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Where is Greek spoken?

Greek is the official language of Greece, which is also called the Hellenic Republic, and is also one
of the official languages of the Republic of Cyprus. There are big Greek and Cypriot communities in
the US, the UK, Australia, Germany, Canada, Chile, South Africa and Russia, but also in
neighboring countries, such as Albania, Bulgaria and Turkey.

How hard is it to learn?

Its fairly easy to learn to read Greek as most letters and sounds already exist in English. The
Greek language has three genders: masculine, feminine and neuter, so the word the is written in
three ways:

[o] for masculine, [ee] for feminine, [to] for neuter.

Moreover, the word the is also used before place names, for example - [to Lonthino],
literally the London, or a persons name, for example [ee Maria], the Mary.

Articles
Masculine article: o
Singular Plural
Nom.
Gen.
Acc. ()
Voc. - -
The final - of the accusative is maintained before , , , , , , , .
Feminine article:
Singular Plural

Nom.
Gen.
Acc. ()
Voc. - -
Neutral article:
Singular Plural
Nom.
Gen.
Acc.

1
Fill in the correct article (, , ) and ending (-, -, -, -, -, -) in the nouns below

The pronominal pronouns:

Singular Plural
1st
ego I We emeis
person
2nd
esy you You eseis
person
aftos he they (masc.) aftoi
3rd
afti she they (fem.) aftes
person
afto it they (neutr.) afta

Personal pronouns are not used as frequently in Greek as in English as the person of the verb
(E.g. I, you, etc is indicated from the ending. They are used for emphasis or when it is not clear
to whom the verb refers from the context. So in the phrase ' (he wants coffee)
it is not necessary to use '' (he) as this is clear from the ending of the verb ''.

verb "to be" - present tense verb "to be" - past tense
eime I am emoun I was
eise you are esoun you were
einai he,she,it is itan he,she,it was
eimaste we are or imaste-
we were
or eise- imastan
you are
eisaste or you were
einai they are they were

Verb to be negative
den eime I am not
den eise you are not
den einai he, she, it is not
den eimaste we are not
or deb eiste / den eisaste you are not
den einai they are not

2
What not to say and do

When visiting Greece you will frequently hear the word [malakas] or [malaka]
used freely amongst friends, especially amongst males. Its slang for pal, stupid or incapable, but
beware, it can be quite offensive to use malaka with someone you dont know very well.

If youre driving in Greece and see another driver extend all their fingers
with the palm of the hand pointing towards another driver in a forward
motion, this isnt them saying hi! A [mouja] its a traditional,
insulting gesture used by the Greeks and is usually followed by a verbal
insult such as , [na, malaka], take that, malaka, or
[stravadi], which roughly translates to watch where youre going. The
angry person might also use both hands to strengthen the gesture,
smacking the palm of one hand against the back of the other, in the direction of the intended
recipient... well, you get the gist!

How to be polite and show respect Greek is one of those languages that differentiates between
a formal and informal you: [esy] for people you can be on first-name terms with, such as close
friends and children, and [eseis] in all other cases

People of all ages often address another person with [kyrie], Mr or [kyria], Mrs
followed by their first name. This is a polite way to address people who are older than you are or
can simply be used out of respect

Greetings: Greeks are often expressive in their greetings. Friends and relatives hug and kiss upon
meeting, while others shake hands. Men often slap each other's back or arm at shoulder level
instead of shaking hands. People use a variety of verbal greetings; the situation dictates the
greeting they choose. One term meaning Good morning is Kalimra. Good evening is Kalispra.

Gestures: Gestures frequently are used among Greeks of a similar social status; using some
gestures with superiors or elders may be improper. To indicate no, one tilts the head backward;
nodding the head slightly forward means yes. Pointing a finger at someone is impolite; it often
indicates a threat or contempt. A person may release a puff of breath through pursed lips to ward
off the jealousy of the evil eye after he or she has given or received a
compliment. People may also try to ward off the evil eye by repeating a short
saying or performing a small ritual and prayer at home.Geographically Greece
is a mountainous peninsula surrounded by water. Due to the 13,676 km of
coastline and the 2,000 Greek islands, of which only 168 are inhabited, the
Greeks developed since the ancient times a strong connection with the sea. This is why the Greeks
have a long tradition in navigation, ship building and marine trade, which historically led to
interconnection with other people.

3
The Greek music is of unbelievable diversity due to the creative Greek
assimilation of different influences of the Eastern and Western culture of Asia
and Europe. Music indancing and music were inseparable and played an
important part in the ancient Greek everyday life and culture. Greece has a
long history dating from the ancient times, during which poetry, dancing and
music played an important part in the ancient Greek everyday life and culture. Dancing and music
were inseparable and played an important part in the ancient Greek everyday life and culture.

The Greek cuisine is famous for its good quality products and the amazing
taste of its food and wines. Some dishes are the same everywhere in Greece,
whereas some others are local culinary specialties. The same dishes can be
cooked differently or with different ingredients depending on the region. Food
is an important part of the Greek culture.

There are many museums around Greece that mostly host archaeological
findings or folk items. The most interesting are the archaeological museums
that host exhibits from the prehistoric till the Roman times. The New Acropolis
Museum, the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, the Archaeological
Museum of Olympia and the Heraklion Archaeological Museum are worth a
visit.

Many cultural events take place in Greece all year round. Particularly famous is
the Athens Epidaurus Greek Festival, with events in the Ancient Theatre of
Epidaurus, the Herodeion Theatre in Athens and other venues. Such festivals
with music concerts, theatre performances, lectures and custom revivals take
place in all Greek islands and towns, usually in summer, presenting the local
culture and occasionally hosting international participations.

Nights in Greece are a delight. A summer night out usually starts with a dinner
at the many taverns and restaurants in the Greek islands and continue with a
soft drink in a lounge bar or with a crazy night in a club till the sunrise. It is
almost part of the Greek culture to have dinner in a traditional tavern during
holidays. Some places known for their nightlife are Mykonos, Crete, Kos,
Rhodes and more.

Going out for a coffee is a special habitude for the Greeks, a strong part of their
culture. The average coffee meeting for a Greek is about 1 and half hour. The
Greeks get together over a coffee and chat loudly. In the village squares, you
will see the traditional type of cafeteria in Greece, the kafenion. Mostly old men
go there to drink their traditional Greek coffee, chat and play cards.

4
Letter Name Pronounced When speaking, sounds like
Upper, lower
A, alpha AHL-fah Ah - -
, vita VEE-tah the letter v - -
the letter y when it comes before e, u, i;
, gamma GHAH-mah
otherwise like a soft gargle gh -

, thelta THEL-tah hard th as in "there" -
, epsilon EHP-see-lon Eh -
, zita ZEE-tah the letter z -
, ita EE-tah Ee -
, thita THEE-tah soft th as in "through" -
, iota YO-tah Ee -
, kappa KAH-pah the letter k -
, lamtha LAHM-thah the letter l -
, mu mee the letter m - -
, nu nee the letter n - -
, xee ksee the letter x - -
, omikron OH-mee-kron Oh -
, pi pee the letter p - -
, ro roh, roe a rolled r - -
, , sigma SEEGH-mah the letter s -
, tau tahf the letter t -
, upsilon EWP-see-lon Ee -
, phi fee the letter f -
, chi hee a light gargly ch as in "challah" -

, psi psee ps as in "chips"
, omega oh-MEH-ghah somewhere between "awe" and "oh"- -

The Greek alphabet has 24 letters and shares many common elements with the English alphabet.
Several letters look and sound the same, although some look less familiar in the lower case, for
example .A few others are false friends, which look familiar but sound quite different, for
example , which is the equivalent of R r. There are a few remaining letters which look
completely different, like and .

5
Certain words are easily recognizable when written in Greek letters, for
example some names of people, places or brands and foreign words which
have been taken into Greek from English and other languages.
the hard d sound is made using "nt",
the b sound is created by putting together "m" and "p",
the j sound is created with a combination of "t" and "z", which doesn't quite match but comes
close, and the same goes for the hard ch sound, which is written using "ts" - except in Crete
where, in the local dialect, the letter k is often given the hard ch sound.

Vowels

The vowels are , , , , , , . The remaining letters are consonants. Vowels are either short or
long. There are separate Greek characters (, , , ) for the e and o sounds, but not for a, i, and
u sounds. In this book the long vowels are designated by macron- a straight line that appears
above the vowel when it is long- , , , , the short vowels are , , , .

Consonants

The consonants are divided into semivowels, mutes and double consonants.
The semivowels are , , , , , and -nasal (10). , , , are liquids, is a siblant.

Diphthongs

A diphthong is a combination of two vowel sounds in a single syllable. The Diphthongs are , ,
, , , , , . The last three, formed by writing under , , , are called improper
diphthongs.

Diphthongs Pronunciation Notes


Pronounced like mine or iron.
[ai] Pronounced the same as hour.
Pronounced the same as .
Pronounced like moist or oyster.
[oi] Pronounced the same as .
Pronounced the same as .
[ei] Pronounced like main or same.

6
The verb to be Future Simple

Future Indicative
Oristiki'
1st sg. Ego tha i'me I will
2nd sg. Esi tha i'se you will
3rd sg. Aftos afti afto tha he, she,
i'ne it will
1st pl. Emis tha i'maste we will
2nd pl. Eseis tha i'saste you will
3rd pl. Afti tha i'ne they will

The verb have

The verb have is one of the most useful ones in any language. In Greek, it is a regular verb.
This means that there is a fixed pattern for forming its endings. In the table below, weve shown
the ending for each pronoun in red

Singular Plural

First Person
I have ego eho we have emis ehoume

Second
Person you have esi ehis you have esis ehete

they (m) afti

Third Person he - aftos


have
they (f) aftes
ehoun
has
she - afti
ehy
they (n) afta

it - afto

THE VERB TO HAVE

ho aftoknito I have a car


ho ponokfalo I have a headache
; Mpos heis na styl? Do you have a pen?
ho diavsei I have read

7
Greek Nouns. Singular
Masculine nouns change their ending depending on the case. The definite article also differs or
disappears altogether in the singular depending on case and gender.
Case Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative
Accusative
Vocative

Greek Nouns. Plural

There is no indefinite article in the plural.


To form the plural of a masculine noun ending - or -, replace the ending with .
To form the plural of a masculine noun ending - , replace the ending with -.
To form the plural of a feminine noun replace the last letter with -.
To form the plural of a neuter noun replace the last letter with -.

The definite article can either change or be ommitted completely depending on gender and case.

Case Masculine Feminine Neuter


Nominative
Accusative
Vocative

A few examples of plurals in the nominative.


(ticket) to eisitirio ' (tickets) ta ysytyria
(the seat) oi thesis (seats) ythesys
(the train) to treno (the trains) ta trena
(the station) o stathmos (the stations) oi stathmoi

The pronouns for he, she, it and they are also used for the this and these.
This , , afto, afty, afto
These , , aftoi, aftes, afta

this porter (masculine noun) aftos o ahthoforos


this case (feminine noun) afti y valitsa

8
Prepositions
In Greek prepositions come before nouns and the noun usually takes the Accusative case.

horis without

horis gala without milk

me gala with milk

me banyo with bathroom

me ntouz with shower

para to (time related)

einai enteka para tetarto it is quarter to eleven

ke and (also past)

einai teserys ke tetarto it is quarter past four

Prepositions. From
apo from
ap edo from here
ap tn Athina from Athens

Prepositions. For
gia for
..; afto einai to treno gia..? is this the train for ..?
gia tyn Patra for Patras
gia tyn Athina for Athens
.. ena eisitirio gia. a ticket for/to
efharisto gia ts plyrofories thanks for the information
(plural)

Prepositions. At, In, On, To

The Prepositions '' can mean 'at', 'in', 'on' or 'to' depending on the context.
se at, in, on, to
borite na mou dyxete sto Can you show me on the map?
harti?
olos o kosmos pygainei sto everyone goes to the cafeteria
kafenio

9
Goodbye Gia sou ou
Hallo Gia sou / Avio
Please Parakalo p
Thank you Efkharisto Efkharisto
You're welcome Parakalo p
Yes Neh
No Okhee
How are you? Tee kanis? ;
I'm fine, thank you eemay kala, efkharisto ,
I'm not well Then eemay kala v
Do you speak English? Milas anglika? ;
Pleased to meet you Khaero poly X o
I need help, please Khreeazome voeetheea, X o
parakalo p
I'm sorry Zitao syghnome v
My name is ... To onoma mou einai To vo o ...
I don't understand Then katalaveno
See you later Tha ta poume! o!
Hi Gia! !
Bye! - Gia! !
Great! fantastika v!

Days of the week in Greek: Imeres tis evdomadas

Sunday KeeriakEE
Monday DehFTEhra
Tuesday TREEtee
Wednesday TeTArtee
Thursday PEmptee
Friday ParaskeVEE
Saturday SAvatoh

; Ty mera eine simera? What day is it today?


. Simera ine Savato. Today is Saturday.

10
USEFUL EXPRESSIONS

K..

English (Greek)

Welcome / / Kals orsate /


/
Kals rthate /Kals rthes
Hello (General greeting) ! / / Gia / Gia su /Ya sas
Hello (on phone) / Lgete / Embrs
How are you? ; / ; Pos ste? / Pos se?
; / ; Ti knete? / Ti knis?
Reply to 'How are you?' (), . ; Kal [me], sas efharist.
(), . ; Ess?
Kal [me], efharist. Es?
we haven't talked for a long ! Ker hume na ta pme!
time" ! Ker ho na sas do
Long time no see

What's your name? ; Ps sas lne?


; Ps lgeste?
; Ps lgese?
; Ps onomzeste?
; Ps onomzese?
; Py ne to nom sas?
; Py ne to nom su?
My name is ... .. Me lne ...
... Onomzome
.. Lgome ...
I'm from ... ... Eme ap
... Katgome ap
Pleased to meet you Hrika ya tin gnorimia
Hrika
Good morning Kali mera

Good afternoon Kal apyevma

Good evening Kalispra - when arriving

11
Kalo vradi - when leaving
Good night Kalinhta
Good luck ! Kal thi
Cheers! ! Stin iy su!
(Toasts used when drinking) ! Stin iy mas! - including
! self
! Stin iy sas! - not including
Is iyan
Have a nice day N ehis omorfi mera
May you be well" ! Nste kal!

Bon appetit / ! Kal reksi!


Have a nice meal
Bon voyage / ! Kal taksdi!
Have a good journey
I understand Katalavno
I don't understand Then katalavno
Yes Ne
No Ochi
Maybe Isos
I don't know Den xro
Please speak more slowly Parakal milte pyo arg
Parakal mla pyo arg
Do you speak English? ; Milte anglik?
How do you say ... in Greek? ... Pos lte sta Ellink?
; Pos les sta Ellinik?
Excuse me ! Me sinhors
! Me synhorte
How much is this? ; Psa kostzi aft?
; Pso kni aft?
Sorry ! Sygnmi
I'm saddened ! Lypme
Please Parakalo
Thank you Efharist
Efharist pol
Reply to thank you Parakal
Where's the toilet? ; Pu ne i tualta?
; Pu ne to bo?

12
This gentleman will pay for O krios tha plirsi gi la
everything
This lady will pay for I kira tha plirsi gi la
everything
Would you like to dance with ; Thlis na horpsis maz mu?
me? ; Thlete na horpsete maz
mu?
I miss you Mou lipis
I love you Sagap

Get well soon Perastik


Leave me alone! ! fis me siho!- m/inf
! fis me sihi!)- f/inf
! Afste me siho! - m/frm

Help! ! Vothia!
Stop! ! ! Stamta!
! Stamatste!
Call the police! Kalste tin astynoma!-
! Klese tin astynoma!
Christmas and New Year ! Kal hristyenna
greetings ! Eftyhismno to No tos!
! Kal hro
Easter greetings Kal psha
Christ has Risen ! Hrists ansti
Truly he has Risen (reply) ! Aliths ansti
Birthday greetings ! Hrnia Poll
! Harmena genthlia!
all right, OK entaksi
bless you! (e.g., after ! (s.), ! (p.) ghia' soo! (s.), ghia' sas!
sneezing) (p.)
excuse me, pardon me, (s.), (p.) Sighnomi / me sinchorite
sorry
how are you? ; (s.), ; (p.) ti' ka'nis? (s.), ti' kanete?
(p.)
how do you do? ; (s.), ; (p.) po's i'se? (s.), po's i'ste?
(p.)
OK, allright enta'ksi
what's up? ; ti' ghi'nete?
where am I? where are we? ; ; poo' i'me? poo' i'maste?
yes, right!, I see... , !, ... ne', sosta'!, ma'lista...

13
;

. I am from Athens ImeapotinAthina.


. I live in Plaka. Meno stin Plaka.
. I am at the airport now Tora yme sto aerodromio.

, I am waiting for a gentleman, Mr. Tom Heart


Perimeno ena kyrio, ton kyrio Tom Heart.

, Mr. Heart is from London, but he knows Greek


E. O kyrios Heart ine apo to Londino, alla xery ellynika.

! ; Goodmorning! Do you speak Greek?


: Kalimera! Mylate Ellinika?
! , . Goodmorning! Yes, I do speak Greek.
: Kalimera! Ne milao Ellinika.
; Are you Mr. Heart.
: Yse o kyrios Heart?
. , ; Yes I am. What is your name?
: Ne. Esys, pos legeste?
. My name is Eleni Oikonomou. Pleased to meet you
: . Me lene Eleni Ykonomou. Hero poly.
, ! A, yes! Pleased to meet you Ms. Ykonomou.
: . A, malista! Hero poly kyria Oikonomou
. Do you speak Greek well. Where are you from?
: ; Xerete kala ellynika. Apo pou yste?
, I am from England, from London. How about you?
: . ; Yme apo tin agglia, apo to lonthyno. Esys?
... I am from Athens. Well, shall we leave for the
: , hotel? Yme apo tin Athyna.. Lypon, fevgoume
; gia to xenodohyo.
. One minute. I am waiting for my friend a, there
: ... , ! K , she is! Ms. konomou, this is Mrs. Betty Brown.
She also knows Greek.
. Ena lepto. Perimeno tin fili mou a, naty! Kyria
. konomou,
apo do y kyria Betty Brown. Xery kai afty ellinika.
. ! Pleased to meet you. Welcome! Hero poly.
: Kalos yrthate!
, ! Pleased to meet you, thank you! Hero poly,
: efharisto!
, Mrs. Oikonomou, do you have a car?
: ; Kyria Oikonomou, ehete aftokinito?
, . No, I dont have a car. The hotel is in Syntagma.
: . I live nearby, in Plaka. Shall we take a taxi?
, Ohi, den exo aftokinito. To xenodohio einai sto
. ; Sintagma. Ego meno eki konta, stin Plaka.
Pernoume taxi?
. okay - entaxi
:

14
VOCABULARY LEXILOGIO
Countries Xores /ethnikotita

Australia Afstralia -
Arabic Aravika -
Canada Kanadas -
China Kina -
Egypt Egyptos -
England Agglia Agglia
France Gallia -
Germany Germania -
Greece Ellada -
India India -
Italy Italia -
Japan Iaponia -
Morocco Maroko -
Spain Ispania -
Russian Rosia -
Turkey Tourkia -
USA HPA -

, . .
Goodmorning, my name is Maria. I am from Spain.
Kalimera, me lene Maria. Yme apo tin Ispania.
. .
Hallo. My name is Olga I am from Germany.
Geia sou. Me lene Olga yme apo tin Germania.

;
Do you live in Athens?
Menis stin Athina?
, .
Yes, I live in Kallithea.
Ne, meno stin Kallithea
;
Do you speak Greek?
Milas Ellinika?
, .
Yes, a bit but I am having lessons now.
Ne, ligo alla kano mathimata tora.
;

15
Do you speak Greek Olga?
Esy Olga milas Ellinika?
, .
Yes I speak the language well.
Ne, milao kala tin glossa.

;
Do you want to go for coffee?
Thelys na pame gia kaffe?
.
I would like to but I have to go to work.
Tha ythela alla prepy na pao stin doulia.

, .
Ok, then we will go another day.
Entaxy, tote tha ta pame alli mera.
, .
Good, pleased to meet you.
Orea, harika poly.
. .
I am also pleased to meet you. Goodbye.
Kai ego harika.Antio.

Greek language and culture around the world

Greek is spoken throughout the mainland and islands of Greece, in


the southern part of Cyprus, and by large numbers of Greeks living in
communities in many other countries such as the US, Australia,
Canada and South Africa. The people in this diaspora, from the Greek
word , meaning scattering, retain strong cultural links with
the (patreedha), fatherland, and many still have Greek as
their first language.
In Greece over the past half century there has been a general move
away from the small villages and islands to the larger towns and
cities, which offer better opportunities for education and employment. Sadly, this has meant the
decline of numerous village and island communities and the feeling that something of the more
traditional way of life is gradually being lost.However, Greeks are still very proud of their culture,
and many traditional customs are kept alive in communities at home and abroad. Also, a number
of Greeks are returning to their native villages and islands, often rebuilding the family home,
opening businesses and so adding to the regeneration of certain areas.

16
, ;
, , ;
. .
. .
, .
;
.
.
.
. ;
.
, .
;
, .
, , .
, .

go : /
Present / I go / am
going
Imperfect I was going / Past I went
used to go
Future I will be going Future I will go
Progressive
Subjunctive to be going Subjunctive to go
Progressive
Conditional I would go / be Judgment [] I [possibly]
Progressive going went
Wish / Hope [] [I wish] I could Assumption [] I [must] have
(Optative) go gone
Imperative ! [start] going! Imperative go!
Progressive

17
Do you speak (English/ Milate (Agglika/Ellinika)? (/ );
Greek)?
Just a little. ligo
What's your name? Pos onomazeste? ;
My name is ... Onomazomai.. ...
Mr.../ Mrs./ Miss Kyrios/kyria/despinda / /
Nice to meet you! Harika gia ti gnorimia
You're very kind! Yste poly / / /
kalos/kaly/kaloi/kales
Where are you from? Apo pou yste/katageste? /;
I'm from (the U.S/ Italy) Yme apo tin Ellada/tin /
Italia
I'm (Greek ) Yme Ellinas/Ellenida / E
Where do you live? Pou mentee/katikite? / ;
I live in (the U.S/ Greece) Meno (stin Ameriki/Ellada ( / )
Did you like it here? Sas eresi etho? ;
Greece is a wonderful country Y Ellada einai mia iperohi
hora
What do you do for a living? Ti thoulia kanete? ;
I work as a (translator/ Yme/doulevo os / (/
businessman) (metafrastis/epihirimatias )
I've been learning Greek for 1 Matheno ellinika edo kai (1)
month ena mina .
Oh! That's good! O! Afto einai kalo! ! !
How old are you? Poso hronon yste? () () ;
I'm (twenty, thirty...) yearsold. Yme (ikosi, (, ...)
trianta..)hronon
I have to go Prepy na figo/na pygeno /
I will be right back! Tha yme amesos piso. .

MEETING PEOPLE
How do you do? Nice to meet Ti kanete? Hero poly. ; .
you.
Welcome to thens. Kalosorisate stin thina. .
May I introduce my secretary? Na sas sistiso tin gramatea .
mou.
This is my father. Aftos einai o pateras mou. .
How are you? Pos yse? ;
I'm very well, thank you. yme poli kala, efxaristo. , .
Make yourself at home. San sto spiti sou. .

18
DESCRIBING YOURSELF & YOUR FAMILY
My name is Jennifer. Me lene Jennifer. Jennifer.
I am 27 years old. Yme ikosi chronon. .
I am English. Yme apo tin Anglia. .
I live in London. Zo sto Londino. .
I have two sisters. Eho thio adelfes. .
I do not have a brother. Den exo adelfo. .
She is older than me. Afti einai megaliteri apo emena .
Her name is Rebecca. To onoma mou einai Rebecca. Rebecca.
She is 31 years old. Einai trianta ena xronon. .
I would like to be an Thelo na gino ilektrologos. .
electrician.
My birthday is January Ta genethlia mou ine okto
8th. Ianouariou.
I was born in 1969. Genithika to xilia eniakosia exinta
ennea.
My father is a O pateras mou Einai programatistis.
programmer. .
am a very happy Yme enas poli haroumenos
person nthropos.
My sister is a pretty girl. Y adefi mou ine ena omorfo koritis.
.
My brother is a very O adelfos mou einai enas poli igees
healthy man. andras. .

; his sigkens ed Do you have family here?


o patras mou My father
y mitra mou My mother
o gios mou My son
y kri mou My daughter
nan adelf A brother
mia adelf a sister
mia megalyteri aderfi - mia mikroteri an older sister/a younger sister
aderfi

19
: , ,
. , .
.
, . .
, .

, ,
, . A.
. ,
, .

(ee eeko-yenn-eea), the family, is still very strong in Greece,


with several members of the same family often involved in family businesses
like hotels and tavernas. If you go out for a meal, especially in the summer
when the schools are closed, you are likely to have (oh pa-tair-ass),
father, taking your order, (ee mee-taira), mother, in the kitchen
cooking the food, and (o yoss) and (ee koree), son and
daughter, serving your meal. Families also tend to live in close proximity to
each other, with (ee yaya), grandmother, and maybe even
(oh pappooss), grandfather, looking after small children while the parents are
at work

.
. ,
.
.
, .
, . ,
, ,
. ,
. . , . ,
, , , .
, , .
, , ,
. .
. .
.
.

20
Greeting family and friends - The most useful Greek greeting is - (yiassas). It
can be used for both hallo and goodbye at any time of day when greeting a group of people or
one person. For someone you are on first name terms with you say (yiassou) youll
notice the word for the . When people are introduced by their first name, literally this is
the John, the Mary.

Relationships
he brothers and sisters Ta Adelphia
he children Ta pedia
Engaged aravoniasmenos
The friend / the boyfriend O filos
The friend / the girlfriend Y fili
To live meno
Married pantremenos
Single eleftheros
The engagement aravonas
The relatives y sygenis
The family Y ykogenia
The kiss To fili
To get married pantrevome
To like Mou aresy
Angry thimomenos
Upset Stenahoremenos
To be angry thimono

Greetings & pleasantries


Welcome ! kalosorisate
How are you? ; ti kanete?
Hello / good bye ! ya sass
Good morning ! kalimera
Have fun! ! kali diaskedasi
Good evening ! kalispera
Not at all ! kathe allo
Good night ! kalinihta
Pleased to meet you hero poly
See you soon ! kaly antamosy
See you tomorrow . tha se do avrio
to introduce sistino
to kiss filao
With pleasure ! efharistos
I'm sorry lypame

21
Aunt Voula: What do you mean he don't eat no meat? T ;
i enois aftos den troy kreas?
Oh, that's okay. I make lamb. , . . O afto einai entaxi. Tha
ftiaxo arni.
Toula Portokalos: Dad is so stubborn. What he says goes. "Ah, the man is the head of the
house!"
O . . , !
O pateras einai xerokefalos. Ginete afto pou theli. A, o andras einai y kefali tou spitiou!
Maria Portokalos: Let me tell you something, Toula. The man is the head, but the woman is the
neck. And she can turn the head any way she wants.
, . , .
.
Na sou po kati, Toula. O andras einai to kefali, alla y geinaika einai o lemos. Ke afty mpory na
gyrisy to kefali opou afty thely.
Gus Portokalos: You know, the root of the word Miller is a Greek word. Miller come from the
Greek word "milo," which is mean "apple so there you go. As many of you know, our name,
Portokalos, is come from the Greek word "portokali", which mean "orange." So, okay? Here
tonight, we have, ah, apple and orange. We all different, but in the end, we all fruit.
, . ,
. , , ,
. ! , . ,
, .
Xerete, y riza tis lexis Miller einai Elliniki lexi. Miller proerxete apo tin Elliniki lexi milo, oriste. Opos
xerete, to onoma mas einai Portokalos, proerxete apo tin Elliniki lexi portokali. Entaxi! Edo
apopse, ehoume ena milo kai ena portokali. Ymaste oli diaforetiki. Alla sto telos, ymaste oli frouta.
Maria Portokalos: It's a cake! I know! Thank you! Thank you very, very much.
! ! .
Einai ena keik! To xero! Efharisto poli.
Maria Portokalos: Toula, on my wedding night, my mother, she said to me, "Greek women, we
may be lambs in the kitchen, but we are tigers in the bedroom."
, , . ,
, .
Toula, tin nihta tou gamou mou, y mitera mou ipe. emys y Ellinides, mpory na ymaste arnia stin
kouzina, alla ymaste tigres stin krevatokamara.
Gus Portokalos: There are two kinds of people - Greeks, and everyone else who wish they was
Greek. ,
.
Yparhoun dio ydy anthropon Y Ellines, ke oly y alli pou efhontan na ytan Ellines.

22
.

The day in Greek has a slightly different structure, in accordance with the warmth of the
Mediterranean climate. The morning, (pro-ee), lasts until 1.30 to 2.00 pm, the time when
people tend to eat lunch, traditionally the main meal of the day. This marks the beginning of the
midday (messee-mairee) rest period when people tend to stay in to avoid the heat,
which lasts until around 4.30 to 5.00 pm. This is when the afternoon (apoh-gevma)
starts. Shops re-open and people start moving about again, until the evening, (vrah-dee),
begins at 8.00 pm. Athens Centre is an educational organization founded in 1969 to sponsor
academic and cultural activities in Greece. The Centre is located in Mets, a residential area of
central Athens, about 15 minutes walk from the heart of the city at Syntagma (Constitution)
Square. Mets is well-served by public transportation by bus, metro, tram and trolley from many
areas of Athens, and is perhaps the greenest area of the city, with parks nearby including the
Zappeio and National Gardens, Pangrati Park, and the woods around the old Olympic Stadium
where the first modern Olympics were held.

: ! , Gia! Ti les, pame sto Hey! What do you think,


Syntagma and Ermou shall we go to Syntagma
Street gia psonia kai Square and Ermou Street
; ystera gia mia volta for shopping and to Plaka
stin Plaka gia kafe? for coffee?
: . Orea ithea. Tha paro to Good idea. I will take the
tram apo tin Glyfada tram from Gyfada and
. kai tha sinantithoume we will meet there. But I
, eky. Alla tha would prefer to go to the
protimousa na pame ke Acropolis Museum; I
sto Mousio tis have heard that it is
Akropolis, eho akousi fantastic.
oti einai fantastic.
: . Simfono mazi sou. Alla I agree with you. But
prota na stamatisoume firstly we should stop at
, sto Monastiraki na Monastiraki to eat
. fame souvlakia, giati souvlakia, I am hungry.
. pinao. Exy toses There are many beautiful
omorfes taverns eky. taverns there.
: . Entaxi pame. To vradi Ok, letsgo. What are we
; ti les na kanoume? Na going to do tonight? How
; pame stou Psiri gia about going to Psiri for a
poto. drink.
: Ego tha protimousa na I would prefer to go to
pame sta bouzoukia na the bouzoukia to listen to
. akousoume mousiki. music.

23
Around Acropolis

The temple of Olympian Zeus one of the largest in antiquity and close
by Hadrians Arch which forms the symbolic entrance to the
city. From there, walking along Dionysou Areopaghitou Street (on
the south side of the Acropolis) you pass the ancient Theatre of
Dionysos where most of the works by Sophocles, Euripides, Aeschylos
and Aristophanes were performed. Continuing, you will reach
the ruins of the Asklepieion and the Stoa of Eumenes and from
there the Odeion of Herodes Atticus, which was built in 161 A.D. and
is nowadays the venue of the performances of the Athens Festival.
From there you climb up to the sacred rock of the Acropolis, the site of
some of the most important masterpieces of worldwide architecture and art, the most renowned of
which is the Parthenon temple. Apart from this, also impressive are the Propylaea, the temple of
the Athene Nike and the Erechtheion, while you must not skip a visit to the Museum, located
close to the Parthenon. Moreover, from the rock you have an impressive view of the city.
Only 300m away from the sacred rock of Acropolis stands the impressive Acropolis Museum, one
of the most important contemporary works of architecture in Athens. It is made of steel, glass
and concrete and it houses 4,000 priceless finds from the Acropolis monuments that represent
its history and function as the most important religious centre of ancient Athens.
Coming down from the Acropolis you arrive at the Areios Pagos, the most ancient law court of the
world. Opposite it is Philopappou Hill, with its beautiful cobbled little roads and the Roman
monument by the same name on its top, while close by is the Pnyx, where the citizens of ancient
Athens used to assemble and exert their democratic rights.
Walking farther along the pedestrian road you arrive at the Ancient Agora, which was the
commercial, political and religious centre of ancient Athens. A visit to the archaeological site will
give you the opportunity to become acquainted with the workings of Classical Athenian democracy.
From there, via Ermou Street, you arrive at the Kerameikos, the largest cemetery of the ancient
city, with impressive tomb sculptures and stelae. The Iridanos River, sacred in antiquity, runs
through the archaeological site.

Around neighborhoods of the historical centre


The core of the historic centre is the Plaka neighborhood (at the
eastern side of the Acropolis), which has been inhabited without
interruption since antiquity. When you walk through the narrow
labyrinthine streets lined with houses and mansions from the time of
the Turkish occupation and the Neoclassical period, you will have the
impression of travelling with a time machine. You will encounter
ancient monuments, such as the Lysikrates Monument, erected by a
wealthy donor of theatrical performances, the Roman Agora with the
famed Tower of the Winds and Hadrians Library, scores of
bigger and smaller churches, true masterpieces of Byzantine art and architecture, as well as
remnants of the Ottoman period (Fetihie Mosque, Tzistaraki Mosque, the Turkish Bath near the
Tower of the Winds, the Muslim Seminary, et al.). There are also some
interesting museums (Folk Art, Greek Childrens Art, Popular Musical Instruments, Frysira
Art Gallery, etc.), lots of picturesque tavernas, cafs, bars, as well as shops
selling souvenirs and traditional Greek products.

Continuing from Plaka you arrive at Monastiraki, a characteristic area


of old Athens, with narrow streets and small buildings where the
citys traditional bazaar (Yousouroum) is held. Close to it is the
Psyrri area, a traditional neighborhood which during the past few years
has evolved into one of the most important centres of the
24
towns nightlife, with scores of bars, tavernas, ouzeris, clubs, etc. However, the heart of the
historical centre is the traditional commercial neighborhood, with more than 2,500 shops of all
kinds, which spreads out over the streets surrounding Ermou Street (the citys best-known
commercial street). The western border of the area is Athinas Street, where the foodstuff
commerce is concentrated, reminding one strongly of the Middle East. Here are situated, among
others, the neoclassical mansions of the Town Hall, the Municipal Market (where meat, fish and
vegetables are sold) and spacious Kotzias Square.

Downtown Syntagma and Omonia are the main central squares of the
town; they are linked by Stadiou Street and Panepistimiou Avenue, along
which some of the towns most beautiful Neoclassical buildings have been
erected. Dominating Syntagma Squareis the Greek Parliament building
and in front of it the Monument of the Unknown Soldier, guarded by the
Evzones in traditional costume. From this square starts the
beautiful National Garden, south of which stands the
impressive Zappeion Mansion. From there you can continue towards
the Presidential Mansion and the entrance to the Panathenaikon (Kallimarmaro) Stadium,
where the first Olympic Games in modern history were held (1896). From there, crossing
the Mets neighborhood, the road leads you to the First Cemetery, the oldest one in Athens,
basically an outdoor sculpture display with a wealth of wonderful monumental tombstones by some
of the most important sculptors of the 19 th and 20thcenturies.

From Omonia Square starts Patission street, a busy street with


interesting buildings, amongst which are the Neoclassical mansions of
the Polytechnic School and the National Archaeological Museum,
which ranks among the leading museums in the world and hosts
rare art treasures from the Neolithic era up to the Roman period.
Close to the museum is the Exarheia area, a charming and
very liveleinaiighborhood, traditional a meeting point and home to
many students and artists. From Exarcheia, crossing the Neapoli
neighborhood, you can climb the verdant Lycavittos Hill. From its
top you have a view of the entire city, all the way to the sea. On the other side of the hill is the
Kolonaki neighborhood, whose boundary is Vassilissis Sophias Avenue, one of the most
grandiose streets of Athens with beautiful buildings, many museums (Cycladic Art, Benaki,
Byzantine and Christian Museum, War Museum, National Gallery) and green areas. In Kolonaki,
which is considered to be the most aristocratic area of the centre of Athens, you will find many
shops selling expensive brands and high couture, modern restaurants, bars and cafs, while it is
worthwhile to take a stroll through the central streets with their art dco, art nouveau and
interbellum buildings.

Breathtaking views over Athens Thanks to its rich morphology Athens


has plenty of places where you can admire stunning panoramic views of
the city. Romantic or not, let yourself be captivated by the Athenian
cityscape as seen from above.

Around suburbs he southern suburbs, located on the coast of


the Saronic Gulf, a recreational and cultural park is being planned,
comprising the existing sports facilities. They offer many opportunities to
take a walk along the seaside, while you will also find many beautiful
organized and freebeaches, large shopping centers and nightclubs
(especially during the summer). In the Maroussi suburb (north of the
centre) are the facilities of the Olympic Athletic Centre of Athens,

25
where the majority of the athletic events were held during the 2004 Athens Olympic
Games. Kifissia (north of Maroussi) is also worth a visit, with its beautiful villas and
impressive mansions.

Moreover, if you wish to leave the centre behind you, you may visit, amongst others, the
neighboring town of Piraeus, Greeces main port (which nowadays forms one big conglomerate with
Athens), the Daphni Monastery (11 km. west), one of the most significant Byzantine
monuments of the country with unique mosaics, the Kaisariani which was founded in the
2nd century, the Temple of Poseidon (on Cape Sounion, following a wonderful route along the
coast, the area of the battle of Marathon with the Tomb of Marathon, the archaeological sites
of Eleusina .

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26

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27
;

Athens is full of (kafiteries) caf, where you can enjoy the local specialty, Greek coffee,
( ). When you order you have to specify whether youd like it with two sugars
(), just half (), or none at all ().

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28
. I would like a cup of coffee Thello ena kafe parakalo.
. please.
; What will you have? Ti tha parete?

I would like a cold beer Thelo mia krya bira.


. A Greek coffee. Ena elliniko kafe.
, . sweet Greek coffee. Ena elliniko kafe, glyko.
. I would like a bottle of water. Thelo ena boukali nero.
. Here is your water. Oriste to nero sas.
/; Here you are/Pardon? Oriste/oriste?
Please / Youre welcome Parakalo.
(I) thank you (very Efharisto poli
()/ much)/(We) thank (you)

Waiter: . Kalimera. Ti tha parete? Good morning. What will you


; have?
Man: Tha ithela ena elliniko kafe Id like a Greek coffee without
sketo. sugar

Woman 1: Thelo ena boukali nero. Id like a bottle of water
.
Man 2: Thelo ena frape metrio Id like a frapp with medium
parakalo. sugar, please.
.
Waiter: ; Kati allo? Anything else?
Woman 1: ohi efharistoume. No, (we) thank you
.
Waiter: . Parakalo. Youre welcome
Woman 1: Ohi efharistoume. No, (we) thank you
.
Waiter: . Oriste. Enas ellinikos kafes Here you are. One Greek coffee
sketos, ena boukali nero kai without sugar, one bottle of
, ena frape. water and one frapp.

.
Woman: . Signomi. Oriste. Excuse me. Here you are.
.
Waiter: . Efharisto poli. Thank you very much.

29
Being polite

Do you mind as piraz

Congratulations synhariitiria
Excuse me signomi
Thank you efharisto
Good luck aly tyhy
Many happy returns hronia polla
Cheers stin ygia sou
Dont worry about it min stenahoriese
It doesn't matter then pirazy
Fine orea
Ok entaxy
Just a minute miso lepto
Thats very kind of you poly evgeniko ek merous sas
Have a nice trip kalo taxidy

Caf culture in Greece - Caf culture is thriving in Greece, so if you want to enjoy a drink and
watch the world go by, there are many establishments to choose from.
Apart from the many (kaffe-tair-iyess)cafs, and , bars
where people can go to enjoy a coffee or a drink, an establishment familiar
to visitors to Greece is the (kaffe-nee-oh) or coffee-house. These
are traditionally frequented by men playing (tav-lee), backgammon, or
cards, or engaged in often heated discussions over a cup of Greek
(kaffeh), coffee. This strong brew is mixed to order, so you have to specify
whether you would like it (ghlee-koh), sweet with two sugars,
(meh-tree-oh), medium with half a sugar, or (skettoh), without
sugar. The same choice applies to (frappeh), iced coffee. This refreshing drink is made by
mixing or shaking the coffee granules with sugar and a little water, and can also be enjoyed
(meh ghalla), with milk. The Greeks are not used as much as most Europeans in the filter
coffe and because they have many different kinds is good to know what to ask. If you want filter
coffee you should ask - kafe filtro, If you want a Greek coffe you can say -ena kafe elliniko,
because the Greek coffee is made with the sugar inside you should ask the way you want it like,
without sugar- horis zahari or sketos, medium- metrios, sweet- glykos. The same as above occurs
when you order a caffe frappe the Greek ice coffee, if you want milk in your coffee you should say -
me gala- (with milk)

30
; SHALL WE GO OUT?

Cubanita Havana Club

Cubanita is a great Latin club in Psyrri which usually has a live band and very often
incredible dancers who will take your breath away.

Akrotiri
Athens is famous for its vibrant nightlife. The Athenians like to party and will do so
almost every night of the week. That is why this city has a large number of nightclubs
and bars!

Vrettos
This is another Athen's must stop, even if you're not going to drink the ouzo, just to see
the place and the barrells storing the ouzo.

Half Note Jazz Club Here we are! My favorite venue in Athens for blues/jazz concerts.
Live performances daily from October to May. There are great moments here watching
famous or less famous bands.

Galaxy BarThe Galaxy Bar has a contemporary dcor, plush wooden decking and the
glass top bar makes it distinct. If you come here after dark you will see it transformed
into one of the Athens most fashionable place to meet friends

Festivals

If you happen to be in Greece during June and July, remember that every year the
Hellenic Festival takes place during these two months. The events take place both in
various sites in Athens and the on the islands

360 Cocktail Bar

A unique cocktail bar in the heart of Athens. It is located on the top the roof of a
building in monastiraki square. It offers you a breathtaking, panoramic 360 view of the
whole city

31
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32
; ;

Waiter: . ;
Hello. What would you like?
Man: , .
One bottle of ouzo, please.
Waiter: ;
What mezedes (snacks) will you have?
All: , , , .
One portion of stuffed cabbage / vine leaves, one tzatziki, one portion of
meatballs, and one Greek salad.
Waiter: .
Right away
Woman: .
To your health / Cheers!
Womanandman: . / .
To our health / Our health / Cheers!
Waiter: , , , . .
One Greek salad, one portion of meatballs, tzatziki, one portion of stuffed
vine leaves. Bon apptit.
Woman: , .
The bill, please
Waiter: .
Here you are
Man: .
We thank you
Waiter: .
We thank you too

How much does it costs pose kani ;


What is this? ti ine afto ;
Without oil horis ladi .
A bottle of wine ena boukali krasi .
I don't eat meat then tros keas .
Do you have vegetarian ehete fagito gia .
food hortofagous
Some water please ligo nero parakalo .
A glass of water ena potiri nero .
A fork ena pirouni .
A knife ena maheri .

33
A spoon ena koutali .
Wine krasi
Bread psomi
Salad salata
Tomato ntomata
Potatoes patates
Cucumber agouri
Vinegar ksidi
Cheese tiri
Salt, alati
Pepper, piperi
The bill please ton logariasmo parakalo

CHOOSING WHAT YOU WANT


Would you like something to ; Tha thelate na fate?
eat?
Would you like something to ; Tha thelate kati na piete?
drink?
What would you like to eat? ; Ti tha thelate na fate?
What would you like to ; Ti tha thelate na piete?
drink?
What tipes of sandwiches do ; Ti idi sandwich ehete?
you have?
What flavours do you have? ; Ti gefsis ehete?
What do you recommend? ; Ti sinistate?
RESTAURANTS AND CAFES
Do you have a table for six? ; Ehete trapezi gia exi?
I would like a table near to Tha ithela trapezi konta sto
the window. . parathiro.
I have a table reserved in Tha ithela na kliso trapezi sto
the name Johnson. Johnson onoma Johnson.
I would like to see the Tha ithela na do ton katalogo,
menu, please. . parakalo.
I would like to order now. Tha ithela na parangilo tora.
.
To start, I would like the , Gia arhi, tha ithela tis garides.
prawn/shrimp. .
For the main course, I , Gia kirios piato, tha ithela brizola.
would like steak.
For dessert, I'll have apple , Gia epidorpio, tha ithela milopita.
tart. .
To drink, I would like some , Gia na pio, tha ithela ligo lefko

34
white wine. . krasi.
That's not what I ordered. . Then parigkela afto.
Waiter! ! Servitor!
Could I have the bill, Tha borousa na exo to logariasmo
please? ; parakalo?
Is service included? Perilamvani to bourbouar?
;
I think there is a mistake in Iparhi lathos sto logariasmo.
the bill. .
At Greek restaurants some fish and meat dishes are ordered by the kilo, but more surprisingly so is
wine, , literally a kilo of wine which is a liter or two pints.

; Have you got a menu? Ehete katalogo?


We have pork today Ehome hirino simera
I like (it) maresy
I dont like (it) Den maresy
pork hirino
grilled chicken Kotopoulo sharas
a kilo (i.e. a litre) of white Ena kilo aspro krasi
wine
red wine Kokino krasi
! To your health/to our Stin ygeia sas/stin ygeia mas!
! health
! Bon appit! Kaly orexi
The bill please To logariasmo parakalo

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35

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: .
Hello
: ;
What do you have to day?
: .
Heres the menu.
: , ;
OK, have you decided?
: .
Half a kilo of red mullet
.
Grilled chicken
Woman 2: .
A pork steak with potatoes
.
One portion of whitebait and a kilo of white wine.
: .- , , ,
.
Thanks very much. - Pork steak with potatoes, whitebait, red mullet, grilled chicken.
: .
The bill, please.
Waiter: , . - .
Yes, of course. - Fruit and raki on the house. ! TalkGreek - Olympics

36
.

, .
!
;
.
.
, .
;
. ;
;
. .
. Pasteria, .
.
. ;
.
,
. . .
, .
.


do you have any snacks? ;
do you have any sandwiches? ;
do you serve food? ;
what time does the kitchen close? ;
are you still serving food? ;
a packet of crisps, please ,
what flavour would you like? ;
ready salted
cheese and onion
salt and vinegar
what sort of sandwiches do you have? ;
do you have any hot food? ;
today's specials are on the board
is it table service or self-service?
;
what can I get you? ;
would you like anything to eat? ;
could we see a menu, please? , ;
I'll have the same, please ,

37
nothing for me, thanks ,
I'll get these
Keep the change! !
cheers! !
whose round is it? ;
it's my round
it'syourround
another beer, please ,
another two beers, please ,
same again, please ,
are you still serving drinks? ;
lastorders! !


do you have internet access here? ;
do you have wireless internet here? ;
whats the password for the internet? ;

do you smoke? ; ;
no, I don'tsmoke ,
I'vegivenup
Do you mind if I smoke? ; ;
would you like a cigarette? ;
have you got a light? ;

38
; !

In Greek numbers from 1 to 20 are unique and therefore need to be memorized individually.
Numbers from 21 and upwards are formed by using the following pattern: for example 21 can be
formed by using 20 + 1 while connecting them. 22 = . 45 can be formed by using 40 + 5
while connecting them: 45 = .

00 miden 11 enteka

01 ena 12 dodeka

02 dio 13 dekatria

03 tria 14 dekatessera

04 tessera 15 dekapente

05 pente 16 dekaexi

06 exi 17 dekaepta

07 epta 18 dekaokto

08 okto 19 dekaennea

09 ennea 20 ykosi

10 deka 21 ykosi ena

22 ykosi dio 100 ekato


23 ykosi tria 1000 hilia
24 ykosi tessera 2000 dio hiliades

25 ykosi pente 10.000 deka hiliades

30 trianta 20.000 ykosi hiliades


40 saranta 100.00 ekato hiliades
0
50 peninta 200.00 diakosies hiliades
0
60 exinta 100 ena ekatommirio
million
70 evdominta 10 deka ekatommiria
million
80 ogdonta 152 ekaton peninta dio

90 eneninta 1872 hilia oktakosia
evominda

39
ORDINAL NUMBERS

first - protos sixth - ektos eleventh - endekatos sixteenth - dekatos ektos




second - defteros seventh - twelfth - dodekatos seventeenth - dekatos
evdomos
evdomos -

third - tritos - eighth - ogdoos thirteenth - eighteenth - dekatos
dekatotritos ogdoos

fourth - tetartos ninth - fourteenth - nineteenth - dekatos
enatos dekatos tetartos enatos

fifth -pemptos tenth - dekatos fifteenth - twentieth - eikostos
dekatos pemptos

DAYS & TIME OF DAY


morning proi
afternoon mesimeri
evening apogevma
night vradi
yesterday hthes
today simera
tomorrow avrio
day imera
week evdinada
last, previous proigoumeno
next epomeno

40
YEAR & TIME OF YEAR

summer kalokeri
winter himonas
spring anikxi
autumn fthinoporo
January Ianouarios
February Febrouarios
March Martios
April Aprilios
May Maios
June Iounios
July Ioulios
August Avgoustos
September Septemvrios
October Oktovrios
November Noemvrios
December Dekemvrios
month minas
year etos
COLOURS

black mavro
white aspro
grey gri
red kokkino
yellow kitrino
blue ble
orange portokali
pink roz
green prasino
brown kafe
purple Mov

41
animals zoa
insects entoma
cat gata
kitten gatoula
dog skilos
puppy kootavi
rabbit lagos
bird pooli
horse alogo
mouse pontiki
tortoise xelona
cow agelada
lamb arni
pig goorooni
donkey gaidouri
elephant elefantas
fly miga
mosquito koonoupi
bee melissa
wasp sfika
butterfly
ant

take :
Present I take / am taking
Imperfect I was taking / used Past I took
to take
Future I will be taking Future I will take
Progressive
Subjunctive to be taking Subjunctive to take
Progressive
Conditional I would take / be Judgment [] I [possibly]
Progressive taking took
Wish / [] [I wish] I could take Assumption [] I [must] have
Hope taken
(Optative)
Imperative ! [start] taking! Imperative ! Take!
Progressive
Present I have taken
Perfect
Pluperfect I had taken
Future I will have
Perfect taken

42
, , .
.
E, . ,
. , , .
. .

, . ,
.
. , .
.
, ,
.
. , .
. .
, .
, . .
.
.
In the summer, in August, I will take my cat and dog and go on holidays. I have rented a beautiful
house with blue windows and white walls by the sea. here, my friend has a black hourse and I will
take it and go riding. My friend Andreas also has other animals on his farm. He has lambs, seven
pigs and a donkey. There in the country side there are many mosquitos and flies. Last year I was
stung by a bee and I went to the doctor.

Andreas has an old read car, and a green bicycle. In July, he came to Athens in his car and we had
a great time. In December we are thinking of going to Rome for twenty days to see our friends
there. We have twelve friends there, seven boys and five girls.

It will be very cold in Rome and I will take two coats and two pairs of boots with me. The ticket
costs two hundred and twenty euros, I only have fifty five euro now, I need another sixty five
euros. My mother will give it to me for my birthday which is on the twenty nine of November.

Yesterday, it was hot and I wore a purple shirt and went to the swimming pool. I had to pay
eighteen euros to get in. it was very expensive. I have been to that swimming pool twice this
month, I will not there again. would like to have fifty thousand euros so that I can go on holidays
in spring, in May to England. I want to buy a black car. With this money I will buy a lot of clothes
and shoes. I will buy a new orange bag for my sister which she likes very much.

43

You are in an open-air taverna near the beach () in the countryside (), or in town
( ). ou are enjoying a nice meal () f fish () on the grill, fresh vegetables
(), a nice salad (), olives (), potatoes in the oven () and a bottle of
wine (). You and your company () hold up your glasses () and wish each
other, , , : which means to your health. Ancient Greeks would
raise their glasses to the Gods on their initial toast, then purposely spill some wine. The tradition
symbolized the first toast/prosposis () was reserved for the Gods. So before your next
glass of wine, satisfy your five senses and leave some for the Gods.

what would you like to drink? ; ;


What are you having? ;
What can I get you? ;
I'll have , please ,
a pint of lager
a pint of bitter ( )
a glass of white wine
a glass of red wine
anorange juice
a coffee
aCoke -
aDietCoke -

drink :
Voice
Present I drink / am
drinking
Imperfect I was drinking / Past I drank
used to drink
Future I will be drinking Future I will drink
Progressive
Subjunctive to be drinking Subjunctive to drink
Progressive
Conditional I would drink / be Judgment [] I [possibly]
Progressive drinking drank
Wish / Hope [] [I wish] I could Assumption [] I [must] have
(Optative) drink drunk
Imperative ! [start] drinking! Imperative ! drink!
Progressive

44
Asking for directions
In small towns and villages in Greece and Cyprus people tend not to use street
names for giving directions but landmarks such as (eklee-see-a) the
church, or , the tavern

; Excuse me - Sorry? seegh-no-mee


...; Wheres ...? poo eeneh
hotel to kseno-dho-heeo
(You) turn tha streeps-eh-teh
(You) go tha pa-teh
Its ee-neh
(on the) right dheksia
(on the) left a-ree-stair-a
straight on ee-see-a
taverna ee ta-ver-nah
; Is it far? Ee-neh makree-a
near konda
then, afterwards mett-a
follow the road akoulouthiste afto to dromo
across the street apenanti sto dromo
just a block away apo edo ena tetragono
next to the bank dipla sti trapeza
straight ahead efthia
intersection y diastavrosi
on the other side stin aly plevra
make a U-turn stripste
turn left stripste aristera
turn right stripste dexia
continue on sinehiste
keep going straight sinehiste efthia
trafficlights fanaria

, ;
,
.
.
, !

, , ;
, . .
.
,

45
...; Would you have ...? mipos ehete?
, one kilo, two kilos ena kilo, dio kila
/; Is that everything? Thats all afta
together ma-zee

beefsteak brizola
very rare steak poli ligo psimeni
rare steak ligo psimeni
medium steak metric spumoni
well done steak kale spumoni
chicken kotopoulo
pork chop hirini brizola
lamb chops paidakia
veal moshari
rabbit kouneli
duck papia
snails saligaria
ham zambon
pate pate

fish psari - psaria -


seafood thalasina
crab kavouri
prawns / garides
shrimps
oysters stridia
lobster astakos
mussels midia
trout pestrofa
salmon solomos
cod bakaliaros
squid kalamari

46

fruit frouto - frouta -


apple milo - mila
orange portokali - portokalia -
banana banana bananes -
lemon lemoni - lemonia -
peach rodakino - rodakina -
apricot verikoko - verikoka -
pear ahladi - ahladia -
grapefruit grapefruit
melon peponi - peponia -
strawberry fraoula - fraoules
raspberry smerouro - smeoura -
pineapple ananas
cherry kerasi - kerasia -
tomato tomata - tomates -
grape stafili - stafilia -

vegetables lahanika
green salad prasini salata
potato patata - patates -
carrot karoto - karota -
peas arakas
mushroom manitari - manitaria -
cauliflower kounopidi
green beans fasolakia
lettuce marouli
onion kremidi - kremidia -
leek praso - prasa -
cucumber aggouri - aggouria -
cabbage laxano
garlic skordo - skorda -

47

drink poto
to drink pino
coffee kafes
tea tsai
with milk me gala
hot chocolate zesti sokolata
orange juice himos portokali
apple juice himos milou
tomato juice domatohimos
pineapple juice himos anana
lemonade lemonada
white wine lefko krasi
red wine Kokkino krasi
dry wine xiro krasi
sweet wine gliko krasi
water nero
mineral water metaliko nero
beer bira
SNACKS AND DISHES

hot dog hot dog


pizza pitsa
fries tiganites patates
omelette omeleta
ice cream pagoto
soup soopa
croissant krouasan
yoghurt giaourti

CONDIMENTS

salt alati
pepper piperi
vinegar xidi
oil ladi
mustard moustarda

48
FINDING THE SHOP YOU NEED

Where is the Pou ine o fournos? ;


baker's?
How do I get to Pou ine o fournos? ,
the chemist's, ;
please?
Is there a book Iparxi vivlopolio edo ;
shop near here? konta?
Can you tell me Borite na mou pite pou
where I can buy boro na agoraso tiri, , ;
some cheese, parakalo?
please?
Is it near here? Ine edo konta? ;
It's very near. Einai poli konta.
It's a fair way ne arketa markria.
away.
It's about five Ine peripou pente lepta
minutes on foot. me ta podia.

Can we have a Boroume na rixoume mia ;


look around? matia ?
Can I help you? Boro na sas boithiso? ;
I'm just looking. Apla koitao. .
I would like two Tha ithela dio kartes, , .
postcards, please. parakalo.
Give me eight Doste mou okto ,
oranges, please. portokalia,parakalo. .
Can I listen to it? Boro na to akouso? ;
Can I try it on? Boro no to dokimaso? ;
What size Ti megethos ine? ;
(clothing) is it?
What size (shoes) Ti noumero forate? ;
do you take?
It's for a present. Ine gia doro. .
Can you gift-wrap Borite na mou tilixete gia ,
it for me, please? doro, parakalo? ;
How much is it? Poso kostizi? ;
I'll take it/them. Tha to/ta paro. / .
That is all. Afta ine ola. .

49
Do you have it in a To exete se alo xroma? ;
different colour?
Do you take Pernete pistotikes kartes? .
cheques?
I only have a 500 Exo mono ena
DRS note. hartonomismo ton
pentakosion.
HOW MUCH AND HOW MANY

I would like a piece of Tha ithela ena komati cake. .


cake.
I would like a slice of ham. Tha ithela mia feta zambon. .
I would like a kilo of Tha ithela ena kilo rodakina.
peaches. .
I would like a tin of tuna. Tha ithela mia konserva
tonou. .
I would like a packet of Tha ithela ena paketo biskota.
biscuits. .
I would like a box of Tha ithela ena kouti sokolates.
chocolates. .
I would like two Tha ithela dio ananades. .
pineapples.
Buying food in the market

Man . - kalimera
Hello
Seller . ; - Kalimera, ty thelete?
Hello. What would you like?
Man ; - Poso kanoun y ntomates?
How much are the tomatoes?
Seller . Trianta lepta to kilo.
Thirty cents a kilo
Man . ; - Ena kilo parakalo. Einai kales?
One kilo please. Are they good?
Seller , ! - Einai freskes, poly kales!
"They are fresh, very good!"
Man . Thelo kai dyo kila melitzanes.
And I want two kilos of aubergines
Seller . Ola mazy tessera euro.
All together 4 euros
Man . Oriste.
Here you are.
Seller . . Efharistopoly. Kali sas mera.
Thanks very much. Have a good day
Man . Na yste kala.
Take care
50
Buying wine

, ;
What would you like?
.
I want a bottle of good Cretan wine
;
Redorwhite?
.
Red.
. ;
I recommend this one here. Do you want to taste?
.
Of course.
.
Here you are
! ;
Very nice. How much does it cost?
.
Ten euros
.
Ill take it
. .
One moment please. Your change.
. .
Thanks very much. Goodbye
.
Have a good day

give :
Present I give / am
giving
Imperfect I was giving / Past I gave
used to give
Future I will be giving Future I will give
Progressive
Subjunctive to be giving Subjunctive to give
Progressive
Conditional I would give / Judgment [] I [possibly]
Progressive be giving gave
Wish / Hope [] [I wish] I could Assumption [] I [must] have
(Optative) give given
Imperative ! [start] giving! Imperative ! give!
Progressive

51
MA ;
The humble (domatia) village rooms are popular with people who like to get closer to
the real Greece and perhaps also to practice their Greek.
... I want to book ... Thello na kleeso
a room enna dhomatio
, one night, five nights mia nihta, pente nihtes
a double room ena diplo domarion
a single room monoklino
/ with bathroom / with shower me banio / me dooss
with a view me thea
...; Can I have ...? mporo na eho?
your passports ta diavatiria sas

In a hotel or other accommodation especially


in self catering apartments, studios and rooms.

Apartment diamerisma
I want a room Thelon ena domatio
; Does it have a bath? ehi banio
; Does it have air ehi klimatismo
conditioning?
; Does it have a ehi psigio
refrigerator?
: Does it have a kitchen? ehi kouzina
Do you do breakfast kanete proino
Do you have a baby's cot? ehete krevataki gia moro
;
is it near the beach? is it near the beach?
;
How much do you charge poso kostisi i dianikterefsi
; per night?
Is that price per person or ine i time gia kathe atomo i gia to
for the room - domatio
;
Electric fan anemistiras
Toilette paper harti toualetas
A bath towel A bath towel
a sheet ena sentoni
a pillow ena maxilari
camping gas gazaki
pay in advance prokatavoli

52
Woman finding her way to her hotel

Woman: . ;
Excuse me. Where is the reception of the Hotel Perivolas, please?
Young girl: , , .
At the bottom of the stairs, turn right by the church and then go straight on.
Woman: .
Thank you
Woman: . , ;
Hello. Where is the reception of the Hotel Asteras, please?
Man: . ,
.
Youre going the wrong way. Go up, at the white house turn left, and at the top of
the stairs go right.
Woman: .
Thank you very much
Man: .
Youre welcome
Woman: . ;
Hello. Wheres my room?

leave, go away :
Present I leave / am leaving
Imperfect I was leaving / used Past I left
to leave
Future I will be leaving Future I will leave
Progressive
Subjunctive to be leaving Subjunctive to leave
Progressive
Conditional I would leave / be Judgment [] I [possibly]
Progressive leaving left
Wish / Hope [] [I wish] I could Assumption [] I [must]
(Optative) leave have left
Imperative ! [start] leaving! Imperative ! / leave!
Progressive !

: . ,
15:30.
: . . 22,50.
: ;
: . .
: .
: ;
: .
: ;
: express 4 . .
: . . : .

53
Man: .
Good afternoon.
Receptionist: .
Hello
Man: , .
I want to book a room, please.
Receptionist: ;
When for?
Man: .
For Friday.
Receptionist: ;
What sort of room do you want?
Man: .
I want a double room.
Receptionist: ;
How long for?
Man: (3) .
For 3 nights.
Receptionist: . ;
A double room from Friday for 3 nights. Your name?
Man:
Stephanos Nikoloyannis
Man: .
I want a room with a view
Receptionist: .
Of course
Man:
Thank you
Receptionist: .
See you on Friday.
Man: .
Goodbye

Taking a boat trip

The most enjoyable way to get to and from mainland Greece and between
the numerous islands is by water. You can go (meh toh
karavee) by boat, (meh to ferry boht) by ferry boat, or
(meh toh dhel-fee-nee) by the High-speed Flying Dolphin.

54
Woman 1: .
Hello
Receptionist: .
Hello
Woman 1: (2) .
Weve booked two rooms.
Receptionist: , ;
In what name, please?
Women: -
Vassiliki Dimitroula - Eleni Nikita
Receptionist: . ;
Two single rooms for two nights. Can I have your passports?
Woman 1: .
Here you are.
Receptionist: . .
.
Your rooms are numbers 6 and 7. Here are the keys. Go left on the first floor.
Woman 2: ;
What time is breakfast served?
Receptionist: .
Breakfast is served from 8 to 10
Woman 2: .
Thank you
Receptionist: . .
Youre welcome. Have a nice stay.

...; What time...? ti ora


(it) leaves fevgy
boat to karavi
for/to Mykonos ya ti mikono
every morning katheh pro-ee
at eight forty sties onto kais savant
tomorrow (in the) morning avrio to proi
this afternoon simera to apogevma
a ticket ena ysitirio
single aplo
(with) return me epistrofi

55
Taking a boat trip

Woman: .
Hello
Attendant: .
Good morning to you.
Woman: ;
How often is there a boat for Mykonos?
Attendant: .
Every day at 8 oclock in the evening
Woman: .
I want two tickets for tomorrow evening
Attendant: ;
Single or return?
Woman:
Single
Attendant: ;
Which class do you want?
Woman: . ;
Economy. How much do they cost?
Attendant: , .
Twenty euros a ticket, forty euros all together.
Woman: .
Thanks very much
Attendant: . .
I thank you very much. Enjoy your holiday in Greece.
Woman: . .
Thank you. Goodbye.

TI ;

Greece is one of the most popular tourist destinations worldwide, as


every year it welcomes more than 12 million tourists, placing it among
the top ranked countries on the World Tourism Organizations list of
countries with inbound tourists. Over the past several decades, alarge-
or small-scaled polymorphic and modern tourist complexes have
developed in order to cater to the demands and accommodation needs
of every visitor. Greeces hotel accommodation potential amounts to
around 8,900 units with a total number of 352,000 rooms.

Moreover, most of the tourist areas have a significant number of rooms


for rent, which operate under the special operational seal of G.N.T.O.,
while more than 340 camp-sites with 30,000 spots and 2,500 small
houses are operating throughout the country. Most tourist lodgings
have been recently renovated and upgraded and now offer high-quality modern facilities.
56
Types of Accommodation - Find a hotel or a camping through the Hellenic Chamber of hotels.
Hotels: (standard type, traditional guesthouses, agrotourist lodgings, etc).
Rooms for rent
Apartments for rent
Tourist residences and villas: self-catering dwellings provided in various sizes as holiday
accommodations, depending on the needs of the tourists.
Campings: organized places for camping throughout Greece which operate under the official
G.N.T.O. seal. They provide places for tents or caravans, as well as small bungalows, while
their facilities provide a wide range of services. Places can be booked through travel
agencies.
Youth hostels
like :
Present I like / am liking
Imperfect I was liking / Past I liked
used to like
Future I will be liking Future I will like
Progressive
Subjunctive to be liking Subjunctive to like
Progressive
Conditional I would like / be Judgment [] I [possibly]
Progressive liking liked
Wish / Hope [] [I wish] I could Assumption [] I [must] have
(Optative) like liked
Imperative ! [start] liking! Imperative ! like!
Progressive

: !
: check-in ;
: . .
:
: . ;
: . . ! ;
: !
: ; ;
: , .
: ;
: ;
: .
: , .
: . .
: , ;
: .
4. !
: ! !
: !

57
.
, ,
.
,
. , ,
.


, . ,
, , .
, .


, .
. ,
.

1. ;
2. .
3. .
4. ;
5. ;

: ;
: . ; ;
: ... . !
: ! ; ;
: .
: , ! , ;
: . .
.
: ! . T
.
: .
: , !
: .
: ! ! , ;
: , .

58
;

(ra) meansboth time and hour. To say oclock, you use the number, such as (ohto),
eight, followed by (ee ora), literally the hour.

time xronos
hour ra
minute lepto
second defterolepto
its twenty to nine okto kai saranta

When telling the time, you say (keh), and, for minutes past the hour: (ohto
keh eekossee) is literally eight and twenty, or twenty past eight and (okto kai misi)
is eight and a half, or half past eight. For minutes to the hour, you say (parra), less:.
(enea para ykosi) is literally nine less twenty, or twenty to nine.

What time is it? ; (Ti raenai?)

It's one o'clock (I ra enai ma akrivs)

It's quarter past one (I ra enai ma kai ttarto)

It's half past one (I ra enai ma kai mis)

It's quarter to two (I ra enai do par ttarto)

It's two o'clock (I ra enai do akrivs)

It's quarter past two (I ra enai do kai ttarto)

It's half past two (I ra enai do kai mis)

It's quarter to three (I ra enai treis par ttarto)

It's three o'clock (I ra enai treis (akrivs))

It's quarter past three (I ra enai treis kai ttarto)

It's half past three (I ra enai treis kaimis)

It's quarter to four (I ra enai tsseris par ttarto)

It's four o'clock (I ra enai tsseris (akrivs))

It's quarter past four (I ra enai tsseris kai ttarto)

It's half past four (I ra enai tsseris kai mis)

It's quarter to five (I ra enai pnte par ttarto)

59
It's five o'clock (I ra enai pnte (akrivs))

It's quarter past five (I ra enai pnte kai ttarto)

It's half past five (I ra enai pnte kai mis)

It's quarter to six (I ra enai xi par ttarto)

It's six o'clock (I ra enai xi (akrivs))

It's quarter past six (I ra enai xi kai ttarto)

It's half past six (I ra enai xi kai mis)

It's quarter to seven (I ra enai ept par ttarto)

It's seven o'clock (I ra enai enai ept (akrivs))

It's quarter past seven (I ra enai ept kai ttarto)

It's half past seven (I ra enai ept kaimis)

It's quarter to eight (I ra enai okt par ttarto)

It's eight o'clock (I ra enai okt (akrivs))

It's quarter past eight (I ra enai okt kai ttarto)

It's half past eight (I ra enai okt kai mis)

It's quarter to nine (I ra enai enni par ttarto)

It's nine o'clock (I ra enai enni (akrivs))

It's quarter past nine (I ra enai enni kaittarto)

It's half past nine (I ra enai enni kaimis)

It's quarter to ten (I ra enai dka par ttarto)

It's ten o'clock (I ra enai dka (akrivs))

It's quarter past ten (I ra enai dka kai ttarto)

It's half past ten (I ra enai dka kai mis)

It's quarter to eleven (I ra enai nteka par ttarto)

It's eleven o'clock (I ra enai nteka (akrivs))

It's quarter past eleven (I ra enai nteka kai ttarto)

60
It's half past eleven (I ra enai nte kakai mis)

It's quarter to twelve (I ra enai ddeka par ttarto)

It's twelve o'clock (I ra enai ddeka (akrivs))

It's quarter past twelve (I ra enai ddeka kai ttarto)

It's half past twelve (I ra enai ddeka kai mis)

It's quarter to one (I ra enai ma par ttarto)

it's midnight (enai mesnychta)

it's midday (enai mesimri)

in the morning (topro)

in the afternoon (toapgevma)

in the evening (to vrdy)

61
:

; (Ti ra ne?) What time is it?

___. (ne ___.) It is ___.

... . (...oht akrivs.) ... eight o'clock.

... . (...oht ke msi.) ... half past eight.

... . (...oht ke ttarto.) ... quarter past eight.

; (Pte?) When?

(tra) now

(sntoma) soon

(argtera) later

(prin na hrno) a year ago

(ton perasmno mna) last month

(tin perasmni evdomda) last week

(ehths) yesterday

(smera) today

(vrio) tomorrow

(tin epmeni efdomda) next week

(tu hrnu) next year

() (depterlepto/a) second(s)

() (ra/es) hour(s) () (

() (ebdomda/es) week(s)

() (hrnos/ya) year(s)

(pro) morning

(apgefma) afternoon

62

. ; kalimra. tiknis Hello. How are you?


. kal me. Efharist I'm fine, thank you
; mils Elinik Do you speak Greek?
, hi, den mil Elinik No, I don't speak Greek
mno ligki Only a little bit
; ap pia hra se Where do you come from?
; pia ne i ethikotit sou What is your nationality?
me gglos I am English
me agglda I am English
, ; ki esi, ed mnis And you, do you live here?
, ne, ed mno Yes, I live here

LOOKING FOR SOMEONE


y sra ne ek parakal Excuse me, is Sarah here?
;
, ne, ed ne Yes, she's here
hi vgi xo She's out
borte na tilefonsete sto You can call her on her mobile phone
kinit tis
.
xrete pou bor na tin Do you know where I could find her?
; vro
. ne sti douli tis She is at work
ojulien neek parakal She is at work
; o julien ne ek
parakal
Excuse me, is Julien Excuse me, is Julien here?
; ojulien neek here?
parakal
, ne, ed ne ne, ed ne
hi vgi xo He's out
xrete pou bor na ton Do you know where I could find him?
; vro

63
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TIME TRACKING
; pte rthes ed When did you get here?
smera Today
hthes Yesterday
prin do mres Two days ago
; gia pso kair tha mnis How long are you staying for?
tha fgo vrio I'm leaving tomorrow
tha fgo methvrio I'll be leaving the day after
tomorrow
tha fgo se tris mres I'll be leaving in three days

64
PARTING
, ! It's late, I have to go!
; Shall we meet again?
, Yes with pleasure
' This is my address
; Do you have a phone number?
I had a lovely time
, Me too, it was a pleasure to meet you
We will see each other soon
I hope so too
! goodbye

AT THE BAR

; Would you like to have a drink?


To drink
Glass
Withpleasure
; What would you like?
; What's on offer?
There is water or fruit juices
Water
; Can you add some ice cubes, please?
Icecubes

AT THE RESTAURANT

Therestaurant
; Would you like to eat?
Yes, with pleasure
To eat
; Where can we eat?
; Where can we have lunch?
Dinner
Breakfast
! Excuse me

65
IN A TAXI
; Where would you like to go?
I'm going to the train station
. I'm going to the Hotel.
, Can you take me to the airport, please?
; Can you take my luggage?
; Is it far from here?
, No it's close
, Yes it's a little bit further away
; How much will it be?
, ; Take me there,please

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, Excuseme! I'm looking for the bus stop


, ; How much is a ticket to the City?
, ; Wheredoesthistraingo, please?
; Does this train stop at the City?
; When does the train for the City leave?
, ; A ticket for the City, please
; Doyouhavethetrain'stimetable?
Busschedule
; Excuseme, whichtraingoestotheCity?
This one
Thanks

68
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KiloShop . 20 . Sabine
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KiloShop shopping .

the clothing ta rouha


to wear forao
to put, put on vazo
(clothes)
to take out, take vgazo
off (clothes)
the shirt poukamiso
the panteloni
(singular!) pants/trousers
the skirt fousta
to the jacket to boufan

76
the coat to palto
the shoes ta papoutsia
the socks or stockings Y kaltses
the hat to kapelo
the belt (~ "zone") y zoni
the tie (~"cravat") y gravata
the blouse y blouza
the boots y botes
the scarf to kaskol
the suit to koustoumi
the dress to forema
the jacket to sakaki
the stockings to kalson
the underwear ta esorouxa

. I put on my clothes. Forao ta rouha


mou
I take off my coat. Vgazo to palto
. mou
We aren't wearing shoes. Den forame ta
. papoutsia mas

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77
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78

;
Can you help me, please? borte na me voithsete
parakal
I'm lost hthika

; What would you like? ti tha thlate

; What happened? ti sinvi

Where could I find an interpreter? pou bor na vro na


; diermina
Where is the nearest chemist's shop? pou vrskete to pio
; kontino farmako?
Can you call a doctor please? borte na fonksete na
, ; giatr sas parakal
; Which kind of treatment are you ti therapa akolouths?
undergoing at the moment?
I am in pain ponao

it hurts ponai

Hospital nosokomo

chemist's (pharmacy) farmako

a chemist (pharmacist) farmakopios

a doctor giatrs

/ pill/pills hapi/hapia

Injection enesi

nurse nosokoma

Ambulance asthenoforo

Bandage epidesmos

cough syrup siropi gia to viha

Microbiologist microviologos

Allergy allergia

my nose is running trehi y miti mou

I am sneezing ftarnizome

79
I need hriazome

Dentist odontiatros

: ; Pos mporo na sas exipiretiso?


How can I help you?
: , ,
;
Eho arostisi, ponaio lemos kai to kefali mou, mporite na mou dosete kati?
I am ill, my throat and head hurts, can you give me something?
: ,
.
Nomizo oti prepi na pas ston giatro, alla mporo na sas doso aspirins kai afta
ta hapakia.
I think you should go to the doctors, but I can give you aspirins and these
pills.
: , , ;
Tha ta paro, den thelo na pao ston giatro, poso kanoun parakalo?
I will take them; I dont want to go to the doctors, how much do they cost
please?
: . Kanoun dodeka euro. Thats twelve euros.
: , . Oriste, efharistopoli.
Here you are, thank you very much.
:
. .
Ean den ginete kala mexri avrio tha prepi na pas ston giatro sou na se exetasi
na dy akrivos ti ehis. Efharisto kai perastika sas.
If you are not better by tomorrow you should go to your doctors so that he
can examine you to see exactly what is wrong with you. Thank you and have
a quick recovery

80
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81
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Here follows some irregular verbs in Simple Past and Present Perfect:

Simple Present Simple Past Present Perfect Simple Present Simple Past Present Perfect










/ /

82

mallia - hair matia - eyes

83
stoma - mouth
/ donti/dontia
tooth/teeth

vrahionas - arm plati - back

lemos - throat
stoma - mouth

gonato - knee
- mia geneiada- beard

podi - leg heri - hand

miti - nose afti - ear

patousa - foot kefali - head

prosopo - face - moustaki - moustache

- derm - skin - heilos - lip

nhi - nail - ishio- hip

aima- blood - frdi- brow

- pigouni - chin -ena metopo- forehead

84

: ! ; Kalos ton Niko. Ti egine? Welcome Niko. Whats


; Ehoume kapoio provlima? up? Do we have a
problem?
: . Ponai to stomachi mou. My stomach hurts.
Merikes fores omos o Sometimes the pain goes
oponos pigaini stin plati to my back and chest.
. kai sto stithos.
: . . Min anisixis. Tha doume. Dont worry. We will see.
; , Kapnizeis? Anhimame Do you smoke? If I
. kala, den kapnizis pia. remember well, you
dont smoke anymore.
: , . Ne, to ekopsa telios. Dio Yes, I have cut smoking.
. hronia tora. Two years now.
: , Elate, xaploste na sa Come, lie down so that I
. extaso ligo. can examine you.

7 ThingsGreeksDoBest 7 ..

1. Barbecues Lamb on the spit

Ive had this debate with plenty of people from many other cultures. But there is no
doubt about it, we Greeks do it best. There is nothing like walking into a gorgeous
open-roof restaurant and getting your first whiff of a sizzling Souvla. Souvla is
skewered lamb, often marinated in olive oil, salt, and pepper and then slowly
cooked over a barbecue. The meat comes out so tender and flavoursome and is
one of the most popular dishes amongst Greeks and tourists alike.

2. Weddings -

Here are some things you can expect from a Greek wedding. Live traditional music
that will ensure people of all ages report to the dancefloor, including your 80 year
old grandad. There is never a dull moment, with non-stop live music, dancing,
singing and chatter. Food, and lots of it. A huge variety of Greek dishes from
Souvlakia, Dolmades (stuffed vine leaves), Moussaka (a baked vegetable dish) to
fresh Calamari. Culture aside, in Islands like Santorini you will find so many beautiful
churches on the coasts.

3. Family Gatherings
Greeks are always finding ways to celebrate. Not just for birthdays, or Christmas,
or New Years, but for name days, saints days, and many more. Family is very
important in Greek culture, so we tend to celebrate it a lot. Even just a general
get together will involve everyone bringing a particular dish to add to the table,
with grandparents, parents and children hustling and bustling around, chattering

85
loudly and organising food. No matter what hardships we are facing, we will always
find a way to celebrate life and come together as a family.

4. Breaking Plates
Greek people are exceptionally good at breaking plates. This may come
across as a very odd tradition for non-Greeks, but it is one that has survived
many decades. If you go to a party function, guaranteed at some point in the
evening clay plates will be skillfully spun into the air and sent crashing to the
floor whilst people, young and old, dance passionately to traditional music. It
sounds dangerous, but it's actually very fun!

5. Traditional Dancing
Dance is something that lives around the world and in so many forms. Over
4000 traditional dances have been developed through all the regions of Greece,
and even to this day are appreciated by young and old at any Greek function,
bringing the community together. If you haven't seen a Greek dance group
perform then you are missing out!

6. Boat Trips
Being a small island surrounded by gorgeous turquoise water has its benefits.
There are so many boat trips all around the island which offer an unforgettable
holiday, but my favourite has been in Paphos, in Cyprus. The beloved scent of an
incredible Greek barbecue fills the air as you sail past mountains and coves
before you stop at the famous Laguna Blu bay where I saw the clearest, brightest
water Ive ever seen. With plenty of opportunities to swim in some of the best
Mediterranean water, a boat trip trip is a must when visiting Greece.

7. Holiday Nightlife

Mykonos. Zakinthos. Corfu. Malia. Kos. . Many of the Greek islands have
become well-known in Europe for hosting some of the best party spots over
the summer. During the high season expect to find crowds of young people,
parading the streets, bar-hopping and night swimming. Mykonos, especially, is
famous for its 24hour beach parties!

86

Greeks adore food! Their cuisine is an authentic sample of Mediterranean nutrition and its healthy
ingredients make it one of the most delicious cuisines of the whole world. Also Greeks, especially
mothers, adore cooking. Food is considered as an action of love and team building so when people
feed you thats a very good sign! Being famous for their hospitality Greeks like to invite foreigners
in their houses and have lunch or dinner altogether! But when you visit a Greek house, you should
have in mind some cultural tips in order to better immerse into the culture and enjoy the
experience with your new friends!

Be hungry

Be absolutely hungry! You cant say Sorry, I had lunch earlier I am not that hungry
because it is considered as an insult! Your table will be full of food and people will expect
you to have a full plate filled twice or three times. When you eat the food that the hostess
cooked for you, people feel you like it and you make them happy!

Bring a present

It is considered polite not to appear with empty hands. You can buy something like;
sweets, a bottle of wine or flowers. The hostess will offer the sweet after the food so that
everybody will try it and is very common that everybody brings sweets so you finish your
meal with 5 or 6 kinds of cakes waiting for you. Flowers are immediately decorated in a
vase as a sign of gratitude. Wine is served during the meal and when you clink glasses
you say Yamas that means Cheers in Greek.

87
Share the food

Greeks love sharing things so that their food tradition is based on sharing the salads, the
appetizers and they put many things in the middle so as to take from there. You will have your own
course but its very common that this lovely pie will fly over your head and be landed in your plate
without being asked, just because you have to try it.

Be social

That means listen to the surgery story of the grandmother next to you, or the picking up of
the olives from the trees narration or any other story you cant imagine. Sometimes people
may talk to you in Greek but if you throw them some words in the local language and show
effort they will just adore you.

Take some extra food

After having all this boost of social food and drink experience, you cant leave with empty
hands as well. If the hostess insists on giving you some food in a packet for tomorrow, do
not hesitate to take it. It shows care from their side and gratitude from your side. Because
despite all the calories you may gain you will also take a part of the Greek generous culture
with you!

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88
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spiti home
diorofo spiti two storey house
diamerisma apartment
polikatikia apartment building
monokatikia private home
orofos storey/floor
retire top floor
isogio ground floor
saloni lounge room
kathistiko sitting room
trapezaria dining room
kouzina kitchen
banio bathroom
krevatokamara bedroom
balkoni balcony
skala stairs
/ skepi/taratsa roof/rooftop
kipos garden

.
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89
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Furniture -
arm chair polithrona ()
bed Krevati
single bed Mono krervati
double bed Diplo krevati
bedside locker komodino ()
book case vivliothiki ()
carpet xali hali ()
carpet (wall to moketa ()
wall)
chair karekla ()
chest of drawers komodino ()

91
coat hanger kremastra ()
coffee table trapezaki saloniou
cupboard ntoloulapi ()
(cabinet)
deckchair sez-long - ()
Desk grafiio ()
drape, curtain kourtina ()
Drawer sirtari ()
Lamp lamba ()
Mat halaki ()
Mattress stroma ()
Mirror kathreftis ()
painting, picture ikona - pinakas (), ()
Refrigerator psigio ()
Shelf rafi ()
Sideboard boufes ()
Sofa kanapes ()
Table trapezi ()
Wardrobe ntoulapa (),

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ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES
ilektriki odontovourtsa electric toothbrush
ilektriko sidero iron
zygaria scale
stereofoniko stereo

92
tilefono telephone
tileorasi television
plintirio rouhon washing machine
plintirio piaton dishwasher
koudouni exoportas doorbell
zaki fireplace
pistolaki mallion hair dryer
fournos mikrokimaton microwave oven
fournos oven
tostiera toaster
psiogio refrigerator
tigani frying pan
katsarola casserole
fos light
stegnotirio clothes dryer
ilektriki skoupa vacuum cleaner
kafetiera coffee maker

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93
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94
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Greek Adjectives
Learning the Greek Adjectives is very important because its structure is used in every day
conversation. The more you practice the subject, the closer you get to mastering the Greek
language. But first we need to know what the role of Adjectives is in the structure of the grammar
in Greek.
Greek Adjectives are words that describe or modify another person or thing in the sentence.

Grammar Tips:

While in English an adjective doesnt change when the noun changes, in Greek an adjective should
agree in gender and number with the noun. So adjectives have a masculine, a feminine and a
neuter form, the most common suffixes being the following:

Singular: -, -, - (good)

Plural: -, -, -

-, -, - (nice, pretty)

-, -, -

-, -, - (deep)

-, -, -

-, -, - (international)

-, -, -

Examples:

Singular Plural

(a good man) . (good men)

(a good woman) . (good women)

(a good child) . (good children)

. (international organizations)

. (international treaties)

. (international airports)

95

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96
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