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Introduction to Computers in

the Hospitality Industry


Chapter 1
COMPUTER SYSTEM

Hardware

Software User
HARDWARE

Includes both the actual


computer itself, and the
various peripherals which
allows data to be input,
output and stored.
COMPUTER
PHERIPERALS
KEYBOARD VISUAL DISPLAY MAGNETIC DISK

STORAGE
INPUT

OUTPUT
MOUSE UNITS CD-ROM
BAR-CODE READER LCD PANEL DVDs
MAGNETIC-STRIP PRINTERS MAGNETIC TAPE
READER SPEAKERS REMOVABLE DRIVES
TOUCH SCREEN
PUNCHED-CARD
READER
DIGITAL SCANNER
PEN ENTRY
VOICE ENTRY
DIRECT ENTRY
SOFTWARE
A series of instructions
which tells the hardware
what to do and how to do
it.
General Classification of
Software

Applications Software

Operating System
Operating Software

2 types of OS
Command Line Interface
Graphic User Interface
Applications Software

2 types of AS
General Purpose
Industry-specific and
Function-specific
General Purpose
Applications
Word-processing Package
Spreadsheet
Database
Graphics Package
E-mail Package
Web browsers
Utilities package
Hospitality-Specific Applications

Reservations system
Property-management
system
Recipe-costing system
Stock-control system
Conference and banqueting
system
Hybrid computer systems in the
Hospitality Industry

Call accounting system


Electronic Point-of-sales
system
Mini-bar system
Electronic door-lock system
Energy-management system
Entertainment system
Why use a computer system?
Characteristics that make
them useful

Speed
Accuracy
Discipline
Capacity
Advantages

Reduction in the amount of


clerical work thus helping
increase job satisfaction
Reduce mistakes which
leads increased guest
satisfaction and better
control over operations
Advantages

Increase productivity
Cost savings by reducing
staff members
More accurate, timely and
relevant management
information
The effectiveness of a system is directly
related to the quality of the
management using it: it cannot
compensate for management
shortcomings and will only accentuate
them. In a well managed hotel, a
system is perceived as a tool for better
performance, while in poorly managed
properties, a system often serves as a
convenient excuse for all operational
problems. (Marko and Moore, 1980)