Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 9

Nelson C.

 Fuentes    ES 321 – Economic Evaluation of Industrial Projects   
Problem Set 2 
 
No. 1 
 
  A certain fluidized‐bed combustion vessel has an investment cost of $100,000, a life of 10 years 
and negligible market (resale) value.  Annual cost of materials, maintenance, and electric power for the 
vessel are expected to total $8,000.  A major relining of the combustion vessel will occur during the fifth 
year at a cost of $20,000; during this year, the vessel will not be in service.  If the interest is 15% per 
year, what is the lump sum equivalent cost of this project at the present time? 
 
Solution: 
 
    Let   Investment Cost,          C0  = $100,000 
      Life,               L  = 10 years 
      Annual cost of materials, etc AC = $8,000 
      Cost at year 5,            C5  = $20,000 
      Interest rate,             i  = 0.15 
 
 
  AC
 
  0  1  2  3  4  5 6 7 8 9 10
 
 
  AC  AC  AC  AC  AC AC AC AC AC AC
 
 
  C0 
  C5
    Let EC = lump sum equivalent cost of the project 
 
AC ⎡
1 − (1 + i ) ⎤ + ( C5 − AC )(1 + i )
−10 −5
EC = C0 +
    i ⎣ ⎦  
= $146,116.27
 
   

neonpoint@yahoo.com 
 
No. 2 
 
  The heat loss through the exterior walls of a certain poultry processing plant is estimated to cost 
the owner $3,000 next year.  A salesman from Superfiber Insulation, has told you, the plant manager, 
that he can reduce the heat loss by 80% with the installation of %15,000 worth of Superfiber now.  If the 
cost of heat loss rises by $200 per year (gradient) after the next year and the owner plans to keep the 
building for 15 more years, what would you recommend if the interest rate is 12%? 
 
Solution: 
 
A. For Present worth of expenses (losses) without insulation: 
 
Let  First term of arithmetic gradient series  A1 = $3000 
Gradient        G   = $  200 
Interest rate        i     =  0.12 
Number of periods      n    =  15 
 
 
 
0  1  2  3  4  5  6 . . . . .  15
 
 
 
A1  A +G 
  1
A1+2G 
  A1+3G 
  A1+4G
  A1+5G
 
  A1+14G
 
G ⎡1 − (1 + i ) ⎤ A
−n
n
+ 1 ⎡1 − (1 + i ) ⎤
−n
PWE = ⎢ − n ⎥
i ⎢⎣ i (1 + i ) ⎥⎦ i ⎣ ⎦ 

= 27, 216.63
 
    
 
B. Present worth of savings, PWS: 
 
Only 80% will be saved, so   PWS = 0.8 ( 27, 216.67 )  
= 21, 773.30
 
C. Recommendation:  Since  the  present  worth  of  all  savings  is  greater  than  the  investment  on  the 
insulation, then  Install the Superfiber. 
 
   

neonpoint@yahoo.com 
 
No. 3 
 
  You  are  the  manager  of  a  large  oil  refinery.    As  part  if  the  refining  process,  a  certain  heat 
exchanger  (operated  at  high  temperatures  and  with  abrasive  materials  flowing  through  it)  must  be 
replaced every year.  The replacement and downtime costing the first year is $175,000.  Therefore, it is 
expected to increase due to inflation at a rate of 8% per year for five years, at which time this particular 
heat exchanger will no longer be needed.  If the company’s cost of capital is 18% per year, how much 
could  you  afford  to  spend  for  a  higher‐quality  heat  exchanger  so  that  this  annual  replacement  and 
downtime cost can be eliminated? 
 
Solution: 
 
  Let First term in the geometric gradient series         A1  = $175,000 
        Inflation rate                f  = 0.08 
        Interest rate                 i  = 0.18 
i − f 0.18 − 0.08
        Convenience rate (for f ≠ i)               icr = =  
1+ f 1 + 0.08
= 0.09259
 
  0  1  2  3 4 5
 
 
  A1 
  A1(1+f) 
  A1(1+f)2
  A1(1+f)3
 
  A1(1+f)4
 
  The Present Worth of all Costs: 
 
A ⎡1 − (1 + icr )− n ⎤
PW = 1 ⎢ ⎥
1+ f ⎣⎢ icr ⎦⎥
175, 000 ⎡1 − (1.09259 ) ⎤
−5

    = ⎢ ⎥ 
1.08 ⎣⎢ 0.09259 ⎦⎥
= $626, 050.52
 
Recommendation :  The company could afford a high‐quality heat exchanger worth up to $ 626,050.53   
   

neonpoint@yahoo.com 
 
No. 4 
 
A  small  company  purchased  now  for  $23,000  will  lose  $1,200  each  year  for  the  first  four  years.    An 
additional $8,000 invested in the company during the fourth year will result in a profit of $5,500 each 
year from the fifth through the fifteenth year.  After 15 years the company can be sold for $33,000.  
a) Determine the IRR and  
b) Calculate the FW if MARR = 12%. 
 
Solution: 
 
Cash Flow Diagram:   let i = interest rate = internal rate of return (IRR) 
  SV
 
  B  B B B B B B B B  B  B
 
 
  0  1  2  3  4  5  6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13  14  15
 
 
  A  A  A  A 
 
  C0 
  C4 
 
    Where:   C0  = $23,000 
        A  = $1,200  
        B  = $5,500  
        C4  = $8,000  
        SV  = $33,000 
 
Equation of values: using a focal date at (4) 
 
A⎡ B
0 = −C0 (1 + i ) − (1 + i ) − 1⎤⎦ + ⎡⎣1 − (1 + i ) ⎤⎦ + SV (1 + i ) − C4  
4 4 −11 −11
 
i ⎣ i
 
In solving for i = IRR, we get 
 
  IRR = 0.10011112  or 10.011% 
 
b) for the future worth at (15) using i = 0.12: 
 
A⎡ B
FW = −C0 (1 + i ) − (1 + i ) − 1⎤ (1 + i ) + ⎡(1 + i ) − 1⎤ + SV − C4 (1 + i )
15 4 11 11 11

  i ⎣ ⎦ i ⎣ ⎦  
= $27, 070.36
   

neonpoint@yahoo.com 
 
No. 5 
 
  A food processing plant consumed 600,000 kwh of electric energy annually and pays an average 
of P2.00 per kwh.  A study is being made to generate its own power to supply the plant energy required, 
and  that  the  power  plant  installed  would  cost  P2,000,000;  annual  operation  and  maintenance, 
P800,000; Other expenses, P100,000 per year.  Life of the plant is 15 years; salvage value at the end of 
life is P200,000; annual taxes and insurance, 6% of the first cost; and rate of interest is 15%.  Using the 
sinking fund method for depreciation, determine if the power plant is justifiable. 
 
Solution:  By the Annual Worth Pattern (AWP) 
 
a) Annual Revenue (savings) = (P2/kwh)(600,000 kwh) = P 1,200,000 
 
b) Annual Expenses = depreciation + annual operation, etc + other expenses + interest on money 
 
[ 2, 000, 000 − 200, 000] 0.15 + 800, 000 + 100, 000 + 0.06 2, 000, 000 + 0.15 2, 000, 000
AE = ( ) ( )
(1.15) − 1
15

= P 1,357,830.70
 
 
c) Since the annual expenses are greater than the annual savings, the purchase of the power plant 
is NOT JUSTIFIED. 
 
 
   

neonpoint@yahoo.com 
 
No. 6 
 
  The Anirup Food Processing Company is presently using an outdated method of filling 25‐pound 
sacks of dry dog food.  To compensate for weighing inaccuracies inherent to this packaging method, the 
process engineer at the plant has estimated that each sack is overfilled by 1/9 pound on the average.  A 
better  method  of  packaging  is  now  available  that  would  eliminate  overfilling  (and  underfilling).    The 
production quota for the plant is 300,000 sacks per year for the next six years and a pound of dog food 
costs this plant $0.15 to produce.  The present system has no salvage value and will last another four 
years, and the new method has an estimated life of four years with a salvage value equal to 10% of its 
investment, I.  The present packaging operation expense is $1,200 per year more to maintain than the 
new method.  If the MARR is 12% per year for this company, what amount, I, could be justified for the 
purchase of the new packaging method? 
 
Solution: By the Annual Worth Pattern 
 
    Let I = justified investment 
 
1
a) Annual Savings   = ( 300, 000 )( 0.15 ) + 1200  
9
= 6200
 
b) Annual Expenses   = capital recovery cost 

=
[ I − 0.1I ] 0.12 + 0.12 I
(1.12 ) − 1
4
 
= 0.308311I
 
c) Equating the savings to the expenses: 
 
    6200 = 0.308311I  
I = $20,109.56
 
 
 
 
 
   

neonpoint@yahoo.com 
 
No. 7 
  A manufacturing firm has considerable excess capacity in its plant and seeking ways to utilize it.  
The  firm  has  been  invited  to  submit  a  bid  to  become  a  subcontractor  on  a  product  that  is  not 
competitive  with  the  one  it  produces  but  that,  with  the  addition  of  $75,000  in  new  equipment,  could 
readily  be  produced  in  its  plant.    The  contract  would  be  for  five  years  at  an  annual  output  of  20,000 
units. 
  In  analyzing  probable  costs,  direct  labor  is  estimated  at  $1.00  per  unit  and  new  materials  at 
$0.75 per unit.  In addition, it is discovered that in each new unit, one pound of scrap material can be 
used from the present operation, which is now selling for $0.30 per pound of the scrap.  The firm has 
been  charging  overhead  at  150%  of  prime  cost,  but  it  is  believed  that  for  this  new  operation  the 
incremental overhead, above maintenance, taxes, and insurance on the new equipment, would not cost 
60%  of  the  direct  labor  cost.    The  firm  estimates  that  the  maintenance  expenses  on  this  equipment 
would not exceed $2,000 per year, and annual taxes and insurance would average 5% of the investment 
cost.  (Note:  Prime cost = direct labor + direct materials cost). 
  While the firm can see no clear use for the equipment  beyond the five years of the proposed 
contract, the owner believes it could be sold for $3,000 at that time.  He estimates that the project will 
require $15,000 in working capital (which would be fully recovered at the end of the fifth year), and he 
wants to earn at least a 20% before‐tax annual rate of return on all capital utilized. 
a.  What unit price should be bid? 
b. Suppose  that  the  purchaser  of  the  product  wants  to  sell  it  at  a  price  that  will  result  in  a 
profit of 20% of the selling price.  What should be the selling price? 
 
Solution: 
    Let CU = unit bid price of the product 
PART A: 
a) Annual  revenue =  20,000(CU) 
 
b) Annual expenses =      depreciation  + labor cost + maintenance + taxes & insurance 
+ material cost (new and scrap)    + overhead  
+ recovery cost of working capital+ interest on money 

    depreciation  =
[ 75, 000 − 3, 000] 0.20   = 9, 675.34  
(1.20 ) − 1
5

    labor cost  = ($1.00)(20, 000)     = 20, 000.00  


    maintenance          = 2, 000.00  
    taxes & insur.  = 0.05(75, 000)     = 3, 750.00  
    material cost  = (0.75 + 0.30)(20, 000)   = 21, 000.00  
    overhead  = 0.60(20, 000)     = 12, 000.00  
    WC recovery  = 15, 000 ÷ 5       = 3, 000.00  
    Interest   = 0.2(75, 000)      = 15, 000.00  
                           =============== 
              AE =  $ 86,425.34 
 
  Equating:   annual revenue =  annual expenses 
  We get    CU = ($86,425.34)/(20,000)  =  $4.32 per unit 
 
PART B:    With a 20% profit for purchaser, selling price = 1.2(4.32) = $5.18  per unit 

neonpoint@yahoo.com 
 
No. 8  
 
  The prospective operation for oil in the outer continental shelf by a small, independent drilling 
company has produced a rather curious patter of cash flows as follows: 
 
    End of Year      Net Cash Flow 
0 − $ 520,000 
1 – 10       +     200,000 
10        − 1,500,000  
 
  The  $1,500,000  expense  at  the  end  of  the  tenth  year  will  be  incurred  by  the  company  in 
dismantling the drilling rig. 
a) Over  the  10‐year  period,  plot  PW  versus  the  interest  rate  (i)  in  an  attempt  to  discover 
whether multiple rate of return exist. 
b) Based on the projected net cash flows and results in part (a), what would you recommend 
regarding the pursuit of the project?  Customarily, the company expects to earn at least 20% 
per year on invested capital before taxes.  Use the ERR method. 
 
Solution: 
A  A A A A A A A A A 
 
Cash Flow Diagram: 
  0  1  2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
 
 
 
 
  C0 
  C10 
 
a. Equation to solve for the present worth with interest i: 
 
A⎡
1 − (1 + i ) ⎤ − C10 (1 + i )
−10 −10
  PW = −C0 +  
i ⎣ ⎦
200, 000 ⎡
1 − (1 + i ) ⎤ − 1,500, 000 (1 + i )
−10 −10
PW = −520, 000 +
i ⎣ ⎦
 
  Note:    See separate paper for chart (graph) of PW vs. i .  
    At   PW = 0,  i = 0.2877632 
 
b. Solving for ERR (i’), using ∈ = 0.20   
 
200, 000 ⎡
520, 000 (1 + i ' ) + 1,500, 000 = (1.2 ) − 1⎤⎦  
10 10

0.2 ⎣
i = 0.21653 or 21.653% > 20%
 
Recommendation:  Project is justifiable.   

neonpoint@yahoo.com 
 
No. 9 
 
Alpha Company is planning to invest in a machine the use of which will result in the following: 
− Annual revenues of $10,000 in the first year and increases of $5,000 each year, up to year 9.  
From year 10, the revenues will remain constant ($52,000) for an indefinite period. 
− The machine is to be overhauled every 10 years.  The expense for each overhaul is $40,000. 
 
If Alpha Company expects a present worth of at least $100,000 at a MARR of 10% for this project, what 
is the maximum investment that Alpha should be prepared to make? 
 
 
Solution: 
 
  Let PR = Present Worth of all revenues 
 
10, 000 ⎡ 5, 000 ⎡1 − (1.10 )−9 9 ⎤ 52, 000
1 − (1.10 ) ⎤ + (1.10 )
−9 −9
PR = ⎢ − ⎥ +
0.1 ⎣ ⎦ 0.1 ⎢⎣ 0.1 (1.10 ) ⎥⎦ 0.1
9
 

= $375, 228.26
 
Let PE = Present Worth of all expenses 
       I  = investment 
 
40, 000
PE = I +
(1.10 ) −1  
10

= I + 25098.16
 
 
Since the net present worth should at least be P 100,000 
 
PR − PE ≥ 100, 000
375228.26 − ( I + 25098.16 ) ≥ 100, 000  
I ≤ $250,130.10
 
Maximum investment should only be $250,130.10. 

neonpoint@yahoo.com