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User’s Guide to UNITY

Version 5.7

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User’s Guide to UNITY Version 5.7 POWER TEC DOC # LIT-TD-1000 08/2001
User’s Guide to UNITY Version 5.7 POWER TEC DOC # LIT-TD-1000 08/2001
User’s Guide to UNITY Version 5.7 POWER TEC DOC # LIT-TD-1000 08/2001
User’s Guide to UNITY Version 5.7 POWER TEC DOC # LIT-TD-1000 08/2001
User’s Guide to UNITY Version 5.7 POWER TEC DOC # LIT-TD-1000 08/2001
User’s Guide to UNITY Version 5.7 POWER TEC DOC # LIT-TD-1000 08/2001
User’s Guide to UNITY Version 5.7 POWER TEC DOC # LIT-TD-1000 08/2001
User’s Guide to UNITY Version 5.7 POWER TEC DOC # LIT-TD-1000 08/2001
User’s Guide to UNITY Version 5.7 POWER TEC DOC # LIT-TD-1000 08/2001
User’s Guide to UNITY Version 5.7 POWER TEC DOC # LIT-TD-1000 08/2001
User’s Guide to UNITY Version 5.7 POWER TEC DOC # LIT-TD-1000 08/2001
User’s Guide to UNITY Version 5.7 POWER TEC DOC # LIT-TD-1000 08/2001
User’s Guide to UNITY Version 5.7 POWER TEC DOC # LIT-TD-1000 08/2001
User’s Guide to UNITY Version 5.7 POWER TEC DOC # LIT-TD-1000 08/2001
User’s Guide to UNITY Version 5.7 POWER TEC DOC # LIT-TD-1000 08/2001
User’s Guide to UNITY Version 5.7 POWER TEC DOC # LIT-TD-1000 08/2001

Table of Contents

User’s Guide to UNITY

UNITY 5.7

The documentation contained in this publication is the exclusive property of Johnson Controls, Inc., and its use is restricted to the licensed software with which it is furnished. This publication may not be used for any other purpose without the express written consent of Johnson Controls, Inc. Johnson Controls, Inc., reserves the right to update specifications when appropriate. Information contained in this document is based on specifications believed to be correct at the time of publication.

Echelon © , Coactive ©, Windows NT © , and General Electric © are registered trademarks and service marks of companies other than Johnson Controls, Inc. FSC™, CPL™ and NexSys™ are trademarks of Johnson Controls, Inc.

© 2001 Johnson Controls, Inc.

of Johnson Controls, Inc. © 2001 Johnson Controls, Inc. System Products 9410 Bunsen Parkway Louisville, KY

System Products

9410 Bunsen Parkway

Louisville, KY

40220

All Rights Reserved

www.johnsoncontrols.com Revised 08/2001 Printed in U.S.A.

UNITY 5.7

User’s Guide to UNITY

Table of Contents

1

Overview of UNITY

16

 

1.1 PC-Based

16

1.2 Graphic User Interface

16

1.2.1

The Logical Group Tree

17

1.3

UNITY Networking

17

1.4

UNITY Hot Backup

17

2

OS/2 WARP Summary

18

 

2.1

The OS/2 Window

18

2.2

Multi-Tasking

18

3

The Hardware

19

 

3.1

The Keyboard

19

3.2

The Mouse

19

4

ScreenBreakdown

21

 

4.1

Desktop

21

4.2

WARP Center

21

4.3

Cursor

22

4.4

Windows

22

4.4.1 Open/Close a Window

22

4.4.2 Resize a Window

22

4.4.3 Move a Window

22

4.4.4 Maximize a Window

22

4.4.5 Restore a Window

23

4.4.6 Minimize a Window

23

4.4.7 Window List

23

4.4.8 Pop Up Windows

23

4.4.9 Select an Open Window

23

4.5

Scroll Bars

23

5

Access Information

24

 

5.1

Pull-Down Menus

24

5.1.1 Select a Pull-Down Menu

24

5.1.2 Cancel a Menu Selection

24

5.1.3 Select a Pull-Down Menu (with cursor keys)

24

5.1.4 Select a Pull-Down Menu (with text keys)

25

5.1.5 Cancel a Menu Selection (with text keys)

25

5.2 Pop Up Menus

25

5.3 Submenus

25

5.4 Conditional Cascade Window

25

5.5 DialogBoxes

26

5.5.1 Keyboard Operation in Dialog Boxes

26

5.5.2 Mouse Operation in Dialog Boxes

27

6

Accessing UNITY Information

28

 

6.1 Revision Number

28

6.2 Program Directory

28

6.3 Message Directory

29

6.4 Graphics Directory

29

6.5 IMS Directory

29

Table of Contents

User’s Guide to UNITY

UNITY 5.7

6.6 System Status

30

6.7 System Map

30

1

Enter and Exit the UNITY Environment

32

 

1.1

Start UNITY from the OS/2 Desktop

32

1.2

Log On to UNITY

32

1.3

Log Off from UNITY

33

1.4

Exit the UNITY Environment

33

2

The UNITY User Interface

34

 

2.1

UNITY Windows

34

2.1.1 HeaderWindow

34

2.1.2 Logical Group Tree/Graphics Window

34

2.1.3 Alarm Window

35

2.2

UNITY Dialog Boxes

35

2.2.1 AcknowledgeAlarms

35

2.2.2 Point Command

36

2.2.3 Auto Event Initiated Messages (EIMs)

36

2.2.4 Alert Boxes

37

2.2.5 WarningBoxes

37

2.2.6 Miscellaneous Dialog Boxes

37

2.3

Menus

37

2.3.1 Logs Menu

38

2.3.2 Edit Menu

38

2.3.3 IMS Menu

39

2.3.4 Card Menu

39

2.3.5 Setup Menu

39

2.3.6 CommandsMenu

41

2.3.7 Logical Menu

41

2.3.8 System Menu

42

 

2.3.8.1 Single Subsystem

42

2.3.8.2 Multiple Subsystem

42

 

2.3.9 Misc. Menu

42

2.3.10 Log Off

43

2.3.11 Remote Log Off

43

3

UNITY Points

44

 

3.1 The UNITY Point Command Dialog Box

44

3.2 Look up UNITY Points by Address

45

3.3 Look up UNITY Points by Descriptor

46

3.4 Request Status for a Point

46

3.5 Command UNITY Points

47

3.5.1 Command Points from the Menu

47

3.5.2 Command UNITY Points from Graphic

47

3.5.3 Command Points from a Log

48

3.6

Advance Schedules for Points

49

3.6.1 Modify only existing schedules

49

3.6.2 When will changes take effect?

49

3.6.3 Add an Advance Schedule to a Point

50

3.6.4 Delete an Advance Schedule

52

UNITY 5.7

User’s Guide to UNITY

Table of Contents

4

UNITY Alarms

53

 

4.1

AcknowledgeAlarms

53

4.2

Print Alarms

53

4.3

Clear the Alarm Window

54

4.4

Alarm Types

54

5

Event Initiated Messages and Event Initiated Graphics

55

 

5.1

Stop Auto EIM Displays

55

5.2

Start Auto EIM Displays

55

5.3

Acknowledge an Auto EIM

56

5.4

Acknowledge a Normal EIM

56

5.5

Acknowledge an Event Initiated Graphic (EIG)

57

6

Generate Logs (Reports) with UNITY

58

 

6.1

Log Types

58

6.2

Single Group Log

58

6.3

Groups Log

59

6.4

Group Type Log

60

6.5

Logical Group Log

61

6.6

Print Tree

62

7

UNITY E-Mail

63

 

7.1

Send an E-Mail

63

7.2

Receive E-Mail

64

7.3

Read E-Mail

64

7.4

Print an E-Mail Message

65

7.5

Delete an E-Mail Message

66

1

UNITY Operational Setup

68

 

1.1

Passwords

68

1.1.1 Add/Edit a Password Setup

68

1.1.2 Remove a Password

71

1.1.3 ChangeaPassword

71

1.1.4 Print the Password File

72

1.1.5 Copy a Password Setup

72

1.2 Printer

74

1.3 Header Data

75

1.4 Time/Date

76

1.5 Daylight Savings Time Setup

76

1.5.1 Set up the Holiday Schedule for H8 and H9

77

1.5.2 Set up UNITY Programs to Start and Stop DST

78

1.5.3 Set up the TIPs to Activate the DST Schedules

79

1.6 Holiday Schedules

80

1.7 BeeperSetup

82

1.8 Point Segregation

83

1.8.1 Add/Modify a Point Segregation File

84

1.8.2 Copy a Segregation File

85

1.8.3 Delete a Segregation File

86

1.9 Energy Management System (EMS) Defaults

86

1.10 Alarm Colors

87

1.11 Tree Colors

87

Table of Contents

User’s Guide to UNITY

UNITY 5.7

 

1.12 Auto Event Initiated Message (EIM)

88

1.13 Update Intervals

88

1.14 Station Setup

88

1.14.1 Assign a Station to a Terminal

89

1.14.2 Add/Modify a Descriptor

89

1.15

CommandTrace

90

1.15.1 Command Trace Setup

90

1.15.2 Command Trace Options

93

2

User Interface Setup

94

 

2.1

Logical Group Tree Setup

94

2.1.1 Add a Logical Group

94

2.1.2 Add a Point to a Logical Group

95

2.1.3 Add a Bar Chart to a Logical Group

96

2.1.4 Add a Cut Out to a Logical Group

97

2.1.5 Use Flood Fill in a Logical Group

98

2.1.6 Add Text to a Logical Group

100

2.1.7 Remove a Logical Group

101

2.1.8 Remove a Point from a Logical Group

102

2.1.9 Rename a Logical Group

102

2.1.10 Modify Points in a Logical Group

103

2.1.11 Open/Close Groups in Logical GroupTree

103

2.1.12 Move Groups in the Logical Group Tree

104

3

Graphics

106

 

3.1 Graphics Setup

106

3.2 Detailed Graphics Information

106

3.3 Graphic Creation

106

3.4 Run the Graphics Editor

106

3.4.1 Open a Graphic File

107

3.4.2 Save the Graphic

107

3.4.3 Draw a Graphic with an Existing File

107

3.4.4 Draw a New Graphic

108

3.5

View Multiple Logical Group Tree/Graphics Windows

109

1

UNITY System Data Trace Utility

112

 

1.1

Enter the System Data Trace Utility

112

2

Set up the System Data Trace Utility

113

 

2.1

The TRACEDB Executable File

113

2.2

System Data Trace Setup

113

2.3

Set Report Parameters

114

2.4

Change Report Parameters

118

2.5

Delete a Report

120

2.6

Generate a Report

121

3

Read a Command Trace Report

122

 

3.1

Point Commands

123

3.2

Commanded By

123

3.3

Logon/Logoff

124

3.4

Database Edits

124

UNITY 5.7

User’s Guide to UNITY

Table of Contents

 

3.5 CardCommand

125

3.6 System Status

125

3.7 Program Execution

126

3.8 AcknowledgedAlarms

126

3.9 Misc. Commands

127

4

Read an Alarm Manager Report

128

5

Read a Card Activity Report

129

1

System Programs

132

 

1.1

ProgramTypes

132

2

GeneralProgrammingProcedures

133

 

2.1

Add/Modify a Program

133

2.2

Delete a Program

134

2.3

Copy a Program

134

2.4

Print a Program's Commands

135

2.5

Enable/Disable a Program

136

2.6

Run a Program

136

3

DetailedProgrammingProcedures

137

 

3.1

Add Commands to a Program

137

3.2

Delete Commands from a Program

138

4

ProgramCommands

139

 

4.1

Point Commands

139

4.2

Limit Commands

141

4.3

LogCommands

142

4.4

Run Programs

143

4.5

Time Delays

144

4.6

Form Feed

145

4.7

Print Text

145

4.8

Set Segregation

147

4.9

Run REXX

148

5

Program Exercise

149

 

5.1

Create the Program

149

5.2

Run the Program

151

6

Messages

152

 

6.1

Add/Modify a Message

152

6.2

Delete a Message

153

6.3

Copy a Message

154

6.4

Print Message Text

155

7

Time Initiated Program Schedules

156

 

7.1

Add/Modify a TIP Schedule

156

7.1.1 Add a Program to a Schedule

157

7.1.2 Delete a Program from a Schedule

158

7.1.3 Change a Program’s Priority

159

7.2 Delete a TIP Schedule

159

7.3 Copy a TIP Schedule

160

7.4 Print TIP Schedules

161

7.5 TIP Exercise

161

8

Time of Day Schedules

164

Table of Contents

User’s Guide to UNITY

UNITY 5.7

8.1 Add a TOD Schedule

164

8.2 Display TOD Schedules

167

8.3 Print Group TOD Information

167

8.4 Edit a Strategy on a TOD Schedule

168

8.5 Delete a Strategy from a TOD Schedule

169

8.6 Detailed TOD Strategy Information

170

8.7 TOD Schedule Exercise

171

8.7.1

Create the TOD Schedule

171

9

Advance Schedules

175

9.1

Advance Schedule Exercise

175

10

Event Initiated Activities

178

10.1 Print EIA Information

178

10.2 Edit Point EIAs

179

10.3 Detailed EIA Procedures

180

10.3.1 Add/Delete an EIM

180

10.3.2 Add/Delete an EIP

182

10.3.3 Disable EIPs

183

10.3.4 Change a Program’s Priority

184

10.3.5 Add/Modify an EIG

185

10.3.6 Delete an EIG

186

10.3.7 Copy Activities to Other Events

187

11

REXX Programs

189

11.1 Use REXX Programs with UNITY

189

11.2 REXX Program Template

189

1

Calculation Point Inputs

192

2

Calculation Point Operators

194

2.1 Absolute Difference (ABS DIFF) A

194

2.2 Absolute Value (ABS) A

194

2.3 Centigrade to Fahrenheit (C to F) A

194

2.4 Dew Point to Relative Humidity (dp to rh) A

194

2.5 Divide (/) A

194

2.6 Enthalpy using Dew Point (ent_dp) A

195

2.7 Enthalpy using Relative Humidity (ent_rh) A

195

2.8 Equal (=) D

195

2.9 Exponent (EXP) A

195

2.10 Fahrenheit to Centigrade (F to C) A

195

2.11 Flow Rate (FLOW) A

195

2.12 Flow Rate using Square Root (FLOWSQRT) A

195

2.13 Greater Than (>) D

196

2.14 Greater Than or Equal (>=) D

196

2.15 Heat Index (HEAT) A

196

2.16 Less Than (<) D

196

2.17 Less Than or Equal (<=) D

196

2.18 Logical And (AND) D

197

2.19 Logical And Not (ANDNOT) D

197

2.20 Logical Exclusive Or (XOR) D

197

UNITY 5.7

User’s Guide to UNITY

Table of Contents

 

2.21

Logical Not And (NAND) D

198

2.22

Logical Not Or (NOR) D

198

2.23

Logical Or (OR) D

198

2.24

Logical Or Not (ORNOT) D

199

2.25

Maximum (MAX) A

199

2.26

Minimum (MIN) A

199

2.27

Minus (–) A

199

2.28

Modulo (MOD) A

199

2.29

Multiply (*) A

200

2.30

Natural Log (LN)A

200

2.31

Not Equal (<>) D

200

2.32

Plus (+) A

200

2.33

Random (RAND) A

200

2.34

Relative Humidity to Dew Point (rh to dp) A

200

2.35

Square Root (SQRT) A

200

2.36

Time Delay (DELAY) D

201

2.37

Truncation (TRUNC)A

201

2.38

Wind Chill (WIND) A

201

3

Calculation Point Functions

202

 

3.1

Absolute Difference (ABS DIFF)

203

3.2

Absolute Value (ABS) A

205

3.3

Accumulator

206

3.4

Addition

207

3.5

Average

208

3.6

Centigrade to Fahrenheit (C to F)

208

3.7

Change of State

209

3.8

Consumption

210

3.9

DegreeDay

212

3.10

DegreeDays

213

3.11

Demand Control

214

3.12

Dew Point to Relative Humidity (dp to rh)

214

3.13

Division

215

3.14

Enthalpy Using Dew Point (ent_dp)

216

3.15

Enthalpy Using Relative Humidity (ent_rh)

217

3.16

Exponent (EXP)

218

3.17

Fahrenheit to Centigrade (F to C)

219

3.18

Flow Rate (FLOW)

220

3.19

Flow Rate Using Square Root (FLOWSQRT)

222

3.20

Heat Index (HEAT)

223

3.21

Maximum (MAX)

225

3.22

Minimum (MIN)

226

3.23

Multiplication

227

3.24

Natural Log (LN)

227

3.25

Optimum Start Time

228

3.26

Optimum Stop Time

229

3.27

Percent of Scale

230

3.28

Random (RAND)

231

3.29

Relative Humidity to Dew Point (rh to dp)

233

Table of Contents

User’s Guide to UNITY

UNITY 5.7

 

3.30

Rolling Average

234

3.31

Run Time

236

3.32

Select High

238

3.33

Select Low

239

3.34

Square Root (SQRT)

240

3.35

Subtraction

241

3.36

Totalizer Difference

242

3.37

Truncate (TRUNC)

243

3.38

Wind Chill (WIND)

244

4

Detailed DCP Information

246

 

4.1

If-Then-Else Format

246

4.1.1 “If” Statement Structure

247

4.1.2 “Then” & “Else” Commands

247

4.2

An Example dcp Exercise

248

4.2.1

Create the Digital Calculation Point

248

5

Detailed ACP Information

255

 

5.1 Formula Format

255

5.2 ACP Statement Structure

255

5.3 An Example ACP Exercise

256

5.3.1 Set up the Formula

256

5.3.2 Create the Analog Calculation Point

256

5.3.3 Test the Analog Calculation Point

263

6

Detailed FCP Information

265

 

6.1

An Example FCP Exercise

265

6.1.1 Create the Function Calculation Point

265

6.1.2 Test the Function Calculation Point

269

7

Example Calculation Group

270

 

7.1

Calculation Group Setup

270

7.2

Run the Calculation Group

275

8

Calculation Point Programming

280

 

8.1

Add a Calculation Group

280

8.2

Add a Calculation Point

281

8.3

Delete a Calculation Point

282

1

Set Up the IMS

284

 

1.1

Store IMS Information

284

1.2

Select Alarms to be Stored

284

1.3

Add/Modify Trend Points

285

1.4

Delete Trend Points

286

2

IMS Reports

287

 

2.1

Set Up IMS Reports

287

2.2

Run IMS Reports

291

2.2.1 IMS Screen Report

292

2.2.2 IMS Graph Report

293

2.2.3 IMS SDF Report

296

2.2.4 IMS ASCII Report

296

2.2.5 Print an IMS Report

297

UNITY 5.7

User’s Guide to UNITY

Table of Contents

2.2.6

Cancel Printing

298

2.3 View the IMS Data File Statistics

298

2.4 View the IMS Directory

298

1

Overview

300

 

1.1

DemandTerms

301

2

Setup

302

 

2.1

Point 1 Setup Procedure

302

2.2

Point 2 Setup Procedure

304

2.3

Point 3 Setup Procedure

305

2.4

Point 4 Setup Procedure

306

2.5

Point 5 Setup Procedure

306

2.6

Points 6-99 Setup Procedure

307

3

UNITY Demand Control Programming Forms

309

1

ScheduledMaintenance

316

 

1.1

Annual Maintenance

316

1.2

Semi-Annual Maintenance

316

1.3

Monthly Maintenance

316

2

HardwareMaintenance

317

 

2.1

Clean Floppy Diskette Drive

317

2.2

Clean the PC

317

2.3

Clean the PC Keyboard

317

2.4

Clean the PC Video Monitor

318

2.5

Replace the Printer Ribbon

318

2.6

Clean the Printer Carriage Area

318

2.7

Clean the PC Mouse

318

3

Software Maintenance

319

 

3.1

Before You Backup

319

3.2

Prepare Files for Backup

319

3.3

Back Up Files to Floppy Disks

320

3.4

Restore Files from Floppy Disks

320

3.5

Restore Files from the Hard Drive

320

3.6

Purge IMS Files

321

3.7

Backup Graphics Files

321

1

Overview

324

 

1.1

Installing the DataBase Dump Utility

324

1.2

Using the DataBase Dump Utility

324

2

An Example Report

326

 

2.1

Reading the Report

326

1

What is the Alarm Manager

328

2

Set Up Alarm Manager

329

Table of Contents

User’s Guide to UNITY

UNITY 5.7

 

2.1 Add a Responder

329

2.2 Change or Delete a Responder

330

2.3 Add a Response

331

2.4 Change or Delete a Response

332

3

Respond with the Alarm Manager

333

4

Refresh the Alarm Manager

335

1

Overview

338

2

Installation

339

3

Setup Tips

342

3.1 Printer Tips

342

3.2 Modem

342

3.3 Pager

342

3.4 Points

343

3.5 Screen

343

3.6 ChipChat Installation Note

343

1

Start Comcall

346

2

Set Up Comcall

347

 

2.1

Printer Setup

347

2.2

Modem Setup

347

2.3

Pager Setup

348

2.4

Point Setup

349

2.5

Screen Setup

349

2.6

Save the Settings

350

2.7

Load Settings

350

3

View Log

351

4

Comcall Help

352

 

4.1

Help Search Method 1

352

4.2

Help Search Method 2

353

4.3

About Comcall

354

5

Activate/Deactivate Comcall

355

 

5.1

Activate Comcall

355

5.2

Deactivate Comcall

355

1

Overview

358

 

1.1

Theory of Operation

358

1.2

Software Requirements

359

1.3

HardwareRequirements

359

1.4

Definition and Location of Files

359

2

Watchdog Timer Board Setup

360

 

2.1

Timer Reset Input

360

2.2

CPU Reset Output

360

2.3

External Device Reset

360

2.4

Switch Pack S1

360

3

Switch Box Setup

361

4

Hot Backup Setup

363

UNITY 5.7

User’s Guide to UNITY

Table of Contents

 

4.1

UNITYINI.EXE*

364

4.2

SETPIPES.EXE

368

4.3

STATECHG.CMD

369

5

Hot Backup Status

370

 

5.1

View the Hot Backup Status

370

5.2

Reset the Masters

370

6

Normal Startup with HotBackup

373

1

Backtrace Overview

376

 

1.1

Add Backtrace to UNITY

376

Table of Contents

User’s Guide to UNITY

UNITY 5.7

This chapter of the Users Guide to UNITY will tell you:

Basic information about UNITY

A brief description of the UNITY architecture

Basic information about OS/2 WARP

Chapter 1: UNITY Basics

Users Guide to UNITY

UNITY 5.7

UNITY is a Graphic User Interface that simplifies access to building data. UNITY also lets you customize the appearance and operation of the system to suit your particular application.

UNITY uses the newest line of Pentium personal computers, and IBMs newest PC operating system OS/2 WARP. These microprocessors give personal computers enough power and speed to handle the complex tasks required by building automation.

OS/2 WARP, the operating system software UNITY uses, coordinates the functions performed by the microprocessor to allow true multi-tasking. You can be working in a spreadsheet, writing a letter in a word processor, and using UNITY to interface with your building, all at the same time.

Personal computers combine high-resolution screen images with screen- pointing devices (i.e., mouse, tablet, light pen, etc.) to create what is commonly called a Graphic User Interface (GUI). The GUI creates a more realistic on-screen model of the activity in the computer. See 2.2 - The UNITY User Interface for more information.

UNITY combines the power of the personal computers, the flexibility of the OS/2 WARP operating system, and the ease-of-use of a Graphic User Interface.

Figure 1-3 shows a typical UNITY screen display:

of a Graphic User Interface. Figure 1-3 shows a typical UNITY screen display: Figure 1-3. Typical

Figure 1-3. Typical UNITY Screen Display.

UNITY 5.7

Users Guide to UNITY

Chapter 1: UNITY Basics

Just as an outline is a map of a written document, the Logical Group Tree is a map of a building automation control system. Figure 1-4 shows a sample Logical Group Tree.

system. Figure 1-4 shows a sample Logical Group Tree. Figure 1-4. Logical Group Tree. Naturally, each

Figure 1-4. Logical Group Tree.

Naturally, each system will be different, and will require a certain amount of custom programming to have an accurate map. See Chapter 2 for more information.

The UNITY Server and User PCs communicate with each other using Local Area Networks (LANs) or modems. LANs are used for same-site (single building or building cluster) communication while modems are used for remote-site communication. UNITY supports Novell Netware, IBM LANServer, and OS/2 Peer to Peer. In addition UNITY supports the following communications protocols: EthernetII, 802.2, 802.3, IPX, Token Ring, and Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP).

UNITY modem communications supports a maximum baud rate of 14.4K.

Hot Backup is a feature that ensures the maintenance of current system data in the event that the primary PC (system server) goes down. Hot Backup provides a secondary PC that contains Global Data files identical to those on the primary PC. The Global Data files backed up to the secondary PC are:

Edit/Groups

Edit Programs

Edit TIP Schedules

Edit Events/EIPs

Edit Schedules

Edit Segregation Files

Card Parameters Card Edit Schedules Card Edit Gr oups

Card Edit Card Purge

Setup Passwords Change Setup Time and Date Setup Holiday Schedule

Delta 1000 Edit Channels System Subsystem Enable

System Subsystem DisableSystem CSI Save DCUMisc. Datafile Backup

Card Change Field

Setup Passwords Edit

Setup Command Trace

Setup Station Setup

Setup EMS Defaults Misc. Reset Priorities

Chapter 1: UNITY Basics

Users Guide to UNITY

UNITY 5.7

This is an overview of OS/2 WARP version 4.0. Refer to the OS/2 WARP manuals for more information.

OS/2 WARP is the personal computers traffic cop. OS/2 WARP decides when things happen and when they dont. If a program (like UNITY) needs information from a floppy disk, OS/2 WARP controls the movement of the information.

disk, OS/2 WARP controls the movement of the information. The OS/2 window appears as an icon

The OS/2 window appears as an icon in the OS/2 System window in the command prompts folder and looks like the example to the left. To access an OS/2 window, double click on that icon. An OS/2 screen will look like the one in Figure 1-10.

icon. An OS/2 screen will look like the one in Figure 1-10. Figure 1-10. OS/2 Screen.

Figure 1-10. OS/2 Screen.

The main difference between OS/2 WARP and DOS is multi-tasking. Multi- tasking describes a system that can perform more than one task at a time. With UNITY, multi-tasking is important because it guarantees that alarms, Time Initiated Programs, and other critical operations are always given proper attention.

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The keyboard and the mouse are the primary instruments used to input data, command points, modify the system, etc. This section will detail the proper use of those items.

There are six types of keys on the keyboard:

1)

- These are the keys that correspond to typewriter keys (a, b, 1, 2, SHIFT, TAB, RETURN, etc.). Use the standard keys to enter and edit text.

2) - These include the four arrow keys (Left, Right, Up, and Down) and the six page keys (Insert, Delete, Home, End, Page Up, and Page Down) to the right of the text and numeric keys.

3) - These keys correspond with the regular calculator functions (1, 2, 3, +, *, ENTER, etc.) and are located on the right side of the keyboard.

4) - These are special keys that may be custom defined by applications. Some applications provide an overlay sheet to remind you of the function key assignments.

5) - These are two special keys that may alter the operation of other keys. The CTRL or Control key must be held down with the key being modified. The ALT or Alternate key can either modify the next key that is pressed if it is first released, or it can be held down with another key being modified.

6) - This is a special key used to abandon a current operation.

Control/Escape function

The mouse (Figure 1-7) is a small hand-held device that allows a user to interface with the computer. The mouse lets you move an on-screen cursor up, down, left or right. The mouse also has two buttons.

Buttons Cable Roller Ball
Buttons
Cable
Roller Ball

Figure 1-1. Mouse.

two buttons. Buttons Cable Roller Ball Figure 1-1. Mouse. Figure 1-2. Using the Mouse. On the

Figure 1-2. Using the Mouse.

On the next page is an explanation of the five basic mouse actions:

Chapter 1: UNITY Basics

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- Move the mouse until the tip of the cursor rests on a specific item or area. Pointing alone does nothing.

or - Point at an item, then press and release the left or right mouse button. Clicking is used to select an on-screen item.

- Press and release the left mouse button twice in rapid succession. Double-Clicking is used to select an item from a list.

- Point at an item to be moved, press and hold down the left or right mouse button, and then move the mouse (and therefore the cursor- item) to a new location. Release the left button only when the cursor-item is in the correct position.

- This is basically the same technique used for dragging, but is used for selecting text. Point to the left of the first character to include, press and hold down the left mouse button. Drag the pointer to the right and/or down until the pointer passes the last character to include, then release the button.

- When the cursor is positioned over the desktop, press both mouse buttons at the same time and release. Dual clicking is used to call up a Window List.

Click the right mouse button only. This is used to display the pop up menu of the item (folder, window, or icon) that the cursor is positioned on. If no menu exists for the item, none will be displayed.

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An OS/2 display should be similar to the example shown in Figure 1-3. A computer screen has several components discussed in the next few pages.

has several components discussed in the next few pages. Figure 1.3 OS/2 WARP Display.   The

Figure 1.3 OS/2 WARP Display.

 

The solid color background area of the screen is known as the Desktop. It appears when OS/2 WARP is running. When other programs are running or windows are open, the desktop can still be found underneath the other windows. Just as the top of your desk is where work is done, the OS/2 WARP Desktop area is where your computer work is done. On the Desktop are icons representing the various programs, data files, and folders (operating systems utilities, applications, etc.) on the hard drive. In addition there are icons representing the floppy drives and other peripherals. To open a file, open a folder, or start a program, double click on the icon with the left mouse button. Or, choose the icon by clicking once and open by pressing enter.

- To move an icon on the desktop, click on the icon with the right mouse button and drag it to the new position. By dragging an icon, it can be repositioned on the screen, placed in a new folder or, if it is dragged to the shredder, deleted.

To make a duplicate copy of a file, hold down the control button while clicking on the right mouse button. Drag the copy to its new location.

The WARP center is a status bar located at the top or bottom of the screen. With it you can access other programs that are running, find lost files, check on the printer, etc. Drag the cursor slowly across the status bar to determine what each icon represents, or click on a icon to display a pull down menu. When UNITY is running, the WARP Center is hidden. To display the Warp Center in UNITY, press Ctrl-Esc to display the window list and select Warp Center.

in UNITY, press Ctrl-Esc to display the window list and select Warp Center. Figure 1-5 Typical

Figure 1-5 Typical WARP Center Status Bar.

Chapter 1: UNITY Basics

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UNITY 5.7

 

The cursor is the on-screen representation of the mouses position. When the mouse is moved to the left, the cursor will move to the left. When the mouse

is

moved to the right, the cursor will move to the right, and so on. Typically,

the mouse and cursor are used to select objects on the screen, pull down menus, push buttons, and select text to be edited. In some situations, the shape of the cursor (normally an arrow) will change to show that the cursor has a different function. Typically, the cursor will be one of the following shapes:

 

• - Used for pointing and selecting • - Used to indicate that you must wait

- Used for pointing and selecting

- Used to indicate that you must wait before proceeding

- Used to change the size of a resizable window (The

orientation of the arrows reflects the window dimension being changed.)

- Used to enter text

• commandable point

commandable point

- This shows that the cursor is currently on a

Windows are rectangular areas of the screen that contain a group of objects or text. Windows may be resizable, fixed in size, or a full screen (where the edges of the window cannot be seen). A title bar is located at the top of each window. When necessary, scroll bars will appear on the bottom and/or left edges of each window.

 

Windows can be opened in three ways. First, it can be opened by double clicking on its icon. Second, highlight the icon by clicking once and then press enter. Third, select the item from a pop up window. If the window is already open, display the Window List and select the desired program. Be sure that only one copy of UNITY is in use.

A

window can be closed several ways. These are the three most common

ways. Click on the

ways. Click on the

(close button) on the right side of the title bar. Double

click on the system menu icon on the left side of the title bar. Or, click once on the icon on the left side of the title bar to display the pop up menu and

choose

.
.
 

 

To make a window smaller or larger, place the cursor on the windows border. When the double ended arrow appears, drag the edge or corner of the window

to

resize appropriately. Dragging the edge of a window will change only one

dimension of the window. Dragging the corner of the window will change both the width and the height of the window.

 

Move a window on the screen by placing the cursor on the title bar and holding down the left mouse button while dragging the window to a new position.

The window can be maximized to take up the entire screen. Click on the (maximize button) on the right side of the title bar.

window can be maximized to take up the entire screen. Click on the (maximize button) on

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Users Guide to UNITY

Chapter 1: UNITY Basics

 

To restore a maximized screen to the original size, click on the

To restore a maximized screen to the original size, click on the

(restore

button) on the right side of the title bar.

 

By clicking on the

By clicking on the (minimize button), the current window can be hidden.

(minimize button), the current window can be hidden.

 

It

will continue running in the background. To reopen that window, call up

 

the Window List and choose the desired program. (See 3.4.7)

 

 

The Window List is a list of programs that are currently running. Some of those windows are running in the background, and others have been mini- mized. This list can be accessed by dual clicking (clicking both mouse buttons) in the desktop area. Or, call the list by pressing the control (CTRL) and escape (ESC) keys at the same time. Double clicking on an item in the list will bring that window back to the foreground.

 

Right click on an icon, a file, a name or a window to activate its pop up menu.

 

If

no menu exist for that item, none will appear.

 

 

Any open window can be brought to the front of the viewing screen by clicking on any visible part of that window. An open window can also be brought to the front by selecting it from the Window List (CTRL-ESC).

A Scroll Bar (Figure 1-5) is a window control that lets you seea document

that is larger than the current window. Scroll bars may be vertical or horizontal. Scroll Bars contain three elements:

- The rectangular buttons with arrows on them at both ends of a scroll bar

- A solid rectangle somewhere between the arrows of the scroll bar

- The areas of the scroll bar between the scroll box and each of the scroll arrows

bar • - The areas of the scroll bar between the scroll box and each of

Figure 1-6. Scroll Bar.

Chapter 1: UNITY Basics

Users Guide to UNITY

UNITY 5.7

Menu Name

Basics User ’ s Guide to UNITY UNITY 5.7 Menu Name Selected Menu Item Main Items

Selected

Menu Item

Main Items

UNITY UNITY 5.7 Menu Name Selected Menu Item Main Items Pull-down menus are groups of commands

Pull-down menus are groups of commands or phrases that are not visible until a menu name is selected. For example: To display the statistics of the IMS (Information Management System) Datafile, the menu name IMSis selected. Selecting IMScauses a list of the available IMS commands to appear. Now Statisticscan be selected from this list. This is shown in the example at left.

Move the mouse around on the table or mouse pad until the cursor arrow points to the middle of the menu name.

The menu is displayed with the top menu item highlighted.

Move the mouse towards you on the table or mouse pad until the cursor arrow rests on the middle of the menu item.

Press once on the left mouse button. The menu item will highlight (highlighted items have a different shading than non-highlighted items) and the menu action will occur.

Press the right mouse button to cancel the most recent step of a menu selection.

Access the pull down menus through the keyboard in one of the following ways.

Each menu name has one letter underlined (the L in Logs for example). The underlined letter is the menu s command letter. The menu name on the left will be highlighted.

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Pressing the right arrow highlights the menu name to the right of the current menu. Pressing the left arrow highlights the menu name to the left of the current menu.

Press either the down arrow key or the RETURN key to open the menu.

Press the up or down arrow keys as necessary until the appropriate menu item is highlighted. (If the appropriate menu item is the parent of a submenu, press the right arrow key to open the submenu, and repeat this step.)

Each menu name has one letter underlined (the L in Logs for example). The underlined letter is the menus command letter.

The menu name on the left will be highlighted.

Each menu item has one letter underlined (the A in Alarm Summary [Logs Menu] for example). The underlined letter is the menu items command letter (if the appropriate menu item is the parent of a submenu, repeat this step for the submenu).

Pressing the Escape (ESC) key cancels the most recent step of a menu selection.

 

Click the right mouse button on an icon to show its pop up menu. Or, right click in a window to access the window s pop-up menu. If an icon or window has no pop up menu, none will be displayed.

 

 

A

submenu is a menu accessed through another menu. A submenu can be

found in a pull-down menu or a pop-up menu and it is indicated by a small arrow on the right side of the menu. Clicking on a menu item with a submenu will call up the submenu.

A conditional cascade window looks similar to a submenu, however, the small

indicator arrow at the right side of the main menu has a box around it ( ). Clicking on top of the arrow inside the box will bring up the conditional cascade menu. Clicking anywhere else on that menu item will not access that menu but will automatically select the default item in the cascade menu.

else on that menu item will not access that menu but will automatically select the default

Chapter 1: UNITY Basics

Users Guide to UNITY

UNITY 5.7

Dialogs or dialog boxes (Figure 1-6) are a special type of window used to enter specific information. For example, when setting up a printer the following dialog is used to select the printer type, printer port, baud rate and report segregation:

Dialog Box

Text Field

Radio Button

and report segregation: Dialog Box Text Field Radio Button Check Box Button Spin Box List Box

Check Box

Button

Spin Box

List Box

Figure 1-7. Dialog Box.

Dialogs may contain one or more of the following:

- Shaded rectangles with a name in the middle

- A rectangular box of text items with a scroll bar along the right side

- A small rectangular box with an arrow on the side. Clicking on the arrow causes the box to drop down an item selection list.

- Small circles with a name to the side

- A small rectangular box with a pair of arrows on the side. Clicking on an arrow causes the box to spin through the items contained in the box.

- Small squares with a name to the side

- Short, wide, rectangular boxes, with a name to the side

Using the mouse or the keyboard with these items is covered in the next section.

The following keys perform specific functions in dialog boxes:

- The RETURN key selects the default button in any dialog box (The default button is signified by a thick border).

- The Escape (ESC) key selects the CANCEL button in any dialog box.

- The TAB key advances the cursor to the next available field in the dialog box.

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Items (buttons, checkboxes, text fields, text, etc.) display differently when they are selected and when they are not selected. Below are descriptions and examples of the appearance change for each object:

- Buttons are spring loaded(when the mouse is released, they

change back to the normal state). When clicked on with the mouse, the shading of the button will change slightly and the text of the button will move down and to the right as shown below:

Not Selected

move down and to the right as shown below: Not Selected … Selected … • -

Selected

to the right as shown below: Not Selected … Selected … • - Lists show the

- Lists show the selected item as a reversed image (white-on- black instead of black-on-white).