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SPECIAL COLLECTORS EDITION

BEST

99
PHOTOGRAPHY 2018

+ALL TIME
PLUS
PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS
FROM CAN GEOS
PHOTOGRAPHERS-IN-RESIDENCE

BEST
BEST WILDLIFE
SHOTS ON
INSTAGRAM

PHOTOGRAPHS
from Canadian Geographics Photo Club
WOLVES,
MOOSE,
BEARS, BIRDS
AND MORE

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BEST
WILDLIFE
PHOTOGRAPHY 2018
EDITORS NOTEBOOK 5
By Michela Rosano

INTRODUCTION 7
By Michelle Valberg,
Canadian Geographic Photographer-in-Residence

BEST OF MAMMALS 8
Big, show-stopping wildlife and their small, feisty peers

BEST OF BIRDS 32
Canadas avian species

BEST OF WATERY WILDLIFE 56


Animals that depend on Canadas water habitats

BEST OF LITTLE LIFE 82


The wacky and colourful world of amphibians and insects

Images published in past issues of Best Wildlife


Photography that were winners and runners-up
in Canadian Geographic photo competitions

Images that appeared on front and back covers


of previous issues of Best Wildlife Photography

The best wildlife images from previous issues


of Best Wildlife Photography that were shared
with @CanGeo on Instagram

A Q&A with a Canadian Geographic


Photo Club photographer and a
portfolio of their work

2 BEST WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY 2016 FRONT

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To the point
A double-crested cormorant searches for
its next meal in an Ontario lake.

Photographer: Bill Maynard


Species: Double-crested cormorant
Location: Big Rideau Lake, Ont.
Portfolio: coolwildlife.com

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Picture Perfect
This could be your photo. *

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* Tim Hopwood/Can Geo Photo Club


Banff, Alberta Official Sponsor

JOIN Canadas largest photography community photoclub.cangeo.ca

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Photographer: William Bickle
Species: Grizzly bear
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER John G. Geiger Location: Khutzeymateen Provincial Park, B.C.
CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER AND PUBLISHER Gilles Gagnier Portfolio: billbickle.com
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER EMERITUS Andr Prfontaine

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Aaron Kylie


SENIOR EDITOR Harry Wilson
MANAGING EDITOR Nick Walker
ASSOCIATE EDITOR Michela Rosano
DIGITAL EDITOR Sabrina Doyle
SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Alexandra Pope

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Javier Frutos


PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Kendra Stieler
GRAPHIC DESIGNER Jenny Chew
CONTRACT DESIGNER Kathryn Barqueiro
COLOUR TECHNICIAN Glenn Campbell
PHOTOGRAPHERS-IN-RESIDENCE Neil Ever Osborne, Michelle Valberg

DIRECTOR OF CIRCULATION Nathalie Cuerrier


NEWSSTAND CONSULTANT Scott Bullock

DIRECTOR OF SALES Valerie Hall Daigle


(416) 360-4151 ext. 380 halldaigle@canadiangeographic.ca
ADVENTURES Lisa Duncan Brown
(888) 445-0052 brown@canadiangeographic.ca
111 Queen Street East, Suite 320, Toronto, ON M5C 1S2
(416) 360-4151 Fax: (416) 360-1526

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Mike Elston


NEW MEDIA MANAGER Paul Politis

Best of the best


PROJECT MANAGER Roisin OReilly
PROGRAM MANAGER Soha Kneen
LOGISTICS COORDINATOR Emma Viel

W
VICE-PRESIDENT, FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION Catherine Frame
SENIOR ACCOUNTANT Christine Chatland
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE/ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE CLERK Lydia Blackman
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Sandra Smith
RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE COORDINATOR Diane Sguin
What makes a wildlife photograph the best? Is it because its a tack-sharp,
Canadian Geographic Best Wildlife Photography 2018 is published by
Canadian Geographic Enterprises on behalf of The Royal Canadian
perfectly lit technical masterpiece? A jaw-dropping shot of megafauna?
Geographical Society. A glimpse of a rarely seen moment from the animal kingdom? A new
EDITORIAL OFFICE 1155 Lola Street, Suite 200, Ottawa, ON K1K 4C1
(613) 745-4629 Fax: (613) 744-0947 canadiangeographic.ca perspective on ordinary behaviour?
ISBN 978-0-9867516-0-8. No part of this publication may be
I dont think theres one answer. Photography, like all art forms, is largely
reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form
or by any means, without the prior written consent of the publisher
subjective. Sure, theres a certain level of skill and knowledge thats required
or a licence from The Canadian Copyright Licensing Agency
(Access Copyright). For an Access Copyright licence, visit
to take a beautiful wildlife image; composition, exposure, lines, patience,
accesscopyright.ca or call toll-free (800) 893-5777. diligence, etc. But what makes a wildlife image the best is really up to you,
Date of issue: August 2017 Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.
Canadian Geographic and design are registered trademarks.
the viewer.
Marque dpose. Well, weve certainly given you plenty to look at in Best Wildlife Photography
2018. To close out Canadas 150th year and usher in the next 150, we looked
back on the past seven issues of Best Wildlife Photography and chose images
worthy of the designation the best of the best. Photographed by talented
members of our 70,000-photographer-strong Canadian Geographic Photo
Club, these images are the kind that prompted us, as magazine editors, creative
directors and designers, to stop and say Wow!
Throughout the issue, youll see icons highlighting past photo competition
winners and runners-up, previous cover subjects (be sure to check out this
issues back cover) and images shared to the Canadian Geographic
Founded in 1929, the Society is a non-profit educational organization.
Instagram account (@CanGeo). Weve also featured the outstanding
Its object is to advance geographical knowledge and, in particular,
to stimulate awareness of the significance of geography in Canadas
work of long-time Photo Club members and sprinkled in some wildlife
development, well-being and culture. In short, the aim is to make
Canada better known to Canadians and to the world.
photography tips from Neil Ever Osborne and Michelle Valberg, Canadian
Geographics Photographers-in-Residence.
HONORARY PRESIDENT PRESIDENT
Alex Trebek, O.C. Gavin Fitch, Q.C., Calgary As you flip through the pages of grizzlies, wolves, birds and other amazing
HONORARY VICE-PRESIDENTS
Roberta Bondar, O.C., O.Ont.
VICE-PRESIDENTS
Wendy Cecil, C.M., Toronto
wildlife in this special collectors issue, I hope you too have some moments
Pierre Camu, O.C.
Arthur E. Collin
Connie Wyatt Anderson,
The Pas, Man.
where you just have to stop and say Wow!
Wade Davis, C.M.
Gisle Jacob SECRETARY Michela Rosano
Louie Kamookak, O.Nu. Joseph Frey, C.D., Toronto
Denis A. St-Onge, O.C. TREASURER

EXPLORER-IN-RESIDENCE
Keith Exelby, Ottawa
Jill Heinerth
CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC 5

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Photographer: Michelle Valberg
Species: Common loon
Location: Sharbot Lake, Ont.
Portfolio: michellevalberg.com

Moment to moment

A
As photographers, we visualize our images even before grabbing our cameras. And once were ready to snap
the shutter, there are two things we absolutely need above anything else: opportunity and patience. Ive been
fortunate enough to have photographed exotic creatures around the world, but until this summer, there was
still an image that had eluded me for 17 years and it was in my own backyard.
In 2000, I was scooting around in a fishing boat on Sharbot Lake, Ont., where I have a cottage, when I
spotted a loon bobbing along with a tiny chick on her back. This special moment between a parent and its
young stuck in my mind, and I knew I had to photograph it. Each year, I came back to the lake to try to snag
a photo of the loon family, but the timing was never right.
This summer, I spotted the loon on her nest. Hoping the chicks had hatched, I hopped in my kayak a
few days later and set out to capture the poignant scene I remember so well. Hearing the loons call, I
paddled my kayak between two islands, rounded the corner and saw at last what Id been looking for: a
pair of loons, one of them with two chicks resting safely on its back. Finally, 17 years later, I captured that
perfect moment.
Photographing exceptional wildlife moments is never a certainty. Sometimes photographers get lucky and
beautiful images seem to unfold in a matter of minutes. Other times it takes years, visiting the same spots
over and over to get that perfect shot. The images in Best Wildlife Photography 2018, all shot by Canadian
Geographic Photo Club members, exemplify those once-in-a-lifetime moments. Whether these images
took hours or years to capture, when that moment finally arrived, it made it all worthwhile.
Michelle Valberg

CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC 7

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BEST OF MAMMA L

8 BEST WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY 2018 BEST OF MAMMALS

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A LS

P
Polar bears, lynx, moose, wolves;
Canada is bursting with photogenic
megafauna. This section showcases
big, show-stopping wildlife, with a few
of their smaller but feisty peers.

Midnight sunning
Polar bears have an acute sense of smell, so when
photographing this one, Nina Stavlunds Zodiac
approached from upwind. That way, the bear
couldnt sense the presence of humans and
remained relaxed.

Photographer: Nina Stavlund


Species: Polar bear
Location: Beechey Island, Nunavut
Portfolio: alwaysanadventure.ca

CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC 9

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PHOTOGRAPHY TIP

It might be staring into a bears eyes or a tender moment between a


person and an animal, but creating a sense of empathy in an image
engages the viewer by putting them in someone elses shoes.
Neil Ever Osborne

The watcher
A wolf pauses while out on an exercise run at the
Northern Lights Wolf Centre, an interpretive
facility that educates the public about the canines.
During these sessions, the wolves are taken to
nearby wild habitat to run and explore.

Photographer: Richard Eckert


Species: Grey wolf
Location: Golden, B.C.
Portfolio: reckert.smugmug.com

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Rainy-day ramble
A female grizzly and her cub pick their way over
fallen trees during a rain-soaked day on the British
Columbia coast.

Photographer: Suzanne Southon


Species: Grizzly bear
Location: Khutze Inlet, Great Bear Rainforest, B.C.
Portfolio: pbase.com/suzanne

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King of the castle
A bighorn sheep grazes at Aylmer Lookout
overlooking Lake Minnewanka in Albertas Banff
National Park.

Photographer: Elaine Kennedy


Species: Bighorn sheep
Location: Banff National Park, Alta.
Portfolio: elainekennedyphotography.com

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CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC 13

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14 BEST WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY 2018 BEST OF MAMMALS

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Frosty feline Playtime
Called the ghost of the north woods, the lynx stays as Red fox kits play at the height of spring. At around
silent as possible when stalking its prey, which is usually one month old, kits begin to play near the entrance
swift snowshoe hares. to their den and have been weaned off their
mothers milk.
Photographer: Chris Gale
Species: Canada lynx Photographer: Leigh Ayres
Location: Fort Nelson, B.C. Species: Red fox
Portfolio: facebook.com/NorthernPhotographyAndHistory Location: Barrie, Ont.
Instagram: @leighayres69

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The chase
Two martens chase each other through a row of
trees in early April, pausing just long enough to
look at the photographer.

Photographer: Chris MacDonald


Species: American marten
Location: Algonquin Provincial Park, Ont.
Portfolio: seventhdayphotography.ca

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Making tracks
Heavy snow blankets the ground at the Kicking Horse
Grizzly Bear Refuge, home to this grizzly named Boo.

Photographer: Neal Weisenberg


Species: Grizzly bear
Location: Kicking Horse Grizzly Bear Refuge, Golden, B.C.
Portfolio: flickr.com/coloramaman

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2014 COMPETITION
RUNNER UP

Moving shadow
Although the photographer surprised this caribou
while hiking, the animal started to trot around him,
providing the perfect set-up for this silhouette.

Photographer: Franck Tuot


Species: Caribou
Location: Marmot Pass, near Fish Lake, Yukon
Portfolio: naturellement-votre.deviantart.com

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CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC 19

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PHOTOGRAPHY TIP

Try getting lower to photograph wildlife. Photographing an animal


at eye level makes them come alive in the image and transports
the viewer to their world.
Michelle Valberg

Feeling dandy
Dandelions are a favourite springtime food source
for black bears at lower elevations, such as this bear
sitting along the road near Dease Lake, B.C.

Photographer: Lars Metzler


Species: Black bear
Location: Near Dease Lake, B.C.
Portfolio: gespanntreisen.com
Instagram: @dagi_gespanntreisen

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Approachable
A red fox approaches the photographer on a clear
winter day in Algonquin Provincial Park.

Photographer: Megan Lorenz


Species: Red fox
Location: Algonquin Provincial Park, Ont.
Portfolio: mlorenzphotography.com
FEATURED ON
2016 COVER

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Deadlock
The mating rituals of elk are confrontational. A bull
elk with a harem of cows and calves will be
aggressive in their defense and will battle other
bulls for dominance, sometimes to the death.

Photographer: Jim Cumming


Species: Elk
Location: Montebello, Que.
Portfolio: redbubble.com/people/darby8

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CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC 23

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Pack mentality
Wolf packs have a culture all their own. Within
the pack, wolves will fight with each other to
establish dominance.

Photographer: John Zimmerman


Species: Wolf
Location: Parc Omga, Montebello, Que.
Portfolio: johnzimmermanphotography.ca FEATURED ON
2014 COVER

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PHOTOGRAPHY TIP

We see so many images of wildlife these days, its hard to take a


memorable shot. Stand out from the rest by creating an image that
marries composition, light and, most importantly, a moment.
Neil Ever Osborne

Bundled up
A curious weasel in its winter coat pops its head
out of a tree in -38 C weather at Centre
dinterprtation de la nature du Lac Boivin.

Photographer: Jacques-Andr Dupont


Species: Weasel
Location: Centre dinterprtation de la nature du
Lac Boivin, Granby, Que.
Portfolio: jadupontphoto.com

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PHOTOGRAPHY TIP

Be prepared with your camera equipment and know it well. A slightly


higher ISO will help you achieve a faster shutter speed and allow you
to get crisp images of wildlife in action.
Michelle Valberg

Branch bandit
A curious raccoon peeks out from the branches of
a fruit tree on Manitobas Hecla Island.

Photographer: Heather Hinam


Species: Raccoon
Location: Hecla Island, Man.

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Rolling thunder
A herd of muskox stampede in the Arctic, a
region the species has inhabited for thousands of
years. With intricate coats made up of many
layers of hair, they are well adapted to life in the
harsh environment.

Photographer: David Ho
Species: Muskox
Location: Kugluktuk, Nunavut
Portfolio: dnvphoto.zenfolio.com

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28 BEST WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY 2018 BEST OF MAMMALS

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Whiteout Tender moment
Many animals blend into their native A red fox kit nuzzles its mother in the early
environments, but rarely is their camouflage morning light in Algonquin Provincial Park.
as uniform as this grey wolfs.
Photographer: Erika E. Squires
Photographer: Bill Maynard Species: Red Fox
Species: Grey wolf Location: Algonquin Provincial Park, Ont.
Location: Parc Omga, Montebello, Que. Portfolio: erikasquires.com
Portfolio: coolwildlife.com Instagram: @erikaesquiresphotography

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FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHER
BILL MAYNARD
What is your most memorable moment in the field?
I was photographing an osprey nest in Merrickville, Ont.
(MIDDLE LEft). Within the first hour of daylight, the male
would usually show up at the nest with a fish. But not on
this day. By 10:30 a.m., the female let out two very high
pitched whistling calls. Im no osprey interpreter, but it
sure sounded like she was angrily calling him back. Within
one minute, the male flew high over the nest and
responded, and in 10 minutes he was back with a fish. It
was amazing to watch that scene unfold.

What has been your biggest challenge?


The biggest challenge for me as a wildlife photographer
has been to capture images that are unique, that surprise
and delight the viewer with something they have never
seen before.

What is your favourite subject to photograph and why?


If I had to choose just one, it would be owls. Im very
fortunate where I live to have access to many different
species of owls, from the massive great grey owl to the
tiny saw-whet owl and many in between. Theyre all
unique, but they all have a powerful presence.

How did you get into photography?


I grew up in Northern Ontario and my brother was a
conservation officer. I spent a lot of time outdoors with
him and gained a great appreciation for wildlife. Over
time as I observed these animals, I realized how wonderful
it would be to capture some of those special moments
and share them with friends and family.

Bill Maynard is based in Ottawa. His work has won


numerous Canadian Geographic photo contests and
has appeared in a Canadian Wildlife Federation
calendar and in Digital SLR Photography magazine.
coolwildlife.com.

Clockwise from OPPOSITE TOP: Great grey owl, Ottawa;


trumpeter swans in the mist, Big Rideau Lake, Ont.;
common loon, Big Rideau Lake, Ont.; osprey nest,
Merrickville, Ont.; grey wolf pack, Montebello, Que.

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FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHER

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BEST OF BIRDS

32 BEST WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY 2018 BEST OF BIRDS

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E
Elegant and mysterious, friendly
and curious, birds inhabit just about
every corner of our country, from
the High Arctic to the Prairie
grasslands. This section features
the best of Canadas avian species.

A parliament of owls
Snowy owls congregate on a picnic table at
Ottawas Central Experimental Farm in the spring.

Photographer: Michelle Valberg


Species: Snowy owl
Location: Ottawa
Portfolio: michellevalberg.com

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PHOTOGRAPHY TIP

Wildlife photographers need a great deal of patience. Sometimes


things happen quickly, but most often, wildlife photography requires
time and perseverance to get that gripping shot.
Michelle Valberg

I see you
In 2013, Newfoundland experienced an influx of
snowy owls, like this one caught peeking out from
behind a cliff.

Photographer: Brad James


Species: Snowy owl
Location: Cape Spear, N.L.
Portfolio: bradjameswildlifephotography.com

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Ruffled feathers
This great grey owl spent the winter minutes from
the photographers southwestern Quebec home.

Photographer: Simon Bolyn


Species: Great grey owl
Location: Bois-de-la-Roche Agricultural Park,
Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Que.
Portfolio: facebook.com/simon.bolyn

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2008 COMPETITION
RUNNER UP

A fine balance
A grandstanding gull poses for tourists on an
icy safety fence at the edge of the Niagara River
in February.

Photographer: Victor Korchenko


Species: Ring-billed gull
Location: Niagara Falls, Ont.
Portfolio: indie-images.ca

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Feeding time
When the lupines bloom in Garry Point Park,
Savannah sparrows come to feast on insects that
hide in the flowers.

Photographer: Philip Chin


Species: Savannah sparrow
Location: Richmond, B.C.
Portfolio: flickr.com/photo_schmoto
Instagram: @iphilflash

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Bird and bloom
The carnivorous puffin dines on a smorgasbord of
herring, crustaceans, hake and capelin. They can fly
nearly 100 kilometres per hour, and during their
minute-long underwater dives, theyve been known to
fill their large beaks with as many as 62 fish at once.

Photographer: Megan Lorenz


Species: Atlantic puffin
Location: Elliston Island, N.L.
Portfolio: mlorenzphotography.com

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PHOTOGRAPHY TIP

Dont fall into the trap of staying on the same f-stop or using the same
shutter speed during your entire shoot. Creating contrast within your
photo selection can be used to mix up the pace of your story on a
particular species.
Neil Ever Osborne

Drink up
An Annas hummingbird dips into a flower at
Vancouvers 22-hectare VanDusen Botanical
Garden, a popular stopping point for many
bird species.

Photographer: Geoffrey Shuen


Species: Annas hummingbird
Location: Vancouver
Portfolio: flickr.com/geoffreyshuen

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Mellow yellow On the bright side
A goldfinch blends in with its perch while Unlike other waterfowl, the brightly coloured wood
taking a break from eating and bathing in duck nests in trees lining wooded swamps and
the photographers backyard. lakes, using its strong claws to grip branches.

Photographer: Ron E. Racine Photographer: Michel Bury


Species: American goldfinch Species: Wood duck
Location: Kelowna, B.C. Location: Laval, Que.
Portfolio: roneracine.com Portfolio: michelbury.com
FEATURED ON
2017 COVER

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Take to the sky
A common loon takes off in the early morning
light. A loon requires between 27 and 400 metres
of space to gather enough speed to take flight.

Photographer: Jim Cumming


Species: Common loon
Location: Wilson Lake, Que.
Portfolio: redbubble.com/people/darby8

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PHOTOGRAPHY TIP

You dont have to travel far distances or visit exotic places to create captivating
images, especially with wildlife. In our own backyards, forests, trails and parks are
little creatures (and maybe big ones, depending on where you live) that are fun and
interesting to photograph.
Michelle Valberg

Surveyor
Theyre great fliers, but gannets are weak on their
feet. They nest mainly on steep cliffs or offshore
islands. These habitats are usually out of reach of
land predators, but Quebecs Bonaventure Island
gannet colony is also home to red foxes, which
prey on the birds.

Photographer: Lina Lepore


Species: Northern gannet
Location: Bonaventure Island, Que.

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Blame it on the rain
This peregrine falcon was unable to fly and was
taken to a rehabilitation centre in Campbellville,
Ont., where the photographer snapped this image
on a cold, rainy March morning.

Photographer: Megan Lorenz


Species: Peregrine falcon
Location: Campbellville, Ont.
Portfolio: mlorenzphotography.com

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Welcome home Blue streak
A pair of northern gannets greet each other after The light had faded at Lost Lagoon in Stanley
the male returns to the nest on Bonaventure Park, and photographer Dave Larkman was just
Island, one of the worlds largest gannet colonies. about to leave when he came across a great blue
heron and quickly snapped this image.
Photographer: Jacques-Andr Dupont
Species: Northern gannet Photographer: Dave Larkman
Location: Bonaventure Island, Que. Species: Great blue heron
Portfolio: jadupontphoto.com Location: Stanley Park, Vancouver

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CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC 47

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Heron sunrise
Just before sunrise, the cool early morning air
formed a veil of fog over the Ottawa River,
creating a dramatic backdrop for this heron.

Photographer: David White


Species: Great blue heron
Location: Ottawa River, Gatineau, Que.
Portfolio: flickr.com/7651494@N02 2014 COMPETITION
RUNNER UP

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PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS

All stories have a beginning, middle and end. Your photography story needs
to be built using images that take a viewer through this narrative. Think about
the selection of your images as you create a story arc.
Neil Ever Osborne

Splendid suitors
King eiders winter along the coast of Atlantic Canada
and Alaska and travel in flocks of up to 10,000 to the
Arctic islands to breed in the summer.

Photographer: Michelle Valberg


Species: King eider
Location: Near Arctic Bay, Nunavut
Portfolio: michellevalberg.com

CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC 49

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Incoming
How many snowy owls show up in southern Canada
in a given year depends in part on the population of
lemmings in the Far North, where the birds breed.
When the lemming population booms, snowy owls
can raise up to triple the number of young.

Photographer: Henrik Nilsson


Species: Snowy owl
Location: Boundary Bay, B.C.
Portfolio: photographybyhenrik.com

50 BEST WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY 2018 BEST OF BIRDS

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Mirror, mirror
A gosling takes a drink from a puddle near the
Avon River in May and catches its own reflection
in the water.

Photographer: Tanya Szustaczek


Species: Canada goose
Location: Stratford, Ont.
Portfolio: tanszshotsz.com
Instagram: @tanszshotsz

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Face off
During an irruption of great grey owls in the winter
of 2013, photographer Bill McMullen snapped this
detailed image of one perched on an upturned
root along the Ottawa River.

Photographer: Bill McMullen


Species: Great grey owl
Location: Orleans, Ont.
Portfolio: billmcmullenphotography.com

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Eagle-eyed
With eyesight five times sharper than a humans,
bald eagles can spot prey thats well over a
kilometre away.

Photographer: Steven Rose


Species: Bald eagle
Location: Near Port Hardy, B.C.
Portfolio: stevenrosephotography.com

CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC 53

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FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHER
NINA STAVLUND
What is your most memorable moment in the field?
While visiting Grand Manan, N.B., I witnessed humpback
whales engaged in bubble-net feeding. Also present were
thousands of gulls, shearwaters and gannets. As the scene
unfolded, I simply had to put my camera down and
observe. So much was going on, I didnt want to miss one
moment of it.

What has been your biggest challenge?


Since my hands are quite shaky, I think my biggest
problem is getting sharp images without the use of a
tripod. Learning to control exposure by using manual
settings, especially with a fast shutter speed, changed
everything for me.

What is the next animal on your photography bucket list?


For years, even before becoming a photographer,
I dreamt of experiencing the elusive snow leopard in the
wild. Id also be pretty grateful to photograph a lynx.

What is the best advice youve received?


To become a great photographer, you also need to be
comfortable in front of the camera.

Nina Stavlund is based in Ottawa. Her work has won


photo contests and has appeared in magazines such
as Canadian Geographic and National Geographic,
as well as in calendars and travel brochures.
alwaysanadventure.ca

Clockwise from OPPOSITE TOP: Polar bear, Naujaat,


Nunavut; snapping turtle laying eggs, Larose Forest,
Ont.; snow goose migration, Moose Creek, Ont.;
black-capped chickadee, Mud Lake, Ottawa;
raccoon, Mud Lake, Ottawa.

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FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHER

CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC 55

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BEST OF WATERY W

56 BEST WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY 2018 BEST OF WATERY WILDLIFE

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Y WILDLIFE

T
These pages present the amazing
variety of species that depend on
Canadas water habitats. Some, such
as whales and fish, rely on water to
survive minute to minute, while others,
such as grizzlies and moose, use it to
hunt and feed.

Mountain retreat
Elk once lived as far east as Quebec, but were
hunted until they inhabited only lightly populated
mountain regions, such as Albertas Jasper
National Park, where James Anderson spotted
this bull.

Photographer: James Anderson


Species: Elk
Location: Jasper National Park, Alta.
Portfolio: flickr.com/jamesa1

CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC 57

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PHOTOGRAPHY TIP

It isnt always possible to have the perfect light, but being aware of it
and watching how it affects the appearance of the animal is important.
Move around and watch how the light plays on your subject.
Michelle Valberg

Surfacing at sunset
The distinctive flukes of a humpback whales tail
scatter shimmering water droplets in the Verney
Passage as the sun sets.

Photographer: Jenny Stevens


Species: Humpback whale
Location: Great Bear Rainforest, B.C.

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Herring gulp
Humpbacks, like this one in Johnstone Strait off
Vancouver Island, are one of the largest whales on
Earth and can eat up to 1 tonnes of krill and
small fish each day.

Photographer: Jamie Scarrow


Species: Humpback whale
Location: Johnstone Strait, B.C.
Portfolio: jamiescarrow.com

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The getaway
Blackflies follow a moose as it swims across
Opeongo Lake in Ontarios Algonquin Provincial
Park. Surveys are conducted every two years in
the park to monitor its population of 3,000 to
4,000 moose.

Photographer: Jim Cumming


Species: Moose
Location: Algonquin Provincial Park, Ont.
Portfolio: redbubble.com/people/darby8

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2006 COMPETITION
WINNER
Go with the floe
Saul Gonor donned a dry suit and snorkel to
capture this image of walrus on an ice floe in the
Arctic Ocean.

Photographer: Saul Gonor


Species: Walrus
Location: Arctic Ocean near Igloolik, Nunavut

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Seal sighting
Pacific harbour seals are a common sight in
Victoria harbours, where tourists offer them an
abundant supply of fish.

Photographer: Drew Glaser


Species: Pacific harbour seal
Location: Victoria

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Lone wolf
Bathed in early evening light, a wolf walks along a
beach. The photographer captured this image
while returning to Tofino after a boat tour of
Vancouver Islands west coast.

Photographer: Beverly Jay


Species: Grey wolf
Location: Vargas Island, B.C.

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2013 CONTEST
RUNNER UP

Reflection
The grizzly bears range has been much reduced
by development in western North America, but
along some parts of the British Columbia coast,
grizzlies are actually expanding their turf.

Photographer: William Bickle


Species: Grizzly bear
Location: Khutzeymateen Provincial Park, B.C.
Portfolio: billbickle.com

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PHOTOGRAPHY TIP

Build a rapport with a guide before you even start shooting. On most
of my assignments, I collaborate with a guide who knows where the
animals are and when to see them.
Neil Ever Osborne

Sheep crossing
Photographer Liza Curtiss made sure to give plenty
of distance between her and a group of bighorn
sheep crossing a river in Jasper National Park.

Photographer: Liza Curtiss


Species: Bighorn sheep
Location: Jasper National Park, Alta.
Portfolio: lizacurtiss.com
Instagram: @liza.curtiss

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White whales
Playful and intelligent, beluga whales curiously eye
a snorkeller in Hudson Bay. Belugas are called
canaries of the sea for the high-pitched chirps,
clicks, whistles and squeals they produce.

Photographer: Andy Murch


Species: Beluga whale
Location: Near Churchill, Man.
Portfolio: bigfishexpeditions.com

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Island equine
Warmed by the Gulf Stream, Sable Island has
some of the mildest winter temperatures in
Canada. That temperate climate has helped the
famous wild horse population there thrive.

Photographer: Michelle Valberg


Species: Sable Island horse
Location: Sable Island, N.S.
Portfolio: michellevalberg.com

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PHOTOGRAPHY TIP

Get out of bed really early and you will be rewarded. The light is
magical, the animals are more active and you will likely be the only one
out there. We all strive to capture that award-winning image, and
being out in the field in the early morning hours or at the golden hour
of sunset offers a greater chance for success.
Michelle Valberg

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Killer shot
On a misty August evening, members of an orca
pod breach the surface of Johnstone Strait, a
popular whale-watching destination.

Photographer: Steven Rose


Species: Orca
Location: Johnstone Strait, B.C.
Portfolio: stevenrosephotography.com

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River keeper
A resident river otter peers over a fallen tree in a
pond in Muskoka, Ont. While this playful species
can be spotted during the day, it is most active
at night.

Photographer: Andy Zeltkalns


Species: North American river otter
Location: Muskoka, Ont.
Portfolio: zelcamphotography.com
Instagram: @activeinmuskoka

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PHOTOGRAPHY TIP

Images of wildlife that reveal a sense of its environment are


powerful. Use a wide angle lens to bring the viewer into the
animals habitat.
Neil Ever Osborne

Low water mark


Low water levels in the Ottawa River in 2012
attracted many white-tailed deer, which fed
along its banks.

Photographer: David White


Species: White-tailed deer
Location: Ottawa
Portfolio: flickr.com/7651494@N02 FEATURED ON
2014 COVER

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The leap
The first area in Canada designated specifically to
protect the habitat of the grizzly bear, British
Columbias remote Khutzeymateen Grizzly Bear
Sanctuary requires that visitors acquire a permit to
check out the parks wildlife.

Photographer: William Bickle


Species: Grizzly bear
Location: Khutzeymateen Provincial Park, B.C.
Portfolio: billbickle.com

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Balancing act
A raccoon balances on a branch. In natural
habitats, raccoons get much of their food from
the water, while in urban environments theyll eat
just about anything.

Photographer: Windy Corduroy


Species: Raccoon
Location: Stanley Park, Vancouver
Portfolio: windycorduroy.com

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2012 COMPETITION
RUNNER UP
Rescue me
Moose love water, but not when its icebound.
Photographer Chris Gale snapped this image during a
moose rescue mission. My buddy lassoed her, and about
10 of us helped pull her up, says Gale. Then she walked
away, looking back at us as if to say thanks.

Photographer: Chris Gale


Species: Moose
Location: Muskwa-Kechika Management Area, B.C.
Portfolio: facebook.com/NorthernPhotographyAndHistory

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2014 COMPETITION
WINNER
Swimming upstream
Every four years the spawning cycle of sockeye
salmon peaks, says Todd Mintz. They fight the
current for 500 kilometres upriver to return to
their birth place, changing a vibrant red to
encourage mating, then dying soon after. This
time, more than 34 million salmon ran in the
Fraser River system.

Photographer: Todd Mintz


Species: Sockeye salmon
Location: Adams River, B.C.
Portfolio: tmintz.ca

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CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC 77

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2012 COMPETITION
RUNNER UP
On the move Shooting stars
Sea stars have no brains or blood, but they do I prefer early morning lighting, says David Clow,
have feet. It often seems that theyre perfectly still, but for this shot, taken on Haida Gwaii, B.C., the
but they move around slowly using countless tiny tides dictated when I could shoot. The multi-
tube feet. As photographer Iain Robert Reid coloured ochre starfish are fully exposed to the air
found, this pace makes for an ideal target. only at low tide. I had just a few minutes to
compose the shot before the tide turned and
Photographer: Iain Robert Reid
began covering the starfish again.
Species: Blood star
Location: Naikoon Provincial Park, B.C. Photographer: David Clow
Portfolio: iainrobertreid.com Species: Starfish
Location: Haida Gwaii, B.C.
Portfolio: lightrenderings.com

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CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC 79

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FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHER
WINDY CORDUROY
What is your most memorable moment in the field?
I once came ridiculously close to a bald eagle. I was out
walking with my son at a local lake when we came across
an eagle perched on a fallen branch at the edge of the
water. It seemed oblivious to the people taking photos,
and looked content to just relax and digest its recent
meal. After a while, the eagle stretched and flew off.
Being that close to this majestic bird would have made a
great photo op for me, but unfortunately, I hadnt brought
my camera.

What is the next animal on your photography bucket list?


The burrowing owl is high on my list. Unfortunately, the
population of these elusive birds has greatly declined in
Canada over the past years. One day, though, I hope to
finally be able to see one and photograph it in the wild.
Next on my list would be a fox.

What is the best advice youve received?


Patience and timing. These are key to capturing images
of animals in the wild. Sometimes I spend an entire day
in the cold or heat, awaiting the arrival of a particular
species. Many times, I leave without a single sighting of
what I came to capture. That said, when I finally do get
the privilege of photographing that animal, the victory is
that much sweeter.

What is your most important piece of equipment?


That would be my telephoto lens, the Canon 100-
400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II. With it, Im able to capture
wildlife without disturbing them.

Windy Corduroy is based in the Vancouver area.


Her work has won photo contests and has appeared in
Canadian Geographic and her local newspaper.
windycorduroy.com

Clockwise from OPPOSITE, TOP LEft: Sandhill cranes,


Delta, B.C.; bald eagle, Abbotsford, B.C.; grey jay,
Pemberton, B.C.; pileated woodpecker, Surrey, B.C.;
Douglas squirrel, Langley, B.C.; barred owl, Vancouver.

80 BEST WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY 2018 FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHER

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FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHER

CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC 81

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BEST OF LITTLE L IF

82 BEST WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY 2018 BEST OF LITTLE LIFE

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L IFE

S
Sometimes you have to look down
to get the best photographs. This
section celebrates the colourful and
sometimes wacky world of the
nations small species, from chorus
frogs to northern blue butterflies.

2010 COMPETITION
WINNER

Frogs-eye view
I was canoeing with a friend on Lac Hroux,
Que., says Normand Watier. We were going to
look for great blue herons when I saw this very
passive bullfrog among the lily pads in this
sheltered bay.

Photographer: Normand Watier


Species: Bullfrog
Location: Lac Hroux, Que.

CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC 83

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PHOTOGRAPHY TIP

If you have time, watch and learn the behaviours of the animals you
are photographing so you can better anticipate their actions. If you
can forecast where or what they might do next, you will have more
opportunities to create amazing images.
Michelle Valberg

Blue belle
Found in all provinces and territories, the northern
blue butterfly is characterized by a blue colouring
(mostly males) and a complex pattern of dark
markings on the undersides of its rounded wings.

Photographer: Brad Smith


Species: Northern blue butterfly
Location: Cochrane, Alta.

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Ladies first
A ladybug rests on the edge of a curled leaf on a
summer day in the photographers backyard in
Port Moody, B.C.

Photographer: Tracy Riddell


Species: Convergent ladybug
Location: Port Moody, B.C.

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Monarchs row
At first glance, Peter Prodger mistook these
monarch butterflies on a tree along the path to the
beach at Presquile Provincial Park, south of
Brighton, Ont., for leaves blowing in the wind.

Photographer: Peter Prodger


Species: Monarch butterfly
Location: Presquile Provincial Park, Brighton, Ont.

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2011 COMPETITION
WINNER

Topsy-turvy
This Robert Ganz image of a praying mantis clinging
to a stalk of grass not only netted him the title of
grand-prize winner in our 2011 wildlife photography
contest, it was also used on a limited edition
$10 silver coin as part of a partnership between The
Royal Canadian Geographical Society and
the Royal Canadian Mint.

Photographer: Robert Ganz


Species: Praying mantis
Location: Near Montreal
Portfolio: robertganz.com

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On the fence
With complementary bright fall colours as its
background, a caterpillar makes its way up a
chain-link fence.

Photographer: Joey Waitschat


Species: Caterpillar
Location: Ottawa
Portfolio: flickr.com/j-j-w

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CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC 89

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Spring surprise Winged splendour
Nestled into a vivid day lily, this spring peeper could Black swallowtail butterflies lay their eggs just one
easily be mistaken for tropical fauna, but these tiny at a time, but are nevertheless among North
tree frogs are suited to the cold. By hibernating Americas most common butterfly species. One
under logs and in loose bark, theyre able to range reason theyve been able to proliferate is the
well into the forests of eastern Canada. appearance of their young larvae, which mimic
bird droppings and fool potential predators.
Photographer: Brian Robin
Species: Spring peeper frog Photographer: Simon Bolyn
Location: Near Desboro, Ont. Species: Black swallowtail butterfly
Portfolio: flickr.com/bprobin Location: Montreal
Portfolio: facebook.com/simon.bolyn

CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC 91

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PHOTOGRAPHY TIP

With everything on your mind, try not to forget about composition. Be creative
with your approach and place your subject in various positions in the frame, use
lines to draw the viewer in and look for textures or patterns.
Michelle Valberg

Lady in red
Ladybugs may look delicate, but appearances are
deceiving. These dainty insects are largely
carnivorous and can have voracious appetites.

Photographer: Shawna Cameron


Species: Ladybug
Location: Ottawa
Portfolio: shawnacameron.com

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Still life
Still groggy and not yet ready to launch into the
days flight, this dragonfly was patient enough to
let Brian Robin set up his camera and lights.

Photographer: Brian Robin


Species: Canada darner
Location: Desboro, Ont.
Portfolio: flickr.com/bprobin

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Madame butterfly
An American lady butterfly perches atop some
flowers on a clear August day. This species is also
known as the American painted lady for the bright
coral colouring on the surface of its forewings.

Photographer: Derek Grant


Species: American lady butterfly
Location: Rothesay, N.B.
Portfolio: derekgrantdigital.com

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PHOTOGRAPHY TIP

If you think youre finished shooting for the day, wait one
more hour. I guarantee your patience will pay off.
Neil Ever Osborne

Floating reflection
This frog was floating alone in a shallow, swampy
area when Brian Robin spotted it. I moved as
slowly as possible, trying to convince it that it
hadnt been spotted, and he carried on floating
motionlessly to avoid drawing attention.

Photographer: Brian Robin


Species: Green frog
Location: Near Desboro, Ont.
Portfolio: flickr.com/bprobin

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2013 COMPETITION
WINNER
Engaged YOUTH
Chorus line
Dragonflies have been around for nearly 300 Western chorus frogs breed in fishless ponds
million years, living even before the dinosaurs starting in early spring, often when the water is still
existed. The life span of an individual dragonfly is icy, and can survive being frozen.
far less impressive. The insects are prey for birds
Photographer: Nina Stavlund
and spiders, and do not live for long after breeding.
Species: Western chorus frog
Location: Dunrobin, Ont.
Photographer: Kylie MacEachern
Portfolio: alwaysanadventure.ca
Species: Halloween pennant dragonflies
Instagram: @always_an_adventure_inc
Location: Tiny Marsh Provincial Wildlife Area, Ont.
Portfolio: 500px.com/kapturedbykylie

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FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHER
JIM CUMMING
What is your most memorable moment in the field?
On a cool, foggy November morning, I found myself in the
local woods surrounded by five large white-tailed bucks
during mating season. Then a doe walked into view. I man-
aged to back away and was fortunate to capture the doe
in the foreground, a huge buck in the background fog and
what I thought was a once in a lifetime shot (TOP LEft).

What is your favourite subject to photograph?


Its a toss-up between white-tailed deer and the common
loon. The majesty of the deer and the call of the loon:
how could you not be thrilled to see or hear these spe-
cies? Both are not easy to find, let alone photograph, but
the thrill of the hunt is what makes it exciting for me.

What is the best advice youve received?


Four things: patience, patience, patience and know
your camera.

What is your most important piece of equipment?


A great camera or a great lens does not always equal a
great photo. My most important piece of equipment
would be my eyes and the ability to create good compo-
sitions. To notice something that is not always evident and
to look at a subject and see it in a different way. That can
separate you from the rest.

Jim Cumming is based in Ottawa. His work has been


featured in magazines, calendars, novels and even on a
silver coin from the Royal Canadian Mint celebrating
Canadas 150th birthday. redbubble.com/people/darby8

Clockwise from OPPOSITE TOP: Common loons fishing,


Wilson Lake, Que.; moose, Opeongo Lake, Algonquin
Provincial Park, Ont.; red fox, Algonquin Provincial
Park, Ont.; snowy owl, St. Isidore, Ont.; kingfisher with
fish, Ottawa; white-tailed doe and buck, Ottawa.

98 BEST WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY 2018 FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHER

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FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHER

CANADIAN GEOGRAPHIC 99

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SPECIAL COLLECTORS EDITION
BEST

99+
PHOTOGRAPHY 2018
IMAGES FROM
OUR PHOTO CLUB

DISPLAY UNTIL MAY 31, 2018


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