digital Signal Processing, Harper And Row


Publications, 1986.

35
2. Defatta, D.J., Lucas J.G. And Hodgkiss, W.S. Digital Signal Processing-A System
Design Approach, John Wiley And Sons 2 nd Edition, 1995

3. Sarkar N., Elements Of Digital Signal Processing. Khanna Publishers, 1997

4. Rabiner & Gold, Theory And Applications Of Digital Signal Processing.

36
MEEPE 206-3 NETWORK PRINCIPLES AND PROTOCOLS L T P C
3 0 0 3

Module 1: Basics of networking


Networks-Architecture, ISO-ISO reference model-Topology-Switching-Transmission
media-Point to point protocolse SLIP, PPP LANS, ALOHA family of protocols,
CSMA/CD, IEEE 802.3,802.4,802.5

Module 2: Network Layer Issues


Routing, Congestion control- Internetworking Issues, Address Learning Bridges,
Spanning Tree, Source routing, Bridges, Routers, Gateway.

Module 3: Network Protocol And Routing


IP datagram - hop by hop routing, ARP, RARP- subnets, subnet Addressing, Address
masking, ICMP, RIP, RIPV2, OSPF, DNS, Lan and WAN Multicast.

Module 4: Transport Layer and Application Layer


Design Issues, Connection Management, Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) - User
Data gram Protocol (UDP) ApplicationLayer:Telnet - TETP-FTP-SMTP- Ping- Finger,
Bootstrap Network Time Protocol SNMP

References:

1. Teanenbaum, A.S., Computer Networks, Third Edition, Prentice Hail of India,


1996.

2. W.RICHARD STEVENS, TCP/P Illustrated Volume I, The protocols, Addition


Wesley Professional Computing Series, 1994

3. ULYESS BLACK, TCP/P and related Protocols, II Edition, Macgraw Hill


International Edition, 1995.

4. D.E. COMER and D.L. STEVEENS, Internetworking with TCP/IP Illustrated


volume III, Prentice Hall of India 1997.

5. W.R. STEVENS, Unix Network Programming, Prentice Hall of India, 1995

37
MEEPE 206-4 ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF ARTIFICIAL L T P C
NEURAL NETWORKS 3 0 0 3

Module 1: Basic architectures and learning


Introduction to Neural networks-pattern classification learning and generalization-
structure of neural networks ADA line and Mada line-perceptions-linear separability-back
propagation-XOR function

Module 2: Linear spaces and optimum points


Linear transformation, matrix representation, change of basis, Eigen values, Eigen vectors,
diagonalization, vector case of taylor series, gradient and hessian matrices, quadratic
functions.

Module 3: Advanced architecture and applications


Hopfied and hamming networks Kohensens network-Boltmen machine in and out star
network-art 1 and art 2 nets-Neuro adaptive control applications

Module 4: Adaptive resonance theory and Applications of neural algorithms


Art architecture-comparison layer-Recognition layer-ART classification process-ART
implementation-Examples. Applications of neural algorithms and systems: Character
recognition networks, neural network control application, connectionist expert systems for
medical diagnosis, self organizing semantic map.
References:

1. Martin T. Hogan, Howard B. Demuth, M Neural Network Design

2. Zuroda, J.M Introduction To Artificial Neural Systems Jaico Publishing House,


Bombay, 1884.

3. Zimmermann, H.J. Fuzzy Set Theory And Its Applications, Allied Publishers
Limited, Madras, 1996

4. Klir, G.J., And Folger, T,M Fuzszy Sets, Uncertainty And Information HPI,
NewDelhi, 1991

5. Limin Fu, Neural Networks In Computer Intelligence, Mcgraw Hill, USA, 1994.

38
MEEPE 207 POWER ELECTRONIC SIMULATION LABORATORY

List of Experiments:-

1. Simulation of single phase Semiconverter, Fully controlled converters with R, RL


and RLE Load using MATLAB/Simulink.

2. Simulation of Three phase semi converter using MATLAB/Simulink.

3. Simulation of Three phase fully controlled converter using MATLAB/Simulink.

4. Simulation of Single phase full bridge inverter using MATLAB/Simulink.

5. Simulation of Three phase full bridge inverter using MATLAB/Simulink.

6. Simulation of PWM inverters using MATLAB/Simulink.

7. Simulation of Three phase AC voltage Controller using MATLAB/Simulink.

8. Modeling of FACTS devices using SIMULINK using MATLAB/Simulink.

MEEPE 208 SEMINAR II


L T P C
0 0 2 1

Each student shall present a seminar on any topic of interest related to the core / elective
courses offered in the second semester of the M. Tech. Programme. He / she shall select
the topic based on the references from international journals of repute, preferably IEEE
journals. They should get the paper approved by the Programme Co-ordinator / Faculty
member in charge of the seminar and shall present it in the class. Every student shall
participate in the seminar. The students should undertake a detailed study on the topic and
submit a report at the end of the semester. Marks will be awarded based on the topic,
presentation, participation in the seminar and the report submitted.

39
MEEPE 301 INDUSTRIAL TRAINING AND MINIPROJECT L T P C
0 0 20 10

The student shall undergo (1) Industrial training of 3 month duration OR (2) Industrial
training of one month duration and a Mini Project of two month duration.. Industrial
training should be carried out in an industry / company approved by the institution and
under the guidance of a staff member in the concerned field. At the end of the training he
/ she has to submit a report on the work being carried out. He/she should also submit mini
project report.

MEEPE 302 MASTERS THESIS PHASE - I L T P C


0 0 10 5

The thesis (Phase - I) shall consist of research work done by the candidate or a
comprehensive and critical review of any recent development in the subject or a detailed
report of project work consisting of experimentation / numerical work, design and or
development work that the candidate has executed.
In Phase - I of the thesis, it is expected that the student should decide a topic of thesis,
which is useful in the field or practical life. It is expected that students should refer
national & international journals and proceedings of national & international seminars.
Emphasis should be given to the introduction to the topic, literature survey, and scope of
the proposed work along with some preliminary work / experimentation carried out on the
thesis topic. Student should submit two copies of the Phase - I thesis report covering the
content discussed above and highlighting the features of work to be carried out in Phase
II of the thesis. Student should follow standard practice of thesis writing. The candidate
will deliver a talk on the topic and the assessment will be made on the basis of the work
and talks there on by a panel of internal examiners one of which will be the internal guide.
These examiners should give suggestions in writing to the student to be incorporated in the
Phase II of the thesis.

40
MEEPE 401 MASTERS THESIS L T P C
0 0 30 15

In the fourth semester, the student has to continue the thesis work and after successfully
finishing the work, he / she have to submit a detailed thesis report. The work carried out
should lead to a publication in a National / International Conference. They should have
submitted the paper before M. Tech. evaluation and specific weightage should be given to
accepted papers in reputed conferences.

MEEPE 402 MASTERS COMPREHENSIVE VIVA

A comprehensive viva-voce examination will be conducted at the end of the fourth


semester by an internal examiner and external examiners appointed by the university to
assess the candidates overall knowledge in the respective field of specialization.

41