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Proudlock's

SEC I1ACI
arid
F O V I K 4 C F
Presentations
WILL ALMA
M.I.M.C. fLONDON)
PROUDLOCK'S EGG BAG
AND FOUR-ACE
PRESENTATIONS
PROUDLOCK'S
EGG BAG AND

FOUR-ACE
PRESENTATIONS
BY

EDWARD BAGSHAWE

COPYRIGHT
Otlv.ON

SERIES

Manufacturing Rights Reserved.

L. DAVENPORT Cr CO.
(Incorporating Maskelync's Mysteries)

LONDON
Printed in England.
Previous Books

" PROUDLOCK'S
ROUTINE WITH
THIMBLES "
(100 Illustrations)

P r i c e 5 / 6 , post 3d. $ 1 . 6 0

" PROUDLOCK'S
VERSION OF THE
SYMPATHETIC
SILKS "
(38 Diagrams)

P r i c e 5/-, post 3 d . $1.40


CONTENTS
PACE
PREFACE 7
INTRODUCTION 9

THE EGG BAG


BRIEF OUTLINE OF EFFECT ... 11
REQUIREMENTS 12
PREPARATION 13
WORKING AND "PATTER" ... 15

THE FOUR ACES


REQUIREMENTS 22
WORKING 23
"PATTER" 27
EDWARD PROUDLOCK
COLD MEDALLIST
MAGICIANS' CLUB
LONDON
PREFACE
T T is w i t h ;i g r e a t d e a l of p l e a s u r e t h a t I h a v e n o t e d t h e v e r y
f a v o u r a b l e r e c e p t i o n g i v e n t o (lie t w o p r e v i o u s v o l u m e s
c o n t a i n i n g niv m a g i c a l p r e s e n t a t i o n s .

In t h i s hook t h e r e a d e r will find m y a r r a n g e m e n t s of t w o of


llie m o s t p o p u l a r I r i c k s in m a g i c n a m e l y , llic K g g H a g a n d
the Four-Ace 1 ricks.

T h e s e v e r s i o n s , l i k e t h e ileitis in m y p r e v i o u s h o o k s , h a v e
a p p e a r e d in m y o w n p r o g r a m m e f o r s o m e c o n s i d e r a b l e t i m e
a n d , t h e r e f o r e , I a m a b l e to t e s t i f y lo t h e i r e f f e c t i v e n e s s w h e n
p r e s e n t e d as o u t l i n e d .

T h e " p a t t e r " h a s been g i v e n in its e n t i r e t y , a n d t h e text,


m a d e e a s y to f o l l o w b y t h e n u m e r o u s i l l u s t r a t i o n s . Both
t r i c k s will b e f o u n d e a s y l o w o r k , w i t h t h e m i n i m u m of s l e i g h t -
of-hand. So w i t h e v e r y w i s h f o r s u c c e s s , I l e a v e t h e r e a d e r
to t h e m .

EDWARD I'KOl'DLOCK.
INTRODUCTION
C I N C H thin is a hook for magicians o n l y , " 1 have
no d o u b t t l i a t t h e t w o e f f e c t s it d e a l s w i t h will he
familiar to every leader. For these tricks have stood
t h e t e s t of t i m e , a n d t h e s i m p l i c i t y a n d e t l ' e e l i v e n e s s of
t h e i r " p l o t s " h a v e m a d e ( h e m eiiiistaiii f a v o u r i t e s .

T h a t good p r e s e n t a t i o n w h i c h i n c l u d e s t h e a r r a n g e -
m e n t of all n e c e s s a r y d e t a i l s - is a n e s s e n t i a l f a c t o r ,
c a n n o t he d e n i e d . O f t e n t h e s u c c e s s of a m a g i c a l
p r o b l e m m a y he said to lie in t h e a m o u n t , of c r e a t i v e
t h o u g h t e x p e n d e d hcl'oi'chand t o d e v i s e t h e m o s t
effective procedure. Happily, my confrere, Edward
I ' r o u d l o c k , is w e l l - k n o w n f o r h i s a b i l i t y in t h i s d i r e c t i o n ,
a m i in t h e p r e s e n t e f f o r t we h a v e t w o f u r t h e r i n t e r e s t i n g
e x a m p l e s of his w o r k .

T h e r o u t i n e w i t h t h e E g g B a g is e s s e n t i a l l y a c o m e d y
o n e ; it is e a s y t o l e a r n , a n d s h o u l d well r e p a y t h o
m a g i c i a n on t h e l o o k o u t f o r a " d i f f e r e n t " v e r s i o n
coinhined with a comedy element.

T h o V o u r - A c e r o u t i n e , a l t h o u g h t h o s a m e in p r i n c i p l e
a s a s t a n d a r d v e r s i o n of t h e t r i c k , p o s s e s s e s p o i n t s
which c a n n o t fail t o a p p e a l to t h e a r t i s t who a p p r e c i a t e s
a t t e n t i o n t o d e t a i l . All t h e c a r d s a r e d e a l t w i t h t h e n -
faces showing, t h e i r host and most deceptive a r r a n g e -
m e n t h a s boon w o r k e d o u t , a n d t h e s e f e a t u r e s , t o g e t h e r
w i t h tin? c l e a n - c u t m o v e s , m a k e s t h i s o n e of t h e v e r y
host m e t h o d s , p a r t i c u l a r l y w h e r e J u m b o c a r d s a r e u s e d .
I can c o n f i d e n t l y r e c o m m e n d t h e s e p r e s e n t a t i o n s t o
m y follow m a g i c i a n s .

HOWARD ISAfiSflAWE.
THE EGG BAG
BRIEF OUTLINE OF THE EFFECT
T W O gentlemen are invited to help, and one is handed a black
cloth bag to examine. A little byplay is introduced by the
production of a rat from this a s s i s t a n t ' s coat, to be followed by
the production of an egg. This e g g is given to the same
assistant and he is asked to write his name upon it. being
given a giant pencil for this purpose.
The performer now propounds the old riddle as to which
came first, the e g g or the c h i c k e n ; and apparently decides for
himself that " the answer is a l e m o n , " a lemon being' produced
from the bag. F i n d i n g (hat (here is still s o m e t h i n g in the bag
the magician alVeets surprise as he extracts a curious-looking
chicken from it which he losses aside.
Now, g e t t i n g down to business, he takes the e g g and places
it in the bag, a n n o u n c i n g that as hi; says " ( J o ! " the e g g will
vanish. He is delected in placing the e g g in his pocket and at
a second attempt is seen a p p a r e n t l y lo place the e g g u n d e r his
left arm. However, he continues by showing the. bag perfectly
e m p t y , inside and out, and then obligingly raises his left arm
lo show the e g g is not there as was anticipated. He next allows
(he two assistants (o grip his wrists and with their r e m a i n i n g
free hands assure (hem,solves that (he bag is empty-this done,
he deliberately inserts his r i g h t hand into the bag aiul produces
the e g g .
And now, says the performer, lie. will explain t h e exact
working to the audience. In the s u b s e q u e n t explanation he
places the e g g in his pocket and shows (he bag e m p t y . The e g g
vanishes from his pocket, which is shown e m p t y , and t h e b a g
is likewise still e m p t y . Again (he assistants hold his wrists ami
lie succeeds in producing (he e g g from the bag. The assistants
examine the e g g aiul note il is the same one t h a t was w r i t t e n
upon at the commencement.
This actually concludes the effect, but as the p e r f o r m e r is
about to see the assistants off s t a g e he grasps one of them by
the lapel and quickly produces a l a r g e imitation duck from
inside his coat, m a k i n g an unexpected finale; and the long-
sulfering helpers are then allowed to r e t r e a t .
REQUIREMENTS
Three Black Cloth Bags, size H i by 10 inches, as detailed
below :
BAG 1 : This bag' is unprepared.
BAG 2 : Has the usual inverted pocket at one side.
BAG 3: A thin wooden stick is sewn inside this bag, along
the bottom edge. An ordinary press-fastener keeps the opening
closed when the bag is set for the trick. One portion of
another similar fastener is sewn outside the hag, near the
top. See Fig 1.

oTICKALOm
Bottom FI(J< FIG. 2.
One Spring Duck, such as is obtainable from the magical
depots. One leg has a 10 inch length of one-inch-wide black
tape fastened to it (for security's sake the tape should bt'
double). The other part of the press-fastener last mentioned is
sewn an inch or so from the end of the tape and a small knot
is tied just above. See Fig. 2.
One Imitation Chicken, the appearance of which will he
gauged from the illustration further on.This chicken is smaller
than those usually obtainable, and has no spring inside, being
stuffed with clown.
One Egg and a shell to fit it. A shell to go over the end of
P a g e Twelve
the egg' is perhaps preferable, although one fitting on the side
will answer the same purpose.
One Lemonimitation or otherwise.
One Spring Rat.
One Giant Pencil, measuring approximately lti inches long
and 2] inches in diameter.
The Card Stand used for the J u m b o Four-Ace Trick is also
requisitioned, hut if the Four Aces is not being performed any
suitable object placed on t h e performer's table can be made to
serve as cover for the exchange of the bags.

PREPARATION
F i g 3 shows the magician's table set for the effect. The card
stand is at the centre and in f r o n t of this lies the unprepared
Bag No. 1. The other bags are out of view behind the stand.

AUDIENCE
Bag No. L' contains the chicken, folded so as to go as flat as
possible, and also the lemon the l a t t e r placed above the
chicken. The large pencil also lies behind the stand, its
pointed end inserted into Hag Xo.
The position of Bag' No. 3, c o n t a i n i n g the duck, is also shown
in T i g 3.- To " load " the duck into the bag first close up the
spring, and holding the bird with its neck downwards, fold the
wings over, then the legsbend the feet in and insert the duck
into the bag with its head near the lower edge of bag, feet near
top. T a k e the tape attached to one of the legs and bring it over
the edge of b a g ; secure it here by means of the press-fastener.
This a r r a n g e m e n t has already been shown in F i g . 1. Finally,
close the opening of the bag by means of the f a s t e n e r a t the
centre.
The e g g and shell, together with the rat, should be placed
in the right trousers-pocket. (As the rat is required first it
should rest above the e g g ) .
In passing, let us add that the effect is usually performed
with one confederate (this being " the assistant on the r i g h t "
see W o r k i n g w h o is mostly addressed by the p e r f o r m e r and
is responsible for a good deal of the comedy " b u s i n e s s " ) .
However, the effect can be worked just as well if both
assistants are unknown to the magician.

" B " SKETCHES S H O W PERFORMER'S


"A" SKETCHES FOR THIS TRICK
SHOW AUDIENCE'S VIEW

I'age Fourteen
WORKING AND "PATTER"
" Ladies and G e n t l e m e n : I am now g o i n g to show you a
very old trickin f a d it is so ancient that Noah is said to have
swopped a pair of W h i t e Angoras for itand that wasn't the
only washout he had either. Anyway, 1 intend to m a k e use of
this little Muck h a g which, as you can see, is as tree from
deception as 1 nin myself. However, as I don't suppose t h e r e is
anyone here who believes a single word I say 1 am going to ask
two members of my audience to step forward for the purpose of
a c t i n g as a committee of t w o . " (Point to someone.) " N o w ,
you, sir, have a nice, Christ mas-like expression1 wonder if
you would care to assist me in this experiment ? And you,
s i r ? " (To someone else.) " lMease don't j u m p , just walk up
in the usual w a y . " (Two assistants having been obtained by
these or similar means, one is seated on the right of stage, the
other on the loftwell in front of the table. Commence by
showing the unprepared b a g and handing il to the helper on
your r i g h t . )

First I would like you to thoroughly s a t i s f y yourself t h a t


this h a g is quite e m p t y . " (Whilst assistant is looking- at the
bag stand with right hand in right trousers-pocket and palm
the rat. The examination finished, bring right hand from
pocket, with rat, and take the hag back.) " I should say, from
the thorough way in which you have investigated the hag, that
a n y f u r t h e r t w i s t i n g or rending on my part would he super-
fluous . . . Pardon me, but what is this you have w r i g g l i n g
about in your p o c k e t ? " (Quickly insert, r i g h t hand inside coal
pocket of assistant and produce the rat, held by the tail.)
" W e l l , I should not have thought front the look of this gentle-
man that he was a Notarial). 1 hope this hasn't g o t yo.i r a t t y ,
s i r ? l'lease keep calm, for there is worse to f o l l o w . " (Place
rat on table with left, hand, at the same time g e t t i n g the e g g
from pocket with the other hand. Continue addressing the
same assistant as follows.)

" Y o u d o n ' t happen to have an e g g on you as well, 1 suppose?


No, I t h o u g h t not. J u s t a moment, please . . . " (Again
plunge right hand into a s s i s t a n t ' s . inside pocket and produce
the e g g . ) " I have on more than one occasion been accused
of using an indiarubber e g g , but I never use a prepared e g g of
any k i n d j u s t an ordinary hen's e g g , which has been hard-
boiled and rendered as hard as any e m p t y wooden b o x . " ( T a p
e g g on head.) " T o prove t h a t I do not e x c h a n g e this e g g I
would first like you to inspect it very carefullytluit is, look
a t it, listen to it, and endeavour to impress it on your memory
and then, having done these t h i n g s , T should like you to
write your name on it with a pencil; and in case you h a v e n ' t
got one (a pencil, I m e a n ) , 1 have here a hit you can u s e . "

( W h i l s t m a k i n g the above r e m a r k s walk behind the table,


holding hag in r i g h t hand. Leave b a g on table and pick u p
the g i a n t pencil and 15ag N o . 2 c o n t a i n i n g the chicken. W a l k
forward with the bag in one hand and pencil in the other. The
e x c h a n g e of the b a g is, of course, completely concealed by the
large stand on the table, and it should appear as if you have
j u s t crossed behind the table to pick up the pencil.)

" N o w please write your name as clearly as you c a n . " ( H a n d


the giant pencil to a s s i s t a n t . Whilst he is a t t e m p t i n g to w r i t e
on the e g g , you casually remove his handkerchief from his
breast-pocket and dab his brow with it then replace the
handkerchief in your own breast-pocket. If the assistant i s n ' t
a confederate, d o n ' t f o r g e t to r e t u r n the handkerchief l a t e r ! )
" T h a t ' s the idea, sir, w r i t e y o u r own n a m e on the e g g . I once
heard of a man who practised w r i t i n g o t h e r people's n a m e s ;
but now lie is t h i n k i n g of a n u m b e r . " ( T a k e t h e e g g from the
assistant and examine the w r i t i n g . ) " T h i s g e n t l e m a n writes
something like an income-tax collector you can only under-
stand the a m o u n t . f suppose you would recognise this
h a n d w r i t i n g a g a i n , sir, if you never saw it a g a i n ; because if
the e g g gets lost we shall want to know definitely t h a t i t ' s this
one. A n y w a y , I should like you to hold this e g g for a m o m e n t
. . . " ( A g a i n hand e g g to a s s i s t a n t ) " . . . and, by the way,
you m i g h t give me back the pencil before you f o r g e t ; as t h a t ' s
the way I came by it m y s e l f . " (Drop pencil on floor behind
assistants chair. T h r o w the b a g in the air and catch it
again.)

I'ago Sixteen
"No doubt you are perfectly satis-
fied that this bag is quite ordinary
and that there is 110 one inside?"
(Now address the assistant on left.)
"Can you, sir, tell me where this
comes from ? " (Point to the egg' held
by the otlier helper.) " A chicken!
And where does the chicken come
from? An e g g ! Then it appears to
me as if the answer is, in the words
of the classics, a lemon." (Produce
the lemon from the bag, show it, and
place on table. Turn to assistant 011
right.) "You don't seem to have
examined this bag very carefully
look h e r e ! " (Slowly extract the
chicken from the bag Fig 4*.)
"This must be the only one in cap-
TIG. tivity . . . I should know those beau-
tiful eyes anywhere!" (Display the
4A chicken, and then drop it at front of
table. Take the egg from the helper
on right.)
"Now I want all of you to watch
me very carefully. Please keep one
eye on the bag, one on the egg, and
just let the otlier roam around. W i t h
that ease and grace for which I am
noted [ am going to hurl the egg-
within the depths of the bag or,
if you prefer, just bung it in and
T now announce the fact that at the
word 'Go', it will completely disap-
pear." (In saying this, and with the
hag held in left hand and t he egg in
right, throw the egg into the bag to
illustrate your remarks; removing it
again in right hand immediately
afterwards). " A t least, 1 cer-
HG.5A tainly hope it will disappear, or
i

we shall be in a terrible mess. However, let us make the


a t t e m p t . " (Quickly plunge the right hand, with the egg, into
the bag. Make a half-turn to your left, holding bag upside-
down, one corner being grasped in vour left fist as seen in
Fig. 5 A . )
"Remember, when L say 'Go' the egg will disappear. One
twothreeGO!" (On the final word remove "the r i g h t
handclosed, containing eggfrom the bag, and place in
right trousers-pocket; leave the egg in pocket and remove
right hand. W i t h this same hand take the bag and slap it a
few times against left hand. Turn bag inside-out, show both
sides, and then turn it back again.) "You will note the bag
is now perfectly empty. Yes, I know what you're thinking
let me confess 1 did place the egg in my pocket, but that was
just to see whether or not I had your undivided a t t e n t i o n . "
Place right hand into pocket and slowly bring the egg into
view again.) "So watch me very closely this t i m e . " (Again
place the egg in the bag and, as before, turn left and hold the
bag upside-down as already shown in Fig. hK This time allow
the right hand to work the egg into pocket of b a g ; then bring
the hand o\it as if containing the egg and appear to deposit the
latter UNDER T H E L E F T ARM P I T . Now let the right hand
grasp the bag, holding egg through it, and slap the bag a few
times against the open left hand.)
" A h , 1 see you think the egg is
under my arm. I'm sorry, but you
are quite wrong this time, which is
perhaps just as well considering the
age of the e g g . " (Raise the left arm
to show the egg is not there. Turn
the bag inside-out and show it
empty in usual manner, then turn it
hack again getting the egg into
position as in F i g . 6b, a la usual
procedure. Address the two helpers
as follows.) "Now, gentlemen, I
should like you to stand one on each
side of me, as I may want a little
FIG6B support if the trick should fail.
(Duly range the assistants on either

Page Eighteen
side of you.) " T h a n k s , 1 knew you
would stand by me and to make
sure i d o n ' t get a w a y , will you
kindly hold my w r i s t s . " (Now hold
the bag' as shown in F i g . 7". Get the
assistants lo hold your wrists, and
with their f r e e hands to feel inside
the bag. This done, allow the e g g to
drop to the lower p a r t of the bag,
and then insert r i g h t hand and
slowly produce i t . ) " A s you see,
here is the e g g once a g a i n . "

" N o w would you like me to explain exactly how this is d o n e ?


I will do so with pleasure. F i r s t 1 should like you two
gentlemen to let go of my wrists, as I am g a s p i n g for air. You
will r e m e m b e r t h a t I placed the e g g in the bag, like this, and
then held the b a g u p in this m a n n e r . " (Repeat the first moves.)
" A n d then you t h o u g h t I put the e g g under my a r m . "
(Remove closed r i g h t hand, c o n t a i n i n g the e g g , front the b a g ,
and place under left a r m , to illustrate t h i s . ) " I d i d n ' t really
put (lie e g g u n d e r m y a r m , but instead, under cover of the b a g ,
1 placed it my p o c k e t . " ( I n s a y i n g this you first t u r n the
closed right hand with fingers towards the audience, then open
it a little to show the e g g is really there. The r i g h t hand at
this s t a g e is near left armpit. Now lower it, keeping it con-
cealed by the b a g in the left hand, and place it in r i g h t
trousers-pocket, leaving e g g (hereremove hand from pocket,
s h o w i n g it e m p t y both sides.) " N o w you see how it is I am
able to show you the b a g to be perfectly e m p t y . " ( T u r n bag
inside-out and display it, finally turn it r i g h t way out a g a i n . )

" N o w when 1 w a n t to get the e g g back into the b a g , under


cover of the b a g 1 just place my hand in my pocket, b r i n g out
the e g g , andidrop it into the b a g a g a i n . " ( S u i t i n g the actions
to the words, place r i g h t hand in pocket and b r i n g out the
e g g W I T H T H E S H E L L U P O N IT. In d o i n g so turn
the pocket inside-out to emphasize its emptiness, and
leave it t h u s for the time being. Show e g g and
drop it into the b a g . Now address one of your helpers.)
" W e l l , tliey d o n ' t seem to t h i n k much, of t h a t , do t h e y ? I
will do it once more, and this time I shall not hide the e g g
at any s t a g e of the proceedings. Please watch me carefully.
Here is the e g g . " (Remove e g g f r o m b a g , L E A V I N G S H E L L
I N S I D E , and display it once a g a i n . ) " 1 place it in the bag,
s o . " ( P u t e g g in b a g and immediately W O R K I T I N T O T H E
P O C K E T , m a k i n g a h a l f - t u r n ty the left and a g a i n holding
1 he b a g upside-down, as depicted in F i g . 5 A . Allow the egg-
to drop down inside the pocket, leaving the S H E L L O N L Y at
the uppermost corner of the bag. Show outline of shell; then
remove r i g h t hand from inside the b a g and flick the shell a
few times with the fingers.) " Y o u can always tell an e g g b y
the sound of it - - this one sounds a little o v e r - r i p e . "

" I now t a k e the e g g out and placf


it in my p o c k e t . " ( L e t t h e right
hand enter the bag and b r i n g out the
shell, fingers clasped around it as
seen in F i g . 8-v audience's view.
Place this h a n d in the trousers-
pocket, p u s h i n g hack t h e pocket
this, it will be recalled, has remained
inside-out. Leave the shell A T T H E
T O P O F T H E P O C K E T and b r i n g
out the r i g h t hand, showing it
clearly to he e m p t y . )

" T h e b a g is, of course, quite e m p t y . " ( T u r n b a g inside-out,


slap it a g a i n s t left h a n d , and p e r f o r m the usual moves such as
screwing it up, etc. Now hold the b a g upside-down, still in
inside out condition, and clip one of the u p p e r corners between
your teeth clap your hands t o g e t h e r and show t h e m e m p t y . )
" A n d . s t r a n g e l y e n o u g h , my pocket is e m p t y a l s o . " (Slap
pocket with r i g h t hand and t h e n place this hand inside and
pull out the pocket, the shell r e m a i n i n g unseen in the space at
top. Allow the r i g h t hand to he clearly seen e m p t y , so t h a t it
does not appear t h a t you have removed a n y t h i n g from the
pocket. Take the b a g in b o t h h a n d s , and t u r n it r i g h t way
out a g a i n . ) " A n d so the point is, w h a t has become of the
e g g ? May I again ask you gentlemen to take liold of my
w r i s t s ? " (Hold bag as before Fig. 7n the egg' being
held t h r o u g h the pocket by the r i g h t hand, in usual m a n n e r . )

".Now let us all m a k e a noise like a chicken and see what


h a p p e n s . " ((.Jet the assistants to " c l u c k " in u n i s o n : then
allow the. e g g to fall to t h e bottom of b a g , insert the r i g h t hand
and slowly bring e g g into view.) " H e r e , g e n t l e m e n , you see
we have the e g g once m o r e . " ( H a n d it; to assistant on r i g h t . )
" A n d if you will examine it, sir, I have no doubt you will
recognize it as yours the s i g n a t u r e 1 mean, of course. Show
it to the other gentleman as w e l l . "

( W h i l s t assistants are looking at the e g g , pick u p the g i a n t


pencilwhich, on r e f e r r i n g hack, you will note was dropped
behind the chair on the r i g h t side. Quickly pass behind
the table, placing the pencil at the back and at the same time
e x c h a n g i n g the bag you hold for Hag No. ii, c o n t a i n i n g t h e
duck. Place the third b a g under your left, arm, compressing
t h e duck inside. T h e opening of the bag should be o u t w a r d s ,
and the side of bag having the tape fastened to it should be
next, to y o u r body. Advance towards the helper on your r i g h t ,
at. the same time u n d o i n g the two fasteners on bag with your
r i g h t h a n d , which hand should g r i p the end of the tape, ready
for the production.)

" W e l l , are you sure it is the same e g g ? I t h o u g h so.


E x c u s e me a m o m e n t , sir . . . w h a t e v e r is t h i s ? (With
r i g h t hand pull bag from under a r m , holding the rod at the
bottom by the left hand. As you face assistant, extend the
left hand, keeping hold of bottom of bag, and g r a s p a s s i s t a n t ' s
coat by its r i g h t japelwith the left hand s w i n g the bag inside
the coat, and pull the duck upwards from the bag, the whole
moves g i v i n g the appearance of the duck being produced
from u n d e r the a s s i s t a n t ' s coat. W i t h the production of the
duck the r o u t i n e is b r o u g h t to an end, and it only remains for
you to t h a n k the assistants and sec them olf the p l a t f o r m . )
PROUDLOCK'S EGG BAG

THE FOUR ACES


AS the effect of this card experiment is so well-known, it will
he unnecessary to describe it in detail, and so we may pass
right away to the . . . *
REQUIREMENTS
These consist of sixteen Jumbo cards and a large stand.
The required cards are listed below. Six should be double-
faced, the remainder are ordinary. They should be arranged

in the order given. To do this, first place the King of Diamonds


FACE U P on table, then place the Queen of Hearts on top
follow with the other cards so that the Ace of Diamonds will
he the face card of the set.
KD; QH; JH: 9H backed A C ) ; 8S (backed A D ) ;
KID (backed A S ) ; J C ; 3 0 ; 5S; 5 D ; 3 H ; 3D; AS
(backed K H ) ; A H ; AC (backed oC); AD (backed 5 H ) .
The above cards can, of course, be run off a pack of Jumbo
cards if desired, in which case the rest of the pack will be
required.
The stand will not require a special description except to
say that it should be of a size to take four packets of Jumbo
cards and should have two ledges upon it (see illustrations).
Incidentally, the method can be applied to standard size
cards, although ginnt cards are naturally more effective.
m

AND FOUR-ACE PRESENTATIONS *

WORKING
Take up a position at the right of' the table, on which reposes
the card stand.
Exhibit the set of sixteen cards, casually showing the packet
both sides, then run the cards from hand to hand, face out-
wards, calling attention to (he Aces on front.
Square up the cards and, still holding them face out-
wards, remove the Ace of Diamonds and place it at the left side
of the stand, on the upper ledge. In a similar manner take the

other three Aces, separately, and lay them on the stand. In


showing the Ace of Hearts, a glimpse may be given of the
back, this being the only genuine Ace. The row of Aces on
the stand is shown in F i g . 9.
You are left with the twelve indifferent cards in your hands,
facing outwards deal the front three cards, separately,
against the Ace of Diamonds, these cards being placed upon
the lower ledge of stand. Similarly, deal three cards against
each of the remaining Aces. The position is now as seen in
Fig. 10.
The location of each card should he clear from the following :
AD AC AH AS
3D, 3H, 5D 5S, 30, JC 10D, 8S, !)II -TH, QH, K D
The next move is to force the H E A R T S packet, and this is
done by means of the usual request for "a number between
one and f o u r , " the counting being clone from either end to
suit the performer; or by any other means preferred.
Now pick up the Ace of Hearts and the three cards in front
of it and hold the packet facing audience, in the left hand.
Count off the three indifferent (double-faced ) cards separately
into the right hand, and then turn the Ace of Hearts FACE
DOWN 011 top of them. Square the four cards together and
place them aside (say, for example, against the back or leg of
a chair), the back of the Ace of Hearts facing towards the
spectators.

VANISH OF THE ACE OF DIAMONDS


Take this Ace from the stand,
together with the three cards in
jf front of it. Fan and show the cards,
then close them up and hold in the
left hand as seen in Fig. 11. W i t h
your right hand draw off the face
card. Similarly, draw oft the next
card ON TOP of the card now held
in right hand. The Ace and an indif-
ferent card remain in your left hand.
Draw off the indifferent card, again
PIG. II on toj) of those already in right
band, but place this third card in
the position shown in Fig. 12 (it
rests about an inch below the other
two cards). Now place the Ace on
top, coinciding with the third card
thus these two cards project a little
below the first two cards dealt off.

Grasp the cards in the left hand


and place the SECOND F I N G E R of
the right hand between the two
front and the two back cards, at the
bottom edge. Curl the third and
fourth fingers in towards the palm.
The correct positions for both hands
are clearly shown in F i g . 13. Press
upwards with the right hand
FIG. 12 and you will thus square the two

- Page Twenty-four
AND FOUR-ACE PRESENTATIONS

front cards together with tlie others.


FIG. 13 Now it will lie found an easy matter
to turn over the two front cards as
one. This accomplished, square the
packet together and show it on both
sides.

With the right hand draw off each


of the three hack cards in turn,
placing them, face out, on the lower
ledge of the stand, at the left side
they should overlap each other
slightly.

Thus apparently the Ace remains


in your left hand; in reality it will
he found to be the T H R E E OF
DIAMONDS. Before showing the
face of this card place the hands
over the upper and lower portions.
Now turn it slowly to the audience
so that the effect is as seen in F i g . 14
and the impression is given that the
card is the Ace of Diamonds.

lilow on it, then withdraw the


fingers from the upper and lower-
portions and the card is seen to he a
Three. Place it on the stand.

VANISH OF THE ACE OF CLUBS


Pick up the Ace of (Hubs and the three indifferent cards and
hold in the left hand as in the previous Fig. 11. Allow the
right hand to approach and draw the cards off one at a time,
reversing their positions so that the Ace is brought to the
front. Square up the cards and show the packet back and front.
Now allow the left thumb to slide the three top cards a little
to the right Fig. lo and with the right hand immediately
turn these cards over on top of the single card at back. Without
pause, fan the four cards and two
will show reversed Fig. 16 this
apparently being a mistake (see
FIG. 16 patter).
Take the two cards which face
outwards, separately, and place them
011 the stand. Two cards remain back
outwards in your hands. Turn the
lowermost one face to audience and
show it to be an indifferent card,v
then place it on the stand. The
remaining' card is apparently the
Ace. Flick the back of this card,
and slowly turn it around and it is
seen to be an indifferent card also.
Likewise place this card on the
stand.

VANISH OF THE ACE OF SPADES


This proceeds exactly the same as
in the vanish of the Ace of Diamonds
FIG 17
up to the point where the Ace
(really two cards) has been reversed.
The packet is then held in the left-
hand in the manner depicted in Fig.
IT.

Now, as a variation, draw off


(upwards) the reversed card at the
front (presumably the Ace), with
your right handand then slide this
card down behind the others so that
it projects about two inches above
themFig. 18. Next, with the right
hand, take the three cards facing-
outwards, showing each separately,
and place them on the stand. Flick
Fl&.lg the back of the remaining card and
slowly turn it to the audience, show-

AND FOUR-ACE PRESENTATK

iug that the Ace had been replaced by an indifferent card*


Place this card on the stand.

And so, as the Aces have down from their original positions,
it is only necessary to conclude by showing,that they have
magically re-assembled in the packet first placed aside. Pick
up this packet and fan i( so that the four Aces are visible. The
fact that one card was reversed at the outset is entirely for-
gotten by the spectators.
Place each of the Aces on the stand. If the cards already
there have been arranged to overlap each other the appearance
finally presented will be that of a row of cards extending across
the stand.

PATTER
" T h e articles I propose using in the following somewhat
strange experiment consist of this large wooden stand and a
supply of playing cards which are .just a little larger than
those you may be accustomed to see.
" T h e four principal characters in fact, I may call them
the prime movers in this little magical problem are the
Aces. Here they are first we have the Ace of Diamonds,
generally known as the Hafton Garden Ace. Next the Ace of
Clubs, sometimes known as the Ace of Piccadilly. And here is
the Ace of Hearts, which is, of course, always favourite with
the ladies. And last, but by no means least, we have the Ace
of Spades, quite a grim Ace.

" I n front of each of the Aces 1 place three further cards, in


this manner. And now may 1 ask any member of my audience
to call out a number between one and four. Three! Thank
you. The third packet, consisting of the Ace of Hearts and
three other cards I now take from the stand and show you
onetwothree cards; and the Ace. 1 shall place these
cards over here where you will be able to keep them in view.

" I now take another packet of cards, consisting of . . .


onetwothree cards, and the Ace of Diamonds which 1
'f PROUDLOCK'S PRESENTATIONS

f l h a l l t u r n over like this. Please keep your eye on the Ace.


l l p i e other cards I return to the stand one two three,
P e a v i n g me with the Ace. Yes, the Ace of Diamonds . . .
no, I am sorry, it isn't the Ace ! merely the Three of Diamonds.

" P l e a s e watch once again with the next packet. One


twothree cards, and the Ace of Gluhs. As before I turn the
Ace over . . . excuse me, I seem to have turned two cards
by mistake. But it will not make the slightest difference.
\Ynich carefully. One two three ordinary cards, and tho
Ace . . . has flown again. The experiment becomes more
exciting as we go on.
" A n d , finally, here is tin; last packet. 1 want you to watch
very closely, for this is your last chance of observing the
departure of the Ace. One two three cards, and the Ace
of Spades. I turn the Ace over, hut in order that you may keep
your eyes on it I will place it behind the others, but a little
apart from them, thus. L now slowly remove the other three
cards one two three. And only the Ace is left. At
least, it seems so, but yet we find that t h a t great, big, black
Ace of Spades has vanished without a trace.

" A n d now, s t r a n g e as if may seem to your somewhat puzzled


intellects, we shall probably find t h a t the four Aces have
assembled in tho first packet of cards I showed you. Yres, here
they are . . . . one two three four Aces, and I am
pleased to tell you that the experiment has been a complete
success."
The State Library of Victoria
"ALMA CONJURING COLLECTION"
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Some of the Four-Ace opening patter must be credited


to that clever entertainer, Stanley Collins; whilst a
small part of the patter for the Egg Bag derives from
Fred Cullpitt's excellent book, "Laughter and Leger-
demain." The"mistake" move of turning three cards
together in the Four Aces (see page 25) is believed to
have been evolved by Ellis Stanyon, the well-known
magical dealer.

Page Twenty-eight. _
Printed and Published by L.D. & Co., London, England. Copyright.
DEMON

SERIES