You are on page 1of 64

Artifact Three: Weebly Teacher Website

For my third artifact, I have included my Weebly Teacher Website along with the link

(http://mrcaseybhoward.weebly.com/ ). This is a website that I created while at Medaille College

as a way for me to integrate technology into my future classroom. This website includes items

that are important for both students and parents. Having a website for the classroom is a great

way to let parents know what their children are doing in the classroom and a way for students to

get their homework if they have forgotten it in the classroom. In the website, I have also included

a vast amount of learning resources like virtual field trips, educational videos, and educational

websites. The website is great for classroom management and time management because it

allows me to communicate with the students while they are at home and they can print off the

work needed for the next day and they can be prepared instead of searching everywhere for their

work in their desks. The Weebly Teacher Website showcases my ability to bring technology not

only to the classroom but also in the family home in a fun and interactive way for both students

and parents.

Connections to Standards

INTASC Standards

Standard #4: Content Knowledge

4(a) The teacher effectively uses multiple representations and explanations that capture key ideas

in the discipline, guide learners through learning progressions, and promote each learners

achievement of content standards.

Standard #10: Leadership and Collaboration


2

10(d) The teacher works collaboratively with learners and their families to establish mutual

expectations and ongoing communication to support learner development and achievement.

10(g) The teacher uses technological tools and a variety of communication strategies to build

local and global learning communities that engage learners, families, and colleagues.

NYS Code of Ethics for Educators

Principle 3: Educators commit to their own learning in order to develop their practice.

Educators recognize that professional knowledge and development are the foundations of their

practice. They know their subject matter, and they understand how students learn. Educators

respect the reciprocal nature of learning between educators and students. They engage in a

variety of individual and collaborative learning experiences essential to develop professionally

and to promote student learning. They draw on and contribute to various forms of educational

research to improve their own practice.

Principle 5: Educators collaborate with parents and community, building trust and

respecting confidentiality.

Educators partner with parents and other members of the community to enhance school programs

and to promote student learning. They also recognize how cultural and linguistic heritage,

gender, family and community shape experience and learning. Educators respect the private

nature of the special knowledge they have about students and their families and use that

knowledge only in the students' best interests. They advocate for fair opportunity for all children.
3

International Society for Technology Education for Teachers and or Students

(ISTE):

1.b. Engage students in exploring real-world issues and solving authentic problems using

digital tools and resources.

2.b. Develop technology-enriched learning environments that enable all students to

pursue their individual curiosities and become active participants in setting their own

educational goals, managing their own learning, and assessing their own progress.

3.b. Collaborate with students, peers, parents, and community members using digital

tools and resources to support student success and innovation.

4.a. Advocate, model, and teach safe, legal, and ethical use of digital information and

technology, including respect for copyright, intellectual property, and the appropriate

documentation of sources.

4.c. Promote and model digital etiquette and responsible social interactions related to the

use of technology and information.

TEAC Claims

The fact that I took time to create a website that encompassed all the resources that the

students and parents will need throughout the school year showcases that I am a caring educator

that TEAC Claim # 3 applies to this artifact.

Claim #3: Medaille College graduates are caring educators.

Ontario Teacher Ethical Standards

All of the Ontario Teacher Ethical Standards are evident in this artifact Care, Respect,

Trust, Integrity. Care is shown through the time spent putting the website together for the
4

students and parents. Respect for the environment is shown through the Operation Save the

Planet flyer for students to come to school with recycled materials. Trust is shown by having

students fill out a survey on the home page and trusting they will do so. And integrity is shown

by holding the students accountable for printing and bringing in any homework that was assigned

on the website for class.

Artifact
5
6
7
8
9

Artifact Four: Science Unit Plan

Over the course of my time in the MSED program at Medaille College, I created a

Science Unit Plan. The unit that I focused on was grade 5 Understanding Matter and Energy. I

have included the Science Unit Plan into my MSED Elementary Portfolio Project so that I could

showcase my skills as an educator to create, plan and produce multiple lesson plans for one unit;

as well as provide evidence of my abilities to assess student learning. Additionally, the Science

Unit Plan correspondingly showcases the methods I would use to manage and create a fun

learning environment that allows the students to engage in a safe and educational way.

I showcase CRT by bringing different examples over the course of the unit that relates to

the different students communities in the classroom. By doing so this allows the students to

share their experiences and personal examples that relate to the subject we are covering. During

the unit, I also provide evidence that I am able to use technology in an educational and engaging

manner in the classroom. Throughout the Science Unit Plan, I also provide evidence of my time

management skills by laying out step by step what will be done in each lesson leading up to the

final experiment. According to Shukla (2011) unit plans are a great way to make the difficult

decisions about what to teach; they help keep you on pace to reach the long-term unit goals; and

they provide opportunities to stimulate the students interest through overarching content that is

relevant to them. This unit plan teaches and allows students to problem solve and use

communication skills in a group setting.


10

Connections to Standards

NYS Code of Ethics for Eductors

Principle 2: Educators create, support, and maintain challenging learning

environments for all.

Educators apply their professional knowledge to promote student learning. They know

the curriculum and utilize a range of strategies and assessments to address differences. Educators

develop and implement programs based upon a strong understanding of human development and

learning theory. They support a challenging learning environment. They advocate for necessary

resources to teach to higher levels of learning. They establish and maintain clear standards of

behavior and civility. Educators are role models, displaying the habits of mind and work

necessary to develop and apply knowledge while simultaneously displaying a curiosity and

enthusiasm for learning. They invite students to become active, inquisitive, and discerning

individuals who reflect upon and monitor their own learning.

The Ontario Ethical Teacher Standards

Respect: Intrinsic to the ethical standard of Respect are trust and fair-mindedness.

Members honour human dignity, emotional wellness and cognitive development. In their

professional practice, they model respect for spiritual and cultural values, social justice,

confidentiality, freedom, democracy and the environment.

TEAC/CAEP Claims 1-3

Claim 2: Medaille College graduates meet the needs of diverse learners through

effective pedagogy and best teaching practices.


11

International Society for Technology Education for Teachers and or Students

(ISTE):

Teachers

1.c. Promote student reflection using collaborative tools to reveal and clarify students

conceptual understanding and thinking, planning, and creative processes.

2.c. Customize and personalize learning activities to address students diverse learning

styles, working strategies, and abilities using digital tools and resources.

3.a. Demonstrate fluency in technology systems and the transfer of current knowledge to

new technologies and situations.

P-12 NYS Common Core Learning Standards

1. New York State K-4 Elementary Science Standards

Standard: The Physical Environment

Key Idea: 3. Matter is made up of particles whose properties determine the observable

characteristics of matter and its reactivity.

3.1. Observe and describe properties of materials, using appropriate tools.

a. Matter takes up space and has mass. Two objects cannot occupy the same place at the

same time.

f. Objects and/ or materials can be sorted or classified according to their properties.

3.2. Describe chemical and physical changes, including changes in states of matter.

a. Matter exists in three states: solid, liquid, gas.

solids have a definite shape and volume

liquids do not have a definite shape but have a definite volume


12

gases do not hold their shape or volume

b. Temperature can affect the state of matter of a substance.

c. Changes in the properties or materials of objects can be observed and described.

New York State P-12 Common Core ELA Standards

Standard Strand: S4.4

Grade: 4

Standard Strand: Speaking and Listening Standards K-5

Topic Strand: Presentation and Knowledge of Ideas

Item Number and Statement:

4.4 Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized

manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or

themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

Ontario Curriculum Expectations

Ontario Elementary Science and Technology Standards

Overall Expectations

Demonstrate an understanding of the properties of matter, changes of state, and physical

and chemical change.

Specific Expectations

- Identify properties of solids, liquids, and gases (e.g., solids have definite volume and hold

their shape; liquids have definite volume but take the shape of their container or spread

when they are not contained; gases have no definite volume and take the volume and
13

shape of their container or spread when they are not contained), and state examples of

each.

- Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including mass, volume, properties,

matter, physical/reversible changes, and chemical/irreversible changes, in oral and

written communication.

- Identify indicators of a chemical change (e.g., production of a gas, change in colour,

formation of precipitate

- Distinguish between a physical change and a chemical change (e.g., a physical change

can be reversed [ice to water to ice], whereas a chemical change creates new substance[s]

[wood to smoke and ash])

Ontario Elementary Language Standards

Overall Expectations

Listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety of situations for a

variety of purposes.

Specific Expectations

Demonstrate an understanding of the information and ideas in a variety of oral texts by

summarizing important ideas and citing important details (e.g., present an oral report to the class

after listening to a guest speaker; use a graphic organizer to map the important ideas in a text;

represent the important ideas of an oral text through visual art, music, or drama).
14

Artifact

Matter & Energy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_of_matter#/media/File:Four_Fundamental_States_of_Matter.
png

Unit Plan: Grade 5 Science


Casey Bouillere-Howard
Medaille College
EDU 500
Dr. Susan Dunkle
July 25th, 2016
15

Teacher Candidates First & Last Name: Casey Bouillere-Howard

Evaluators Name: Dr. Susan Dunkle Date: July 25th, 2016

Unit Plan Title: Understanding Matter and Energy: Properties of and Changes in Matter

I. UNIT DATA:

A. Teacher Candidates First & Last Name: Casey Bouillere-Howard


B. Subject/Content Area: Science
C. Grade Level (PK-12): Grade 5 (Ontario); 4th (NYS)
D. Unit Topic: Understanding Matter and Energy
E. Unit Title: Properties of and Changes in Matter
F. Duration of Unit Plan: 5 days
Lesson Plan #1 Title: Introduction to Matter and Energy and Vocabulary.
Lesson Plan #2 Title: Vocabulary continued and introduction to physical
and chemical changes.
Lesson Plan #3 Title: Introduction to Experimentation and the Scientific
Method/Science Journaling/Solids, Liquids, and Gases in Balloons
Lesson Plan #4 Title: Balloon Experiment Conducted/Make Notes
Lesson Plan #5 Title: Discuss Scientific Journal and Results of Balloon
Experiment

G. Materials, Including Technology Integration


Handouts
Science Journals
Scientific Methods Sheets
Smart Board and White Board, Markers
Whats Matter? Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ELchwUIlWa8
Changing Water States of Matter video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tuE1LePDZ4Y
Chemical Change Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=37pir0ej_SE
BrainPop Video
https://www.brainpop.com/science/scientificinquiry/scientificmethod/
Balloons
Deep Tubs

H. Table of Contents
Cover Page1
Table of Contents..2
Introduction/Significance..3
Central Focus4
General Objectives/ Expectations.5
Assessment5
Anticipatory Set/ Student Engagement.6
Classroom Management7
16

Reflection..8
Culturally Responsive Teaching8
Accommodations9
Pre-Requisite Skills..10
Anticipated Misconceptions.10
Academic Language.11
Lesson Plans.13
Appendixes...38
Appendix A..40
Appendix B..41
Appendix C..45
Appendix D..46
Appendix E47
Appendix F48
References.................................39

II. Unit Description

A. Introduction/Significance of the Unit

This introduction will introduce where the unit fits into the larger picture of the curriculum as
well as the rationale/reasons that the unit was chosen. This unit plan is and an important part of
this grade three Science curriculum for Matter and Energy for both New York State Elementary
Science Curriculum and Ontario Elementary Science and Technology Curriculum. As well,
elements of the New York State P-12 Common Core English Language Arts Curriculum for the
K-5th grade classroom are included.

The grade four New York State Standards for Science states that for Standard 4 The Physical
Setting - Students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories
pertaining to the physical setting and living environment and recognize the historical
development of ideas in science. This includes the grade four New York State Learning
Standards for Science states that for Standard 1 Matter is made up of particles whose properties
determine the observable characteristics of matter and its reactivity. It also includes the grade
four New York State Learning Standards for Science states that for Standard 1 Energy exists in
many forms, and when these forms change energy is conserved.

The Ontario Curriculum Grade 5 Properties of and Changes in Matter Unit fits into the larger
Ontario Science and Technology Curriculum under the strand for Understanding Matter and
Energy that starts in Grade 1 and continues through Grade 8 that investigates a variety of
different changes of states in matter from solids to gases and liquids.

The significance and importance of learning about Science and Technology in the Elementary
Classroom can be seen through the Ontario Elementary Science Curriculum:

During the twentieth century, science and technology played an increasingly important
17

role in the lives of all Canadians. Science and technology underpin much of what we take
for granted, including clean water, the places in which we live and work, and the ways in
which we communicate with others. The impact of science and technology on our lives
will continue to grow. Consequently, scientific and technological literacy for all has
become the overarching objective of science and technology education throughout the
world.

Also, all science and Technology has three Over objectives in each unit:

1. to relate science and technology to society and the environment


2. to develop the skills, strategies, and habits of mind required for scientific inquiry and
technological problem solving
3. to understand the basic concepts of science and technology (Ontario Elementary
Science Curriculum, 2007, p. 4)

Located in the New York State Elementary (K-4) Science Curriculum it is stated that:

The elementary science program should emphasize a hands-on and minds-on approach to
learning. Students learn effectively when they are actively engaged in the discovery process,
often working in small groups. Experiences should provide students with opportunities to
interact as directly as possible with the natural world in order to construct explanations about
their world. This approach will allow students to practice problem-solving skills, develop
positive science attitudes, learn new science content, and increase their scientific literacyThe
elementary science program should emphasize a hands-on and minds-on approach to learning.
Students learn effectively when they are actively engaged in the discovery process, often
working in small groups. Experiences should provide students with opportunities to interact as
directly as possible with the natural world in order to construct explanations about their world.
This approach will allow students to practice problem-solving skills, develop positive science
attitudes, learn new science content, and increase their scientific literacy (NYS Elementary
Science Curriculum, 1996, p. 3).

The Essential Questions are:


1. What is matter and energy?
2. Why is matter and energy important to us?
3. How does matter and energy impact our environment?

B. Central Focus

During this unit Matter and Energy, the students will be concentrating on an assortment of
skills and abilities. The students will use problem solving, reasoning skills and critical
thinking to describe, categorize, compare, and measure observable physical properties of
matter and objects. The students will gain a better informed understanding of the variety of
forms of energy through worksheets, observations and experimentations and explain the
results of simple energy transformations from one form to another in their physical
environment.
18

C. General Objectives

1. Discuss and correctly use Scientific and technical vocabulary.


2. Assess the social and environmental impact of using processes that rely on chemical
changes to produce consumer products, taking different perspectives into account (e.g.,
the perspectives of food manufacturers, consumers, landfill operators, people concerned
about the environment), and make a case for maintaining the current level of use of the
product or for reducing it.
3. Use scientific inquiry/experimentation skills to investigate changes of state and changes in
matter.
4. Identify matter as everything that has mass and occupies space
5. Identify properties of solids, liquids, and gases (e.g., solids have definite volume and hold
their shape; liquids have definite volume but take the shape of their container or spread
when they are not contained; gases have no definite volume and take the volume and
shape of their container or spread when they are not contained), and state examples of
each
6. Describe physical changes in matter as changes that are reversible (e.g., a melted ice cube
can be refrozen; a bottle of frozen water can be thawed to a liquid state again; water
vapour that has condensed on a cold window can evaporate into a vaporous state again;
water from a puddle that has evaporated will fall to the ground as rain)
7. Describe chemical changes in matter as changes that are irreversible (e.g., when the
chrome on a bicycle rusts, it can never go back to being chrome; when an egg is boiled it
can never go back to being a raw egg)
8. Use scientific inquiry/experimentation skills to determine how the physical properties of
materials make them useful for particular tasks (e.g., when cleaning up a liquid spill in the
kitchen, which material is best suited to do the job: a piece of sponge, a piece of terry
cloth, a paper towel?

D. Assessment

1. The teacher will formatively assess the students ability to discuss and correctly use
Scientific and technical vocabulary through brainstorming/copying down definitions, daily
discussions, and providing leveled readers to accommodate struggling readers and ESL
students.
2. The teacher will formatively assess the students ability to discuss and assess the social
and environmental impact of using processes that rely on chemical changes to produce
consumer products, taking different perspectives into account (e.g., the perspectives of
food manufacturers, consumers, landfill operators, people concerned about the
environment), and make a case for maintaining the current level of use of the product or
for reducing it through watching videos on environmental impact and through discussion
questions and journal writing.
3. Investigate and discuss the changes of state and changes of matter by observing pictures,
discussing vocabulary, experimentation and evaluation of experiment results.
4. The teacher will formatively assess the students ability to provide explanations, through
experimentation and discussion, to highlight/identify the properties of solids, liquids and
19

gases (e.g., solids have definite volume and hold their shape; liquids have definite volume
but take the shape of their container or spread when they are not contained; gases have no
definite volume and take the volume and shape of their container or spread when they are
not contained), and state examples of each.
5. The teacher will formatively assess the students ability to identify/describe physical
changes in matter as changes that are reversible (e.g., a melted ice cube can be refrozen; a
bottle of frozen water can be thawed to a liquid state again; water vapour that has
condensed on a cold window can evaporate into a vaporous state again; water from a
puddle that has evaporated will fall to the ground as rain) through discussion.
6. The teacher will formatively assess the students ability to identify/describe chemical
changes in matter as changes that are irreversible (e.g., when the chrome on a bicycle
rusts, it can never go back to being chrome; when an egg is boiled it can never go back to
being a raw egg) through discussion and short worksheets.
7. The teacher will formatively assess the students ability to accurately use the Scientific
Method, steps and procedures when conducting structure-based experiments through
observation and discussion (see attachment checklist). ****
8. The teacher will formatively assess the students ability to communicate and use safety
steps that can be developed and applied for a safe and successful experiment through a
discussion of these steps and actual practice during experimentation.
9. The teacher will summatively assess the students ability to answer basic questions about
the Tier 3 vocabulary; social and environmental impact of using processes that rely on
chemical changes; identifying matter as everything that has mass and occupies space; the
properties of solids, liquids and gases (e.g., solids have definite volume and hold their
shape; liquids have definite volume but take the shape of their container or spread when
they are not contained; gases have no definite volume and take the volume and shape of
their container or spread when they are not contained); physical changes in matter as
changes that are reversible(e.g., a melted ice cube can be refrozen; a bottle of frozen water
can be thawed to a liquid state again; water vapour that has condensed on a cold window
can evaporate into a vaporous state again; water from a puddle that has evaporated will
fall to the ground as rain) and describe chemical changes in matter as changes that are
irreversible (e.g., when the chrome on a bicycle rusts, it can never go back to being
chrome; when an egg is boiled it can never go back to being a raw egg) a multiple choice
test. ****

E. Anticipatory Set/ Student Engagement

As the anticipatory set for this unit, the teacher will start by introducing the students to the
unit show them a short video about matter and then proceed by asking the students a
question. The name of our next unit is Properties of and Changes in Matter. I am now
going to show you a video about matter.
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ELchwUIlWa8)
After watching this video, I want you to describe what you think matter means. what
makes matter matter? What are some examples of matter?
https://www.superteacherworksheets.com/matter/matter-
article_WMTBN.pdf?up=1466611200
20

Students will complete the worksheet (Appendix A). Once the students have had time to
complete the worksheet and develop initial answers, the teacher will stop the class to discuss
the concept of matter everything that has mass and occupies space.

Day 2, we will also discuss the concept of changes of matter (Physical changes that are
reversible and chemical changes that are irreversible). And follow up that discussion with
Appendix B and C activities.
http://files.havefunteaching.com/free-worksheets/grade/third/science/physical-changes-
worksheet-1.pdf (B)
http://files.havefunteaching.com/free-worksheets/grade/third/science/chemical-changes-
worksheet-1.pdf (C)

ENGAGEMENT USED THROUGHOUT UNIT


Each of the 5 lessons will be unique in their process of teaching; a mix of teacher-centered
and student-centered learning methods will be used to keep students interested, engaged and
learning. All students learn differently and the unit will give the opportunity for students to
use variable intelligences from Gardner.

The students will have the chance to do some fun work sheets pertaining to matter and
energy within the unit, each emphasizing different standards within the grade 4 The Physical
Setting curriculum in New York State and grade 5 Matter and Energy within the Ontario
Curriculum. Students will also be using receptive and expressive literacy skills to read, write,
listen and discuss vocabulary all while using their Science Journals to track their information.

The students will view videos on matter and energy.

During the course of the unit, the students will be asked questions to involve them in
discussion to both provide a foundation of information on the lesson taught, and to
demonstrate the level of knowledge and understanding they have and have acquired.

Students will work independently and also in team to complete the objectives. They will be
given team and individual assignments.

Reading and writing homework will also be provided to improve student literacy and writing,
according to New York State P-12 Common Core Standards for English Language Arts and
Literacy. To review the unit, the students will participate in an Active Discussion Circle to
review important concepts of the Unit before being summatively assessed on their
knowledge.

F. Classroom Management

Students will be expected to obey and follow the rules of the teacher and school that were
laid out on the first day of class. By following the rules, this will help ensure that the
classroom is a safe, accepting, respected and positive learning environment for all students.
Because we will be engaging in many discussions throughout the unit, the students will be
reminded to be respectful to others while they are speaking, and to raise their hand and wait
21

for the teacher to call on them if they have something to share with the class. The students
will be reminded to respect the opinions of others. Misbehaving students will be addressed
straightaway and if it continues the teacher will speak to the principal and the students
parents/guardians. Teacher will practice time management control during lectures and
discussions.

Students are expected to work respectfully individually or in teams/groups with all members
of the classroom. As well, students will be expected to take responsibility to daily jobs (e.g.
materials person).

The teacher-student relationship is one of mutual respect and guidance by the teacher for the
students. The students are responsible for their own work. Bullying is NOT and WILL
NEVER be tolerated in any relationship in the classroom. The teacher will concentrate on
the experiential, referent and legitimate power that they have in the classroom to provide a
safe and secure environment in which each individual student may learn and flourish.

When it comes to working at the highest levels of Cognition, Evaluation, we want to


encourage our students to have independent thought, think critically and come up with ideas
and solutions independent of a defined mental set.

III. Reflection

In the first lesson of the unit, the students are asked to discuss academic/content language
necessary for participation in the upcoming unit. The teacher will provide the words mass,
volume, properties, matter, Three states of matter: solids, liquids, and gases. The students
will brainstorm definitions and formal definitions will be provided to them for their Science
Journals. The students will then learn about the Scientific Method for experimenting in a
classroom as well as proper methods of respectful discourse to discuss results. These
methods will be used throughout the Unit and there will be many opportunities for practice of
academic language, scientific methods and discourse as it relates to conducting experiments
in the class.

The most difficult part of this unit was planning for how long it will take the students to
complete each of the lessons and the handouts/worksheets and if there is time to revisit
concepts and vocabulary that students are not understanding. As well, it is important to
consider working with the Reading and ESL teachers to assist our students in learning the
Tier 3 vocabulary necessary for understanding the Unit.

A. Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT)

To be culturally responsive, a teacher needs to incorporate relatable aspects of students' daily


lives into the curriculum. Throughout this unit students will be learning about the
importance of exchanging ideas and working together in groups.
22

CRT acknowledges the legitimacy of the cultural heritage(s) of culturally different groups,
both as legacies that affect students attitudes and approaches to learning, and as content
worthy to be taught in the formal, mandated curriculum. In this regard, the teacher will
include examples of matter, physical and chemical changes that relate to students cultural
backgrounds to show the importance of matter and property changes in all cultures and
backgrounds.
CRT builds bridges of relevance between home, community, and school experiences; the
learning experience becomes seamless, in this regard, students will be asked to share what
matter are in their homes or communities.

CRT uses a range of instructional strategies that are connected to different learning styles,
preferences, and needs. In this regard, the teacher will use a variety of learning strategies
base on Gardners Multiple Intelligences throughout the unit to enhance the learning of all
students and respect student learning differences.

CRT teaches students to know, respect, and appreciate their own cultural heritage, and the
heritage(s) of others; cultural pride is nurtured. In this regard, the students will be able to
share information about chemical and physical changes, and matter that they are familiar
with based on their authentic and experiential knowledge.

CRT incorporates multicultural information, materials, and resources in all school subjects
and activities which relates to the materials, videos and discussion questions offered
throughout the unit.

Finally, the use of open ended questions for discussion and journaling allows students to
participate in discourse that allows for answers based on experiential knowledge.

B. Accommodations:

Within our class there are ENL Learners and students who are struggling readers. For each
of these needs the teacher will use several accommodation methods in addition to working
with the ESL and Reading teachers. The ideas below are part of a list of strategies from the
Everything ESL website.
http://www.everythingesl.net/inservices/seven_teaching_strategies_clas_06140.php .

1. Provide comprehensible input for ELLs. Language is not soaked up. The learner must
understand the message that is conveyed (Krashen, 1981). As ENL Learners acquire
language by hearing and understanding messages that are slightly above their current English
language level. It is necessary for teachers to speak more slowly, use gestures and body
language to get across the meaning to ENLs during lecture.

2. The teacher will use visual representations of new vocabulary and use graphs, maps,
photographs, drawings and charts to introduce new vocabulary and concepts. Tell a story
23

about information in the textbook using visuals. Create semantic and story maps, graphic
organizers to teach students how to organize information.

3. It is important to use scaffolding of information to link new information to prior


knowledge from students personal, cultural, and world experiences. Teachers also need to
understand the culture from which their students are coming to understand cultural norms.

4.Determine key concepts for the unit and define language and content objects for each
lesson and assure that those words are posted for students in the room. Make sure that
students understand the objectives for the day and assess if those objectives have been met at
the end of each day. Classroom teachers also need to set language objectives for the ELLs in
their class. This objective might be to learn new vocabulary or be able to communicate
through journaling or discussion.

5. Modify vocabulary instruction for ELLs. English language learners require direct
instruction of new vocabulary. Teachers should also provide practice in pronouncing new
words. ELLs need much more exposure to new terms, words, idioms, and phrases than do
English fluent peers. Teachers need to tie new vocabulary to prior learning and use visual to
reinforce meaning. Content area teachers should teach new vocabulary words that occur in
the text as well as those related to the subject matter. Word wall should be used at all grade
levels.

6. Use cooperative learning strategies. Working in small groups is especially beneficial to


ELLs who have an authentic reason to use academic vocabulary and real reasons to discuss
key concepts. ELLs benefit from cooperative learning structures. Give students a job in a
group. Monitor that they are participating.

7. Differentiate homework and assessments for ENLs. Alternative types of assessment:


oral, drawings, physical response (e.g., act-it-out), and manipulatives as well as modification
to the test. Homework and assessment should be directly linked to classroom instruction and
students should be provided with study guides so that they know what to study. Remember
that the ELLs in your class may not be able to take notes.

Note that these methods may also be used for Struggling Readers in addition to specific IEP
instructions.

C. Prerequisites

Students should be able to follow step by step instructions.


Students should be able to follow direction.
Students should be able to use their experiential knowledge to talk about physical and
chemical changes in their communities.
Students should be able to work in small groups and independently.

D. Anticipated Misconceptions

Students may not know or be aware of what physical or chemical changes are.
24

The teacher will define physical changes as something that can be reversed and
chemical changes as something that cannot be reversed.

Students may not know how to use the Scientific Method.


The teacher will present, model and discuss the Scientific Method for students so they
can understand how to Problem Solve.

Students may not know what a hypothesis is.


The teacher will clarify that a hypothesis is an educated guess and will then show the
students how to come up with a hypothesis on their own.

E. ACADEMIC LANGUAGE (content vocabulary, language function, discourse,


syntax)

For this unit the teacher will use both Content Vocabulary and Discourse as academic
language requirements. Each of these areas is vital to assist students in understanding the
language of science and how to correctly use this content-specific terminology. When
teachers empower students with command over content specific language, and students
are aware of the correct use of that language, they become subject matter experts who are
both motivated to use this language and maintain an internal locus of control over that
information. They become empowered individuals willing to take academic chances in a
safe and secure environment.

Content Vocabulary
1. Mass How much something weighs.
2. Volume Amount of space an object takes up.
3. Properties A character or quality that something has.
4. Matter Everything that has mass and occupies space.
5. Solid- Matter that is composed of atoms packed tightly together. (you cant walk through
a solid wall.)
6. Liquid- There is no space between the atoms; the atoms are always moving slightly.
(liquids do not hold their shape at room temperature.)
7. Gas do not hold their shape at room temperature and their atoms are always moving.
There is so miuch space between the atoms that you can walk through them. (when you
walk from one side of the room to the other, you have walked through a gas.)
8. Change of State matter can move from one state to another, but can still be the same
substance. Matter can also move from one state to another and become a new substance.
9. Physical/Reversible Changes- A type of change in which the form of matter is altered
but one substance is not transformed into another. (e.g. water to ice; ice back to water).
10. Chemical/Irreversible Changes- A type of change that occurs when a new substance is
formed through a chemical reaction. (Wood burning; wont become wood again).
11. Question What do you want to learn?
12. Research Find out as much as you can. Look for more information in books, on the
internet and talking with others.
13. Hypothesis An educated guess. Try to predict the answer to the problem.
14. Experiment design a test or procedure to find out if your hypothesis is correct.
25

15. Analysis- record the data record what happened during the experiment.
Conclusion- Review the data and check to see if your hypothesis was correct. Compare
your conclusion to others.

Discourse
Students will actively participate in group, class wide and one-on-one
conversations/discussions regarding the Unit topics.
Students will be writing notes down in their scientific journals. The teacher will
formatively assess the students scientific journals at the end of each class.
26

I. LESSON DATA: Lesson #1

A. Candidates First & Last Name: Casey Bouillere-Howard


B. Subject/Content Area: Science
C. Grade Level (PK-12): Grade 5 (Ontario); 4th (NYS)
D. Unit Topic: Understanding Matter and Energy
E. Lesson Topic Introduction to Matter and Vocabulary
F. Duration of Lesson: 40 minutes
G. Materials:
Smartboard
White Board
Whats Matter? Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ELchwUIlWa8
Changing Water States of Matter video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tuE1LePDZ4Y
Handouts
Dry erase markers
Science Journals

II. INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS:

A. Standards:

1. New York State K-4 Elementary Science Standards


Standard: The Physical Environment
Key Idea: 3. Matter is made up of particles whose properties determine the observable
characteristics of matter and its reactivity.

3.2. Describe chemical and physical changes, including changes in states of matter.
a. Matter exists in three states: solid, liquid, gas.
solids have a definite shape and volume
liquids do not have a definite shape but have a definite volume
gases do not hold their shape or volume

2. New York State P-12 Common Core ELA Standards


Standard Strand: S4.4
Grade: 4
Standard Strand: Speaking and Listening Standards K-5
Topic Strand: Presentation and Knowledge of Ideas
Item Number and Statement:
4.4 Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized
manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or
themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

3. Ontario Elementary Science and Technology Standards


Overall Expectations
27

demonstrate an understanding of the properties of matter, changes of state, and


physical and chemical change.

Specific Expectations
Identify properties of solids, liquids, and gases (e.g., solids have definite
volume and hold their shape; liquids have definite volume but take the shape of
their container or spread when they are not contained; gases have no definite
volume and take the volume and shape of their container or spread when they are
not contained), and state examples of each.

4. Ontario Elementary Language Standards


Overall Expectations
Listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety of
situations for a variety of purposes.

Specific Expectations
Demonstrate an understanding of the information and ideas in a variety of
oral texts by summarizing important ideas and citing important details (e.g.,
present an oral report to the class after listening to a guest speaker; use a graphic
organizer to map the important ideas in a text; represent the important ideas of an
oral text through visual art, music, or drama).

B. Central Focus:
The students will use problem solving, reasoning skills and critical thinking to describe,
categorize, compare, and measure observable physical properties of matter and objects. The
students will gain an informed comprehension of the forms of energy and explain the results of
simple energy transformations from one form to another in their physical environment.

C. Objectives:

1. Students will be able to correctly explain and discuss the difference between the three
states of matter.
2. Students will be able to identify matter as everything that has mass and occupies space.
3. Students will be able to define and discuss the terms mass, volume, properties, matter,
solids, liquids and gases.
4. The students will be able to discuss the relevant facts about the topic.

D. Assessment Plan:

1. The teacher will formatively assess students ability to identify the properties of solids,
liquids and through discussion and a worksheet.
2. The teacher will formatively assess students ability to define the words mass, volume,
properties, matter, solids, liquids and gases through discussion and a short quiz.
3. The teacher will formatively assess the students understanding that matter is everything
that has mass and occupies space through discussion.
28

4. The teacher will formatively assess students ability to discuss relevant facts about matter
through whole class discussion.

E. Opening/Anticipatory Set:

1. Good morning boys and girls. I will be showing you a couple of short videos that will
explain the topic of matter to you.
2. After entering the classroom, the teacher will show a couple short videos on matter.
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ELchwUIlWa8)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tuE1LePDZ4Y
3. After watching the video, the teacher will have the students write down vocabulary that
they learned in the video in their Science Journals. This will allow them to engage in
written discourse.
4. Students who are ESL will have collected a handout that provides the words, definitions
and pictures of examples for each of the vocabulary words (mass, volume, properties,
matter, Three states of matter: solids, liquids, and gases) (Appendix A & B). ESL students
and struggling readers will have practiced these words in their Academic Intervention
Services (AIS) reading class.
5. Once all the vocabulary words are written in the journals, the teacher will begin a
discussion of these new terms.

F. Main Body/Procedure:

16. The teacher goes over the vocabulary with the students.
17. Mass How much something weighs. (Ex: Casey weighs 210lbs)
18. Volume Amount of space an object takes up. (Ex: This water bottle holds 500ml of
water)
19. Properties A character or quality that something has. (Ex: The desk is brown)
20. Matter Everything that has mass and occupies space. (Ex: this marker is matter)
21. Solid- Matter that is composed of atoms packed tightly together. (you cant walk through
a solid wall.) (Ex: ice)
22. Liquid- There is no space between the atoms; the atoms are always moving slightly.
(liquids do not hold their shape at room temperature.) (Ex: water)
23. Gas do not hold their shape at room temperature and their atoms are always moving.
There is so much space between the atoms that you can walk through them. (when you
walk from one side of the room to the other, you have walked through a gas.) (Ex:
Oxygen/breathing)
24. The teacher will then pass around a handout for students to complete about the properties
of matter. (Appendix A & B)
25. The teacher will explain the worksheet, model and answer questions to help the students
comprehend how to fill it out.
26. Students who are ESL will have collected a handout that provides the words, definitions
and pictures of examples for each of the vocabulary words (mass, volume, properties,
matter, Three states of matter: solids, liquids, and gases). ESL students and struggling
readers will have practiced these words in their Academic Intervention Services (AIS)
reading class.
29

27. Once the teacher has discussed the vocabulary and the students have copied the
definitions down in their Science Journals, the teacher will check for understanding
through discussion and review of the handout with the students.
28. For CRT the teacher will ask the students open ended questions about examples from the
students daily lives of each of the vocabulary words.
29. At the end of the discussion the teacher will talk about the concepts coming up
throughout the rest of the unit. (solids, liquids and gases, chemical and physical changes).

G. Closing:

1. The teacher will review the main vocabulary definitions covered in class Okay friends,
we are now going to go over the new words and definitions that we learned today.
2. The teacher discusses with the students what their definitions of mass, volume,
properties, matter, Three states of matter: solids, liquids, and gases.
3. The readings assigned for homework will reinforce the understanding of the key terms
and definitions discussed in class.
4. The teacher will explain the readings they have to do for the evening.
5. Tomorrow we will discuss the terms we learned today and we are also going to learn
about physical and chemical changes. The readings for tonight should help you get a head
start on what we will go over tomorrow.

III. Reflection

1. Culturally Responsive Teaching:

In our class there are a variety of learning styles, needs, low socio-economic and diverse
cultures. The teacher will include examples of different ways physical and chemical
changes can occur in certain areas of the world. The examples will also be such that our
students from a low socio-economic community will find realistic and interesting.

This lesson focuses on the concepts of mass, volume, properties, matter, Three states of
matte: solids, liquids, gases which can be seen in everyday life.

Modeling for students these terms and processes of what mass, volume, properties, matter,
Three states of mater: solids, liquids, and gases are will help all students understand why
learning about matter and energy are important.

Defining and discussing the vocabulary will assist all of our students understanding. The
teacher will offer visuals, practice and graphics/pictures of the process to assist all students
in being able to discuss and define.

2. Accommodations:

This lesson uses variety of delivery methods to accommodate different learning styles. The
lesson includes oral instructions, teacher modeling, hands-on activities, discussions, and
visual aids and picture diagrams.
30

Prior to this lesson, the AIS teacher will be provided with the list of the Tier 3 vocabulary, so
he/she can help the ELL and IEP students to familiarize themselves with the terms.
ELLs and IEP students will benefit from the vocabulary sheet with examples of each
vocabulary word and also descriptions along with the word definition.
For students who complete problems faster, the teacher had them write down other examples
of what we discussed in class.
In addition, the teacher will ensure that every single student understands the instructions of
each activity and will allow sufficient time to complete the problems on the smartboard slides
and the worksheets handed out.
3. Prerequisites:
In order to be successful in this lesson:
- Students should be able to understand a bit about physical properties.
- Students should understand a little about volume and mass.

4. Anticipated Misconceptions:
Students may confuse the term properties so the instructor will provide ample amounts of
examples and practice work sheets.
Students may confuse the difference between mass and volume. The teacher will provide
additional examples.
5. Academic Language:
Academic language used within the lesson was Tier 3 (scientific vocabulary).
The key words used were: mass, volume, properties, matter, Three states of matter: solids,
liquids, and gases.
Students received a vocabulary list containing both the written definition and a corresponding
example for each term.
Students who are ELL have received a list with both pictures and written definitions for each
corresponding terms.
Verbal discourse/ discussions as a whole class were used throughout the lesson in order to
share and evaluate what each term represented and how to appropriately differentiate
between each term.
31

I. LESSON DATA: Lesson #2

H. Candidates First & Last Name: Casey Bouillere-Howard


I. Subject/Content Area: Science
J. Grade Level (PK-12): Grade 5 (Ontario); 4th (NYS)
K. Unit Topic: Understanding Matter and Energy
L. Lesson Topic Vocabulary continued and Introduction to (Physical
and chemical changes)
M. Duration of Lesson: 40 minutes
N. Materials:
Smartboard
White Board
Handouts
Chemical Change Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=37pir0ej_SE
Dry erase markers
Science Journals

II. INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS:

A. Standards:

5. New York State K-4 Elementary Science Standards


Standard: The Physical Environment
Key Idea: 3. Matter is made up of particles whose properties determine the observable
characteristics of matter and its reactivity.

3.2. Describe chemical and physical changes, including changes in states of matter.
c. Changes in the properties or materials of objects can be observed and described.

6. New York State P-12 Common Core ELA Standards


Standard Strand: S4.4
Grade: 4
Standard Strand: Speaking and Listening Standards K-5
Topic Strand: Presentation and Knowledge of Ideas
Item Number and Statement:
4.4 Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized
manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or
themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

7. Ontario Elementary Science and Technology Standards


Overall Expectations
Demonstrate an understanding of the properties of matter, changes of
state, and physical and chemical change.

Specific Expectations
32

Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including mass,


volume, properties, matter, physical/reversible changes, and chemical/irreversible
changes, in oral and written communication.

8. Ontario Elementary Language Standards


Overall Expectations
Listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety of
situations for a variety of purposes.

Specific Expectations
Demonstrate an understanding of the information and ideas in a variety of
oral texts by summarizing important ideas and citing important details (e.g.,
present an oral report to the class after listening to a guest speaker; use a graphic
organizer to map the important ideas in a text; represent the important ideas of an
oral text through visual art, music, or drama).

B. Central Focus:
The students will use problem solving, reasoning skills and critical thinking to describe,
categorize, compare, and measure observable physical properties of matter and objects. The
students will gain an informed comprehension of the forms of energy and explain the results of
simple energy transformations from one form to another in their physical environment.

C. Objectives:

5. Students will be able to correctly explain and discuss the difference between physical and
chemical changes.
6. Students will be able to identify matter as everything that has mass and occupies space.
7. Students will be able to define and discuss the terms matter, change of state,
physical/reversible changes, and chemical/irreversible changes.
8. The students will be able to discuss the relevant facts about the topic.

D. Assessment Plan:

5. The teacher will formatively assess students ability to describe the difference between
physical and chemical changes through discussion and a worksheet.
6. The teacher will formatively assess students ability to define the terms matter, change of
state, psychical/reversible changes, and chemical/irreversible changes through discussion
and a short quiz.
7. The teacher will formatively assess the students understanding that matter is everything
that has mass and occupies space through discussion.
8. The teacher will formatively assess students ability to discuss relevant facts about matter
through whole class discussion.

E. Opening/Anticipatory Set:
33

6. After entering the classroom, the teacher will review the terms copied down in the
science journal from the previous lesson and will discuss the readings assigned the night
before.
7. After discussion the teacher will put on a short video about chemical changes.
8. After the video, the teacher will have the students write down vocabulary and definitions
(change of state, psychical/reversible changes, and chemical/irreversible changes) in their
Science Journals. This will allow them to engage in both oral and written conversation.
9. Students who are ESL will have collected a handout that provides the words, definitions
and pictures of examples for each of the vocabulary words (change of state,
psychical/reversible changes, and chemical/irreversible changes) (Appendix C & D). ESL
students and struggling readers will have practiced these words in their Academic
Intervention Services (AIS) reading class.
10. Once all the definitions are written in the journals, the teacher will begin a discussion of
these new terms.

F. Main Body/Procedure:

30. The teacher goes over the vocabulary with the students.
31. Change of State matter can move from one state to another, but can still be the same
substance. Matter can also move from one state to another and become a new substance.
(Ex: When ice melts it becomes water. It changed from a solid state to a liquid state.).
32. Physical/Reversible Changes- A type of change in which the form of matter is altered
but one substance is not transformed into another. (e.g. water to ice; ice back to water. Ice
and water can be melted and frozen over and over and never change its properties. This
means that it is a reversible change).
33. Chemical/Irreversible Changes- A type of change that occurs when a new substance is
formed through a chemical reaction. (Wood burning; when wood is burnt, the ashes from
the wood cannot become that same piece of wood again. This means that it is irreversible
therefore a chemical change).
34. The teacher will then pass around Two (2) handouts for the students to complete. One
handout for Chemical Changes and another handout for Physical Changes. (Appendix C
& Appendix D).
35. The teacher will provide examples and model the handouts for the students so they can
better comprehend how to fill it out.
36. Students who are ESL will have collected a handout that provides the words, definitions
and pictures of examples for each of the vocabulary words (psychical/reversible changes,
and chemical/irreversible changes). ESL students and struggling readers will have
practiced these words in their Academic Intervention Services (AIS) reading class.
37. Once the teacher has discussed the vocabulary and the students have copied the
definitions down in their Science Journals, the teacher will check for understanding
through discussion about physical/reversible changes.
38. In our class there are a variety of learning styles, needs, low socio-economic and diverse
cultures. The teacher will include examples of different ways physical and chemical
changes can occur in certain areas of the world. The examples will also be such that our
34

students from a low socio-economic community will find realistic and interesting. (Ex: A
rusting car (chemical change) and boiling water (physical change).
39. Once the students have completed the handouts, the teacher will review the answers with
the students to check for understanding and assure completion.

G. Closing:

6. The teacher will review the main vocabulary definitions covered in class Okay friends,
we are now going to go over the new words and definitions that we learned today.
7. The teacher discusses with the students what their definitions of change of state,
psychical/reversible changes, and chemical/irreversible changes.
8. The readings assigned for homework will reinforce the understanding of the key terms
and definitions discussed in class.
9. The teacher will explain the readings they have to do for the evening.
10. Tomorrow we will be learning about the scientific method and I will be explaining the
experiment we will be conducting in small groups.

III. Reflection

6. Culturally Responsive Teaching:

In our class there are a variety of learning styles, needs, low socio-economic and diverse
cultures. The teacher will include examples of different ways physical and chemical
changes can occur in certain areas of the world. The examples will also be such that our
students from a low socio-economic community will find realistic and interesting.

This lesson focuses on the concepts of change of state, psychical/reversible changes, and
chemical/irreversible changes which can be seen in everyday life.

Modeling for students these terms and processes of what change of state,
psychical/reversible changes, and chemical/irreversible changes are will help all students
understand why learning about matter and energy are important.

Defining and discussing the vocabulary will assist all of our students understanding. The
teacher will offer visuals, practice and graphics/pictures of the process to assist all students
in being able to discuss and define.

7. Accommodations:

This lesson uses variety of delivery methods to accommodate different learning styles. The
lesson includes oral instructions, teacher modeling, hands-on activities, discussions, and
visual aids and picture diagrams.
Prior to this lesson, the AIS teacher will be provided with the list of the Tier 3 vocabulary, so
he/she can help the ELL and IEP students to familiarize themselves with the terms.
35

ELLs and IEP students will benefit from the vocabulary sheet with examples of each
vocabulary word and also descriptions along with the word definition.
For students who complete problems faster, the teacher had them write down other examples
of we discussed in class.
In addition, the teacher will ensure that every single student understands the instructions of
each activity and will allow sufficient time to complete the problems on the smartboard slides
and the worksheets handed out.
8. Prerequisites:
In order to be successful in this lesson:
- Students should have been exposed to information about physical properties.
- Students should define and describe the three states of matter: solids, liquids and gases.

9. Anticipated Misconceptions:
Students may confuse the term physical/reversible change and chemical/irreversible change
so the instructor will provide ample amounts of examples and practice work sheets.

10. Academic Language:


Academic language used within the lesson was Tier 3 (scientific vocabulary).
The key words used were: matter, change of state, psychical/reversible changes, and
chemical/irreversible changes.
Students received a vocabulary list containing both the written definition and a corresponding
example for each term.
Students who are ELL have received a list with both pictures and written definitions for each
corresponding term.
Verbal discourse/ discussions as a whole class were used throughout the lesson in order to
share and evaluate what each term represented and how to appropriately differentiate
between each term.
36

I. LESSON DATA: Lesson #3

O. Candidates First & Last Name: Casey Bouillere-Howard


P. Subject/Content Area: Science
Q. Grade Level (PK-12): Grade 5 (Ontario); 4th (NYS)
R. Unit Topic: Understanding Matter and Energy
S. Lesson Topic Introduction to Experimentation and the Scientific
Method/Science Journaling/Solids, Liquids, and
Gases in Balloons
T. Duration of Lesson: 40 minutes
U. Materials:
Smartboard
White Board
Dry erase markers
BrainPop Video https://www.brainpop.com/science/scientificinquiry/scientificmethod/
Science Journals

II. INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS:

A. Standards:

9. New York State K-4 Elementary Science Standards


Standard: The Physical Environment
Key Idea: 3. Matter is made up of particles whose properties determine the observable
characteristics of matter and its reactivity.

3.2. Describe chemical and physical changes, including changes in states of matter.
b. Temperature can affect the state of matter of a substance.
c. Changes in the properties of materials of objects can be observed and described.

10. New York State P-12 Common Core ELA Standards


Standard Strand: S4.4
Grade: 4
Standard Strand: Speaking and Listening Standards K-5
Topic Strand: Presentation and Knowledge of Ideas
Item Number and Statement:
4.4 Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized
manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or
themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

11. Ontario Elementary Science and Technology Standards


Overall Expectations
Demonstrate an understanding of the properties of matter, changes of
state, and physical and chemical changes.
Specific Expectations
37

Identify indicators of a chemical change (e.g., production of a gas, change


in colour, formation of precipitate
Distinguish between a physical change and a chemical change (e.g., a
physical change can be reversed [ice to water to ice], whereas a chemical change
creates new substance[s] [wood to smoke and ash])

12. Ontario Elementary Language Standards


Overall Expectations
Listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety of
situations for a variety of purposes.

Specific Expectations
Demonstrate an understanding of the information and ideas in a variety of
oral texts by summarizing important ideas and citing important details (e.g.,
present an oral report to the class after listening to a guest speaker; use a graphic
organizer to map the important ideas in a text; represent the important ideas of an
oral text through visual art, music, or drama).

B. Central Focus:
The students will use problem solving, reasoning skills and critical thinking to describe,
categorize, compare, and measure observable physical properties of matter and objects. The
students will gain an informed comprehension of the forms of energy and explain the results of
simple energy transformations from one form to another in their physical environment.

C. Objectives:

9. Students will be able to correctly explain and discuss the difference between physical and
chemical changes.
10. Students will be able to identify matter as everything that has mass and occupies space.
11. Students will be able to define and discuss the scientific method.
12. The students will be able to discuss the relevant facts about the topic.

D. Assessment Plan:

9. The teacher will formatively assess students ability to identify the steps of the scientific
method through discussion.
10. The teacher will formatively assess students ability to define the words hypothesis,
physical and chemical change through discussion and a short quiz.
11. The teacher will formatively assess the students understanding that matter is everything
that has mass and occupies space through discussion.
12. The teacher will formatively assess students ability to discuss relevant facts about matter
through whole class discussion.
38

E. Opening/Anticipatory Set:

11. After entering the classroom, the teacher will show a short BrainPop video about the
Scientific method.
12. After watching the video, the teacher will have the students write down vocabulary and
the steps for the scientific method (question, research, hypothesis, experiment, analysis,
conclusion) in their Science Journals. This will allow them to engage in both oral and
written conversation.
13. Students who are ESL will have collected a handout that provides the words, definitions
and pictures of examples for each of the vocabulary words method (question, research,
hypothesis, experiment, analysis, conclusion) (Appendix E). ESL students and struggling
readers will have practiced these words in their Academic Intervention Services (AIS)
reading class.
14. Once all the definitions are written in the journals, the teacher will begin a discussion of
these new terms.

F. Main Body/Procedure:

40. The teacher goes over the vocabulary with the students.
41. Question What do you want to learn? (Why does ice float?)
42. Research Find out as much as you can. Look for more information in books, on the
internet and talking with others.
43. Hypothesis An educated guess. Try to predict the answer to the problem.
44. Experiment design a test or procedure to find out if your hypothesis is correct.
45. Analysis- record the data record what happened during the experiment.
46. Conclusion- Review the data and check to see if your hypothesis was correct. Compare
your conclusion to others.
47. Students who are ESL will have collected a handout that provides the words, definitions
and pictures of examples for each of the vocabulary words method (question, research,
hypothesis, experiment, analysis, conclusion) (Appendix D). ESL students and struggling
readers will have practiced these words in their Academic Intervention Services (AIS)
reading class.
48. Once the teacher has discussed the vocabulary and the students have copied the
definitions down in their Science Journals, the teacher will check for understanding
through discussion.
49. After reviewing and checking the students understanding of the scientific method, the
teacher will introduce the Balloon Experiment the students will be conducting in the next
lesson by giving the students a brief overview of the experiment (Appendix F).
50. The teacher will then go over safety in the classroom during the experiment.
a. Keep pathways clear by placing books away in desks and on shelves.
b. Have long hair tied back.
c. Do not place any items in your mouth during the experiment
d. No food or drinks while the experiment is in progress. (if you need a drink you
may step outside the classroom)
e. Clean up after the experiment.
f. No running in the classroom.
39

g. Follow all instructions given by the teacher.


51. The teacher will answer any questions the students may have about the experiment they
will be conducting.
52. The teacher will assign groups.
53. The teacher will assign work areas.
54. The teacher will check for students understanding of the vocabulary by having a class
discussion, and making them fill out and hand in an exit slip.
55. In our class there are a variety of learning styles, needs, low socio-economic and diverse
cultures. The teacher will include examples of different ways physical and chemical
changes can occur in certain areas of the world. The examples will also be such that our
students from a low socio-economic community will find realistic and interesting. (Ex:
rusting car and boiling water).

G. Closing:

11. The teacher will review the main vocabulary definitions covered in class Okay friends,
we are now going to go over the new words and definitions that we learned today.
12. The teacher discusses with the students what their understanding of the scientific method
is (question, research, hypothesis, experiment, analysis, conclusion).
13. The readings assigned for homework will reinforce the understanding of the key terms
and definitions discussed in class.
14. The teacher will explain the readings they have to do for the evening.
15. Tomorrow we will discuss the terms we learned today and we are also going to perform
our Balloon Experiment! Whos excited for that!!!

III. Reflection

11. Culturally Responsive Teaching:

In our class there are a variety of learning styles, needs, low socio-economic and diverse
cultures. The teacher will include examples of different ways physical and chemical
changes can occur in certain areas of the world. The examples will also be such that our
students from a low socio-economic community will find realistic and interesting.

This lesson focuses on the concepts the scientific method; question, research, hypothesis,
experiment, analysis, conclusion which can be used in everyday life.

Modeling for students these terms and processes of the scientific method; question,
research, hypothesis, experiment, analysis, conclusion are will help all students understand
why learning about matter and energy are important.

Defining and discussing the vocabulary will assist all of our students understanding. The
teacher will offer visuals, practice and graphics/pictures of the process to assist all students
in being able to discuss and define.
40

12. Accommodations:
This lesson uses variety of delivery methods to accommodate different learning styles. The
lesson includes oral instructions, teacher modeling, hands-on activities, discussions, and
visual aids and picture diagrams.
Prior to this lesson, the AIS teacher will be provided with the list of the Tier 3 vocabulary, so
he/she can help the ELL and IEP students to familiarize themselves with the terms.
ELLs and IEP students will benefit from the vocabulary sheet with examples of each
vocabulary word and also descriptions along with the word definition.

For students who complete problems faster, the teacher had them write down other examples
of we discussed in class.
In addition, the teacher will ensure that every single student understands the instructions of
each activity and will allow sufficient time to complete the problems on the smartboard slides
and the worksheets handed out.

13. Prerequisites:
In order to be successful in this lesson:
- Students should have been exposed to information about physical properties.
- Students should list and define the scientific method.

14. Anticipated Misconceptions:


Students may confuse the steps of the scientific method so the teacher will give out a handout
with the steps in order.
Students may confuse physical and chemical changes. The teacher will provide ample
examples.
15. Academic Language:
Academic language used within the lesson was Tier 3 (scientific vocabulary).
The key words used were: question, research, hypothesis, experiment, analysis, conclusion.
Students received a vocabulary list containing both the written definition and a corresponding
example for each term.
Students who are ELL have received a list with both pictures and written definitions for each
corresponding terms.
Verbal discourse/ discussions as a whole class were used throughout the lesson in order to
share and evaluate what each term represented and how to appropriately differentiate
between each term.
41

I. LESSON DATA: Lesson #4

V. Candidates First & Last Name: Casey Bouillere-Howard


W. Subject/Content Area: Science
X. Grade Level (PK-12): Grade 5 (Ontario); 4th (NYS)
Y. Unit Topic: Understanding Matter and Energy
Z. Lesson Topic Balloon Experiment Conducted/Make Notes
AA. Duration of Lesson: 40 minutes
BB. Materials:
Smartboard
White Board
Dry erase markers
Science Journals
3 balloons/group (1 filled with water and frozen, one filled with water, one with air)
Water
1 deep tub per group
Experiment handout (Appendix E)
II. INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS:

A. Standards:

13. New York State K-4 Elementary Science Standards


Standard: The Physical Environment
Key Idea: 3. Matter is made up of particles whose properties determine the observable
characteristics of matter and its reactivity.

3.1. Observe and describe properties of materials, using appropriate tools.


a. Matter takes up space and has mass. Two objects cannot occupy the same place at the
same time.
f. Objects and/ or materials can be sorted or classified according to their properties.

14. New York State P-12 Common Core ELA Standards


Standard Strand: S4.4
Grade: 4
Standard Strand: Speaking and Listening Standards K-5
Topic Strand: Presentation and Knowledge of Ideas
Item Number and Statement:
4.4 Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized
manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or
themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

15. Ontario Elementary Science and Technology Standards


Overall Expectations
Demonstrate an understanding of the properties of matter, changes of
state, and physical and chemical changes.
Specific Expectations
42

Identify indicators of a chemical change (e.g., production of a gas, change


in colour, formation of precipitate
Distinguish between a physical change and a chemical change (e.g., a
physical change can be reversed [ice to water to ice], whereas a chemical change
creates new substance[s] [wood to smoke and ash])

16. Ontario Elementary Language Standards


Overall Expectations
Listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety of
situations for a variety of purposes.

Specific Expectations
Demonstrate an understanding of the information and ideas in a variety of
oral texts by summarizing important ideas and citing important details (e.g.,
present an oral report to the class after listening to a guest speaker; use a graphic
organizer to map the important ideas in a text; represent the important ideas of an
oral text through visual art, music, or drama).

B. Central Focus:
The students will use problem solving, reasoning skills and critical thinking to describe,
categorize, compare, and measure observable physical properties of matter and objects. The
students will gain an informed comprehension of the forms of energy and explain the results of
simple energy transformations from one form to another in their physical environment.

C. Objectives:

13. Students will be able to correctly chart, explain and discuss the difference between
physical and chemical changes using the Scientific Method.
14. Students will be able to properly use the Scientific Method to conduct the experiment.
15. Students will be able to discuss the experiment by using the Scientific Method.
16. The students will be able to discuss the relevant facts about the topic.

D. Assessment Plan:

13. The teacher will formatively assess students ability to identify the steps of the scientific
method through discussion and review of their scientific journals.
14. The teacher will formatively assess students ability to properly use the Scientific method
through observation.
15. The teacher will formatively assess the students ability to tell the difference physical and
chemical changes in properties by review their science journals.
16. The teacher will formatively assess the students understanding of the Scientific Method
through discussion.
17. The teacher will formatively assess students ability to discuss relevant facts about matter
through whole class discussion.
43

E. Opening/Anticipatory Set:

15. After entering the classroom, the teacher will review the Scientific Method with the
students.
16. After reviewing the Scientific Method, the teacher will then explain the Balloon
experiment and will give a handout with instructions on how to conduct the experiment.
17. The teacher will discuss and go over the steps of the Balloon Experiment with the
students.
18. Once instructions have been given, the teacher will call groups up one by one to come
and collect their materials needed to conduct the experiment.
19. Students who are ESL will have collected a handout that provides the words, definitions
and pictures of examples for each of the vocabulary words and the step by step instructions
for the experiment (Appendix E). ESL students and struggling readers will have practiced
these words in their Academic Intervention Services (AIS) reading class.
20. Once all the materials have been handed out the teacher will allow the class to begin
conducting their experiments.

F. Main Body/Procedure:

56. The teacher will discuss and go over the steps of the Balloon Experiment with the
students.
57. Once instructions have been given, the teacher will call groups up one by one to come
and collect their materials needed to conduct the experiment.
58. The teacher reviews the Scientific Method with the students.
59. Question What do you want to learn?
60. Research Find out as much as you can. Look for more information in books, on the
internet and talking with others.
61. Hypothesis An educated guess. Try to predict the answer to the problem.
62. Experiment design a test or procedure to find out if your hypothesis is correct.
63. Analysis- record the data record what happened during the experiment.
64. Conclusion- Review the data and check to see if your hypothesis was correct. Compare
your conclusion to others.
65. Students who are ESL will have collected a handout that provides the words, definitions
and pictures of examples for each of the vocabulary words and step by step instructions for
the experiment (question, research, hypothesis, experiment, analysis, conclusion)
(Appendix E). ESL students and struggling readers will have practiced these words in their
Academic Intervention Services (AIS) reading class.
66. Once the teacher has reviewed the Scientific Method with the students, the teacher will
check for understanding through discussion.
67. After reviewing and checking the students understanding of the scientific method, the
teacher will hand out instructions for the Experiment.
68. Teacher will go over the Balloon Experiment.
69. The teacher will then go over safety in the classroom during the experiment.
a. Keep pathways clear by placing books away in desks and on shelves.
44

b. Have long hair tied back.


c. Do not place any items in your mouth during the experiment
d. No food or drinks while the experiment is in progress. (if you need a drink you
may step outside the classroom)
e. Clean up after the experiment.
f. No running in the classroom.
g. Follow all instructions given by the teacher.
70. The teacher will answer any questions the students may have about the experiment they
will be conducting.
71. The teacher will call groups up one by one to collect the materials needed for the
experiment.
72. Once all groups have their materials, the teacher will allow them to begin their
experiment.
73. The teacher will check for students understanding of the experiment and Scientific
Method through observation and mini discussion as the teacher goes around the room and
checks in periodically with each group.
74. In our class there are a variety of learning styles, needs, low socio-economic and diverse
cultures. The teacher will include examples of different ways physical and chemical
changes can occur in certain areas of the world. The examples will also be such that our
students from a low socio-economic community will find realistic and interesting. (Ex:
Rusting car and boiling water).

G. Closing:

16. The teacher will go over the experiment with the students, Okay friends, we are now
going to review what we just did for this experiment.
17. The teacher discusses with the students what their understanding of the scientific method
is (question, research, hypothesis, experiment, analysis, conclusion).
18. Tomorrow we will be going over the experiment in full detail and we will share our
conclusions as a class.
19. We will also be doing a short quiz at the end of the lesson.

III. Reflection

16. Culturally Responsive Teaching:

In our class there are a variety of learning styles, needs, low socio-economic and diverse
cultures. The examples will also be such that our students from a low socio-economic
community will find realistic and interesting.

This lesson focuses on the concepts the scientific method; question, research, hypothesis,
experiment, analysis, conclusion which can be used in everyday life.

Modeling for students these terms and processes of the scientific method; question,
research, hypothesis, experiment, analysis, conclusion are will help all students understand
why learning about matter and energy are important.
45

Defining and discussing the vocabulary will assist all of our students understanding. The
teacher will offer visuals, practice and graphics/pictures of the process to assist all students
in being able to discuss and define.

17. Accommodations:

This lesson uses variety of delivery methods to accommodate different learning styles. The
lesson includes oral instructions, teacher modeling, hands-on activities, discussions, and
visual aids and picture diagrams.
Prior to this lesson, the AIS teacher will be provided with the list of the Tier 3 vocabulary, so
he/she can help the ELL and IEP students to familiarize themselves with the terms.
ELLs and IEP students will benefit from the vocabulary sheet with examples of each
vocabulary word and also descriptions along with the word definition.
For students who complete problems faster, the teacher had them write down other examples
of we discussed in class.
In addition, the teacher will ensure that every single student understands the instructions of
each activity and will allow sufficient time to complete the problems on the smartboard slides
and the worksheets handed out.
18. Prerequisites:
In order to be successful in this lesson:
- Students should have been exposed to information about physical properties.
- Students should list and define the scientific method.

19. Anticipated Misconceptions:


Students may confuse the steps of the scientific method so the teacher will give out a handout
with the steps in order.
Students may confuse chemical and physical changes. The teacher will provide examples for
the students.

20. Academic Language:


Academic language used within the lesson was Tier 3 (scientific vocabulary).
The key words used were: question, research, hypothesis, experiment, analysis, conclusion.
Students received a vocabulary list containing both the written definition and a corresponding
example for each term.
Students who are ELL have received a list with both pictures and written definitions for each
corresponding terms.
Verbal discourse/ discussions as a whole class were used throughout the lesson in order to
share and evaluate what each term represented and how to appropriately differentiate
between each term.
46

I. LESSON DATA: Lesson #5

CC. Candidates First & Last Name: Casey Bouillere-Howard


DD. Subject/Content Area: Science
EE. Grade Level (PK-12): Grade 5 (Ontario); 4th (NYS)
FF. Unit Topic: Understanding Matter and Energy
GG. Lesson Topic Discuss Scientific Journal and Results of Balloon
Experiment
HH. Duration of Lesson: 40 minutes
II. Materials:
Smartboard
White Board
Dry erase markers
Science Journals

II. INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS:

A. Standards:

17. New York State K-4 Elementary Science Standards


Standard: The Physical Environment
Key Idea: 3. Matter is made up of particles whose properties determine the observable
characteristics of matter and its reactivity.

3.1. Observe and describe properties of materials, using appropriate tools.


a. Matter takes up space and has mass. Two objects cannot occupy the same place at the
same time.
f. Objects and/ or materials can be sorted or classified according to their properties.

18. New York State P-12 Common Core ELA Standards


Standard Strand: S4.4
Grade: 4
Standard Strand: Speaking and Listening Standards K-5
Topic Strand: Presentation and Knowledge of Ideas
Item Number and Statement:
4.4 Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized
manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or
themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.

19. Ontario Elementary Science and Technology Standards


Overall Expectations
Demonstrate an understanding of the properties of matter, changes of
state, and physical and chemical changes.
Specific Expectations
Identify indicators of a chemical change (e.g., production of a gas, change
in colour, formation of precipitate
47

Distinguish between a physical change and a chemical change (e.g., a


physical change can be reversed [ice to water to ice], whereas a chemical change creates
new substance[s] [wood to smoke and ash])

20. Ontario Elementary Language Standards


Overall Expectations
Listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety of
situations for a variety of purposes.

Specific Expectations
Demonstrate an understanding of the information and ideas in a variety of
oral texts by summarizing important ideas and citing important details (e.g.,
present an oral report to the class after listening to a guest speaker; use a graphic
organizer to map the important ideas in a text; represent the important ideas of an
oral text through visual art, music, or drama).

B. Central Focus:
The students will use problem solving, reasoning skills and critical thinking to describe,
categorize, compare, and measure observable physical properties of matter and objects. The
students will gain an informed comprehension of the forms of energy and explain the results of
simple energy transformations from one form to another in their physical environment.

C. Objectives:

17. Students will be able to explain and discuss the experiment using the Scientific Method.
18. Students will be able to properly explain and use the Scientific Method.
19. Students will be able to discuss the experiment by using the Scientific Method.

D. Assessment Plan:

18. The teacher will formatively assess students ability to identify and explain the
experiment by using the steps of the scientific method through discussion and review of
their scientific journals.
19. The teacher will formatively assess students ability to properly use the Scientific method
through observation.
20. The teacher will formatively assess the students ability to use and discuss the Scientific
Method through discussion and a short quiz.
21. The teacher will formatively assess students ability to discuss relevant facts about matter
through whole class discussion.

E. Opening/Anticipatory Set:

21. After entering the classroom, the teacher will discuss the Balloon Experiment from the
previous lesson.
22. After discussing the Balloon Experiment, the teacher will call on the students to explain
the experiment back to her using the scientific method.
48

23. Students who are ESL will have collected a handout that provides the words, definitions
and pictures of examples for each of the vocabulary words and all of the previous handouts
(Appendix C, D & E). ESL students and struggling readers will have practiced these words
in their Academic Intervention Services (AIS) reading class.
24. Once the review has been completed the teacher will ask for students to share their
conclusion of the experiment with the class.

F. Main Body/Procedure:

75. The teacher reviews the Scientific Method and the results of the experiment with the
students.
76. The teacher will discuss and ask the students to discuss physical and chemical changes.
77. Question What do you want to learn?
78. Research Find out as much as you can. Look for more information in books, on the
internet and talking with others.
79. Hypothesis An educated guess. Try to predict the answer to the problem.
80. Experiment design a test or procedure to find out if your hypothesis is correct.
81. Analysis- record the data record what happened during the experiment.
82. Conclusion- Review the data and check to see if your hypothesis was correct. Compare
your conclusion to others.
83. Students who are ESL will have collected a handout that provides the words, definitions
and pictures of examples for each of the vocabulary words and all previous handouts
(question, research, hypothesis, experiment, analysis, conclusion) (Appendix C, D & E).
ESL students and struggling readers will have practiced these words in their Academic
Intervention Services (AIS) reading class.
84. Once the teacher has reviewed the Scientific Method with the students, the teacher will
check for understanding through discussion reciprocation of the steps used for the
experiment.
85. After reviewing and checking the students understanding of the scientific method and
the results of the experiment the teacher will call upon students to share their conclusions
with the class.
86. The teacher will ask the students to share their conclusions and discuss how they came to
their conclusions and how they applied the Scientific Method to come to their
conclusions.
87. Teacher will review the scientific method again.
88. The teacher will answer any questions the students may have about the Scientific
Method.
89. The teacher will check for students understanding the vocabulary used during the unit
and the Scientific Method through a 15-question test (10 multiple choice and 5 short
answer).

G. Closing:

20. The teacher will review the unit with the students, Okay friends, we have just finished
our unit on Matter and Energy...
49

21. The teacher discusses with the students what their understanding of the scientific method
is (question, research, hypothesis, experiment, analysis, conclusion).

III. Reflection

21. Culturally Responsive Teaching:

In our class there are a variety of learning styles, needs, low socio-economic and diverse
cultures. The teacher will include examples of different ways physical and chemical
changes can occur in certain areas of the world. The examples will also be such that our
students from a low socio-economic community will find realistic and interesting.

This lesson focuses on the concepts the scientific method; question, research, hypothesis,
experiment, analysis, conclusion which can be used in everyday life.

Modeling for students these terms and processes of the scientific method; question,
research, hypothesis, experiment, analysis, conclusion are will help all students understand
why learning about matter and energy are important.

Defining and discussing the vocabulary will assist all of our students understanding. The
teacher will offer visuals, practice and graphics/pictures of the process to assist all students
in being able to discuss and define.

22. Accommodations:

This lesson uses variety of delivery methods to accommodate different learning styles. The
lesson includes oral instructions, teacher modeling, hands-on activities, discussions, and
visual aids and picture diagrams.
Prior to this lesson, the AIS teacher will be provided with the list of the Tier 3 vocabulary, so
he/she can help the ELL and IEP students to familiarize themselves with the terms.
ELLs and IEP students will benefit from the vocabulary sheet with examples of each
vocabulary word and also descriptions along with the word definition.
For students who complete problems faster, the teacher had them write down other examples
of we discussed in class.

In addition, the teacher will ensure that every single student understands the instructions of
each activity and will allow sufficient time to complete the problems on the smartboard slides
and the worksheets handed out.
23. Prerequisites:
In order to be successful in this lesson:

- Students should have been exposed to information about physical properties.


- Students should list and discuss the scientific method.
50

24. Anticipated Misconceptions:


Students may confuse the steps of the scientific method so the teacher will give out a handout
with the steps in order.

Students may confuse chemical and physical changes. The teacher will provide examples.
25. Academic Language:
Academic language used within the lesson was Tier 3 (scientific vocabulary).
The key words used were: question, research, hypothesis, experiment, analysis, conclusion.
Students received a vocabulary list containing both the written definition and a corresponding
example for each term.
Students who are ELL have received a list with both pictures and written definitions for each
corresponding terms.
Verbal discourse/ discussions as a whole class were used throughout the lesson in order to
share and evaluate what each term represented and how to appropriately differentiate
between each term.
51

References

Image, Four States of Matter (Cover Page),


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_of_matter#/media/File:Four_Fundamental_States_of_
Matter.png (retrieved, July 22, 2016).

Properties of Matter Handout.


http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/Graduate/TI/pages/LEWIS/worksheet.htm Retrieved July 23,
2016.

Solids, Liquids, and Gases Balloon Experiment.


http://www.superteacherideas.com/science18-morematter.html Retrieved July 23, 2016.

Steps of the Scientific Method. http://images.slideplayer.com/1/273350/slides/slide_3.jpg


Retrieved July 23, 2016.

Why Does Matter Matter? Worksheet.


https://www.superteacherworksheets.com/matter/matter-
article_WMTBN.pdf?up=1466611200 Retrieved July 23, 2016.
52

Appendix A
Name____________________ Date_____________________

Properties of Matter
1. Define matter.

______________________________________________________________

2. What are the three states of matter?

______________________________________________________________

3. Which state has a shape of its own.

______________________________________________________________

4. Explain what happens to a gas when it is put into a container.

______________________________________________________________

5. Does a liquid take up a different amount of space when put into a


different container?

______________________________________________________________

6. Name three other solids.

______________________________________________________________

7. Name three other liquids.

______________________________________________________________

8. Name one other gas.

______________________________________________________________

http://www2.mcdaniel.edu/Graduate/TI/pages/LEWIS/worksheet.htm

41
53
Appendix B
Name:

Why Does Matter Matter?


by Kelly Hashway

What do trees, air, and water have in common? They all have matter. That means they take up

space. You might be wondering why these things look so different if they all have matter. Everything

found on Earth can be grouped into one of three states of matter: solid, liquid, or gas. In order to figure

out which state of matter an object fits in, we have to examine its properties. The properties we look at

are shape, mass, and volume. Mass is the amount of matter an object has, and volume is the amount of

space the matter takes up.

Solids are easy to recognize. They have definite shape, mass, and

volume. Trees are solids. They are made up of tiny particles called atoms.

These atoms are packed closely together, and they hold the solid in a

definite shape that does not change. If you look around your house, you

will see lots of solids. Televisions, beds, tables, chairs, and even the food

you eat.

Liquids do not have definite shape, but they do have definite mass

and volume. Liquids are similar to solids because their atoms are close

together, but what makes a liquid different is that those atoms can move

around. Liquids can change shape by flowing. If youve ever spilled a glass

of milk, then you know it spreads out across the floor. It does this because

the milk is taking the shape of the floor. Since liquids do not have a definite

shape of their own, they will take the shape of their containers. This is why
54
the same amount of milk can look different in a tall glass, a wide mug, or

spread out on your kitchen floor.


Gases do not have definite shape or volume. Like liquids, gasses

will take the shape of their containers. If a gas is not in a container, it will

spread out indefinitely. This is because the atoms in a gas are spaced

farther apart than in a solid or a liquid. And being spread out like this

allows them to move around freely. Think about the air you breathe

everyday. That air is spread across the empty space around the earth.

Youve probably also noticed that you usually cannot see the air. This is

another property of gases. Even though we cannot see them, you

come in contact with them everyday. Theres air in the tires of your

family car and your bicycle. There are many different types of gas in the

earth's atmosphere, such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, water

vapor, and helium.

When trying to remember the three states of matter, think

about water. If it freezes into a solid, it becomes ice. Its atoms are

packed together keeping its shape. Of course, we know water can


You can see three different
also be a liquid. It flows in rivers or it can be poured from a glass. states of matter in this
When water evaporates it becomes water vapor, a type of gas in picture. The pot is made of
solid matter. The water
the air. Try a little experiment of your own by placing an ice cube in
inside the pot is liquid.
a covered glass or container. You will be able to observe the ice first When the liquid is heatedit

in its solid form and then watch as it melts into a liquid to become becomes water vapor, which is a
gas.
water. Eventually the water will turn to water vapor and your glass or

container will be filled with this gas. Matter is everywhere! Can you
find a solid, a liquid, and a gas
around you right now?

Super Teacher Worksheets - www.superteacherworksheets.com


Name:

Why Does Matter Matter?


by Kelly Hashway

solids volume container matter ice juice

gases mass atoms chair oxygen melting

liquids shape space milk helium

Choose a word from the box to complete each sentence.

1. The three basic properties of matter are ,

, and .

2. All matter is made up of tiny particles called .

3. Volume is the amount of that matter takes up.

4. Mass is the amount of an object has.

5. Liquids take the shape of their .

6. do not have a definite shape or volume.

7. do not have a definite shape, but they do have a definite volume.

8. have a definite shape and volume.

9. A and areexamplesofsolids.

10. and areexamples ofliquids.

11. and are examples of gas.

12. Solid ice is when it is changing into a liquid.

Super Teacher Worksheets - www.superteacherworksheets.com


ANSWER KEY
Why Does Matter
Matter?
by Kelly Hashway

solids volume container matter ice juice

gases mass atoms chair oxygen melting

liquids shape space milk helium

Choose a word from the box to complete each sentence.

1. The three basic properties of matter are volume, mass, and shape.

2. All matter is made up of tiny particles called atoms.

3. Volume is the amount of space that matter takes up.

4. Mass isthe amount of matter anobject has.

5. Liquids take the shape of their container.

6. Gases do not have a definite shape, mass, or volume.

7. Liquids do not have a definite shape, but they do have a definite volume.

8. Solids have a definite shape and volume.

9. Achair andice are examples of solids.

10. Milkandjuiceareexamplesofliquids.
11. Oxygen and helium are examples of gases.

12. Solidiceis melting whenitischangingintoa liquid.

Super Teacher Worksheets - www.superteacherworksheets.com

https://www.superteacherworksheets.com/matter/matter-
article_WMTBN.pdf?up=1466611200
Name:

Appendix C
____

Chemical Changes in Matter


Chemical changes in matter occur when the matter changes into something
new. The change cannot be reversed.

Directions: Circle the examples of items that changed chemically.

chopped

soda

Directions: Give an example where matter has been changed chemically


by the following.
mixing


www.HaveFunTeach
ing.com
Name: A_p_p_e_ndix D

Physical Changes in Matter


Physical changes in matter occur when the matter changes the way it
looks, without becoming a new kind of matter.

Directions: Circle the examples of items that changed physically.

Directions: Give an example where each property of matter has changed.



www.HaveFunTeach
ing.com
Appendix E
Appendix F

This Experiment is meant to help you visualize solids, liquids, and gases!

Materials

- 3 Balloons per group


- 1 deep tub per group
- water

Instructions:

1. Fill 2 balloon with water


2. Fill one balloon with air
3. Freeze one of the balloons filled with water
4. The frozen balloon represents solids, the balloon filled with air represent gases, and the balloon filled with
water represents liquids.
5. Once all the balloons are ready, place a solid balloon, a liquid balloon, and a gas balloon in the deep tub.
6. Once all of the balloons are placed in the tub you will write down what each of the balloons look and feel
like in your science journals.
7. Write down your hypothesis in your science journal about what you think will happen to each balloon when
we pop them.
8. After writing down your hypothesis, write down your observations and your predictions of what will
happen when you pop the balloons.
9. Share these predictions with the class.
10. Now you are ready to POP the balloons!!!
11. Once you have popped your balloons, record your observations in your science journals.
12. You will also write down step by step what and how you are conducting the experiment. (Keeping track of
these steps is important to perform the Scientific Method properly.)
13.

Finally, pop each balloon and see what happens! The solid stays the same, tightly packed, the
liquid should take form of the tub, and the air should vanish and spread throughout. The students
get very excited when it's time to pop the balloons. This is a great experiment for students to
really get a hands-on experience with solids, liquids and gases. Have Fun!

http://www.superteacherideas.com/science18-morematter.html