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ED498 Lesson Plan Plus Assessment

You will develop detailed lesson plans throughout the semester in which you apply second language acquisition and sociocultural theories. Please use the lesson plan template to frame your lesson planning. The purpose of these detailed lesson plans is to provide you the time and structure to think very specifically about how you will make your content accessible to English language learners and other diverse learners. A secondary purpose of the lesson plan plus is to give you an opportunity to demonstrate your understanding of the theoretical foundations explored in this class and how theory should inform classroom instruction. Please note that you need to include the appropriate Indiana Content Literacy Standards and WIDA Can-Do Indicators in your lesson plan that effectively support the content area objective you have set out for the lesson and is appropriate for the level of English learners in your class.

You will need to provide a rationale for the instructional practices and student activities you include in your lesson plans. You will have the opportunity to receive formative feedback on your lesson plans from your peers and instructor and you will be allowed to resubmit your first lesson plan. I will grade your lesson plans using the rubric that will be provided. Please make sure your name is within the lesson plan document (not just within the file name).

We will meet for a 20 minute midterm conference concerning your Lesson Plan Plus. You should be nearly finished with your lesson plan. Bring two copies of the lesson plan to the conference. We will discuss your lesson plan and will receive feedback regarding your progress.

Lesson Plan Plus Template

Your name: Natalie Kaczmarski

ED498

Supporting Diverse Learners

Detailed Description of 3 ESL Focal Students (base on field experience students):

Level 2 Spanish speaking male student This student typically speaks in phrases or short sentences in English. He will often talk to other Spanish speaking students in Spanish. The student may often need clearer instructions from the Spanish speaking aide in the classroom. He often uses the same phrases in English with very few variations. He understands the general math vocabulary words. This student is a visual learner. He learns best from visuals and examples. He does not like to speak out loud unless with other Spanish speaking students.

Level 3 Swahili speaking female student from the Democratic Republic of the Congo - This student almost always speaks in English except for between passing periods where she speaks Swahili with her friends. The student often participates in class in English, whether called on or not for attention. She uses some short and complex sentences. She often repeats grammatical structures and uses a variety of sentence patterns. She

understands specific key vocabulary in her mathematics class. This student is an auditory learner. She likes to give steps aloud and explain topics in front of the class.

Level 2 Arabic speaking male student from Jordan This student always speaks in English during class but talks very softly and is often shy around his classmates. He typically speaks using short phrases and understands general math terms. The student is always on task, completing assigned work in a timely manner on his own. He does not speak much to his classmates except for one other student from Jordan. He is a visual learner and prefers to work on his own.

Special Considerations for IEP and/or ESL Individualized Learning Plan (ILP):

I think it is important to consider students with an IEP or ILP. I think that these students may be conceptually challenged with the combination of letters and numbers. Students may struggle with understanding that a variable represents an unknown number. To help them, I will include visuals, lots of talking techniques, pointing, and using the vocab in a mathematical context multiple times. Students with an IEP/ILP will be given extra time to complete the assigned activity. Also, students will work in groups of varying levels so that the students can guide each other and help each other. Also, I will be sure that these students are understanding the material based on a variety of checks during the lesson.

What might be challenging for ELL students?

Concepts

ELL students may have trouble with understanding the need of solving linear equations. They may also have issues identify which values are constants and which are coefficients. Students may not understand the need for linear equations in real life and how they can be applied. Students may struggle which there are letters in math problems.

Prior Knowledge Differences

Some students may home some prior knowledge differences. For instance, students may struggle with the concept of solving for x and the coefficients such as 3x as a multiplication of 3 times some value x. Students may not be used to solving linear equations. They may have trouble thinking of the opposite operation such as addition and subtraction. Students may not be used to math problems with letters.

Key Vocabulary

Linear equation Linear equation is the equation for the straight line in which each term is the constant or product of a constant.

Variable - Variable is a symbol (usually a letter) that represents a value.

Coefficient - In an algebraic expression, a coefficient is a numerical or constant quantity placed in front of a variable.

Constant - A fixed value. In Algebra, a constant is a number on its own.

Content Standards, Objectives, & Assessments

Indiana Academic Standard: (for English, math, science, social studies, world language) http://www.doe.in.gov/standards .

AI.L.1: Understand that the steps taken when solving linear equations create new equations that have the same solution as the original. Solve fluently linear equations and inequalities in one variable with integers, fractions, and decimals as coefficients. Explain and justify each step in solving an equation, starting from the assumption that the original equation has a solution. Justify the choice of a solution method.

Academic objective: The students will solve and be able to show the complete steps in solving a linear equation of 1 variables with integers, fractions, and decimals as coefficients by completing an activity in groups and a worksheet independently. They will be able to complete the equations by 1) including all steps in the process to find a solution 2) the solution for the equation and 3) be able to understand and explain the process taken to find the solution.

I will know that this lesson was successful if by the end of the lesson, the student is able to: 1) include all the steps in solving linear equations/inequalities 2) find the solutions for the given problems and 3) have the ability to understand and explain the process of finding the solution.

How will you assess this standard/objective?

I will assess my standard/objective in a variety of ways. First and foremost, students will complete a worksheet independently. Before this, however, students will try to solve problems in my lesson in their notes. Students will also work in groups to solve some equations before being turned loose to work on the worksheet independently. I will be sure to go around the room while students are working and interact and answer questions when necessary. I will move around the room to see how quickly people are understanding the material and know to either slow down or speed up the lesson.

Language Standards, Objectives, & Assessments

Indiana Content Literacy Standard: (for math, science, social studies, world language) http://www.doe.in.gov/standards .

9-10.LST.3.1: Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 9-10 texts and topics.

Language objective: The students will be able to solve a linear equation or linear inequality and determine the meaning of the linear equation and the solution. They can take the foreign concept of letters combined with numbers and understand how to solve these symbols.

How will you assess this standard/objective?

I will assess this objective and standard by interacting with the students during the lesson and group activities and by their individual worksheet. Students should be able to label each symbol of a linear equation and solve the equation correctly.

For this LPP develop 5 levels of Performance Indicators based on the WIDA Can-Do Descriptors K-12 for all 4 modalities: Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing. (Yes, this means all 4 modalities must be present SOMEWHERE in this lesson)

Task

Level 1 Entering

Level 2 Beginning

Level 3 Developing

Level 4 Expanding

Level 5 Bridging

Listening

Match oral content- related words to the parts of a linear equation

Match oral content- related words and follow modeled oral commands of solving the equation

Identify the main ideas of how to solve for a linear equation and understand the vocabulary used orally

Follow the steps given orally of solving a linear equation and identify the details of oral discussions of how to solve the equations from other classmates

Solve the equation and recognize the important steps in the oral discussion of how to solve for the equation

Speaking

Read the linear equation using some of the essential math words for the lesson:

Read the linear equation aloud and name the parts of the equation (coefficients, variables, and constants)

Speak about the steps taken to solve the equation using the essential words: linear equation, coefficient, variable, and constant

Describe the process that you have completed of solving a linear equation using the terms linear equation, coefficient, variable, constant, and other math appropriate terms for explanations

Describe the process that you have completed of solving a linear equation and can apply this to a real- world situation. Should use a variety of mathematical words including linear equation, constant, variable, and coefficient.

linear equation, coefficient, variable, and constant

Reading

Identify the variables and types of coefficients of a linear equation

Identify the variables and types of coefficients and begin the solving process of a linear equation

Understand the parts of the linear equation and solve the equation

Interpret the linear equation in terms of variables and coefficients and solve the equation

Interpret the linear equation in terms of variables and coefficients and solve the equation and use in an application

Writing

Label and identify the steps of solving the linear equation in order

Begin to solve a linear equation in the correct sequence of order

Solve the equation

Solve the equation in a step-by-step process, some missed steps may be acceptable

Solve the equation in a step-by-step process, without any missed steps

The Lesson Plan

Stage and activity(ies)

What the teacher is doing

What the students are doing

Why you made these instructional decisions (explicit/cited connections to research-based theory and professional practices for EL students)

How will you introduce the lesson concepts and/or skills?

1.

I will begin the lesson by first

1.

Students will be getting in groups

1. Group work is often used in ELL classrooms. This allows for students of varying abilities to work together (Peregoy & Boyle, 2008, 82).

placing the student in groups of two or three. I will assign the groups so that there is variety of mathematics levels in the group. I will also put

of 2 or 3.

 

2.

Students will be working in groups

to answer questions A, B, C and be

students who speak the same first language together.

looking at visuals.

2.

This allows for students that speak the

3.

Students will be listening to my

same language to interact in their native language if necessary. Allowing students to speak in their native language plays a major role in ELL student learning. Native language should be permitted in ELL classrooms (Moughamian, Rivera, & Francis, 2009, 21. This is a talk move activity so that students only have to worry

2.

I will show a linear equation on

answers and sharing any answers they

the board. I will present various visuals such as graphs and images to represent these linear equations. I will also show how slope correlates with linear equations both visually

found as a group.

4.

Students will be repeating the term

“linear equation”. They will also be viewing a variety of linear equations

and orally. I will have students answer these questions in there

and answering what all the equations have in common.

about filling in the blanks and can elaborate as much as possible (Williams, Stathis, & Gotsch, 2009, 3). Students can speak aloud in small groups. This is also building on prior knowledge and almost is like a KWL chart type of activity (Peregoy & Boyle, 2008, 74).

groups orally. A) This math problem

looks

B) I think we are

 

5.

Students will be listening to the

supposed to solve for

C) This

definition of a linear equation, writing the definition down, and reading it

problem could be used to solve

 

aloud.

3.

I will share what I think their

 

3.

Students will feel more comfortable to

possible answers may have been such as A) I think this math problem looks different than most. B) I think we are supposed to solve the problem for some x. C) I think this problem could be used to solve a real-life situation, but I’m not sure how exactly. Students can agree with my answers or share some other answers that their group

found.

share after working with their small group first. Also, I will give answers that are similar to their first that way they will feel comfortable (Bondie, R., Gaughran, L., &

Zusho, A., 2014, 44).

4.

Students can speak the term aloud

multiple times to better understand the term. They can also visually see a variety of

linear equations and compare. Comparing activities are great in mathematics for ELLs (NYU, 2009, 10). This provides a visual. Variety is always important so that students understand that linear equations do not always look exactly the same.

4.

I will explain to students that this

is a linear equation. I will ask them

to repeat the word after me. I will then show a variety of linear equations to the students. I will ask them what all the linear equations have in common.

5.

Students will hear the important term,

write it down, and read their own handwriting. This uses the different parts of speaking, listening, speaking, reading

5.

I will explain the definition of a

writing (Freeman-Field, R., 2012, 4).

linear equation and ask that the students write it down and read it

aloud.

 

How will you teach the lesson concepts and/or skills?

6.

First and foremost, I will first need

6.

Students will be participating in the

6.

Students will first hear, speak, write, and

to explain a linear equation and the key vocabulary necessary to understand for the lesson. I will pass around note cards for students to write down the definitions for the four vocabulary words and draw a visual representation to represent each word (linear equation, variable, constant, and coefficient). Before they write down any definitions, I will explain the key terms. We will repeat the definitions and words aloud. They will be given time to fill out the notecards, review them alone, and also discuss them in

vocabulary explanation by first listening. They will repeat after me. Then, they will write the definitions and examples for each vocab word on each notecard. They will also draw an

read the key terms for the lesson. This promotes learning with all their senses and for different types of learners. They also have notecards to use as a reference

 

(Freeman-Field, R., 2012, 4).

7.

Students need to be sure they

image to represent each word. After making them, they will review over

them independently. Then, they will discuss the terms with other people in

understand the terms of a linear equation. Learning math vocabulary is essential (NYU,

their group.

7. Students will be identifying the terms of a linear equation and reading the linear equations out loud. They will do one with the entire class and a few with their group mates.

2009, 3). We allow students to do one as a big group and gain confidence. Then, they will feel better to work alone (Bondie, R., Gaughran, L., & Zusho, A., 2014, 44).

8.

Students are using their speaking skills.

Students will visually watch and listen to

groups.

the steps of the equation, repeating the words (Hill & Flynn, 2006, 4).

7. Then, I will ask students to identify the terms of a few linear equations and read the equations aloud orally. We will do one together as a class and a few in groups.

8.

As a group, the students will be

listening and following along as I show

 

them how to solve a linear equation. They will be repeating what I say and will not be taking the notes just yet.

9. Then, they will write it down. This is good for many different styled learners (Bondie, R., Gaughran, L., & Zusho, A., 2014, 44).

8. We will look at a new linear equation. I will ask students to read the equation aloud with me. I will tell the students that we will now solve a linear equation together. I will discuss aloud how to solve the equation, asking students to repeat certain portions of how to solve. I will ask that students do not write down the first example as I want their brains focused on this equation

9.

Students will write down the steps

to solve the equation in their notes.

10.

Students will gain confidence and need

10. Students will be taking notes, listening to me describe the steps, and they will also be speaking the steps out loud.

much repetition to better understand a new concept (SIOP, n.d., 38).

11.

Students are using their listening skills

which better promotes learning and picking up English faster (Freeman-Field, R., 2012,

11.

Students will listen to the

4).

applications and uses for linear

equations.

12.

Active movement plays an important

role in all learning (Levine and McClosky, 7).

This is a talk move. Students will feel

and not copying what I write on the board.

12.

Students will be moving around

comfortable with sharing their answers and finishing the given statements before (Williams, Stathis, & Gotsch, 2009, 3).

the room solving the linear equations.

9. I will ask students to write down the steps I have taken to solve the equation.

Groups will work together but must all show their own work. Also, one

student in the group will explain to the group the steps taken to solve the equation for each question and answer these statements “This is my strategy….” “This is how I solved the

10.

equations and we will work them together. Students will be talking through the steps to solve, writing

I will put up a few linear

 

equation…”

“The steps that I have

the steps, and listening to me as I discuss the steps.

taken to solve for the variable _ are ”

11.

I will then discuss the

applications for linear equations.

12. I will have 12 linear equations placed around the room numbered. Each group will begin with a different equation. The groups will travel around the room solving each equation. I will ask students to work together. Each student must have their own work to turn in. I will be going around answering questions and seeing how well the students are understanding the material. Students should take turns explaining how to solve the equation aloud by answering these statements “This is my strategy….” “This is how I solved the equation…” “The steps that I have taken to solve for the variable _ are ”

How will you help your students to draw conclusions and/or self-assess on the lesson concepts and/or skills?

13.

I will call the class back together

13. Students will be completing homework on their own, asking questions, and drawing conclusions as to how well they understand the material.

13.

This is important as students can

and again ask for questions. I will then pass out the homework and ask students to complete the first problem on their own. After the have found the solution, they will check their work with mine on the board. They will be able to see how well they are doing and what they need to work on. They will have class time to work on their homework and I will go around to answer any questions. Then, students will be able to self-assess their progress based on how well they do the homework.

better understand how much they understood from their lesson. They can ask questions. They have gained much confidence after working in groups (SIOP,

   

n.d., 38).

References

Bondie, R., Gaughran, L., & Zusho, A. (2014). Fostering English Learners' Confidence. Educational Leadership, 72(3), 42-46.

Freeman-Field, R. (2012). WIDA Focus on differentiation part 1. file:///C:/Users/kbrooks/Downloads/WIDA_Focus

Hill & Flynn. (2006). Classroom Instruction that works with English Language Learners. Stages of Second Language Acquisition, 14-21.

Levine & McCloskey (2009). Teaching Learners of English in Mainstream Classrooms (K-8). Pearson. 1-26.

Moughamian, A., Rivera, M., & Francis, D. (2009). Instructional models and strategies for teaching English language learners. Portsmouth, NH: RMC Research

Corporation, Center on Instruction. http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED517794.pdf.

Peregoy & Boyle, 2008 Classroom Practices for English Language Learners. My Education Lab.

SIOP (n.d.). Comprehensible Input. SIOP. 80-95.

NYU, (2009). Math Module for ELLs. ELLs and Mathematics. http://steinhardt.nyu.edu/scmsAdmin/

uploads/004/738/NYU_PTE_Math_Module_For_ELLS_Oct_8_2009.pdf

Williams, C., Stathis, R., & Gotsch, P. (2009). Managing student talk in the English language development classroom. Ruidoso, NM: Teacher Writing Center.

LPP Rubric

Emerging

Basic

Competent

Proficient

(approaches standard)

(meets standard)

(exceeds standard)

Most of the competent criteria, but…

All competent criteria, and…

/8

Standard 1.b. Language Acquisition and Development Candidates understand and apply theories and research in language acquisition and development to support their ELLs’ English language and literacy learning and content-area achievement.

points

Listed key content area vocabulary, potential conceptual challenges, and potential prior knowledge differences/difficulties do not reflect research and theory presented in ED497 and ED498 or are weak/ missing/ incorrect

Lists a few vocabulary, potential conceptual challenges, and/or potential prior knowledge differences.

Identifies key content area vocabulary, potential conceptual challenges, and potential prior knowledge differences that reflect a general understanding of the needs of ELL students.

Description of target ELL students’ language proficiency levels, learning styles, and academic development included.

Most relevant key content area vocabulary, potential language difficulties, and potential prior knowledge differences/difficulties listed and based on the needs of the target ELL students. They reflect research and theory presented in ED408, ED398/497, and ED498.

The differentiation criteria is not consistently tied to both content and language objectives. Few or no objectives are taught and assessed.

The differentiation plan delineates assessment criteria that have some connections to language objectives. The differentiation by language proficiency level attempts to allow students to understand and/or show what they know in developmentally appropriate ways. The WIDA table

The differentiation plan delineates instruction and/or assessment criteria that have explicit connections to language objectives. The differentiation by language proficiency level allows students to understand and/or show what they know in somewhat developmentally

The differentiation plan delineates clear assessment criteria that have explicit connections to language objectives. The differentiation by language proficiency level allows students to understand and/or show what they know in developmentally appropriate

 

shows differentiation for productive or receptive language.

appropriate ways. The WIDA table shows differentiation for both productive and receptive language.

ways. The WIDA table shows differentiation for both productive and receptive language.

/8

Standard 3.a. Planning for Standards-Based ESL and Content Instruction Candidates know, understand, and apply concepts, research, and best practices to plan classroom instruction in a supportive learning environment for ELLs. They plan for multilevel classrooms with learners from diverse backgrounds using standards-based ESL and content curriculum.

points

Standards and/or objectives inappropriate for grade level or missing, AND/OR unrelated to the lesson plan.

Includes standards and objectives. Standards and/or objectives unclear, and/or unrelated to each other.

Includes clear, interrelated standards and objectives.

Includes clear, interrelated standards, content objectives, and language objectives. These elements reflect natural opportunities for academic language development.

Lesson plan does not reflect an understanding of research, theory, and practical strategies addressed in Cores

Lesson plan reflects some research, theory, and practical strategies addressed in Cores 1-3. There is a lot of inconsistency in applying these understandings to lesson plan.

Lesson plan reflects research, theory, and practical strategies addressed in Cores 1-3. Some inconsistency in applying these understandings to lesson plan.

Exceeds expectations. Lesson plan reflects a thorough understanding of research, theory, and practical strategies addressed in Cores 1-3. These understandings are consistently applied to lesson plan.

1-3.

/8

Standard 3.b. Implementing and Managing Standards-Based ESL and Content Instruction Candidates know, manage, and implement a variety of standards-based teaching strategies and techniques for developing and integrating English listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Candidates support ELLs’ access to the core curriculum by teaching language through academic content.

points

Few or no opportunities for schematic connections. Few or no connections to real-life problems. Few or no opportunities for higher order thinking planned.

Inconsistent opportunities for schematic connections. Inconsistent connections to real-life problems. Higher order thinking not emphasized.

Provides students with some opportunities to make schematic connections. Provides opportunities for student exploration of higher-order thinking real-life problems.

Provides students with many opportunities to make schematic connections (text to self, text to text, and text to world). Opportunities planned for students to be responsible for posing questions and exploring higher order thinking real-life problems.

No opportunities for meaningful student engagement and discussion. No native language use is encouraged.

Few opportunities for meaningful student engagement and discussion. Little use of the native language is encouraged.

Provides some opportunities for active student discussion and engagement. When more than one speaker of a language is present, students have opportunities to clarify their understanding in their native languages.

Provides many opportunities for student choice & active engagement. When more than one speaker of a language is present, students have opportunities to engage in discussions in their native languages and in English. Student group conversations have clear expectations (a protocol) and explicit outcomes.

Missing one or more language skills. No academic language development strategies are emphasized.

Provides inconsistent opportunities for reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Strategies and activities support content and/or language objectives.

Students have some opportunities for reading, writing, speaking, and listening throughout the lesson. Students practice using a specific strategy that they can use to become better readers, writers, listeners, and/or speakers.

Students have opportunities for reading, writing, speaking, and listening throughout the lesson. The teacher scaffolds (modeling/coaching) the students in learning a specific strategy that they can use to become better readers, writers, listeners, and/or speakers. The strategy is taught using authentic text or conversation, not using a worksheet or workbook.

/4

Standard 3.c. Using Resources and Technology Effectively in ESL and Content Instruction Candidates are familiar with a wide range of standards-based materials, resources, and technologies, and choose, adapt, and use them in effective ESL and content teaching.

points

Limited visual or experiential support. Few, irrelevant or inappropriate visual or hands-on materials integrated into lesson plan.

Inconsistent use of visual or experiential support.

Some use of visual and experiential support. Provides supplementary materials /activities to support student understanding (pictures, videos, audio, manipulatives, graphic organizers, etc.). Visual or hands-on materials support language or content objectives.

Strong use of visual and experiential support. Provides materials/ activities to support student understanding (pictures, videos, audio, manipulatives, graphic organizers, etc.). Instructional materials support language and content objectives and reflect student anticipated difficulties listed in the student characteristics section.

/8

Standard 4.c. Classroom-Based Assessment for ESL Candidates know and can use a variety of performance-based assessment tools and techniques to inform instruction for in the classroom.

points

Standards and objectives aren’t assessed OR WIDA Can-Do Indicators are missing or ineffectively used to differentiate assessments for each level of language proficiency.

Most standards and objectives are assessed. Candidates inconsistently use WIDA Can-Do Indicators to differentiate assessments for each level of language proficiency.

All standards and objectives are assessed. Candidates effective use WIDA Can-Do Indicators to differentiate assessments for each level of language proficiency.

Candidates use a variety of observational and/or performance assessments to assess students.

/4

Standard 5.a. ESL Research and History Candidates demonstrate knowledge of history, research, educational public policy, and current practice in the field of ESL teaching and apply this knowledge to inform teaching and learning.

points

Makes no explicit connections to research/theory, OR reference citations and bibliography are missing

Makes few explicit connections, or reference citations and a bibliography are used inconsistently, or inaccurately uses some key terms

Grounds discussion in current research and theory on second language acquisition and learning. Cites relevant sources to support conclusions.

Cites multiple and most relevant texts, researchers, and theorists throughout the analysis and discussion.