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Program overview

15-Dec-2017 16:25

Year 2009/2010
Organization Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Education Master Mechanical Engineering

Code Omschrijving ECTS p1 p2 p3 p4 p5

ME variant Precision and ME Track Precision and Microsystems Engineering


Microsystems Engineering (ME- (ME-PME)
PME)
Obligatory Courses ME-PME
ME1611 Physics for Mechanical Engineers 2
ME1612 Introduction to Nanoscience and Technology 1
SC4026 Control System Design 3
WB1442-08 Microsystems 3
WB1450-05 Mechanical Analysis for Engineering 4
WB2414-09 Mechatronic System Design 4
WB5451-05 Student colloquia and events PME 1
WB5452-07 Intro Lab PME 2
WB5454 MEMS Lab 2
Specialisation Engineering Specialisation Engineering Mechanics (ME-PME-EM
Mechanics (ME-PME-EM)
Obligatory Courses ME-PME-EM
WB1406-07 Experimental Dynamics 3
WB1418-07 Engineering Dynamics 4
WB1440 Eng. Optimization: Concept & Applications 3
WB1451-05 Engineering Mechanics Fundamentals 4
Recommended Elective Courses ME-PME-EM
AE4153 Advanced Numerical Techniques for Fluid Flow and Stuctural 3
Engineering
AE4684 Fibre Reinforced Materials in Aerospace Structures 3
AE4900TU Continuum Mechanics 4
AE4930 Aeroelasticity 3
CT5142 Computational Methods in Non-linear Solid Mechanics 3
CT5145 Random Vibrations 4
ET4245ME Elektromechanics in Mechatronic Systems 3
ET4257 Sensors and Actuators 4
ID5211 Computer Visualisation for Designers 3
ME1100 Automated Driving, Automotive Human Factors and Safety 3
ME1600 Reliability and Uncertainty Models in Engineering Mechanics 2
SC4032 Physical Modelling for Systems and Control 4
SC4110 System Identification 5
WB1310 Multibody Dynamics A 3
WB1405A Stability of Thin-Walled Structures 1 4
WB1408A Shell Structures - Introductory Course 3
WB1408B Shell Structures - Advanced Course 5
WB1409 Theory of Elasticity 3
WB1412 Linear & Non-lineair Vibrations in Mechanical Systems 3
WB1413-04 Multibody Dynamics B 4
WB1416 Numerical Methods for Dynamics 3
WB1417-05 Fluid-Structures Interaction 4
WB1433-04 Thermomechanical Modelling & Charact.of Polymers 3
WB1441 Engineering Optimization 2 3
WB1443 Matlab in Engineering Mechanics 2
WB1444-07 Advanced Micro Electronic Packaging 3
WB1445-05 Mechanics of Micro Electronics and Microsystems 3
WB1481LR Dynamics and Control Space Systems 4
WB2303-08 Measurement in Engineering 4
WB2308 Biomedical Engineering Design 4
WB2408 Physiological Systems 3
WB2427 Predictive Modelling 3
WB2428-03 Mechanical Design in Mechatronics 5
WB2432 Bio Mechatronics 4
WB2454-07 Multiphysics Modelling using COMSOL 4
WB3404A Vehicle Dynamics A 3
WB5400-08 Mechatronic System Design 2 4
WB5414-08 Design of Machines and Mechanisms 4
WI4011-17 Computational Fluid Dynamics 6
WI4014TU Numerical Analysis 6
WI4141TU Matlab for Advanced Users 3

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WI4201 Scientific Computing 6
WM0605TU Business Economics for Engineers 4
Specialisation Mechatronic System Design (ME-PME-MSD)
Obligatory Courses ME-PME-MSD
ET4245ME Elektromechanics in Mechatronic Systems 3
SC4010 Introduction Project SC 3
WB2303-08 Measurement in Engineering 4
WB2427 Predictive Modelling 3
WB2428-03 Mechanical Design in Mechatronics 5
WB5400-08 Mechatronic System Design 2 4
Recommended Elective Courses ME-PME-MSD
ET4289 Integrated Circuits and MEMS Technology 4
SC4032 Physical Modelling for Systems and Control 4
SC4110 System Identification 5
TN2053(-10) Elektromagnetism 6
WB1413-04 Multibody Dynamics B 4
WB1416 Numerical Methods for Dynamics 3
WB1418-07 Engineering Dynamics 4
WB1440 Eng. Optimization: Concept & Applications 3
WB1441 Engineering Optimization 2 3
WB1443 Matlab in Engineering Mechanics 2
WB2305 Digital Control 3
WB2415 Robust Control 6
WB2421 Multivariable Control Systems 6
WB2454-07 Multiphysics Modelling using COMSOL 4
WB3404A Vehicle Dynamics A 3
WB5430-05 Engineering Informatics 3
Specialisation Micro and Nano Enigineering (ME-PME-MNE)
Obligatory Courses ME-PME-MNE
ME1613-09 Operations Management for Microsystems Production 3
ME1614 Micro en Nano Fabrication Challenge 3
ME1615 Micro-Assembly, Packaging and Test 3
WB2303-08 Measurement in Engineering 4
WB2427 Predictive Modelling 3
WB5414-08 Design of Machines and Mechanisms 4
Recommended Elective Courses ME-PME-MNE
AE3X01 Modern Materials for Aerospace Appllications Part A 3
AE4786 Sheet Metal Forming 3
AE4X04 Materials Selection in Mechanical Design 3
ET4245ME Elektromechanics in Mechatronic Systems 3
ET4248 Introduction to Microelectronics 3
ET4257 Sensors and Actuators 4
ET4258 Displays and Imaging sensors 4
ET4260 Microsystem Integration 4
ET4289 Integrated Circuits and MEMS Technology 4
ET8017 Electronic Instrumentation 5
IN4050TU Java and Object Oriented Design 6
IN4073TU Embedded Real-Time Systems 6
MS3021 Metals Science 4
MS3421 Developments in Production and Processing 2
MS4011 Mechanical Properties 3
SC4032 Physical Modelling for Systems and Control 4
SC4070 Control Systems Lab 4
SC4150 Fuzzy Logic and Engineering Applications 3
WB1406-07 Experimental Dynamics 3
WB1418-07 Engineering Dynamics 4
WB1440 Eng. Optimization: Concept & Applications 3
WB1443 Matlab in Engineering Mechanics 2
WB1444-07 Advanced Micro Electronic Packaging 3
WB1445-05 Mechanics of Micro Electronics and Microsystems 3
WB1451-05 Engineering Mechanics Fundamentals 4
WB2428-03 Mechanical Design in Mechatronics 5
WB2454-07 Multiphysics Modelling using COMSOL 4
WB3423-04 The Delft Systems Approach 3
WB3424-08 Production Organisation Principles 3
WB5400-08 Mechatronic System Design 2 4
WB5430-05 Engineering Informatics 3
WB5431-05 Life Cycle Engineering 3
WM0516TU Turning Technology into Business 6
WM0605TU Business Economics for Engineers 4
Specialisation Automotive (ME-PME-AUT)
Obligatory Courses ME-PME-AUT
ME1100 Automated Driving, Automotive Human Factors and Safety 3
SC4210 Vehicle Mechatronics 4
WB3404A Vehicle Dynamics A 3

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Recommended Elective Courses ME-PME-AUT
CT5820 Sociology and Psychology in Transport 3
ET4245ME Elektromechanics in Mechatronic Systems 3
ID5242 Automotive Design 6
MT216 Introduction Combustion Engines 3
SC4032 Physical Modelling for Systems and Control 4
SC4040 Filtering & Identification 6
SC4070 Control Systems Lab 4
SC4091 Optimization in Systems and Control 4
WB1406-07 Experimental Dynamics 3
WB1413-04 Multibody Dynamics B 4
WB1418-07 Engineering Dynamics 4
WB1440 Eng. Optimization: Concept & Applications 3
WB1451-05 Engineering Mechanics Fundamentals 4
WB2301-5 System Identification and Parameter Estimation 7
WB2303-08 Measurement in Engineering 4
WB2306 The Human Controller 3
WB2404 Man-machine systems 4
WB2407 Human Movement Control 4
WB5414-08 Design of Machines and Mechanisms 4
WBP202 Haptic Experiment Design 4
WM0808TU Safety in Transportation 5

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1.
Year 2009/2010
Organization Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Education Master Mechanical Engineering

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ME variant Precision and Microsystems Engineering (ME-PME)
Program Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Program Title MSc Track Precision and Microsystems Engineering
Contact for Students Coordinator: J.J.L. Neve,
room 4B-1-38
tel. +31 (0)15 27 86581,
e-mail j.j.l.neve@tudelft.nl
Introduction 1 The Precision and Microsystems Engineering Track offers a strong and unique combination of disciplines, which allows students
to specialise in various advanced technical fields. The name of the track reflects its focus on the research carried out by the
supporting groups within the PME department: precision and micro. This focus is in line with major technical challenges in
modern industry, where innovative solutions and advanced know-how are key factors in creating the competitive edge. Think of
optimised and smart structures for advanced aerospace or automotive applications, or of nanometric positioning systems for IC
production or mirrors in satellites. Imagine high-speed spindles for manufacturing sub-millimetre devices and multifunctional
MEMS (microelectromechanical systems), where intelligent sensing and actuation are embedded in mechanical components
smaller than a hair! Research ranges from highly fundamental to application oriented and is nearly always multidisciplinary.

The application spectrum of this track includes all the fields in which advanced simulation, mechatronics, smart microsystems
and high-precision production techniques are essential innovating factors. The PME department has close links with companies
involved in consumer goods, IC manufacturing, industrial equipment, the automotive industry, aerospace and biomechanics.
Many of our research projects are undertaken in collaboration with industry and directed towards future needs.

Education
The PME programme consists of several building blocks which for the most part can be shaped according to the students own
interest, as long as it is in focus with the PME research themes. The scope for freedom of choice gradually increases in the
course of the programme. The PME track offers four specialisations. The programme starts with compulsory courses which are
common to all specialisations. Once the specialisation has been chosen, specialisation-specific components are introduced, which
include obligatory specialisation courses and electives. The last part of the programme offers the greatest opportunity for
students to pursue studies in their area of interest and encompasses a design/literature/research assignment, an industrial
internship and a masters thesis. Both can also be performed within the subject of another PME specialisation. This can be done in
the Netherlands or abroad.

The PME track encourages students to take a part of their study abroad, through courses or individual assignments. Students
have the opportunity to participate in an Erasmus exchange programme at European institutions. In the past, students have also
visited Japan, Brazil, China, South Africa, Dubai, the USA and Australia, amongst others.

Masters thesis
The masters thesis will be undertaken at the University and sometimes in industry. Most projects are done in close collaboration
with industry or with regular feedback from the industry. This work includes aspects of modelling/simulation, design, realisation
and experimental verification in varying ratios depending on the area of interest and subject.

Introduction 2 Specialisations
The PME track is divided into 4 specialisations.

* Engineering Mechanics specialisation (ME-PME-EM)


Engineering Mechanics is a science describing the fundamental behaviour of structures and includes the art of experimental
analysis and computer simulation. As such it is a broad and generic specialisation, and the mother of many engineering tracks. In
this specialisation, students will be challenged to understand the physics of mechanics and its mathematical and numerical tools.
With its international expertise in dynamics (including vehicle-related problems), optimisation and material modelling, the
specialisation supports advanced research in many fields.
Examples of masters theses: characterisation of thin film material for flexible micro-devices, experimental validation of a model
for the motion of an uncontrolled bicycle and optimisation strategies for upgrading an Airbus aircraft model.

* Mechatronic System Design specialisation (ME-PME-MSD)


The specialisation of Mechatronic System Design focuses on the multidisciplinary design of precision systems and related
technology. Important aspects are the integration of drive electronics and actuators in position control systems, measurement
principles and system engineering. Though the background theory as given in the BSc phase is used the emphasis is on practical
realization rather than deepening of the theory. This requires the students to gain a broad knowledge of the supporting disciplines
where optimal cooperation is the cornerstone of a successful design.
Examples of masters theses: testing of a contactless transport and high-precision positioning system for thin, fragile products;
active magnetic and air bearings; haptic assembly.

* Micro and Nano engineering specialisation (ME-PME-MNE)


Micro and Nano Engineering bridges the gap between the ultimate small and the macro world. Students learn to develop and
optimise production and assembly processes and technologies which make use of phenomena at the nanometre level.
The primary focus within the Micro and Nano Engineering group is on the production and assembly of precise and small parts
and products of micrometer and nanometer scale.
The specialisation prepares mechanical engineers for a career in industrial, academic or service oriented environments in which
advanced small devices and systems play an important role.
Examples of masters theses:
design, modelling, realisation and testing of thermal MEMS actuators for fine-alignment of optical fibres.
growing nanotubes of centimeters length
self-assembly of ultra thin chips on polymer foils in a high volume production scheme (co-operation with the Holst Centre)
Development of a thermal sensor concept (co-operation with Demcon)

* Automotive specialisation (ME-PME-AUT)


Modern cars consist of ever more sophisticated mechanical parts with integrated electronics and therefore form an important
field of application for precision- and micro systems. Further system integration requires an interdisciplinary mechatronic
approach in future vehicle development. In this multidisciplinary approach, the generic fields of engineering mechanics and -
dynamics play a central role, as it forms the basis for understanding important aspects such as road handling (vehicle and tyre
dynamics, multi-body modelling) and passenger comfort and safety (vibration analysis, modal analysis and acoustics, crash
response)
Examples of masters theses: Feasibility of a novel ABS-controller (Bridgestone Rome); Modelling of the subsystems of a
toroidal Continuously Variable Transmission (DaimlerChrysler AG); Analysis and experimental techniques to accurately predict
the noise transmission in a car (BMW München).

Automotive is a coordinated specialisation in the tracks Control Engineering (ME-CE), Precision and Microsystems Engineering
(ME-PME) and BioMechanical Design(ME-BMD).
Introduction 3 Market and Companies
The PME track aims to prepare students to fulfil key positions in companies that develop and produce advanced products, such
as Philips, ASML, Océ, ESA/Estec, SKF, DIMES, Corus, BMW, Airbus, Stork, Fokker, Rolls Royce, Bronckhorst, Siemens and
Bosch. Many of the abovementioned companies are keen to hire our best students to be future leaders or members of

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multidisciplinary teams working on mechanical innovations.
Other opportunities include continuing research within universities, institutes or companies, engineering consultancy and
business start-ups.
Program Structure 1 * Engineering Mechanics
Compulsory core courses: 22
Compulsory specialisation courses: 14
Elective courses: 24
ME2410-10: Small-scale design, research and/or literature assignment: 10
ME2400-15: Industrial traineeship: 15
ME2490-35: Master's thesis: 35

* Mechatronic System Design


Compulsory core courses: 22
Compulsory specialisation courses: 21
Elective courses: 17
ME2410-10: Small-scale design, research and/or literature assignment: 10
ME2400-15: Industrial traineeship: 15
ME2490-35: Master's thesis: 35

* Micro and Nano Engineering


Compulsory core courses: 22
Compulsory specialisation courses: 19
Elective courses: 19
ME2410-10: Small-scale design, research and/or literature assignment: 10
ME2400-15: Industrial traineeship: 15
ME2490-35: Master's thesis: 35

* Automotive
Compulsory core courses: 22
Compulsory specialisation courses: 10
Elective courses: 28
ME2410-10: Small-scale design, research and/or literature assignment: 10
ME2400-15: Industrial traineeship: 15
ME2490-35: Master's thesis: 35
Transfering from HBO to Students from HBO have to follow a bridging program.
TUD Details can be found by selecting in the above pull-down menus:
Year: 2009/2010
Organization: Werktuigbouwkunde, Maritieme Techniek & Technische Materiaalwetenschappen
Education Type: Pre-masters Program
Education Pre-Master Mechanical Engineering

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Year 2009/2010
Organization Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Education Master Mechanical Engineering

Obligatory Courses ME-PME


Program Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve

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ME1611 Physics for Mechanical Engineers 2
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr. U. Staufer
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 3/0/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
Start Education 1
Exam Period 1
2
Course Language English
Required for all MSc students of the track PME
Expected prior knowledge Mathematical Analysis
Summary This lecture provides an overview on parts of Physics, which are important for mechanical engineers in the precision and
microsystems domain. Starting with knowledge familiar from high school and bachelor education, we will reach out for
understanding oscillations and waves in Mechanics, Electronics and Optics, and glance at fundamentals of quantum mechanics.
Course Contents Models in physics for example the point mass,
Conservation laws
Harmonic motion, damping,
Mechanical waves
Interference and diffraction
Electric charge, potentials and fields, their interaction with materials
Electrical dipole
Passive electronic components, laws of Kirchhoff, Ohm
Electro-magnetic waves,
Optics
Quantization of the harmonic oscillator.
Uncertainty principle, Tunneling effect
The wave particle duality
Study Goals Acquire the basic knowledge in mechanics and electrodynamics for analyzing problems in Mechatronics, Engineering Dynamics
and Micro- and Nanosystems Engineering.
Understand the concepts of fields and waves.
Get a notion of quantum mechanics
Education Method Lectures 2/0/0/0 and exercises 1/0/0/0
Literature and Study There are different textbooks in physics, which cover the topics of this course and which also contain supplemental exercises. It
Materials is highly recommended to acquire such a textbook, also for future reference. The course is based on:
Tipler and Mosca, Physics for Scientists and Engineers, W.H. Freeman Co. 2007. ISBN 0716789647
Feynman, Lectures on Physics, Addison Wesley 1977. ISBN 0201021161 P
Alonso and Finn, Physics, Addison Wesley, 1992. ISBN-10: 0201565188
Assessment exercises, 50% success required for admission to final exam
written exam
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

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ME1612 Introduction to Nanoscience and Technology 1
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr. U. Staufer
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period 2
3
Course Language English
Required for Precision and Microsystems Engineering
Expected prior knowledge ME 1611 Physics for Mechanical Engineers or equivalent.
Summary Introduction into methods, instruments, and processes used in nanotechnology
Course Contents Nanoscience is a relatively young discipline, which emerged from the analysis of basic physical, chemical and biological
phenomena at the atomic to sub-micrometer scale range. By having investigated and explained fundamental questions, it broke
ground for what is now often cited as being one of the most important areas for future technology developments. Based on
nanoscientific concepts, new materials, processes, and devices are expected to emerge within the next few years. Nanoscience
has developed its own professional jargon with expressions from its parent disciplines, which have to be know if one wants to
communicate within the nanoscience community.
This course establishes this basic knowledge and introduces the major instruments and methods used in nanoscience and
technology. It thus lays the base for participating in the above mentioned developments. The following chapters will be treated:
- Seeing at the nanoscale
The optical microscope - its limitations and advantages
The electron microscope how does it work?
The family of scanning tunneling and scanning force microscopes the SXMs
- Working material at the nanoscale
Surface modifications by means of SXM highly controlled, low throughput
Bottom up synthesis by chemical means high throughput, challenging assembly
- Carbon is amazingly diverse
- From the bottom: the C-atom, hydro-carbons, C60 and other fullerenes
- From the top: diamond, graphite, graphene, carbon nanotubes
- Applications
Study Goals Upon a successful participation in this course, the student shall know and understand:
- the common expressions used in nanoscience and technology,
- the instruments and methods used for measuring at the nanometer level
- at least one method used for preparing nanomaterial (nanoparticles, -tubes, -wires, -rods etc.)
Education Method Lectures
Literature and Study Presentation Slides and Hand-outs
Materials E. L. Wolf, Nanophysics and Nanotechnology, Wiley VCH, Weinheim, 2004 (ISBN 3 527 40407 4).
E. Meyer, H.J. Hug and R. Bennewitz, Scanning Probe Microscopy the lab on a tip, Springer Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New
York, 2004. ( ISBN 3 540 43180 2).
Assessment written exam
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

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SC4026 Control System Design 3
Responsible Instructor T. Keviczky
Responsible Instructor A. Abate
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr. C.W. Scherer
Course Coordinator Dr. P.S.C. Heuberger
Contact Hours / Week 4/0/0/0 (2 hours lectures and 2 hours exercises)
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
Start Education 1
Exam Period 1
2
Course Language English
Course Contents State-space description of single-input, single-output linear dynamic systems, interconnections, block diagrams
Linearization, equilibria, stability, Lyapunov functions and the Lyapunov equation
Dynamic response, relation to modes, the matrix exponential
Realization of transfer function models by state space descriptions, coordinate changes, canonical forms
Sampling, foundations of digital design
Controllability, stabilizability, uncontrollable modes and pole-placement by state-feedback
Application of LQ regulator, robustness properties
Observability, detectability, unobservable modes, state-estimation observer design
Output feedback synthesis and separation principle
Disturbance and reference signal modeling, integral action for zero steady-state error
Study Goals The student is able to identify the theoretical concepts and apply the developed tools to simulation-based controller design
projects. More specifically, the student must be able to:

Translate differential equation models into state-space and transfer function descriptions
Linearize a system, determine equilibrium points and analyze local stability
Describe the effect of pole locations to the dynamic system response in time- and frequency-domain
Describe the main elements of a digital control system, the effect of aliasing, and the approximation of continuous-time
controllers using zero-order hold
Verify controllability, stabilizability, observability, detectability, minimality of realizations
Describe the purpose and apply the procedure of pole-placement by state-feedback
Apply LQ optimal state-feedback control and analyze the controlled system
Explain the relevance of state estimation and build converging observers
Build disturbance and reference models and achieve zero steady-state error using integral control
Education Method Lectures 2/0/0/0 and exercise sessions 2/0/0/0
Computer Use The exercises will be partially based on Matlab in order to train the use of modern computational tools for model-based control
system design.
Literature and Study K.J. Astrom, R.M. Murray, Feedback Systems: An Introduction for Scientists and Engineers, Princeton University Press,
Materials Princeton and Oxford, 2009
http://www.cds.caltech.edu/~murray/amwiki/index.php?title=Main_Page

B. Friedland, Control System Design: An Introduction to State-space Methods. Dover Publications, 2005.
Assessment Successful completion of bi-weekly exercise sets (30%) and written examination (70%).
Design Content Simulation-based state-space approach to model-based control system design.
Department 3mE Department Delft Center for Systems and Control

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WB1442-08 Microsystems 3
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. J.F.L. Goosen
Contact Hours / Week 2/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
2
Start Education 1
Exam Period 2
3
Course Language English
Course Contents This lecture gives and introduction to Microsystems with typical sizes up to 1mm and feature sizes of a few micrometers.
Overview of applications, an overview of manufacture techniques, reliability and modeling, etc. relevant to microsystem design
and some of the physics involved in such small multiphysics systems.
Study Goals The student is able to understand the basic behaviour, application and manufacture of miniature systems and the results on
design and engineering. He/she will know the terminology and is able to read and understand the literature on Micro Systems.

More specifically the student must be able to:


1. list the applications of micro systems and describe their weak and strong points
2. use scaling laws to calculate and predict behaviour of specific micro systems and compare and evaluate different concepts and
systems when subjected to miniaturization
3. describe several basic mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical, thermal and fluidic principles, calculate how some these
effects scale and explain how they are used in micro systems
4. list and describe the basic manufacturing techniques used for micro systems and their specific strengths and weaknesses
5. design a basic manufacturing sequence resulting in a specific structure using photolithography and micromachining process
steps
6. list the functions of a package, several packaging solutions and describe the problems associated with packaging related to
specific micro system needs
7. describe the difficulties in testing and measuring of micro systems and the special equipment and structures involved in this
8. describe the difficulties involved in the design of micro systems and list the tools available to assist in this process
9. compare different possibilities of physical principles, manufacturing techniques, packaging options, etc. in a specific micro
system and/or situation and formulate a choice
Education Method Lecture
Literature and Study Handouts and Presentations
Materials
Assessment Written exam
Percentage of Design 50%
Design Content Design requirements and conceptual design of microsystems and process design.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

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WB1450-05 Mechanical Analysis for Engineering 4
Responsible Instructor Prof. D.J. Rixen
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. A. van Keulen
Contact Hours / Week 3/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
2
Start Education 1
Exam Period 2
5
Course Language English
Required for wb1451-05,wb1416, wb1418, wb1417,wb1408a,wb1405a
Expected prior knowledge a basic knowledge of engineering mechanics is required (see mechanics and dynamics courses from BSc engineering mechnics)
Course Contents The course is designed to give a overview of essential mechanical topics relevant for production techniques, mechatronics and
system designers. The main topics that will be handled are:
- Multi-physical aspects of models (electrostatic coupling of microstructures, piezo-electric materials, thermo-mechanical
coupling, vibro-acoustics)
- basics of rotor dynamics
- damping description in structural dynamics
- visco-elasticity of materials
- mechanical properties of composites

The course is intended to give an overview of the important phenomena and to give guidelines for further modeling and solving
of structural analysis problems.
Study Goals The student is able to recognize if complex mechanical interactions are affecting a mechatronical device or a production machine
and, understanding the important physical effects in action, he can choose the proper analysis tool and interpret the results.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.recognize and analyse the effects of the coupling of structural parts with electrostatic forces, acoustic pressure, thermo-
mechanical effects and piezo-electric mechanics. In particular is able to analyze how those effects are utilized in mechatronical
designs.
2.evaluate the effect of gyroscopic forces on the dynamics of rotors
3.compute the linear dynamic response of mechanical systems excited by random forces
4. Now the different ways to describe damping in structural dynamics (viscous, histeretic and visco-elastic).
5.analyze the stiffness and strength of simple composite materials
6.evaluate the visco-elastic properties of materials and use their constitutive description in numerical modelling

Education Method Lectures


Computer Use Computer tools will be used (Matlab and/or Ansys) for the project exercise
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials lecture notes specifcally designed for the course and available through blackboard

References from literature:


Fung, Y.C., Foundations of Solid Mechanics, Prentice-Hall, 1965.
Timoshenko, S.P. en Gere, J.M., Theory of elastic stability, Second edition, McGraw-Hill, 1981.
Crisfield, M.A., Nonlinear finite element analysis of solids and structures.
Bathe, K.J., Finite element procedures.
Zienkiewicz, O.C. en Taylor, R.C., The finite element method, Vol. 1 and 2, Fourth edition.
Géradin, M. en Rixen, D.J., Mechanical vibrations: theory and applications to structural dynamics, Wiley, 1997.
Inman, D.J., Engineering Vibration, Second edition, Prentice-Hall, 2001
Hughes, T.J.R., The finite element method: linear static and dynamic finite element analysis, Prentice-Hall, 1987.
Assessment Oral exam + project exercise
Design Content No direct design content.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

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WB2414-09 Mechatronic System Design 4
Responsible Instructor Prof.ir. R.H. Munnig Schmidt
Contact Hours / Week 2/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
2
Start Education 1
Exam Period 2
3
Course Language English
Required for All PME students
Expected prior knowledge Bsc Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering or Physics.
Basic knowledge on electromagnetism, electricity, electronics, control and signal theory is very adviseable.

The most important aspect needed is the talent to match theory with practice. Translate a real system into a dynamic model and
vice versa. Understand what a position control system really does. Observe a system top-down. Starting with a global overview
and approximate calculations by hand and only as a last step calculate the details with the help of a (finite element) computer
program.
Course Contents Mechatronic system design deals with the design of controlled motion systems by utilizing a multitude of disciplines. It starts
with thinking how the required function of a machine can be achieved by utilizing its different subsystems following a systems
Engineering approach (V-model).

Some supporting disciplines are not originally the working area of mechanical engineers like electronics, electromechanics and
optics. This course aims to connect these disciplines to realise an optimally designed system.

The target application of controlled motion systems explicitly includes the controlling of any movement ranging from perfectly
standing still, slow motion precision manipulators to high speed applications with extreme precision to sub nm level.

Based on practical cases ranging from CD drives , active car suspension systems to waferscanners the following subjects will be
dealt with.

System design breakdown into subsystems and elements


Mechatronic motion system characteristics
Dynamic behaviour in the time and frequency domain of actively controlled motion systems.
Transfer functions and position control(feedback,PID and feedforward).
Vibration isolation
Electromechanical Actuators
Active bearings
Analog electronics, operational amplifiers and power electronics used for driving actuators
Although embedded sofware is very relevant in mechatronic systems only limited attention will be given to the subject.
Study Goals The student can analyze active dynamic systems by means of bode diagrams.

The student can solve new mechatronic problems from a systems Engineering perspective.

The student will be able to understand the role of different disciplines that are used in Mechatronic systems in their mutual
relationship.

The student will be able to determine the optimal combination of the different disciplines to achieve a specific controlled motion
function.

Education Method Lectures around practical mechatronic systems.

The theoretical part will concentrate on those supporting disciplines that are underexposed in the Bsc curriculum

The following disciplines are important aspects:


Dynamics, electronics, electromechanics, control engineering, dynamic error budgetting.

While these disciplines mostly are dealt with in separate specialized courses, in this course the mutual relationship in the
application in controlled motion systems is the central theme.
Computer Use No computers will be used nor will the emphasis lay on exact calculated values.
Literature and Study A reader is in concept published on blackboard.
Materials When possible in time it will be made available in printed form.

The presentations will also be published on blackboard


Books Besides the reader which is sufficient for the examination the following book can be used to broaden the scope especially in the
control part.

"Feedback Control of Dynamic Systems" from Franklin, Powell and Emami-Naeini ISBN 0-13-149930-0
Reader "Mechatronic System Design"

R. Munnig Schmidt

(blackboard)
Assessment Written Examination (Closed book)
Permitted Materials during Calculator
Tests
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 13 of 150
WB5451-05 Student colloquia and events PME 1
Responsible Instructor Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 1/1/1/1
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
2
3
4
Start Education 1
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Required for Mandatory for all students doing the ME variant PME
Course Contents Presentations by PME students about their research assignments, followed by an academic discussion.

Presentations are held throughout the year.


Study Goals The student:
- is able to communicate verbally about research and solutions to problems with colleagues, non-colleagues and other involved
parties in the English language.
- is able to generate a well-structured multi-media presentation to colleagues, non-colleagues and other involved parties in the
English language.
- is able to take part in an academic dispute.
Education Method Presentations and mini-lectures. Learning by example. Academic discussions.
Literature and Study Optional.
Materials The student might benefit from literature on preparing multi-media presentations and on presentation skills.
Assessment Students have to present a research topic, in which they have contributed and attend at least 20 presentations by fellow PME
students and selected guestspeakers.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

WB5452-07 Intro Lab PME 2


Responsible Instructor Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 2/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
2
Start Education 1
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Required for Mandatory for all students of the ME-track PME
Course Contents After a plenary introduction session a number a number of praticals will have to be attended. You will work in small groups
(mostly 2 students/group), in parallel with other groups, depending on the available infrastructure.

Topics may include:


- Labview:
..* Basic understanding of how to use the computer as a measuring instrument or controller
..* Use of graphic interactive user interface
- PLC-programming:
..* Gain basic knowledge of how to use and program a Modern Programmable Logic Controller.
- 3D CAD: an introduction to SolidWorks:
..* Understanding the capabilities of modern 3D CAD software
..* Learning the basic functionalities of SolidWorks
- Surface roughness measurements:
..* gain basic awareness of how to measure workpiece roughness.
..* Using state-of-the-art equipment.
- Dynamics Session:
..* understanding Modal Analysis
..* learning to use accelerometers, signal conditioning units and SIGlab.
- Mechanical measurements on a curing exopy,
..* using a Dynamic Mechanical Analyser (DMA)

- .. other topics to be defined


- .. Course contents may change from year to year, depending on the availability of infrastructure.
Study Goals Learning a number of basic skills, necessary for the PME MSc-study.
Become acquainted with the lab infrastructure of PME.
Education Method Presentations, lectures, instructions, assignments.
Literature and Study - handouts of powerpoint presentations.
Materials - instruction manuals
- selected documentation on the infrastucture used.
- exercise manuals
Assessment Every practical is assessed by a report (written and oral) and/or a portfolio of generated software source code and a
demonstration of the workings (in the case of programming activities). Based on weightfactors a final score is calculated.
Enrolment / Application Inform Mr. Neve before 1 september 2009 via email that you want to participate. Once the practicum has started no more
applications will be accepted. This practicum starts only once per year.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 14 of 150
WB5454 MEMS Lab 2
Responsible Instructor A. Khiat
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Instructor Ir. J.P. van Schieveen
Instructor Ir. J. Wesselingh
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Course Contents Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are different from conventional mechanical systems, and not only by their size.
Often unconventional forms of actuation, such as electrostatic and thermal actuation, are used. These actuators are rarely made
with off-the-shelve components and the same applies for sensors. This makes the selection of the right equipment for actuation
and measurement, like amplifiers, more tedious. Also, their small size often means that micro systems cannot be characterised
with equipment normally used in mechanical engineering. This is not just because micro systems are more fragile and too small
to attach, for instance, sensors, but also because they can operate at must higher frequencies due to their extremely small mass. In
this course students will be taught how to characterize and work with micro systems. And by doing so, they will get a sense for
the advantages of and opportunities offered by miniaturization. The influence of fabrication processes, the multi-physics nature
of MEMS and their modelling are also important parts of this course.
Study Goals During this practical course students will gain hands-on experience with micro systems. Afterwards the student must be able to:
1. describe the advantages and drawbacks of miniaturization, and understand the specific challenges in working with micro
systems.
2. use scaling laws to calculate and predict behaviour of specific micro systems,
3. model specific micro systems, both static and dynamic, and experimentally validate these models,
4. handle, test and characterize micro systems using, as much as possible, basic measurement equipment (e.g. oscilloscope,
function generator, microscope) and integrated sensors and calibration scales.
Education Method Lectures and practical assignments
Assessment Practical assignment / oral exam
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 15 of 150
Year 2009/2010
Organization Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Education Master Mechanical Engineering

Page 16 of 150
Specialisation Engineering Mechanics (ME-PME-EM)
Program Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Program Title Specialisation Engineering Mechanics (ME-PME-EM)
Introduction 1 The Engineering Mechanics specialisation is supported by the following five disciplines that collaborate in this one
specialisation (listed in alphabetical order):

Engineering Dynamics (EM-ED):


Prof. D.J. Rixen, tel. +31 (0)15 27 81523, d.j.rixen@tudelft.nl
Secretary, Ms. C.P. du Burck, tel. +31 (0)15 27 85733, c.p.duburck@tudelft.nl

Mechanics of Materials (EM-MM):


Prof. L.J. Ernst, tel. +31 (0)15 27 86519, l.j.ernst@tudelft.nl
Secretary, Ms. C.P. du Burck, tel. +31 (0)15 27 85733, c.p.duburck@tudelft.nl

Microsystems Reliability (EM-MR):


Prof. G.Q. Zhang, tel. +31 (0)15 27 82704, g.q.zhang@tudelft.nl
Secretary, Ms. C.P. du Burck, tel. +31 (0)15 27 85733, c.p.duburck@tudelft.nl

Reliability of structures and processing (EM-RSP)


Prof. M.A. Gutiérrez, tel. +31 (0)15 278 1610, m.a.gutierrez@tudelft.nl
Secretary Ms. M.C. Stolker, tel. +31 (0)15 278 6513, m.c.stolker@tudelft.nl

Structural Optimisation and Computational Mechanics (EM-SOCM):


Prof. A. van Keulen, tel. +31 (0)15 278 6515, F.vanKeulen@tudelft.nl
Secretary Ms. M.C. Stolker, tel. +31 (0)15 278 6513, m.c.stolker@tudelft.nl

Engineering Mechanics is the field of study covering the foundations of mechanical engineering. The design of mechanical
systems requires a thorough (fundamental) understanding of their behaviour, together with the use of modelling tools. Broadly
speaking, this includes theoretical and experimental analysis of the statics and dynamics of structures and mechanical systems
(loads and performance), material properties of system components, aspects of reliability, and automation of design and
optimisation of mechanical system components.

The Engineering Mechanics specialisation therefore focuses on understanding the characteristics of mechanical systems, rather
than on their operational aspects. Engineering Mechanics is a core field for mechanical engineers. As a result, graduates from
this specialisation are often in demand as members and as future leaders of industrial teams committed to developing mechanical
innovations.

Introduction 2 * Course structure *

The selection of obligatory courses for the EM specialisation aims to give the MSc students a broad overview of the
fundamentals of engineering mechanics
(continuum mechanics, engineering dynamics, experimental methods ), computational techniques (Finite Elements, algorithmic
strategies for optimization ) as well as subjects closer to innovative applications (mechatronics, Microsystems, automotive ).

After this the students can choose to focus in more depth on a field from the disciplines mentioned above or to work across more
than one of the disciplines and benefit from the resulting synergies. Students can also decide to focus on an area which combines
one or more of the above-mentioned disciplines together with a discipline covered by another PME specialisation. In other
words, students have a large amount of flexibility in the design of their study programmes.
This flexibility is important because it allows students to structure their study programmes to correspond with their individual
interests and because it prepares them for a career in engineering where engineers are often required to be flexible both at a
project level and in terms of the job itself.
Introduction 3 * Disciplines *

The following overview of the typical focus and activities in each discipline and the example projects, gives a greater insight into
the overall field of study in the EM specialisation (for more information visits the PME website):

Engineering Dynamics

The focus of the Engineering Dynamics group is on analysing the dynamic behaviour of structures and mechanisms, using
simulations and experimental testing.
Within the Engineering Mechanics specialization, the students being dynamically-inclined are advised to choose elective courses
and projects involving the fundamentals of structural vibrations, multibody dynamics and multi-physical modelling. The research
the students will be associated with involves computer simulations as well as experimental investigations in the dynamics
laboratory. The research projects cover a broad spectrum, with an emphasis on the fundamentals of efficient simulation
techniques and advanced experimental methods. Many students choose to do their projects and MSc thesis research in
collaboration with industries in the field of, high-tech systems (Microsystems, high-precision), aerospace, automotive, wind
energy or offshore. Others work directly in the engineering dynamics group on more theoretical subjects coinciding with the
fancy research projects involving PhD students and staff.

Mechanics of Materials

The focus is on the mechanical properties of materials both during and after production. Engineering Mechanics offers a variety
of analytical, numerical and experimental methods to gain / improve insight in these mechanical properties.
Education and research in Mechanics of Materials is directed to these aspects, with special focus on experimental
characterization and modelling of (process dependent) material behaviour, simulation of production steps and related mechanical
properties of products and experimental verification of simulation results.

Microsystems Reliability

This field focuses on the (production related) reliability of microelectronics and of micro-systems. Because of the continuing
miniaturization in this area new concepts in mechanics as well as in experimental methods are being developed and applied.
The education and research is focused on typical failure modes in microelectronics and Microsystems, related to design and
production, experimental mechanics directed to materials characterization and modelling and to verification of product properties
and simulation of behaviour during and after production. Master theses will often offer opportunities to co-operate with the
industrial research partners, such as Philips, Fraunhofer IZM, IMEC, TNO, Thales, Siemens, Kitron, Motorola, ICI, DSM.

Reliability of structures and processes

The group works on the development of algorithms for the incorporation of randomness into the modelling of material and
structural failure. This includes the development of stochastic finite elements, which is one of the basic tools to consider random
fluctuations of material properties in solid mechanics, analysis of material instability, including the evaluation of failure
probabilities, the analysis of likely failure modes and size effects and multiphysics phenomena, such as piezoelectricity. Typical

Page 17 of 150
applications range from earthquake interpretation to micro-mechanical behaviour in MEMs

Structural Optimization and Computational Mechanics

This group works at developing numerical techniques and methods for analyzing, designing and optimizing systems. The
research is primarily focused on microsystems and biomedical systems. We are looking at accuracy, efficiency and practical
applicability. This includes both fundamental and numerical research. Links to experimental work are important for validation.
The educational programme offers numerical techniques such as FEM, optimisation approaches and some fundamentals of
design.

Introduction 4 * Research *

The research activities of the groups are centred around several applications, including (i) microsystems, (ii) biomechanical
systems and (iii) aerospace structures. It should be noted, however, that the main emphasis is on microsystems. Some examples
of ongoing projects are:

Passive suppression of vibration in key components of a wafer stepper at ASML


Shock response of small electronic equipment (e.g. MP3 player) at Philips
Vibrations in high-speed, high-precision cold rolling mills at CORUS
Multibody dynamics analysis of a human knee prosthesis, in collaboration with Otto Bock HealthCare GmbH
Biodynamic identification of sacroiliac joints with ultrasound measurements and modelling (in-house).
Design and analysis of driver seat vibration attenuation for heavy duty vehicles at the University of Stellenbosch
Efficient hybrid modelling of the vibrations of coupled automobile components at BMW
Influence of vibrations on the performance of a high-performance optical test bench at TNO-TPD
Dynamic load analysis of satellites coupled with an Ariane 5 launcher for Estec
Dynamic load analysis in the gearbox of a large-scale wind turbine (Siemens Wind Energy)
Modelling and controller design for dynamic operations of a large system for structural testing (a 20-tonne hydraulic shaker) at
Estec
Modelling and experimental verification of the dynamics of a musical instrument (in-house)
Modelling and analysis of the dynamics of small manoeuvring submarine vehicles at Princeton University and with the Nato
Underwater Research Center (Italy)
Computational aspects of multiphysics phenomena in microsystems, in-house
Curing electronic materials in collaboration with Philips
Reliability of microsystems in collaboration with Philips
Buckling of thin layers in collaboration with Philips research
Fast reanalysis in collaboration with Airbus
Topology optimisation of microsystems, in-house, SNU Korea and Dimes
Modelling of surface effects in collaboration with Philips and Dimes
Updating models using ground vibration tests in collaboration with NLR and Airbus
Design of micro-grippers using shape memory alloys, in-house
Design of electrostatic actuators, in-house
Bone ingrowth simulation for shoulder endoprosthesis at EUR and LUMC

Page 18 of 150
Year 2009/2010
Organization Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Education Master Mechanical Engineering

Obligatory Courses ME-PME-EM

Page 19 of 150
WB1406-07 Experimental Dynamics 3
Responsible Instructor D. de Klerk
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Parts The course consists of two parts:
- part A Classes
- part B Laboratory experiments (four in total)
Course Contents Part A: Theory
- How does a modern measurement system work?? In specific how does it minimize desturbances and does it cope with filter
effects?
- Pitfalls in Frequency Analysis: Descrete algorithms, Leakage, Aliasing. Know it or you'll mess up your experements.
- The power of Transfer and Frequency Response Functions (FRF); why are the so usefull?
- Experimental Modal Analysis: Does and don't, pitfalls & challenges in practice.
- Harmonic excitation (with frequency stepping), impulsive excitation, stochastic excitation.
- Sensors, how do they work, what is important when using them.
- Rotoranalysis, operational system analysis.
- Latest advances in measurement technology.

Moto: In theory, theory and practice are the same... In practice they are not.
This course concentrates on pointing where those differences orignate from, valuable for any who'll perform measurements,
needs to analyse measurements or who tries to match his / her simulation to the experiment.

Part B: Experimental analysis


The second part of the course involves working on assigments meant to illustrate concepts described in Part A and to deepen
insight.
Teams of three students each, carry out multi´ple experiments. Last year students got to simulate in Matlab a measurement
system as a first assignment. Their final project involved analyzing measurement data measured by them selves on my car on the
Rotterdamsestraatweg. Can it be more exciting? Yes, maybe you have always wanted to analyze a different product like a boat,
train, motorbike, music instrument, etc. maybe we can come up with that exciting experiment in this year's course!
Study Goals In general the student is able to perform dynamic measurements, being aware of possible pitfalls.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1. describe the effects of Quantization, Leakage, Aliasing in measurements and measurement equipment.
2. explain the principle of extracting modal parameters (resonance frequency, spring constant, damping ratio) from system
response both in the time domain and in the frequency domain
3. explain the principle of extracting modal parameters (modal frequencies, modal gains, modal damping ratios) from system
response both in the time domain and in the frequency domain
4. discuss relative merits of different excitation techniques (shaker with frequency sweep, impact hammer, shaker with random
excitation)
5. discuss the prinicples and the elative merits of different sensing techniques (strain gauge, seismic mass, piezo crystal,
electromagnetic induction, laser vibrometer)
6. carry out dynamic experiments, analyze the data, and report and discuss his findings.
Education Method Classes followed by laboratory projects.
Computer Use Matlab
Word
LaTeX
PowerPoint
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials - Part A: Course notes
- Part B: Laboratory assignments manual

References from literature:


- see the reference list in the Course notes.
Assessment Written report, and oral discussion of experiment activities and of report.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 20 of 150
WB1418-07 Engineering Dynamics 4
Responsible Instructor Prof. D.J. Rixen
Instructor Dr.ir. A.L. Schwab
Contact Hours / Week 2/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
2
Start Education 1
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Required for Engineering Dynamics and Mechanicsms (wb1419, extension of wb1418), Multibody Dynamics A (wb1310), Multibody
Dynamics B (wb1413), Numerical Methods in Dynamics (wb1416), Non-Linear Vibrations (wb1412).
Expected prior knowledge Statics and Strength of materials (e.g. wb1214), Dynamics (e.g. wb1311), Linear Algebra
Course Contents The dynamic behavior of structures (and systems in general) plays an essential role in engineering mechanics and in particular in
the design of controllers. In this master course, we will discuss how the equations describing the dynamical behavior of a
structure and of a mechatronical system can be set up. Fundamental concepts in dynamics such as equilibrium, stability,
linearization and vibration modes are discussed. If time permits, also an introduction to discretization techniques to approximate
continuous systems is proposed.

The course will discuss the following topics:

- Review of the virtual work principle and Lagrange equations


- linearization around an equilibrium position: vibrations
- elastodynamics in a solid and continuous systems
- discretization techniques (Rayleigh-Ritz and Finite Elements)
- Free vibration modes and modal superposition
- Forced harmonic response of non-damped and damped structures

Study Goals The student is able to select different ways of setting up the dynamic equations of mechanical systems, to perform an analysis of
the system in terms of linear stability and vibration modes and to properly use mode superposition techniques for computing
transient and harmonic responses. He also understands the concept of displacement approximation techniques for discretizing
continuous dynamic systems.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1. explain the relations between the principle of virtual work and the Lagrange equations for dynamics to the basic Newton laws
2. describe the concept of kinematic constraints (holonomic/non-holonomic, scleronomic/rheonomic) and choose a proper set of
degrees of freedom to describe a dynamic system
3. write the Lagrange equations for a minimum set of degrees of freedom and extend it to systems with additional constraints
(Lagrange multiplier method)
4. linearize the dynamic equations by considering the different contributions of the kinetic and potential energies (both for
system with and without overall motion imposed by scleronomic constraints)
5. analyze the linear stability of dynamic systems (damped and undamped) according to their state space formulation if necessary
6. explain and use the concept of free vibration modes and frequencies
7. interpret and apply the orthogonality properties of modes to describe the transient and harmonic dynamic response of damped
and undamped systems
8. evaluate the approximations introduced when using truncated modal series (spatial and spectral)
9. explain how mode superposition can be used to identify the eigenparamters of linear dynamic systems
Education Method Lecture
Computer Use The assignement will require using Matlab-like software.
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Lecture notes (available through blackboard)

References from literature:


Mechanical Vibrations, Theory and Application to Structural Dynamics, M. Géradin and D. Rixen, Wiley, 1997.
Applied Dynamics, with application to multibody and mechatronic systems, F.C. Moon, Wiley, 1998, isbn 0-471-13828-2.
Engineering vibration, D.J. Inman, Prentice Hall, 2001, isbn 0-13-726142-X
The Finite Element Method: Linear Static and Dynamic Finite Element Analysis, T.J.R. Hughes Prentice-Hall, 1987.
Structural Dynamics in Aeronautical Engineering, M.N. Bismark-Nasr, AIAA education series, 1999, isbn 1-56347-323-2
Assessment Oral exam + assignment
Remarks An assignment will be given which will make up part of the final mark. SInce the enphasis of the lectures will be on
understanding concepts in dynamics more than memorizing formulas, the oral exam will be open book to evaluate your
understanding of the concepts.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 21 of 150
WB1440 Eng. Optimization: Concept & Applications 3
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. A. van Keulen
Instructor Dr.ir. M. Langelaar
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Required for wb1441
Expected prior knowledge Basic knowledge of mechanical engineering and mathematics
Course Contents Formulation of optimization problems
Typical characteristics of optimization problems
Minimization without constraints
Constrained minimization
Simple optimization algorithms
Discrete design variables
Approximation concepts
Sensitivity analysis
Study Goals The student is able to formulate a proper optimization problem in order to solve a given design problem, and is able to select a
suitable approach for solving this problem numerically. Furthermore, he is able to interpret results of completed optimization
procedures.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.formulate an optimization model for various design problems
2.identify optimization model properties such as monotonicity, (non-)convexity and (non-) linearity
3.identify optimization problem properties such as constraint dominance, constraint activity, well boundedness and convexity
4.apply Monotonicity Analysis to optimization problems using the First Monotonicity Principle
5.perform the conversion of constrained problems into unconstrained problems using penalty or barrier methods
6.compute and interpret the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker optimality conditions for constrained optimization problems
7.describe the complications associated with the use of computational models in optimization
8.illustrate the use of compact modeling and response surface techniques for dealing with computationally expensive and noisy
optimization models
9.perform design sensitivity analysis using variational, discrete, semi-analytical and finite difference methods
10.identify a suitable optimization algorithm given a certain optimization problem
11.perform design optimization using the optimization routines implemented in the Matlab Optimization Toolbox
12.derive a linearized approximate problem for a given constrained optimization problem, and solve the original problem using a
sequence of linear approximations
13.describe the basic concepts used in structural topology optimization
Education Method Lectures (2 hours per week), exercises
Computer Use MATLAB is used for exercises.
Literature and Study Course material: P.Y. Papalambros et al. Principles of Optimal Design: Modelling and Computation.
Materials
References from literature: R.T. Haftka and Z. Gürdal: Elements of Structural Optimization.
Assessment MATLAB exercises
Percentage of Design 80%
Design Content The course is focusing on design optimization.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 22 of 150
WB1451-05 Engineering Mechanics Fundamentals 4
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. E.H. van Brummelen
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period 4
5
Course Language English
Course Contents In this course the students will be given the basic knowhow to formulate the equations describing the mechanical behavior of
continuum media and learn the theory underlying the elastic behavior of solids. The course will also cover the concepts of
energies and variational analysis relevant to mechanical analysis. Two-dimensional and three dimensional classical problems
will be handled. Also the theory of plates and shells will be outlined.
Study Goals The student is able to choose the proper formulation to describe the continuous description of mechanical systems and of the
material behaviour. He/she can apply energy principles to derive the governing equations and he/she can use the fundamental
solutions for basic two and three-dimensional elasticity problems.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.formulate in a proper way the deformations in contiuum media (small and finite deformations), including the relation between
different strain and stress tensors
2.describe the relations between Lagrangian/Eulerian representation
3.write, in solid mechanics, the constitutive laws of elastic materials
4.use variational energy principles and apply them to derive approximation techniques
5.describe the special formulations relative to plates and shells
Education Method Lecture 0/0/2/2
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Gerhard A. Holzapfel, "Nonlinear Solid Mechanics: a Continuum Approach for Engineering", Wiley, 2000.

References from literature:


R. Aris, "Vectors, Tensors and the Basic Equations of Fluid Mechanics", Dover, 1962.
Fung, Y.C., "Foundations of Solid Mechanics", Prentice-Hall, 1965.
M.E. Gurtin, "An Introduction to Continuum Mechanics, Mathematics in Science and Engineering", vol. 158, Academic Press,
New York, 1982.
R.W. Ogden, "Nonlinear elastic deformations", Ellis Horwood Ltd., 1984
Prerequisites A basic knowledge of engineering mechanics and linear algebra is required (see mechanics and dynamics courses from BSc
engineering mechanics)
Assessment Written assignment and oral exam
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 23 of 150
Year 2009/2010
Organization Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Education Master Mechanical Engineering

Recommended Elective Courses ME-PME-EM

Page 24 of 150
AE4153 Advanced Numerical Techniques for Fluid Flow and Stuctural 3
Engineering
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. H. Bijl
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period 4
Course Language English
Required for AE4-151
AE1-152
Course Contents To get a good starting knowledge of some state-of-the-art
computational methods used in fluid dynamics and structural
engineering (in aerospace engineering in particular).
Education Method Lecture
Literature and Study Reprints of book sections, papers and reports (to be distributed
Materials during the course).
Assessment Take-home exam
Set-up Several lecturers will speak on topics of their own specialism, such as:
Multigrid methods,
Large-eddy simulation,
Partitioned methods for fluid-structure interactions,
Discretization for flows in deforming domains,
Conservative and non-conservative methods for two-fluid flows,
Least-squares spectral-element methods,
Variational-multiscale large-eddy simulation.

AE4684 Fibre Reinforced Materials in Aerospace Structures 3


Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. S. Koussios
Contact Hours / Week 4/0/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
Start Education 1
Exam Period 1
Course Language English
Course Contents The lecture is associated with Mechanics of Composite
Materials.
Contents:
Introduction: Background & overview of composite
structures and materials.
Fibre and matrix properties.
Anisotropy, plane stress, plane strain, material
characterisation.
Engineering constants of a single layer: mixture laws,
contiguity theory.
Mechanical properties of an anisotropic layer of arbitrary
orientation, directionality & angularity.
Thin laminates, basic engineering configurations.
Thick laminates: ABD matrices, coupling effects.
Interlaminar stresses.
Failure criteria, strength analysis of laminates.
Theory of anisotropic elasticity.
Governing equations, formulation of boundary conditions,
solution strategies, conformal transformations.
Quantification of stress concentrations around holes and
rigid enclosures in infinite shells.
Stress concentrations around elliptical holes, specific
engineering practice related cases.
Study Goals To understand and successfully apply basic principles from the Classical Lamination Theory and Anisotropic Elasticity on
design problems. To understand why composites require a different design approach as compared to metals.
Education Method Lecture , feedback on assignments
Literature and Study Isaac M. Daniel, Ori Ishai. Engineering Mechanics of
Materials Composite Materials, Oxford University Press, Oxford,
2006 ISBN 0-19-515097-1
Handouts: Available in pdf format on Blackboard.
Assessment Take-home assignments, to be submitted at any time, review is carried out approximately two weeks after every regular
examination period (for details see blackboard).
Set-up For students of the chairs "Design & Production of Composite structures" and "Aerospace
Materials", participation in a practical belonging to the course is
mandatory (AE4-653).

Page 25 of 150
AE4900TU Continuum Mechanics 4
Responsible Instructor S.R. Turteltaub
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/4/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period 3
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge Students taking this course are expected to be familiar with linear algebra, vector calculus and should have taken introductory
courses in solid and fluid mechanics.
Course Contents This is an introductory course of the mechanics of continuous media where solid and fluid mechanics are presented in a unified
framework. Basic notions of tensor algebra and analysis, which are required to study general deformations, are covered in the
first part of the course. The basic notions of general kinematics are subsequently introduced, with special emphasis on the
differences between the eulerian and lagrangian approaches. Fundamental principles (balance equations) are developed in both
lagrangian and eulerian formulations, which naturally leads to the definition of different stress and deformation measures. The
last part of the course is devoted to the constitutive theory where typical models for fluids and solids are presented.

Topics include:

1. Introduction to tensor algebra and tensor analysis.

2. Kinematics: bodies and configurations. Description of deformations and motions. Lagrangian and Eulerian descriptions of a
continuum. Material and spatial time derivatives. Theory of admissible deformations. Deformation and strain tensors. Polar
decomposition (stretch and rotation tensors). Rates of deformation (stretching and spin tensor).

3. Kinetics: Mass and mass balance. Reynolds transport theorem. Body and contact forces. Balance of linear and angular
momentum in Eulerian and Lagrangian formulations. Cauchy and Piola-Kirchhoff stresses.

4. Introduction to constitutive relations. Constitutive relations in elasticity and Newtonian fluid mechanics.
Study Goals The purpose of this course is to provide a unified framework and a thorough understanding of the theories of solid and fluid
mechanics. General principles, used in advanced theoretical and numerical work in mechanics, are emphasized.
Education Method Lecture
Literature and Study 1. Lecture notes
Materials
2. Recommended literature:
Morton E. Gurtin, An Introduction to Continuum Mechanics, Academic Press, 1981
I-Shih Liu, Continuum Mechanics, Springer, 2002
Lawrence E. Malvern, Introduction to the Mechanics of a Continuous Medium, Prentice Hall, 1969
Peter Chadwick, Continuum Mechanics: Concise Theory and Problems, Dover, 1999
Raymond W. Ogden, Non-Linear Elastic Deformations, Dover, 1997
Assessment Exercises + oral examination

AE4930 Aeroelasticity 3
Responsible Instructor Dr. S.J. Hulshoff
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period 4
5
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge AE2-914
AE2-115
Course Contents This course provides an introduction to the physical and analytical aspects of aeroelasticity.

The course begins with illustrations of aeroelastic phenomena using simplified aerodynamic and structural models. Then
experimental results and analytical solutions for unsteady flows are described, and the influence of unsteady aerodynamics on
aeroelastic phenomena is discussed. After a presentation of reduced-order modelling for continuous structures, efficient flutter-
prediction methods are described. Commonly-used dynamic-response prediction procedures are also presented. An overview of
modern computational aeroelasticity is then given, with an emphasis on comparing sources of error and the strengths and
weaknesses of different methods. Finally, experimental techniques are briefly discussed, and the use of the methods presented in
the course is described in the context of aircraft design.
Study Goals At the end of the course the student should:
understand the physical processes which drive aeroelastic phenomena;
be able to formulate and solve aeroelastic response and instability problems;
be able to identify strengths and weaknesses of different aerodynamic and structural models for the analysis of a given
aeroelastic condition;
understand the basic design of computational aeroelastic solution techniques;
be familiar with the role of aeroelasticity in aircraft design.
Education Method Lecture
Literature and Study Course notes with practice problems, videos of aeroelastic phenomena
Materials Demonstrations of static and dynamic aeroelastic phenomena using a small wind tunnel.

Additional references (optional):


"A Modern Course in Aeroelasticity", 4th edition, E.H. Dowell (Editor), Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004.
C.S. Bisplinghoff, H.Ashley, R.L.Halfman, "Aeroelasticity", Adisson-Wesley Publishing Company, 1955 .
Y.C. Fung, "An introduction to the theory of aeroelasticity", Dover Publications Inc., New-York, 1955 .
Assessment Projects (30%) and final examination (70%)

Page 26 of 150
CT5142 Computational Methods in Non-linear Solid Mechanics 3
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. L.J. Sluijs
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/4
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Course Contents In the lecture series computational techniques for the description of nonlinear behaviour of materials and structures will be
treated.

Topics of the course are:


1. Mathematical preliminaries;
2. Structure of nonlinear finite element programs;
3. Solution techniques for nonlinear static problems;
4. Solution techniques for nonlinear dynamic problems;
5. Plasticity models for metals and soils;
6. Fracture models;
7. Visco-elastic and viscoplastic models for time-dependent problems;
8. Computational analysis of failure and instabilities;
9. Geometrically nonlinear analysis.

Study Goals The course provides the student with the basic knowledge to adequately use nonlinear finite element packages.
Education Method Lectures
Literature and Study Lecture notes:
Materials "Computational methods in non-linear solid mechanics", R. de Borst and L.J. Sluys
Assessment Oral examination on the basis of a set of exercises
Remarks Advise: CT5123
Judgement Examination mark is final mark.

CT5145 Random Vibrations 4


Responsible Instructor Prof.ir. A.C.W.M. Vrouwenvelder
Contact Hours / Week 0/4/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Course Contents 1. General introduction into the problem field of stochastic and dynamic loads and the position of the course in the teaching of
engineering mechanics;
2. Mathematical aspects of the modelling of stochastic processes, Fourier series, Fourier analysis, transfer functions, variance
spectra etc; formal mathematical approach of the problem field;
3. Modelling of the stochastic process in general;
4. Application of the modelling of the stochastic process to the dynamics of structures; the response of a single- or multi-mass-
spring system and its judgement with respect to ultimate load bearing capacity (safety), fatigue and comfort;
5. Applications: wind load on high-rise buildings, wave loads on offshore structures and earthquakes; simplifications that are
commonly made in practice and which are laid down in standards.
Study Goals Getting familiar with design of civil engineering structures under random dynamic loadings like wind, waves and earthquake.
Education Method Lectures, tutorial
Literature and Study Obligatory lecturenote(s)/textbook(s):
Materials Stochastische trillingen (b15), available at the lecturer.
Assessment Prerequisite: lecture notes

Oral exam.
Condition for the conduction of the exam: Report of the exercise should be rewarded with a satisfactory mark (>6)
Judgement Condition for the conduction of the exam: Report of the exercise should be rewarded with a satisfactory mark (>6)
Determination of the final mark:
Report of assignment (67%) plus oral exam (33%)

Page 27 of 150
ET4245ME Elektromechanics in Mechatronic Systems 3
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. H. Polinder
Instructor Ir. J.W. Spronck
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/3
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period 4
5
Course Language English
Course Contents Electromechanics in mechatronic systems
Study Goals Students who have followed this course should be able to
1 Use the terminology of electromechanics.
2 Use the principles of electric and magnetic circuits to calculate voltages, currents, magnetic flux densities, magnetic fluxes,
magnetic flux linkages, forces, torques, power, and (stored) energy.
3 Recognize different types of permanent-magnet machines, derive the voltage equations and the equivalent circuits, sketch the
characteristic voltage and current waveforms and calculate forces and torques using the power balance.
4 Recognize magnetic bearings, explain their strength and weaknesses, calculate magnetic bearing forces from the power
balance, explain that magnetic bearings can be linearised by making them double-sided, explain zero-stiffness and gravity
compensation.
5 Explain the important limitations and characteristics of materials (magnets, iron, conductors), and machines (losses and heat
dissipation, mechanical commutation, safe operating area, cogging, force density), indicate if there are methods to get around
these limitations and do calculations on these limitations.
6 Distinguish between the different construction forms of permanent-magnet machines and explain their strengths and
weaknesses.
7 Explain which criteria play an important role in choosing a machine and how these criteria influence the choice, explain which
part of the safe operating area is most attractive and why, explain which criteria play a role in selecting transmissions and in
selection motional profiles.
8 Explain why linear motor are used, recognize different types of linear permanent-magnet machines, derive the voltage
equations and the equivalent circuits, calculate forces.
9 Recognise different types of amplifiers (analogue, switching, one quadrant, four quadrant, resonant) and know their strength
and weaknesses, sketch current and voltage waveforms of switching amplifiers, explain how they can be used to control speed.
Education Method Lectures, assignments, demonstrations
Literature and Study J.C. Compter, 'Mechatronics, Introduction to Electromechanics', lecture notes
Materials
Assessment Written examination (closed book) or group assignment

ET4257 Sensors and Actuators 4


Responsible Instructor Prof.dr. P.J. French
Contact Hours / Week 0/3/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period 2
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge P-study
Course Contents The course silicon sensors gives an overview of the most important principles related to sensors fabricated in integrated silicon
technology. The sensors are divided into those for optical, mechanical, thermal, magnetic and chemical signals. These domains
will be dealt with from basic principles leading to the applications. The second part of the course will deal with actuators. The
actuators lectures give the range from large machines down to silicon micromachined device in the micron range.
The course is designed for students who will perform their thesis work in one of the laboratories within the faculty working on or
using sensors
Education Method Lectures
Literature and Study Lecture notes
Materials Part 1 Silicon Sensors
part 2 Actuators
Assessment Written, essay or oral. Assessment material: at least 5 chapters of the lecture notes including at least one chapter from Actuators.

Page 28 of 150
ID5211 Computer Visualisation for Designers 3
Responsible Instructor W.A. Aprile
Contact Hours / Week 4/0/0/4
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
4
Start Education 1
4
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Course Contents The course starts with an introductory lecture on the field of "virtual photography" e.g. creating beautiful presentations using 3D
computer tools and manipulated natural imagery.
We approach the tools from a designers perspective instead of an engineering approach. We demonstrate the capabilities of
current advanced visualization tools and discuss research in this area.

The main body of the course consists of a practical activity that starts with tutorials on a visualization tool, currently Autodesk
Maya. The tutorials are followed by a modeling assignment and presenting a product of choice.

This course focuses on creating materials, lighting and building an environment for presentation.

More information and results on our website http://studiolab.io.tudelft.nl/compvis/

Study Goals The goal of the computer visualisation course is to gain insights in the use of advanced visualisation and animation tools in the
creative process of designing products, both in theory and hands-on practice.
* Insights in lighting and rendering techniques
* Insights in how to create convincing looking materials
* Ability to create a stunning product presentation.
Education Method The main of this course consists of a practical, that will take place in the computer rooms. Tutors are available for questions and
advice. During the course two individual progress discussions are planned.
Literature and Study All study materials are online and free accessible in the help file or on the accompanying website.
Materials http://studiolab.io.tudelft.nl/compvis/
Assessment A portfolio with A3 prints of the created presentations and the digital sources by CDRom or otherwise.

The portfolio will be judged on:


* the mastery of visualizing virtual materials
* the mastery of setting up a virtual lighting environment around the product
* the mastery of blending 3D visualisations into existing imagery.
* quality of the presentation.

Special Information Dr. W. A. Aprile


Room 2A-10 (ID-Studiolab), phone +31 (0)15 27 84966.
E-mail: w.a.aprile@tudelft.nl

Page 29 of 150
ME1100 Automated Driving, Automotive Human Factors and Safety 3
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. R. Happee
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/4
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period 4
5
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge WB3404A Vehicle Dynamics A can be followed in parallel (recommended).
Summary Automotive Safety technologies are covered with a focus on potential benefits, test procedures, sensing, control and human
machine interfacing.
Course Contents Contents as stated below may be adapted based on the interests of students and time constraints
Course Contents 1.The road safety problem
Continuation Review of fatalities, injuries and vehicle damage in a national and international perspective. Outlook on safety in first, second
and third world countries.
Comparison of safety of different transport modes. Breakdown into injuries of car occupants, pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists
and others. Breakdown of costs into life years lost, medical and rehabilitation costs, vehicle damage and congestion due to
accidents.

Road safety countermeasure overview: Pre-crash, In-crash and Post-crash measures (Haddon Matrix). Vehicle safety
technologies, road infrastructure, enforcement of speed, alcohol and other regulations, education.

2.Accident causation
Introduction of aspects like perception of speed, direction and distance, awareness, reaction times & failure to act.
Illustration of loss of control due to wheel slip etc.

3.Active Safety 1
Vision and Visibility.
Obstacle & vehicle detection technologies.
Vehicle to vehicle communication and vehicle to infrastructure communication.
Driver assistance systems.

4.Active Safety 2
The role of tyre, suspension, steering and braking system.
Antilock Braking Systems (ABS) and Electronic Stability Programs (ESP).

5.Crash dummies & Injury Criteria


Development and validation of crash test dummies using cadaver testing for high severity and volunteer testing for low severity
loading.
- Mathematical human body models.
- Injury severity scales (AIS, MAIS, )
- Injury criteria and tolerances and their derivation from cadaver testing and real accidents.

6.Passive Safety 1 frontal impact


Frontal car impact will be used to explain how occupant safety is enhanced by the deformable vehicle front structure, the
protective vehicle compartment, belt system, airbag and seat. The mechanical interaction will be illustrated quantitatively
including some practical calculation assignments.
- Injuries to car occupants in Frontal Impact.
- Demonstrated benefits of belts and airbags.
- Full vehicle front overlap versus partial overlap impact.
- Compatibility of vehicle shape and stiffness across the diversifying car fleet.
- Triggering of belt pretensioner and airbag(s)
- Adaptation of belt and airbag operation towards crash conditions and occupant size and position. Potential benefits of real time
control of belt and airbag.

7.Passive Safety 2 other impact modes


Other impact modes will be reviewed in a global manner:
SIDE IMPACT: Injuries. Test procedures & dummies. Protection offered by the protective vehicle compartment, airbags and
vehicle interior padding.
ROLLOVER: Injuries and ejection. Test procedures & dummies. Effectiveness of curtain airbags and belts to prevent ejection.
REAR IMPACT: Injuries. Test procedures & dummies. Passive and active seat systems for rear impact.
PEDESTRIANS AND CYCLISTS impacted by vehicle fronts: Injuries. Test procedures & dummy subsystems representing
body parts. Deformable vehicle front and bonnet structures. Compromises between pedestrian, frontal impact, durability and
repair costs for marginal accidents (parking).

8.Safety from a sensing & control perspective


Review of safety systems described in previous chapters in terms of:
- Sensing, identification and state estimation.
- Human machine interfacing.

9.Safety test procedures


Review of regulated test procedures, consumer test procedures and best practice for active and passive safety as introduced in
previous chapters.
- Safety in the vehicle development process.
- Subsystem versus full system testing.
- Hardware versus virtual testing.
- Gaps where accident types and injury types are not well covered.
- Gaps where innovative safety systems are not well covered.
- Discussion of political and financial forces driving safety enhancement including: Governments, Car manufacturers, Suppliers,
Vehicle and health Insurance companies.
Study Goals The student must be able to analyse the potential benefits of current or future active and/or passive safety systems
Education Method Lectures (4 hours per week)
Plus Self-study & Exercises
Assessment Written exam
Enrolment / Application Register on Blackboard and mail r.happee@tudelft.nl
Percentage of Design 10%

Page 30 of 150
Department 3mE Department Biomechanical Engineering

ME1600 Reliability and Uncertainty Models in Engineering Mechanics 2


Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. M.A. Gutierrez De La Merced
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Course Contents Interval, fuzzy and probabilistic descriptrions of uncertainty, random fields, finite element techniques for random field problems,
perturbative and non-perturbative approaches, geometric reliability, sensitivity analysis
Study Goals To provide an overview of the most common techniques to predict the effect of parameter uncertainty in engineering mechanics
problems
Education Method Lecture
Assessment Assignment and oral discussion
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

SC4032 Physical Modelling for Systems and Control 4


Responsible Instructor Nabestaanden van O.H. Bosgra
Course Coordinator Dr. P.S.C. Heuberger
Contact Hours / Week 0/4/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period 2
3
Course Language English
Course Contents SC 4032 Physical Modelling for Systems and Control

Contents 2009/2010

1.Formulation of dynamic models for physical plants and equipment. Role of System boundary, choice of input- and output
variables. Causality and properness of input-output behaviour. Microscopic versus macroscopic conservation laws. Linearization
around steady-state operating conditions or around trajectory. Linear parameter-varying versus nonlinear and linearized models.
Frozen behaviour versus time-varying behaviour.
2.Simple process models. Role of residence-time distribution. Distributed-parameter models versus compartmental models.
Characterization of flow behaviour with respect to mixing and backflow. Series connection of flow systems.
3.Bilateral coupling between subsystems. Causality, exchange of power between subsystems.2-port behaviour. Relationships
with choice of boundary conditions in distributed-parameter systems. Hydraulic transmission line, heat conduction as examples
of bilateral coupling
4.Time scales of dynamic phenomena. Equation ordering and scaling of model equations. Modal approximation, time moments
and Padâe approximation. Singular perturbations.
5.Model reduction by projection and residualization Model reduction through ba;lancing and truncation. Role of Hankel singular
values. Closed-loop relevant model reduction. Examples, finite dimensional approximation of distributed-parameter systems.
Realization theory, approximate realization as model reduction step.
6.Rosenbrock's system matrix. System equivalence, interconnection of subsystems. Models in differential-algebraic equations for
interconnected subsystems Index problems as result of interconnection of state variables. Nonproper internal or external
behaviour, use of Kronecker-Weierstrass form

Study Goals The student must be able to formulate dynamic models on the basis of an understanding of underlying physical principles. In
addition, understanding major system properties must enable the student to manipulate the models, make them simpler (if
desired) and bring them in a suitable format that allows implementation in a software platform. The student must be able to
explain properties and behaviour of the system models under study.
Education Method There will be handouts of course notes, also available electronically, in addition to copies of the course slides.
Assessment A set of Matlab/Simulink/theory exercises will be available. Solving the exercises constitutes the basis for the assessment. The
results of the exercises must be summarized in a short report, and will be discussed and examined during an oral examination,
during which also the contents of the course notes will be the subject of discussion. The report on the exercises has to be handed
in ultimately April 16, 2010. The exam can in principle be executed throughout the year (restrictions during april/may and
october 2010), both individually as well as in groups of 2 students.
Department 3mE Department Delft Center for Systems and Control

Page 31 of 150
SC4110 System Identification 5
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. X.J.A. Bombois
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. P.M.J. van den Hof
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/6/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Course Contents Experimental modelling of dynamic systems; methodology.
Discrete-time signal- and system-analysis. Identification of transferfunctions.
Representations of linear models; black-box models.
Identification of prediction-error-methods; least squares-method.
Approximation modelling; algorithms. Experiment design and
data-analysis. Identification in time- and frequency-domain;
closed-loop identification; model validation; Matlab toolbox;
laboratory assignment.
Study Goals General learning objectives

System identification deduces and subsequently validates mathematical models of real-life dynamical systems (industrial
processes, mechanical servo-systems, ) based on experimental data collected from those systems. This course can be considered
as a follow up of the course Sc4010 Filtering and Identification where different solutions to identify a model are presented (note
nevertheless that Sc4010 is in no way a prerequisite for this course). The course Sc4110 selects two widely-used linear
identification methodologies: Empirical Transfer Function Estimate (ETFE) and Prediction Error Identification (PEI) and
provides the students with engineering and theoretical skills to perform the identification in a suitable way. In particular, after
this course, the students are able to set up an experiment, identify a nominal model, assess the accuracy/precision of this model,
and make appropriate design choices to arrive at a validated model.

Detailed learning objectives:

1)Based on time-domain input-output data collected on the true system in open loop, the student is able to deduce a frequency-
domain model of a system using the ETFE identification method
2)The student is able to specify the bias and variance properties of models identified by the ETFE identification method.
3)For the ETFE identification method, the student is able to interpret the bias and variance properties of identified models, and
knows how these properties can be influenced by input signal design and by applying windowing techniques.
4)The student is able to specify different linear model structures, and to characterize their computational and statistical properties
in prediction error identification.
5)The student masters the statistical properties (bias, variance, consistency) of prediction error estimators both for the situation of
exact plant and noise model sets, and for the situation of exact plant model sets only.
6)The student can interpret estimated models as approximations of an underlying physical systems, through the specification of
well-defined approximation criteria in the frequency domain, and is able to select design variables so as to arrive at identified
models that have prechosen approximative properties.
7)The student is able to specify how experiment design and signal to noise ratio affect estimated models. This includes mastering
the concept of sufficiently exciting input signals, and the design of appropriate input signals.
8)The student is able to apply and interpret correlation-based model structure validation tests, and to draw conclusions on the
(in)validity of model structures, distinguishing between plant models and noise models.
9)For both ETFE and PE identification methods, the student is able to appropriately acquire digital data from a real-life system
(choice of sampling frequency, data processing).

Required level for the assignment

1)the student is able to explain in details the presented theory, to demonstrate important properties and to make links and
comparisons between the different parts of the course
2)the student is able to use the presented tools in practice on a laboratory setup and to interpret his/her result with a critical
attitude

Education Method Lectures and project 0/0/6/0


Assignment form: final project on a laboratory setup followed by an oral examination
Literature and Study lecture notes and slides
Materials
Prerequisites Basics in linear algebra and signal theory
Assessment Oral and project
Assignment form: final project on a laboratory setup followed by an oral examination
Remarks Course load: 14 theory courses, 3 exercise sessions and 2 computer sessions
Department 3mE Department Delft Center for Systems and Control

Page 32 of 150
WB1310 Multibody Dynamics A 3
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. A.L. Schwab
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/4
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period 4
5
Course Language English
Required for wb1413
Expected prior knowledge wb1113wb, wb1216
Course Contents Multibody Dynamics is about the analysis of the motion of complex mechanical systems as in a robot arm, a railway bogie or a
gantry crane. In this course you will learn about the fundamentals of Multibody Dynamics: the description of the orientation of a
rigid body in space, the Newton-Euler equations of motion for a 3D rigid body, how to add constraints to the equations of
motion, and how to solve such a system of coupled equations. Next you will spend most of the time (80%) in doing the
assignments with the ADAMS Software.
Study Goals The student is able to make a complex computer model of a realistic 3-D mechanical system in a standard software package for
multibody system dynamics (currently MSC.ADAMS), to perform a dynamic analysis on the model, to draw some conclusions
from this analysis, and to identify the limitations of the model.

More specifically, the student must be able to:

1.apply the Newton-Euler equations of motion to a single 3D rigid body


2.describe the orientation of a rigid body in 3-D space by means of Euler angles and derive expressions for the angular velocities
in terms of the Euler angles and their time derivatives
3.construct a computer model of a complex mechanical system by selecting the appropriate number of rigid bodies, and number
and type of constraints
4.make approximate dynamic calculations for a complex computer model in order to determine for instance the stiffness and the
damping of individual components
5.make approximate dynamic calculations for a vehicle system model in order to verify for instance the eigenfrequencies and the
equilibrium state in steady motion
6.explain the difference between the results from a dynamic analysis on the model and the behaviour of the real system, identify
the limitations of the model
7.explain the finite accuracy of the results from a dynamic analysis due to the finite accuracy of the numerical integration
together with the constraint violations
Education Method Lectures (2 hours per week), computer assignment.
Computer Use The course and the course/lab work are fully computer-oriented. The Lab assignment consists of a number of practical problems
that have to be worked out with the software package ADAMS. Your findings are to be put down in a Lab Report.
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Lecture Notes and M.Wisse, Introduction to ADAMS, Delft, 1999.

References from literature:


A.A.Shabana, ' Dynamics of multibody systems', Wiley, New York, 1998.
E.J.Haug, ' Computer aided kinematics and dynamics of mechanical systems, Volume I: Basic methods', Allyn and Bacon,
Boston, 1989.
P.E.Nikravesh, ' Computer-aided analysis of mechanical systems', Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, 1988.
M. Géradin, A. Cardano, ' Flexible multibody dynamics: A finite element approach', J. Wiley, Chichester, New York, 2001.
Assessment Written exam + assignment report
Remarks The written exam is of the open book type and has the form of a questionnaire about the findings as written down in your Lab
Report. This report serves as reference material for your exam. At the end of the exam the questionnaire together with the Lab
Report are to be handed over, The grading is on both items.

Checkout the wb1310 home-page at http://tam.cornell.edu/~als93/ for up-to-date information.


Percentage of Design 25%
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 33 of 150
WB1405A Stability of Thin-Walled Structures 1 4
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. A. van Keulen
Contact Hours / Week 0/4/2/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Required for AE4-534
Expected prior knowledge Basic courses on mechanics and finite elements.
Course Contents Detailed description of topics:

Functional description
General buckling phenomena
Initial post-buckling behaviour
Linear and nonlinear pre-buckling solution
Buckling of discrete systems
Buckling of finite element models
Geometrical stiffness
Geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis
Eigenvalue analysis
Sensitivity analysis
Study Goals The course is designed to give the students a thorough foundation for solving the variety of structural stability problems they
may encounter in practice. Students become acquainted with both analytical and numerical techniques. The course is intended to
place stability problems in a broad context. Therefore nonlinear buckling, post-buckling and design sensitivity analysis are also
included.
Education Method Lectures (4 hours per week in period 2A, 2 hours per week in period 2B)
Computer Use ANSYS, MARC or NASTRAN finite element software
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Every student must prepare his own lecture notes. Some handouts will be provided. In addition, references to literature and
textbooks will be given during the lectures.

References from literature:


Normal lectures will be provided. For further reading references to textbooks and literature will be given. Exercises will be
distributed that lead to both analytical and numerical training. Several of these exercises require basic hands-on experience with
finite element modeling.
Assessment Take-home exercises + oral exam
Remarks Assignments will be provided during the lectures. The answers must be handed in before the oral exam.

The final grade is based on the quality and completeness of the answers on take-home excersises and the quality of an oral exam.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 34 of 150
WB1408A Shell Structures - Introductory Course 3
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. L.J. Ernst
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/3/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Required for wb1408B
Expected prior knowledge wb1212, wb1213-03, wb1214, wb1311
Course Contents Load bearing principles in shell structures
Axi-symmetrical thin shells
Membrane theory versus general theory
Stress catogaries and life assessment, background of "design by analysis" in engineering codes
Thermo-mechanical loading
Axi-symmetric thick-walled shells
Finite Element applications to local shell problems
Mechanical design aspects of pressure vessels, flares, tube-plates, nozzles, flanges, etc.
Study Goals The student is able to understand and calculate the mechanical response on mechanical and thermal loading of thin shells of
revolution such as generally used in the design of pressure vessels. In addition the student is able to design pressure vessels
components such as nozzles, flares, pipe plates, flanges, etc.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.understand general load bearing principles in shell structures
2.describe the theory of linear axi-symmetric shells
3.identify the difference in load bearing behaviour according to membrane theory and general theory
4.understand the limits of applicability of thin shell theory
5.classify stresses in thin and thick shells according to stress categories and perform life time assessment
6.perform "design by analysis" of thin and thick pressure vessel parts in accordance with engineering codes and standards
7.perform finite element stress analysis to shells and components and to perform the reliability evaluation
Education Method Lectures (4 hours per week), computer exercise
Computer Use ANSYS-exercise
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Lecture notes available via Blackboard

References from literature:


S. Timoshenko, "Theory of Plates and Shells", MacGraw-Hill
S. Schwaigerer, "Festigkeitsberechnung im Dampfkessel, Behalter-und Rohrleitungsbau", Spriger-Verlag
Timoshenko and Goodier, Theory of Elasticity
V.V. Novozhilov, "Thin Shell Theory", Noordhof
R.J. Roark, W.C. Young, "Formulas for stress and strain", McGraw-Hill
ASME-code, NB3000 and A8000
Assessment Oral exam
Remarks Oral exam after approval of exercises
Percentage of Design 50%
Design Content Yes, Designing for reliability of pressure vessels and components
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 35 of 150
WB1408B Shell Structures - Advanced Course 5
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. L.J. Ernst
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/6/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge wb1408A
Course Contents Tensorial description of geometry of surfaces, general nonlinear thin shell theory, simplified shell theories.
Study Goals The student is able to understand the general non-linear theory of thin shells. The student is also able to understand the
applicability (and limits) of simplified shell theories. The student has a good understanding of general load bearing behaviour of
thin shells of arbitrary shapes.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.understand the general non-linear theory of thin shells and its limitations
2.work with the tensorial description of geometry of surfaces, the general nonlinear thin shell theory and simplified shell theories
3.familiarize himself with the backgrounds of the extended field of "Plates and Shells" in order to have good entrance to the vast
literature on the subject
Education Method Lectures (4 / 2 hours per week)
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Lecture notes.

References from literature:


· Y. Basar, W.B. Kratzig, Mechanik der Fluchentragwerke, ISBN 3-528-08685-8.
· W.T. Koiter, A consistent first approximation in the general theory of thin elastic shells, Proc.I.U.T.A.M.Symp.on the
theory of thin elastic shells (Delft, August 1959), North Holland Publishing Company, Amsterdam (1960).
· W.T. Koiter, A systematic simplification of the equations in the linear theory of thin shells, Kon.Ned.Academie der
Wetenschappen, Proceedings, Series B, 64, No.5, 1961.
· W.T. Koiter, On the non-linear theory of thin elastic shells, Sept 25, 1965.
Assessment Oral exam + assignments
Remarks Examination by appointment.
Percentage of Design 30%
Design Content Not applicable
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

WB1409 Theory of Elasticity 3


Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. A. van Keulen
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Instructor Dr.ir. M. Langelaar
Contact Hours / Week 2/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
2
Start Education 1
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Required for wb1405a
Course Contents COURSE IS NO LONGER PRESENTED AND IS REPLACED BY THE
NEW COURSE WB1451-05

Education Method On appointment:


Lectures (2 hours per week), 2 other hours per week.
Assessment Exercises + oral exam
Remarks More information on http://www-tm.wbmt.tudelft.nl/~onck/wb1409.htm
Percentage of Design 50%
Design Content The theory of elasticity is the foundation for the analysis of stresses and the flexibility in the design of structures and
components. This holds for the initial design stages, where "rough" estimates are made based on simple models (beams, etc.), as
well as for the final, detailed designs where advanced numerical tools are used.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 36 of 150
WB1412 Linear & Non-lineair Vibrations in Mechanical Systems 3
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. P.T.L.M. van Woerkom
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
4
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge wb1216, wi2051wb, wi3097wb
Parts The course consists of two parts:

- presentation of a number of topics selected from the Course Contents (see below), by the lecturer;

- investigation of a specific topic, by the participant. The topic for the assignment will be selected in consultation between
participant and lecturer. The participant will carry out an exploratory study and document his findings in the form of a written
progress report and a written final report.
Alternatively, the participant can elect to solve a number of standard exercises assigned by the lecturer.
Course Contents - Introduction: review of linear vibration theory, sources of excitation, nonlinear vibrations in mechanical systems.

- Occurrence and types of mechanical vibrations: forced vibrations, self-excited vibrations, stick-slip vibrations, limit cycles,
jump resonance, transient response due to impulse excitation, effect of impact, effect of vibrations on humans (hearing, comfort),
machine vibrations, machine-tool chatter, vibration of structures to due fluid-structure interaction, intended vibrations in micro-
electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), dynamics of buckling.

- Analysis of linear and nonlinear vibrations in discrete systems: phase plane analysis, stability of equilibrium, stability of
motion, stability criteria (Routh-Hurwitz, Sylvester, Lyapunov, Mathieu), Duffing's method, method of averaging (Krylov-
Bogoliubov, Van der Pol), Poincaré perturbation method, Poincaré-Lindstedt perturbation method, two-time-variable
perturbation method, bifurcations.

- Suppression of vibrations: isolation, damping, properties of metal and rubber springs, and composites, passive dynamic
damping, passive configuration damping, active damping.

- Introduction of nonlinear vibrations in continuum systems: nonlinear sound wave propagation, nonlinear vibration of a string.
Study Goals The student is able to model mathematically the dynamics of vibrating mechanical systems (i.e., set up the equations of motion)
and to analyse and interpret the dynamic response, also in the presence of mechanical system nonlinearities and of parametric
excitation.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.demonstrate understanding of the essentials of linear vibration theory, for single degree-of-freedom (dof) systems and for multi
dof systems
2.model and analyse four classes of response suppression techniques applicable to multi dof linear systems, namely passive
isolation, passive damping, active isolation, active damping
3.identify physical sources of nonlinear dynamic behaviour of multi dof and of continuum systems, occurring in a wide field of
engineering endeavour
4.analyse system stability under small perturbations (linearisation; Routh-Hurwitz, Sylvester, first method of Lyapunov) and
under large perturbations (global stability, using second method of Lyapunov)
5.describe global nonlinear dynamic behaviour single dof systems, using the phase plane
6.analyse weakly nonlinear dynamic behaviour (perturbed motion) of single and multi dof systems using general perturbation
theory (Poincaré expansion, Krylov-Bogoliubov method, averaging methods, two-variable method), to justify equivalent
linearization, and to apply these techniques in the analysis of the dynamics of various physical systems
7.analyse periodic behaviour of single dof nonlinear systems (Lindstedt method, Duffing method, averaging methods) and to
analyse stability of periodic behaviour (Floquet analysis, Mathieu analysis)
8.discuss physical sources of parametric excitation in linear systems, to analyse resulting periodic motion including presence of
viscous damping (generalised Mathieu equation)
9.model and analyse the dynamics of nonlinear vibrations in distributed systems - specifically sound propagation, string
vibration, and dynamic buckling of beams

Some items may be given more attention than others, depending on the interests of the participants.
Education Method Lectures, presentation & investigation
Computer Use Matlab, if desired as part of take-home assignment.
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Course notes, on Blackboard (in preparation).

References from literature:


- Dimarogonas, A. Vibration for Engineers. Second edition. Prentice-Hall, 1996.
- Harris, C.M. and Piersol, A.G. Harris's Shock and Vibration Handbook. Fifth edition. McGraw-Hill, 2002.
- Inman, D.J. Engineering Vibration. Prentice-Hall, 1996. See especially chapter 10 on nonlinear vibrations (only in this first
edition!)
- Jordan, D.W. and Smith, P. Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equations - an Introduction to Dynamical Systems. Third edition.
Oxford University Press, 1999.
- Kelly, S.G. Fundamentals of Mechanical Vibrations. Second edition. McGraw-Hill International Editions, 2000.
- Rao, S.S. Mechanical Vibrations, SI edition. Pearson / Prentice-Hall, 2005.
- Thomson, J.J. Vibrations and Stability - Order and Chaos. McGraw-Hill, London, 1997.
Assessment Written report
Remarks The assessment (grading) will be based on the quality of the investigation as documented in the report.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 37 of 150
WB1413-04 Multibody Dynamics B 4
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. A.L. Schwab
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period none
Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge wb1113wb, wb1216, (wb1310).
Course Contents In this course we will cover a systematic approach to the generation and solution of equations of motion for mechanical systems
consisting of multiple interconnected rigid bodies, the so-called Multibody Systems. This course differs from 'Advanced
Dynamics', which mostly covers theoretical results about classes of idealized systems (e.g. Hamiltonian systems), in that the goal
here is to find the motions of relatively realistic models of systems (including, for example, motors, dissipation and contact
constraints). Topics covered are:
-Newton-Euler equations of motion for a simple planar system, free body diagrams, constraint equations and constraint forces,
uniqueness of the solution.
-Systematic approach for a system of interconnected rigid bodies, virtual power method and Lagrangian multipliers.
-transformation of the equations of motion in terms of generalized
independent coordinates, and lagrange equations.
-Non-holonomic constraints as in rolling without slipping, degrees of freedom and kinematic coordinates.
-Unilateral constraints as in contact problems.
-Numerical integration of the equations of motion, stability and accuracy of the applied methods.
-Numerical integration of a coupled differential and algebraic system of equations (DAE's), Baumgarte stabilisation, projection
method and independent coordinates.
-Newton-Euler equations of motion for a rigid three-dimensional body, the need to describe orientation in space, Euler angles,
Cardan angles, Euler parameters and Quaternions.
-Equations of motion for flexible multibody systems, introduction to Finite Element Method approach, Linearised equations of
motion.

Upon request and if time and ability of the instructor allows, related topics are open for discussion.
Study Goals The student is able to find the motions of linked rigid body systems in two and three dimensions including systems with various
kinematic constraints, like there are: sliding, hinges and rolling, and closed kinematic chains.

More specifically, the student must able to:


1.derive the Newton-Euler equations of motion for a simple planar system, draw free body diagrams, set-up constraint equations
and introduce constraint forces, and demonstrate the uniqueness of the solution
2.derive the equations of motion for a system of interconnected rigid bodies by means of a systematic approach: virtual power
method and Lagrangian multipliers
3.transform the equations of motion in terms of generalized independent coordinates, and derive and apply the Lagrange
equations of motion
4.apply the techniques from above to systems having non-holonomic constraints as in rolling without slipping, degrees of
freedom and kinematic coordinates
5.apply the techniques from above to systems having unilateral constraints as in contact problems
6.perform various numerical integration schemes on the equations of motion, and predict the stability and accuracy of the applied
methods
7.perform numerical integration on a coupled system of differential and algebraic equations (DAE's), apply Baumgarte
stabilization, the coordinate projection method and transformation to independent coordinates
8.derive the Newton-Euler equations of motion for a general rigid three-dimensional body system connected by constraints,
identify the need to describe orientation in space
describe the orientation in 3-D space of a rigid body by means of: Euler angles, Cardan angles, Euler parameters and
Quaternions, derive the angular velocity and accelerations in terms of these parameters and their time derivatives, and their
inverse
9.derive the equations of motion for flexible multibody systems by means of a Finite Element Method approach, and extend this
to linearised equations of motion
Education Method Lectures (2 hours per week)
Computer Use The course is computer-oriented. In doing the assignments you will be using Matlab, Maple or related computer software.
Literature and Study Course material: Arend L. Schwab, `Applied Multibody Dynamics', Delft, 2003
Materials
References from literature:
A.A.Shabana, ' Dynamics of multibody systems', Wiley, New York, 1998.
E.J.Haug, ' Computer aided kinematics and dynamics of mechanical systems, Volume I: Basic methods', Allyn and Bacon,
Boston, 1989.
P.E.Nikravesh, ' Computer-aided analysis of mechanical systems', Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, 1988.
M. Géradin, A. Cardano, ' Flexible multibody dynamics: A finite element approach', J. Wiley, Chichester, New York, 2001.
Assessment Final Project
Remarks There will be weekly assignments and a final project. You have to make a report on the final project. In doing the assignments I
strongly encourage you to work together. The final project is individual. Check out the up-to-date web page at
http://tam.cornell.edu/~als93/
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 38 of 150
WB1416 Numerical Methods for Dynamics 3
Responsible Instructor Prof. D.J. Rixen
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. A. van Keulen
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge Statics and Strength of materials, Dynamics (e.g. wb1418, wb1419), Linear Algebra, Numerical Analysis (e.g. wi3097wb),
Finite Elements (e.g. wb1212-1214)
Course Contents Using engineering tools as black boxes can be dangerous and inefficient. This is especially true when performing dynamic
analysis of structures in a finite element package. Choosing the right finite element types and the suitable solution procedure is
critical to get accurate results and to compute solutions efficiently. In order to discuss basic principles of numerical methods for
dynamics and to explain fundamental concepts related to dynamic analysis, the course will cover the following topics:
- Elastodynamic equations for a continuous media (short recap)
- Discretization techniques: Rayleigh-Ritz and Finite elements (bar, beam)
- Linear solvers, storage techniques and singular systems
- Free vibration modes, mode superposition techniques and eigensolvers for large systems
- Accuracy of modal superposition, modal acceleration, system excited through support
- model reduction, including dynamic substructuring
- time-integration of linear and non-linear systems
- computing senstitivity of modes and eigenfrequency to design parameters, model updating
- Parallel computing techniques for fast solvers
Some topics might be dropped depending on students background. Specific topics might also be discussed if time permits.
In this courses emphasis will be put on understanding fundamental concepts of numerical methods and how they relate to the
mechanics of structures. Therefore, the oral (open book) exam will concentrate on the mastering of concepts rather than on
formulation details. A computational project will be included (using Matlab pre-cooked routines and/or Ansys-Nastran).
Study Goals The student is able to grasp the basic numerical concepts underlying the methods used to perform the analysis of models in
engineering statics and dynamics. He can choose the appropriate methods in specific applications and analyse the reasons why
methods can result in erroneous solutions. He is aware of computational and programming issues relative to specific numerical
techniques and implementations.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1. understand the assumption underlying the discretization process and the associated limitations in terms of spatial and
frequential accuracy
2.describe the solutions steps needed to solve linear systems and choose the proper algorithm according to the problem (LU,
Cholesky, LDLT) including storage techniques
3.identify singular matrices arising from mechanical systems and compute a generalized inverse of a singular matrix and its
nullspace
4.use the concept of eigenmodes to write the dynamic solution as a modal superposition and the system matrices in the form of
spectral expansions
5.choose the proper eigensolvers and implement standard techniques from the family of the power iteration including shifting
6.evaluate the approximations inherent to modal truncation in the mode displacement method and apply the mode acceleration
method to correct for the static truncated part
7.solve by mode superposition the dynamics of systems excited by their support and apply the technique of additional mass to
replace imposed displacements
8.describe the concept of effective modal mass and explain how it can be used to evaluate the contribution of modes to the
approximation by modal series of the response of systems excited by the support
9.describe the concept of model reduction and write the reduced equations and write the reduced dynamic equations according to
the static Guyan-Iron reduction
10.outline the idea of substructuring and derive the substructure approximation in the Craig-Bampton method, derive the
associated reduced matrices and describe how accurate the Craig-Bampton approximation is in practice
11.solve the normal equations using Laplace transforms and put the solution procedure of the normal equations in a recursive
matrix
12.discuss the concepts of consistency, stability and accuracy for simple implicit and explicit direct time-integration schemes
13.derive the time-integration formulas belonging to the Newmark family and discuss the stability limits and the accuracy of the
Newmark schemes
14.write the explicit and implicit time-integration algorithms for non-linear systems
15.write the sensitivity of eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies of dynamic systems
16.describe the basic principles of parallel computing and explain the concept of domain decomposition and write the
decomposed problem in a dual and primal interface problem suitable for parallel computing
17.write a small program (in Matlab for instance) to perform a dynamic analysis according to the Finite Element method, and
implement the proper numerical techniques
Education Method Lectures, computer use (16 hours)
Computer Use Use of ANSYS and/or Matlab for assignment and illustration.
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials
Lecture notes (available through blackboard)

References from literature:

Mechanical Vibrations, Theory and Application to Structural Dynamics, M. Géradin and D. Rixen, Wiley, 1997.
The Finite Element Method: Linear Static and Dynamic Finite Element Analysis, T.J.R. Hughes Prentice-Hall, 1987.
Finite Element Procedures, K.J. Bathe, Prentice-Hall, 1996
Structural Dynamics: an introduction to computer methods, R.R. Craig, Wiley, 1981, ISBN 0-471-04499-7
Matrix Computation, G.H. Golub and C.F. Van Loan, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996.
Assessment Oral exam
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 39 of 150
WB1417-05 Fluid-Structures Interaction 4
Responsible Instructor Prof. D.J. Rixen
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. H. Bijl
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period 4
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge dynamics (e.g. wb1311, wb1418), fluid dynamics (e.g. wb1321)
Course Contents Fluid-Structure interaction is a topic that covers many important and complex problems in engineering where the interaction
between the mechanical behaviour of a solid structure is significantly influenced by surrounding fluids (water, air, etc ) and
where, in turn, the aero/hydro-dynamic forces are modified by the deformation of the structure. Although it was pioneered by
aeronautics engineers to study the static and dynamic deformation of wings under aerodynamic forces (aeroelasticity), fluid-
structure interaction analysis involves also the description of interaction phenomenon in constructions (e.g. wind induced
vibrations), vibro-acoutics, blood flow in elastic arteries or ink flow in an actuated printer head.

In the past, many semi-analytical approaches were developed to describe fluid-structure interaction. Today, complex problems
interaction problems are investigated using engineering codes that couple structural models to fluid models.

In this course, we will recall the basics of fluid and solid mechanics and discuss some important numerical issues appearing
when coupling fluid-structure models. In particular we will shortly introduce the Finite Volume Discretization of the fluid,
discuss the expression of the fluid equation on moving meshes (Arbitrary Eulerian Lagragian formulation) and discuss time
integration issues of the coupled problem.
Vibro-acoustics will also be introduced as a special linearized case of fluid-structure interaction.

We will go in more details in discussion the issues of time-integration of the coupled problem. Also the issue on sharing
forces/displacements across the interface between the fluid and the structural mesh will be handled in more details.

This course is developed in collaboration with the Aerodynamic Research Group from the Faculty of Aerospace.
Study Goals The student is able to build a proper model of a problem exhibiting coupling between fluid and solid mechanics. Using standard
numerical techniques from fluid and solid dynamics he/she can set up a discretized problem and write the coupling conditions
between the fields.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.derive the different forms of the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations (integral, local, conservative and non-conservative forms)
2.derive the linear elasto-dynamic equations for a solid
3.write the coupling conditions between fluid and structure domains (compatibility/equilibrium)
4.linearize the fluid equations to obtain the acoustic equations and write the vibro-acoustic coupling conditions and apply the
Finite Element method to vibro-acoustic problems
5.understand the issues of time integration accuracy and stability of the coupled problem
6.write the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian Formulation of the Fluid Dynamics
7.write the coupling conditions in time between a finite volume model of a fluid domain and a finite element model of a structure
8.outline and apply techniques such as virtual mesh, mesh matching and staggered time integration needed to solve numerical
models in fluid-structure interaction
Education Method Lectures (2 hours per week), seminars
Computer Use Use of ANSYS and/or Matlab for assignment and illustration.
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Lecture notes (available through blackboard)

References from literature:


Structural acoustics and vibration; mechanical models, variational formulations and discretization, R. Ohayon, C. Soize,
Academic Press, 1998, ISBN 0-12-524945-4
A modern course in aeroelasticity, Earl H. Dowell, Kluwer Academic Pub.,1995, isbn 0-7923-2788-8
Fluid-Structure interaction: applied numerical methods, H. Morand. R. Ohayon, Wiley ed., 1995, isbn0-471-94459-9
Assessment Written report
Remarks The lecture are partly organized as seminars prepared by the students. The evaluation will be based on the seminar and on a
computer project
Percentage of Design 0%
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 40 of 150
WB1433-04 Thermomechanical Modelling & Charact.of Polymers 3
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. K.M.B. Jansen
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/3/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Course Contents Linear viscoelasticity, creep, stress relaxation and dynamic behaviour, glass transition. Boltzman superposition principle. Time-
temperature superposition. Free-volume interpretation. Crosslinking effects. Deformation modes, shear, tensile and bulk
compression. Interconversion relations, Kramers-Kronig relations. Laplace transformation. Non-linear viscoelastic models.
Experimental methods: shear rheometers, dynamic mechanical devices, resonance devices, bulk modulus measurements.
Study Goals The student is able to understand and calculate the mechanical response of time dependent materials at different loading
conditions.

More specifically, the student must be able to


1.understand the derivation of the basic linear viscoelastic constitutive equations
2.describe the differences between relaxation, creep, creep-recovery, constant strain rate and dynamic tests
3.identify the glassy and rubbery parts in a viscoelastic function
4.describe the basic shape of the creep, relaxation and dynamic viscoelastic functions as a function of either time or frequency
5.select the appropriate equations for transforming data from creep tests to that of relaxation and dynamic experiments (and vice
versa)
6.use the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle to solve simple viscoelastic problems
7.explain the basics of the Time-Temperature Superposition principle
8.use the Time-Temperature Superposition principle to construct mastercurves of experimental data
9.understand the basics of the rubber elasticity and free volume theories
Education Method Lectures (3 hours per week), practical assignment
Computer Use MatLab
Literature and Study Hand-outs and sections from various books
Materials
Assessment Oral exam
Remarks The course includes practical work on a Dynamic Mechanical Analyser
Percentage of Design 0%
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

WB1441 Engineering Optimization 2 3


Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. A. van Keulen
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week This course will not be given as lecture, but can be followed by self study (in consultation with prof. van Keulen)
x/x/x/x
Education Period None (Self Study)
Start Education 3
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge wb1440
Course Contents The course is intended as a follow-up course to wb1440. However, the focus is more on the use of numerical models. Aspects
that will be presented are:
Optimization techniques
Sensitivity analysis
Coupling with simulation techniques
Multi-objective optimization
Multi-disciplinary optimization

The course will be organized as a special topics course.


Study Goals The course targets at a comprehensive understanding of structural optimization, ranging from the optimization strategies
available, up to the inherent complications related to the simulation techniques used.
Education Method Computer-based projects.
Literature and Study R.T. Haftka and Z. Gürdal: Elements of Structural Optimization.
Materials
Assessment Project work
Percentage of Design 80%
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 41 of 150
WB1443 Matlab in Engineering Mechanics 2
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. A.L. Schwab
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Required for wb1413 Multibody Dynamics B, wi 4141TU: Matlab for advanced users.
Expected prior knowledge wi3097wb Numerieke Wiskunde (DUP)
Course Contents Matlab in Engineering Mechanics is an introductory course in technical computing, Matlab, and numerical methods. The
emphasis is on informed use of mathematical software. We want you to learn enough about the mathematical functions in
MATLAB that you will be able to use them correctly, appreciate their limitations, and modify them when necessary to suit your
own needs. The topics include:

- introduction to MATLAB
- linear equations
- zero finding
- least squares
- ordinary differential equations
- eigenvalues and singular values

The weekly homework assignments are on these topics. The final project is an individual choice from various fields of
application like: Multibody System Dynamics with Matlab, Control Theory with Matlab/Simulink, or Finite element calculations
with FEMLab.
Study Goals The student is able to write his own MATLAB code to solve a technical computing problem in Engineering Mechanics on
graduate level. The emphasis is on informed use of mathematical software. The student is able to use the mathematical functions
in MATLAB correctly, appreciate their limitations, and modify them when necessary to suit his own needs.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.identify the finite accuracy of numerical results obtained in general due to the finite word length of the computer
2.solve a system of linear equations and understand the effect on the solutions of close to singular systems
3.apply numerous root finding algorithms and evaluate the speed and accuracy
4.apply various curve fitting techniques and identify the least square solutions, both in linear and nonlinear curve fitting
5.apply various numerical integration schemes to obtain the solutions of ordinary differential equations, determine and compare
the amount of computational effort, and the stability and accuracy of the solutions
6.apply and understand Fourier analysis on measured data in order to extract basic frequencies
7.calculate eigenvalues and do singular value decomposition on a system of equations and discuss the efficiency and accuracy
for large systems
Education Method Lecture (1 hour per week)
Computer Use The course and the assigments are fully computer oriented.
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Cleve Moller, "Numerical Computing with MATLAB", SIAM, 2004
An electronic edition published by The MathWorks is available for free at:
http://www.mathworks.com/moler/chapters.html

References from literature:


Rudra Pratap, "Getting Started With MATLAB 6", Oxford University Press, 2002.
Assessment homework assignments + final project
Remarks There will be weekly homework assignments and a final project. The homework is normally due a week after hand out and will
be graded. In doing the homework I encourage you to work in pairs. You have to make a report on the final project. After
handing in the report you make an appointment for the oral exam which is mainly on the assignments and the final project. The
exam is individual. For up-to-date information check out the webpage at http://tam.cornell.edu/~als93/
Percentage of Design 0%
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 42 of 150
WB1444-07 Advanced Micro Electronic Packaging 3
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr. G.Q. Zhang
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Instructor Dr.ir. W.D. van Driel
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Required for wb1445-05
Summary Introduction to (advanced) wafer technology, microelectronic packaging and assembly, design and reliability qualification.
Course Contents As the bridge between IC and various electronics systems, microelectronic packaging controls more than 90% of the size, 60%
of the cost, and largely the system performance and reliability. It is one of the most fascinating and rapid developing technology
and business fields of Semiconductors. Due to the recent progress of Cu/Low-k CMOS and advanced SiP technologies,
microelectronic packaging is playing a dominant role in the development of future microelectronics and Microsystems.
Course outline:
- Application needs (Ambient Intelligence drives) for Semiconductors
- Technology and business development trends of Semiconductors
- Overview of advanced CMOS process technologies (including Cu/Low-k), and advanced packaging technologies (covering the
packaging glossary, design specification, materials and properties, process flows and process characteristics for both peripheral
and Area Array interconnects, etc.)
- Designing and qualification of advanced packages (QFN, BGA, FlipChip, CSP, WLP, three level SiP)
- Emerging packaging technologies, such as Cu/low-k packaging, Nanopackaging, MEMS packaging, opto-packaging and Bio-
packaging
- Second level assembly
- International technology roadmap and future packaging perspectives
Study Goals To master the knowledge of advanced packaging technologies, via learning the basics and critical aspects of designing and
qualification of advanced packages; knowing the technology roadmap, future perspectives and business trend of advanced
packaging.
Education Method Lectures
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Handout (presentations)
Book 'Mechanics of Microelectronics' by G.Q. Zhang, W.D. van Driel, and X.J. Fan
Excursion to Philips
Assessment Two possibilities of course assessment: 1) participating in real and mini industrial R&D project team, or 2) conducting literature
study
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 43 of 150
WB1445-05 Mechanics of Micro Electronics and Microsystems 3
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr. G.Q. Zhang
Course Coordinator Dr.ir. W.D. van Driel
Instructor Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Instructor Dr.ir. O. van der Sluis
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Summary Virtual prototyping and qualification, designing for reliability, thermo-mechanical and multi-physics modeling, simulation-based
optimisation.
Course Contents The technology trends of microelectronics and microsystems are mainly characterized by miniaturization down to nanoscale,
increasing levels of technology and function integration and introduction of new materials, while the business trends are mainly
characterized by cost reduction, shorter time to market, and outsourcing. Combination of these trends leads to increased chances
and consequences of failures, increased design complexity,decreased product development and qualification times, dramatically
decreased design margins, and increased difficulties to meet quality, robustness and reliability requirements.
Most importantly, for the new product/process development, trial-error based design methods are still the common practice,
while reliability qualification methods are still empirical. This situation, however, is becoming the bottleneck for the future
development, especially for the advanced Cu/Low-k CMOS and higher level SiP technologies. To achieve competitive
product/process development, it is vital to know and to apply the state-of-the-art of virtual prototyping and qualification.
Course outline:
Major reliability problems in Semiconductors industries
Status quo of current reliability paradigm
The state-of-the-art of virtual prototyping and qualification, including the basic theories and methodologies
Case study of covering important failure modes related with wafer backend, IC packaging and board level assembly, such as
(not limited to):
Various cracks, and delamination
Wire bonding failures
Solder fatigues
Moisture-induced failures
Warpage
Challenges and future perspective
Study Goals To know the current and expected reliability problems of and industry's concern for Microelelctronics and Microsystems; to
master the state-of-the-art of theories, methodologies and industrial practices of virtual prototyping and qualification, in
combination with some real industrial case studies; to know the challenges and future perspectives of virtual prototyping and
qualification.
Education Method Lectures
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Handout (presentations)
Reference books and papers
Book 'Mechanics of Microelectronics' by G.Q. Zhang, W.D. van Driel, and X.J. Fan
References from literature
Proceedings of IEEE conference of EuroSimE

Assessment Presentation
Remarks Two possibilities of course assessment: 1) participating in real and mini industrial R&D project team, 2) conducting literature
study.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 44 of 150
WB1481LR Dynamics and Control Space Systems 4
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. P.T.L.M. van Woerkom
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/4/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period 3
4
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge Recommended prequisite courses:
AE4-305 Spacecraft attitude dynamics and control
AE4-305P Spacecraft attitude control system design exercise.
Course Contents The course focuses on dynamics modelling and controller design for space systems, such as rigid spacecraft, flexible spacecraft,
space robotic manipulators, and onboard space mechanisms.
To understand system behaviour a thorough understanding of system dynamics is required. In turn this understanding forms the
basis for the synthesis of suitable measurement and control systems, and for the selection of suitable estimation and control
algorithms.
Study Goals The student must be able to:

A. Concerning dynamics modelling and dynamics analysis


1. define suitable attitude parametrizations and the associated kinematic relationships for single bodies and for concatenated
bodies (including structural flexibility)
2. derive and interpret the equations of motion for the translation, rotation, and deformation of a generic single flexible body
(virtual work derivation; hybrid coordinate formulation)
3. derive and interpret the equations of motion of single-spin and dual-sin spacecraft
4. derive and interpret the equations of motion for a rigid Earth-pointing three-axis stabilized spacecraft
5. derive and interpret the equations of single-axis attitude motion of an agile (i.e. maneuvering) spacecraft disturbed by
structural flexibility, by environmental torques (gravity gradient and magnetic) and by internal torques (reaction wheels)

B. Concerning space system control


6. determine dynamic stability of a given space system (Routh-Hurwitz criterion; Lyapunov first and second methods)
7. design three controllers for a single-axis spacecraft: classical PID, modern LQG, and Lyapunov
8. design and analyze suppression of nutation of a spinstabilized spacecraft, using passive damping (viscous dissipation) and
through active damping (jet; reaction wheel)
9. describe and analyze multi-sensor data fusion (test case: single-axis spacecraft with attitude sensor and rate sensor)
10. describe and analyze measurement spill-over and control spill-over (test cases: pinned-pinned beam and single-axis
spacecraft)
11. describe and analyze robust disturbance accommodation control

During the course some items may be given more attention than other items, depending on the interest of the participants.
Education Method Lectures

The course consists of a series of lectures and of several small-scale take-home assignments. Final grade for the course will be
based on the quality of the take-home work. Where deemed helpful the student will be asked to further clarify his work.
Literature and Study Study material (on Blackboard):
Materials - lecture notes
- various supporting documents
Several take-home assignments (on Blackboard)
Assessment A series of take-home exercises
Special Information
Students wishing to follow this course are invited to express their interest to dr.ir. P.Th.L.M. van Woerkom, Faculty
3mE/Mechanical Engineering, Section Engineering Dynamics, 3mE 8B-4.21, extension 82792.
Aerospace students wishing to follow this course are invited to express their interest in addition to dr. Q.P. Chu, Faculty
Aerospace Engineering, Section Control and Simulation, LR room no. 027, extension 83586.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 45 of 150
WB2303-08 Measurement in Engineering 4
Responsible Instructor Prof.ir. R.H. Munnig Schmidt
Instructor Ir. J.W. Spronck
Gast Instructor Dr.ir. J.F. Creemer
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Required for Students Mechatronic System Design
Expected prior knowledge The master course "Mechatronic System Design" (WB 2414-08) is very much advised. Especially some basic knowledge on
electromechanics, dynamics and electronics is needed. Preparation by studying the related course material of WB 2414-08 is
almost compulsory.
This will be published on blackboard
Course Contents The course will focus on measurement techniques that are usually applied in Mechanical Engineering so integrated in larger
equipment but also in stand alone setups.

Topics include:

General performance characteristics of measurement instruments.


Elements in measurement systems: Sensors, Signal conditioning and Signal processing.
Electronics used in measurement systems and EMC. Signal manipulation and transmission, filtering, noise suppression.
Maesurement uncertainty, error sources, correction methods. Interfering and modifying error sources.
Calibration, traceability and standards.
Dynamics of measurement systems and measurement of dynamics. Transfer functions in the frequency and time domain.
Amplitude modulation.
Measuring devices for both linear and angular motion (displacement, velocity, acceleration)
Force, torque and pressure sensors.
Strain gauge principles
Optical measurement systems, encoders and laser interferometry
Temperature sensors.
MEMS related sensors
Study Goals * The student will be capable of understanding the fundamental approach in measuring fysical quantities
* The student will be capable of applying the basic principles of measurement of mechanical magnitudes.
* The student will be capable of determining the suitable measurement systems for a given metrology problem.
* The student will be able to design a concept measurement system for a given measurement problem by using different physical
principles.
Education Method Classroom Lectures. Basic theory and application by the main teacher and max. 4 invited speakers on a certain theme. These can
be from industry, another faculty or phd students about their research topic.
Computer Use No computer is needed. The course deals basically on the understanding of measurement systems rather than calculations.
Course Relations Strong relation with Mechatronic System Design (WB 2414-09)
Literature and Study A course book is used
Materials
Books Principles of Measurement Systems, J.P. Bentley, Pearson Education Ltd
Assessment Written examination, closed book
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 46 of 150
WB2308 Biomedical Engineering Design 4
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. D.H. Plettenburg
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. J.L. Herder
Instructor Dr.ir. G.J.M. Tuijthof
Contact Hours / Week 0/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period 2
Course Language English
Course Contents In biomechanical engineering, the design specifications are fundamentally different from those in industry. Typically, precise
motion is much less critical than safety, force transmission or distribution, and energy-efficiency. Hence, a different design
approach is needed.

This course presents a design philosophy and a design approach, dedicated to rehabilitation technology and [orthopaedic]
surgery. These fields were selected because of human-machine interaction is inherent and vital. Illustrative examples will be
discussed by their entire design proces (system analysis, design approach, topology synthesis, system alternatives and
improvements, dimensional optimization, choice of components).

Topics addressed include: arm and hand prosthetics, arm orthotics and exoskeletons, control of prosthetics and orthotics,
minimally access orthopaedic surgery, arthroscopy, transmission of forces, influence of visco-elastic materials on the behaviour
of mechanical systems, static balancing, pneumatics, low-friction mechanisms, medical terminology.

Students will select a design assignment and perform a problem analysis, generate conceptual designs, and select a feasible one.
The assignment will be carried out in groups of around two students, where possible from different faculties, and is completed
with a presentation and a report.
Study Goals The student must be able to:
1.make a Problem Analysis of a given assignment in the field of medical or rehabilitation technology
identify the underlying cause of the problem as presented in the assignment
translate the result of 1a into technical Design Objectives without reference to any solutions
derive qualitative and quantitative Design Specifications from the Design Objectives, and categorize and prioritize these.
obtain and assess feedback on the Design Specification from Assignor
2.generate Conceptual and Embodiment Designs for the given assignment
select and apply appropriate Design Methodology and Design Methods
generate a variety [typically at least three] of Conceptual Designs
judiciously select the most appropriate Conceptual Design
obtain and assess feedback on the selected Conceptual Design from Assignor
transform the selected Conceptual Design into an Embodiment Design
demonstrate the plausibility or feasibility of the Embodiment Design
Education Method Lectures (2 hours per week)
Literature and Study "Upper Extremity Prosthetics. Current status & evaluation"
Materials Dick H. Plettenburg
VSSD, 2006, ISBN13: 978-90-71301-75-9
Assessment Design project
Remarks The course is completed with a conceptual engineering design project.
Percentage of Design 80%
Design Content Design methods and design tools, illustrated with examples, are the major part of the course. Furthermore several supporting
theories are discussed. Students are required to do a conceptual design study on real-life and actual problems.
Department 3mE Department Biomechanical Engineering

Page 47 of 150
WB2408 Physiological Systems 3
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr. J. Dankelman
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. C.A. Grimbergen
Instructor Dr.ir. A.C. van der Eijk
Contact Hours / Week 0/4/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period 2
3
Course Language English
Course Contents 1.Introduction to human physiology (human body, homeostasis, general organization of the circulatory system).
2.Central nerve system (nerve cells, synapses, sensory system, motor system, autonomic nerve system, reflexes).
3.Mechanics and excitation of the heart (contraction mechanism of cardiac muscle, action potentials).
4.Coronary circulation (control of coronary blood flow, influence of heart contraction on coronary blood flow, effect of
stenoses).
5.Cardiac output and Frank-Starling mechanism (regulation, venous return, arterial pressure, pulmonary resistance).
6.Blood rheology and wave phenomena in the circulation (blood cells, blood flow, blood pressure, vascular compliance, clotting,
Newtonian flow).
7.Mass transport (diffusion, convection, osmosis, transport through cell membranes).
8.Kidneys (anatomy, glomerular filtration, reabsorption, regulation of blood volume, artificial kidneys).
9.Arterial pressure regulation (control system, baroreceptors, influence of nerve system, control by renal system).
10.Lungs (respiration, alveoli, transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide, artificial lung).
11.Pregnancy and human development (foetal circulation, oxygen transport in utero, umbilical cord, prematurity)
12.Measurement and imaging techniques (ECG, MRI, Röntgen, echo, Doppler, catheters, ultrasound).
13.Modelling of physiological control systems (identification, difficulties).
14.A practical course on Cell Physiology at LUMC.
Study Goals The student is able to describe the function of several physiological systems from an engineering point of view.

The student must be able to:

Describe the anatomy and function of the heart, lungs, kidneys, and nerve system
Describe and draw graphs of the mechanical and electrical activity of the heart(muscle)
Identify and explain the transport mechanisms in the human body
Describe mechanisms for regulation of the cardiac output and the arterial blood pressure
Describe and draw graphs of wave and rheological phenomena in the blood circulation
Describe the principles of current used measurements and imaging techniques (e.g. echo, MRI,
Röntgen)
Formulate the problems of applying standard modeling and identification techniques on physiological control systems
Formulate design criteria for artificial organs

Education Method 2 times per week 2 lectures of 45 minutes


1 excursion to Leiden University Medical Centre
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Reader: Physiological Systems
by J. Dankelman, C.A. Grimbergen, J.A.E. Spaan.
Powerpoint slides of lectures

Optional:
E.N. Marieb
Human Anatomy & Physiology
6th edition
Pearson; Benjamin-Cummings
ISBN: 0321204131

A.C. Guyton, J. E. Hall


Textbook of Medical Physiology
11th Edition
W B Saunders Co
ISBN: 9780721602400

W. Boron, E. Boulpaep
Medical physiology
Revised edition
W B Saunders Co
ISBN: 9781416023289

Assessment Written exam


Percentage of Design 10%
Design Content The design of several artificial organs will be discussed (e.g. artificial heart, valves, lung, and kidney).
Department 3mE Department Biomechanical Engineering

Page 48 of 150
WB2427 Predictive Modelling 3
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. H.H. Langen
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. J. van Eijk
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/4/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Course Contents Steps in a Modelling Activity
Stepwise Refined Modelling
Practical Modelling
Mixed Dynamics/Control Simulations
Effect of Modal Truncation and Accuracy
Model Reduction Techniques
Static Reduction Techniques
Component Mode Techniques
Study Goals The student is going to be able to model (lump sum) some high precision engineering applications (positioning and vibration
isolation) with structural resonances using 20-sim, and is able to modify and optimize the mechanical structure for better
performances
Education Method Lecture and computer room exercises
Literature and Study Machine Dynamics in Mechatronics Systems - An Engineering Approach (Rankers)
Materials
Assessment Oral
Percentage of Design 30%
Design Content System level design and modelling - Improving mechanical design
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

WB2428-03 Mechanical Design in Mechatronics 5


Responsible Instructor Ir. P.C.J. van Rens
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. J.L. Herder
Instructor Dr.ir. R.A.J. van Ostayen
Instructor Dr.ir. D.H. Plettenburg
Instructor Dr.ir. A. van Beek
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/4/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period 3
4
Course Language English
Course Contents Mechanical design principles for high precision positioning, controlling degrees of freedom
Stress and strain, design for stiffness
Design principles to eliminate friction, wear and hysteresis

Study Goals To gain sound understanding of mechanical design principles for high precision applications in mechatronics
Education Method Lectures (4 hours per week)
Literature and Study Will be made available on Blackboard
Materials
Assessment Verbal exam (semester 2A) and Design Exercise (semester 2B)
Percentage of Design 90%
Design Content Mechanical design principles for high precision applications
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 49 of 150
WB2432 Bio Mechatronics 4
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. D.H. Plettenburg
Instructor Prof.dr. F.C.T. van der Helm
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period 4
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge wb2407
Course Contents Biomechatronics is a contraction of biomechanics and mechatronics. In this course the function and coordination of the human
motion apparatus is the central focus, and the design of assistive devices for the support of the function of the motion apparatus.
Examples are assistive devices like an orthosis, prosthesis or Functional Electrical Stimulation of muscles. The goal is to provide
some function to patients with functional deficiencies.
Study Goals The student must be able to:
1.make a Problem Analysis of a given assignment in the field of the human motion apparatus and its interaction with an assistive
device
identify the underlying cause [pathology] of the problem as presented in the assignment
describe and explain the possible treatment options for the pathology of 1a
translate the result of 1a into technical Design Objectives without reference to any solutions
derive qualitative and quantitative Design Specifications from the Design Objectives, and categorize and prioritize these
assess feedback on the Design Specification from Assignor
2.optimize the assistive device application given in the assignment in energetical and control aspects
select and apply appropriate Design Methodology and Design Methods
generate a variety [typically at least three] of Conceptual Designs
judiciously select the most appropriate Conceptual Design
assess feedback on the selected Conceptual Design from Assignor
demonstrate the plausibility or feasibility of the Conceptual Design, with special emphasis to the patient benefits
Education Method Lectures (2 hours per week)
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials
A reader is available through Blackboard

References from literature:

D.B. Popovic and T. Sinkjaer


Control of Movement for the Physically Disabled
Springer (2000)
ISBN-13: 978-1852332792

D.H. Plettenburg
Upper Extremity Prosthetics. Current status & evaluation
VSSD (2006)
ISBN-13: 978-9071301759
Assessment Assignment + written exam
Remarks Students are requested to make one final assignment, which will be part of the examination.
Department 3mE Department Biomechanical Engineering

Page 50 of 150
WB2454-07 Multiphysics Modelling using COMSOL 4
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. R.A.J. van Ostayen
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Summary finite element method, multiphysics modelling, MATLAB, COMSOL
Course Contents In applied mechanics one is often confronted with a multi-physics or coupled problem: A problem that requires the
(simultaneous) solution of more than one type of physical process or phenomenon in order to accurately describe the problem.
Examples of multiphysics problems are fluid-structure interaction, thermal-structure interaction and electro-thermal-structure
interaction, possibly combined with a control problem. Particularly in the field of Mechatronic design and MEMS multiphysics
problems are frequently encountered.

COMSOL MultiPhysics is a finite element code, which can be used both as a MATLAB toolbox and as a standalone program,
which is particularly suited for the simulation of multi-physics systems.

In this course the student will learn to recognize different types of multi-physics coupling and methods for their efficient
numerical solution using COMSOL. Short homework assignments are used to practise the use of COMSOL on different types of
problems and in a final assignment the student is asked to study a multi-physics problem using COMSOL.
Study Goals The student must be able to:
1. recognize multiphysics coupling in complex problems
2. distinguish between different types of coupling
one-directional vs. bi- or multi-directional
interface vs. field
strong vs. weak
3. describe numerical solution techniques applicable to coupled problems
4. use COMSOL MultiPhysics on coupled problems
Education Method Lectures (2 hours per week) / Self study
Computer Use COMSOL MultiPhysics and MATLAB
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Lecture notes and online COMSOL manual
References from literature:
Zienkiewicz, O.C. and Taylor, R.C., The finite element method, Vol.1, 2 and 3, Fifth edition.
Assessment Written report
Remarks A basic knowledge of engineering mechanics, fluid mechanics and the finite element method is required. The student is expected
to have some working knowledge of MATLAB.

The assessment is based on homework assignments and a more complex final assignment and report.
Design Content None
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 51 of 150
WB3404A Vehicle Dynamics A 3
Responsible Instructor Ir. E.J.H. de Vries
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Course Contents Basic elements of the dynamics of road vehicles (car, truck, motorcycle). Ride vibration response to road unevenness. Sine and
stochastic roadprofile. Single, two and three mass/spring/damper systems. Linear and non-linear models. Vibrational modes and
stability. Discomfort analysis. System identification. Roadholding: vehicle handling and stability. Response to stear input and
side wind. Singel two-wheel vehicle model to discuss effects of tyres, inertia and geometry. Influence of several design
variables: steering and wheel suspension, kinematics and compliance, toe angle, camber, roll axis, roll stabilizer, load transfer.
Motorcycle stability and modal shapes (brief discussion of results)
Study Goals The student is able to apply dynamics methods and knowledge on vehicle specific problems

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.quantify comfort and road holding: recognise the paradox for optimal suspension design
2.realize that linear models are approximations of reality in many aspects
3.employ single mass and higher order models for vertical vibration analysis, and justify the choice for single d.o.f., quarter car
or half car model
4.implement the most common non linear elements in vehicle(models) and discover some analytical solution methods
5.solve non-Linear problems with numerical integration routines
6.apply Lagrange method to derive equations of motion
7.analyze driving stability in the horizontal plane using Hurwitz criterion
8.characterize vehicle handling in terms of under- and oversteer, apply critical and characteristic velocity on the vehicle
behaviour
9.derive the single track model, linear and including elementary non-linear properties
Education Method Lectures (4 hours per week), practical exercises
Computer Use In working out the problems the computer will be helpful.
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Lecture notes: Voertuigdynamica A

References from literature:


Mitschke, Wong, Gillespie, Newland.
Assessment Oral exam, by appointment
Remarks Laboratory project(s):
About 10 problems (exercises) are requested to prepare at home.
Percentage of Design 25%
Design Content The effect of design parameters of wheel suspension and stearing system are discussed.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 52 of 150
WB5400-08 Mechatronic System Design 2 4
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. A. van Beek
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Required for wb2454-05
Expected prior knowledge wb3201
Course Contents In this course you are asked to carry out a small research project related to the mechanical design of precision machines and
equipment. Examples are

- The preparation of an experimental research project that may include the design of a test rig, setting up a test procedure,
making a time schedule and the budgeting of costs. For example, the design of a test rig to measure stick in MEMS devices.

- Performing an experimental research project that may include to set up a test with data acquisition (labview), to carry out some
experiments and to evaluate the results. For example, testing the limitations of an ultra high speed rotating spindle, testing
lubricants or testing materials of slide surfaces and evaluating the results.
Study Goals The student is able to
- Apply design principles for high precision test rigs, machines or measuring equipment.
- Set up experimental research projects (selecting the experimental method, planning, budgeting)
- Set up data acquisition programs (labview).
- Perform data analyses (Evaluating measuring data, applied statistics).
Education Method Personal coaching
Computer Use Labview, Pro Engineer / Solid Works, Comsol Multiphysics
Literature and Study Beek, A. van, "Advanced Engineering Design: lifetime performance and reliability", 534 pp., edition 2009, available at
Materials Leeghwater

References from literature:


see references in the course book
Assessment Written report as a small paper with attachments
Remarks Topics treated in the course wb3201 are to be applied.
Design Content 100%
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 53 of 150
WB5414-08 Design of Machines and Mechanisms 4
Responsible Instructor Dr. T. Tomiyama
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. J.L. Herder
Contact Hours / Week 2/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
2
Start Education 1
Exam Period 2
Course Language English
Course Contents 1. Introduction (Grouping, Assignments)
2. Conceptual Design of Machines (first quarter)
- Design Methods
- Requirement Analysis
- Function Modeling and Function Decomposition
- Generating Concepts
- Evaluation of Concepts
- Selection of Solutions
3. Design of Mechanisms
- Diagram of Motion
- Diagram of Goal Functions
- Available Mechanism Types
- Type- and Dimension Synthesis of Mechanisms
4. Presentation of Assignments
5. Industrial Application of Mechanization and Mechanisms (Factory Visit)
Study Goals The student must be able to:
1. describe the conceptual design process for systematic design
perform requirement analysis and build function structure
derive physical phenomena necessary for achieving required function and combine different options to systematically develop
different candidate solutions
compare different candidate solutions and choose the best solution
2. describe the basic design process of mechanisms
calculate the performance of various kinds of mechanisms (such as four bar link, cam, gear pairs, etc.) with software packages
for mechanisms design
determine the dimensions and other design parameters of a mechanism
3. employ these design methods for a real industrial problem in a teamwork environment
perform the design task at the both conceptual and basic design levels in a team
present their design in drawings or as a CAD model
Education Method Project: Students will be divided into groups of 4 to 5 students and each group is given its assignment.

At every lecture, in principle, first half of lecture hours is used for presenting students homework and the other for instructions.
During presentation of homework, students are expected to participate in discussions actively.
Computer Use Use of dedicated PC software. Software programs will become available for downloading from the blackboard.
Literature and Study Lecture notes wb5414 (in Dutch available from the blackboard).
Materials Pahl, G., Beitz, W., Feldhusen, J., Grote, K.-H: Engineering Design, A Systematic Approach (Third Edition), Translated by K.
Wallace and L. Blessing, Springer, London, ISBN: 978-1-84628-318-5, (2007). Available from TU Delft Library as an e-book.
Other appropriate literature and software programs will be specified during the lectures and uploaded to the Blackboard.
Books Lecture notes wb5414 (in Dutch available from the blackboard).
Pahl, G., Beitz, W., Feldhusen, J., Grote, K.-H: Engineering Design, A Systematic Approach (Third Edition), Translated by K.
Wallace and L. Blessing, Springer, London, ISBN: 978-1-84628-318-5, (2007). Available from TU Delft Library as an e-book.
Assessment Attendance (compulsory) including a factory visit scheduled at the end of the semester or the beginning of 2A: if you are absent
twice, the end of the story.

Written reports (intermediate and final).

Final presentation (taking place during the exam period).


Enrolment / Application Since this course involves team working, good command of English is required. In particular, foreign students should make sure
that their English level is high enough for intensive communication with teachers and other students.

While any specific knowledge about machine design is not required, it is desirable that students have some experiences of
machine design (such as BSc mechanical engineering design courses and projects).
Remarks During the course, a real industrial design case will be assigned to a group of students. Attendance is obligatory, including a
factory visit planned at the end of the lecture.
The project has two parts, conceptual design (largely following the Pahl & Beitz method) and mechanisms design (using various
analysis and synthesis software).
Percentage of Design 100%
Design Content Design of industrial machinery for discrete production (mechanization). Design aspects: technical and economical demands,
conceptual design, finding mechanisms to perform the required motions (synthesis), analysis and evaluation of solutions.
Department 3mE Department Biomechanical Engineering

Page 54 of 150
WI4011-17 Computational Fluid Dynamics 6
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. D.R. van der Heul
Contact Hours / Week 0/4/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge Introductory numerical analysis (WI2091 and WI2092, or WI3097) Introductory partial differential equations (WI3150 or
equivalent)
Introductory continuum mechanics (WI2090 or equivalent).
Course Contents Basic equations of fluid dynamics.
Numerical methods for convection-diffusion equations: finite volume schemes;
stability, consistency and convergence of numerical schemes;
Fourier stability analysis, local grid refinement; singular perturbation theory;
uniform accuracy and efficiency for vanishing viscosity.
Numerical solution of the time-dependent and time-independent incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Pressure-correction
method.
Colocated and staggered discretisation methods.
Discretisation on structured and unstructured grids.
Distributive iteration methods for the Navier-Stokes equations.
Introduction to structured and unstructured grid generation in 2D
Study Goals Objectives
Upon completion of the course the student should be able to:
1. Derive the equations of fluid dynamics in differential and integral form from first principles using the transport theorem, as
opposed to considering an infinitesimal control volume.
2. Explain the difference in behaviour of a scalar convection-diffusion equation for different values of the Peclet number
(elliptic/hyperbolic differences, characteristics vs. sub-characteristics).
3. Choose boundary conditions for discretization of a simple convection-diffusion equation as well as for the incompressible
Navier-Stokes equations, such that a well-posed boundary value problem results without unphysical boundary layers in the
solution. Consider the three standard boundary conditions, as well as boundary conditions specifically for the N-S Equations.
4. Use the finite volume method to discretize a convection diffusion equation and derive the discretization errors that results
when either a smooth or a rough tessellation is used.
5. Explain that although the properties of the convection diffusion equation change with the Peclet number a discretization
method can be formulated that is uniform in both work and accuracy, for a simple convection-diffusion equation as well as the
incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Note: take into account the boundary layer resolution and the positivity of the scheme.
6. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of a staggered discretization scheme over a collocated discretization scheme for the
incompressible Navier-Stokes equations.
7. Apply Fourier analysis to determine linear stability properties of a temporal discretization method for convection diffusion
equation.
8. Derive the pressure-correction method algorithm from the discretized momentum and continuity equations.
9. Explain how distributive iteration methods can be applied to saddle-point problems, and derive the SIMPLE method from the
discretized momentum and continuity equations. Choose the most efficient iterative method to solve the linear system resulting
from the discretisation of the Navier-Stokes equations.
10. Choose and motivate a method to generate a fold-free curvilinear mesh for a given two-dimensional domain. Explain
advantages and disadvantages of Delaunay triangulation versus advancing front tessellation for generation of a fold free grid for
a given two-dimensional domain.

Education Method The course comprises 12 lectures and 2 computerroom sessions. One of the lectures will be taught by a guest expert either at TU
Delft, or at the National Aerospace Laboratory NLR (fieldtrip!)
Course Relations In the past WI4011 briefly covered a number of subjects more extensively discussed in the course WI4201 'Scientific
Computing'.
This overlap has been removed, and therefore student are strongly recommended to take the course WI4201
Literature and Study Lecture notes "Elements of Computational Fluid Dynamics" by Prof. dr. ir. P. Wesseling, revised by Dr. ir. D.R. van der Heul
Materials
Practical Guide Will be provided during the two computerroom sessions.
Assessment At the beginning of the course, a list of subjects related to the content of the course is provided. The students select one of the
subjects and write a short paper of 5-10 pages on the chosen subject, discussing the subject on textbook level and include a
summary of the latest publications. The students can either work alone or in pairs.
Upon completion of the paper, the students take an oral exam, where both the content of their paper is discussed and the material
of the lecture notes is examined.
Remarks More information on the course can be found on Blackboard.

Page 55 of 150
WI4014TU Numerical Analysis 6
Responsible Instructor Ir. A. Segal
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. F.J. Vermolen
Contact Hours / Week x/x/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
2
Start Education 1
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Course Contents Numerical methods for partial differenial equations. Discretization methods. Solution techniques for large sparse systems.
Nonlinear systems. Applications
Study Goals The student will be able to discretize partial differential equations with the finite difference, finite volume and finite element
methods.

He or she will be able to evaluate the solutions in terms of accuracy, consistency and convergence.
Education Method Lectures in the 1st and 2nd education period. Lab exercises in the 3rd education period which have to be finished before the 1st
of February in the form of a written report.
Literature and Study J.van Kan, A.Segal and F.Vermolen. Numerical methods in scientific computing. VSSD, Delft, 2005, improved 2008, ISBN-13
Materials 978-90-71301-50-6
Prerequisites Numerical Analysis cI, Introduction partial differential equations
Assessment Take-home assignments, Labexercise with a written report

The grades of any take-home assignment has to be minimal a 3.0. If a grades is lower than 3.0, then an oral examination will be
obligatory to get a final grade.

WI4141TU Matlab for Advanced Users 3


Responsible Instructor Dr. P. Wilders
Instructor Dr. K. Dekker
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/4
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Course Contents Matrices and linear algebra (emphasis on sparse matrices). Functions, subfunctions, nested functions, recursive functions,
argument passing. Advanced graphics, printing and presentation, plot editor, object properties, animation. Debugging, profiling
and optimizing performance. Advanced data types, structures and cells. Simulation (emphasis on differential equations).
Study Goals Programming and solving nontrivial engineering problems in Matlab. Presentation of graphical results
Education Method Lectures, interactive lecturers, training sessions and practical work, highly interactive course
Literature and Study Lecture notes, to be distributed during the course. Useful background information is available in: D.J. Higham and N.N. Higham,
Materials Matlab Guide, second edition, SIAM, 2005 and in: D. Hanselman and B. Littlefield, Mastering Matlab 7, Pearson, 2005.
Prerequisites Basic knowledge of Matlab (knowledge of Matlab at level of a Bachelor in one of the engineering sciences). Basic knowledge of
differential equations both analytical and numerical.
Assessment Grading and completion based upon reports practical work

WI4201 Scientific Computing 6


Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. C. Vuik
Instructor Dr. D.J.P. Lahaye
Contact Hours / Week 2/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
2
Start Education 1
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge A basic knowledge on partial differential equations (PDEs), on numerical methods for solving ODEs/PDEs, and on linear
algebra.
Course Contents During the course, the important steps towards the solution of real-life
applications dealing with partial differential equations will be outlined. Based on a well-known basic partial differential
equation, which is representative for different application areas, we treat and discuss direct and iterative solution methods from
numerical linear algebra in great detail. The discretization of the equation will result in a large system of discrete equations,
which can be represented by a sparse matrix. After a discussion of direct solution methods, the iterative solution of such systems
of equations is an important step during numerical simulation. Emphasis is laid upon the so-called Krylov subspace methods,
like the Conjugate Gradient Methods. Finally, a concrete real life application will be presented.
Study Goals Student is able to solve linear systems by direct and iterative method, student should be able to analyse these method,
approximation methods of eigenvalues can be used.
Education Method Lectures/computer exercises
Literature and Study Lecture notes, for further reading the book Matrix Computations, G.H. Golub and C.F. van Loan, the Johns Hopkins University,
Materials Baltimore, 1996, can be used.
Assessment Home work/computer exercise project/oral exam

Page 56 of 150
WM0605TU Business Economics for Engineers 4
Module Manager Dr. G. van der Velde
Contact Hours / Week 2/0/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
Start Education 1
Exam Period 1
Course Language Dutch

Page 57 of 150
Year 2009/2010
Organization Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Education Master Mechanical Engineering

Specialisation Mechatronic System Design (ME-PME-MSD)


Program Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Program Title Specialisation Mechatronic System Design (ME-PME-MSD)
Introduction 1 Prof. R. Munnig Schmidt, tel. +31 (0)15 2786663, R.H.MunnigSchmidt@tudelft.nl
Prof. Jan van Eijk, tel. +31 (0)15 2785396, J.vanEijk@tudelft.nl
Secretary Ms. C.P. du Burck, tel. +31 (0)15 27 85733, C.P.duBurck@tudelft.nl

Mechatronic System Design focuses on the multi-disciplinary design of precision positioning and guiding systems for the high
tech industry. The specialisation integrates fundamental disciplines like mechanics, control, electronics, electromechanics, optics
and embedded software. Special attention is given to supporting technologies like tribology and dimensional metrology. Some of
the most challenging issues relate to communication and cooperation with experts in these different disciplines and to the ability
to realise designs that make optimal use of their expert knowledge. The mechatronics student will have the opportunity to
broaden his or her knowledge and skills in the design and modelling of integrated systems.
Typical research projects are often carried out in collaboration with industry (Philips, ASML, TNO, etc.) In special occasions
international internships or research work at other institutes like MIT and EPFL can be done.

Ongoing projects include:


High-precision magnetic bearing concepts .
Adaptive optical systems
High-precision positioning stages
Rapid pick and place machinery for micro components
High-precision desktop machinery for combined high-speed milling and electro discharge machining (EDM)
Desktop machinery for haptic micro assembly
Hybrid bearing systems for high-speed, high-precision stages
MEMS actuators for dual stage disk drives

The majority of the MSc graduates will fill positions as mechatronic designers in multidisciplinary product development teams at
the abovementioned companies . Other opportunities include continuing research within universities and other research
institutes. Some graduates may choose to work for engineering consultancies and a few may even start their own companies.

Page 58 of 150
Year 2009/2010
Organization Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Education Master Mechanical Engineering

Obligatory Courses ME-PME-MSD

Page 59 of 150
ET4245ME Elektromechanics in Mechatronic Systems 3
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. H. Polinder
Instructor Ir. J.W. Spronck
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/3
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period 4
5
Course Language English
Course Contents Electromechanics in mechatronic systems
Study Goals Students who have followed this course should be able to
1 Use the terminology of electromechanics.
2 Use the principles of electric and magnetic circuits to calculate voltages, currents, magnetic flux densities, magnetic fluxes,
magnetic flux linkages, forces, torques, power, and (stored) energy.
3 Recognize different types of permanent-magnet machines, derive the voltage equations and the equivalent circuits, sketch the
characteristic voltage and current waveforms and calculate forces and torques using the power balance.
4 Recognize magnetic bearings, explain their strength and weaknesses, calculate magnetic bearing forces from the power
balance, explain that magnetic bearings can be linearised by making them double-sided, explain zero-stiffness and gravity
compensation.
5 Explain the important limitations and characteristics of materials (magnets, iron, conductors), and machines (losses and heat
dissipation, mechanical commutation, safe operating area, cogging, force density), indicate if there are methods to get around
these limitations and do calculations on these limitations.
6 Distinguish between the different construction forms of permanent-magnet machines and explain their strengths and
weaknesses.
7 Explain which criteria play an important role in choosing a machine and how these criteria influence the choice, explain which
part of the safe operating area is most attractive and why, explain which criteria play a role in selecting transmissions and in
selection motional profiles.
8 Explain why linear motor are used, recognize different types of linear permanent-magnet machines, derive the voltage
equations and the equivalent circuits, calculate forces.
9 Recognise different types of amplifiers (analogue, switching, one quadrant, four quadrant, resonant) and know their strength
and weaknesses, sketch current and voltage waveforms of switching amplifiers, explain how they can be used to control speed.
Education Method Lectures, assignments, demonstrations
Literature and Study J.C. Compter, 'Mechatronics, Introduction to Electromechanics', lecture notes
Materials
Assessment Written examination (closed book) or group assignment

SC4010 Introduction Project SC 3


Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. A.J.J. van der Weiden
Contact Hours / Week 4/0/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
Start Education 1
Exam Period 1
Course Language English
Course Contents To achieve good controller designs it is necessary to connect theory with problems of practical interest. In this project the
concepts and theory of the basic program concerning Control Systems and Signal Analysis will be reviewed. Implementation
issues of e.g. PID controllers via continuous-time techniques on real experimental servo-systems are treated. The laboratory
sessions use a digital signal processing controller. These controllers are programmed via the Simulink block diagram language
which is part of the Matlab control system design software.
Study Goals The goal of this project is to refresh and apply theoretical knowledge gained in
previous classical control courses and to get the ability to tune mechanical servo systems. The concepts and tools to be used
include modelling mechanical systems, measurement of the frequency responses and controller design in the time and frequency
domain.
The designed controllers have to be implemented on a real experimental servo-system and their performances have to be
analysed.
Some theoretical lectures are given to support the students during the exercises.
Education Method Project
Literature and Study Lecture notes
Materials
Prerequisites Undergraduate curriculum, experience with MATLAB could be useful but is not required.
Assessment Small report
Department 3mE Department Delft Center for Systems and Control

Page 60 of 150
WB2303-08 Measurement in Engineering 4
Responsible Instructor Prof.ir. R.H. Munnig Schmidt
Instructor Ir. J.W. Spronck
Gast Instructor Dr.ir. J.F. Creemer
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Required for Students Mechatronic System Design
Expected prior knowledge The master course "Mechatronic System Design" (WB 2414-08) is very much advised. Especially some basic knowledge on
electromechanics, dynamics and electronics is needed. Preparation by studying the related course material of WB 2414-08 is
almost compulsory.
This will be published on blackboard
Course Contents The course will focus on measurement techniques that are usually applied in Mechanical Engineering so integrated in larger
equipment but also in stand alone setups.

Topics include:

General performance characteristics of measurement instruments.


Elements in measurement systems: Sensors, Signal conditioning and Signal processing.
Electronics used in measurement systems and EMC. Signal manipulation and transmission, filtering, noise suppression.
Maesurement uncertainty, error sources, correction methods. Interfering and modifying error sources.
Calibration, traceability and standards.
Dynamics of measurement systems and measurement of dynamics. Transfer functions in the frequency and time domain.
Amplitude modulation.
Measuring devices for both linear and angular motion (displacement, velocity, acceleration)
Force, torque and pressure sensors.
Strain gauge principles
Optical measurement systems, encoders and laser interferometry
Temperature sensors.
MEMS related sensors
Study Goals * The student will be capable of understanding the fundamental approach in measuring fysical quantities
* The student will be capable of applying the basic principles of measurement of mechanical magnitudes.
* The student will be capable of determining the suitable measurement systems for a given metrology problem.
* The student will be able to design a concept measurement system for a given measurement problem by using different physical
principles.
Education Method Classroom Lectures. Basic theory and application by the main teacher and max. 4 invited speakers on a certain theme. These can
be from industry, another faculty or phd students about their research topic.
Computer Use No computer is needed. The course deals basically on the understanding of measurement systems rather than calculations.
Course Relations Strong relation with Mechatronic System Design (WB 2414-09)
Literature and Study A course book is used
Materials
Books Principles of Measurement Systems, J.P. Bentley, Pearson Education Ltd
Assessment Written examination, closed book
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

WB2427 Predictive Modelling 3


Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. H.H. Langen
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. J. van Eijk
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/4/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Course Contents Steps in a Modelling Activity
Stepwise Refined Modelling
Practical Modelling
Mixed Dynamics/Control Simulations
Effect of Modal Truncation and Accuracy
Model Reduction Techniques
Static Reduction Techniques
Component Mode Techniques
Study Goals The student is going to be able to model (lump sum) some high precision engineering applications (positioning and vibration
isolation) with structural resonances using 20-sim, and is able to modify and optimize the mechanical structure for better
performances
Education Method Lecture and computer room exercises
Literature and Study Machine Dynamics in Mechatronics Systems - An Engineering Approach (Rankers)
Materials
Assessment Oral
Percentage of Design 30%
Design Content System level design and modelling - Improving mechanical design
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 61 of 150
WB2428-03 Mechanical Design in Mechatronics 5
Responsible Instructor Ir. P.C.J. van Rens
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. J.L. Herder
Instructor Dr.ir. R.A.J. van Ostayen
Instructor Dr.ir. D.H. Plettenburg
Instructor Dr.ir. A. van Beek
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/4/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period 3
4
Course Language English
Course Contents Mechanical design principles for high precision positioning, controlling degrees of freedom
Stress and strain, design for stiffness
Design principles to eliminate friction, wear and hysteresis

Study Goals To gain sound understanding of mechanical design principles for high precision applications in mechatronics
Education Method Lectures (4 hours per week)
Literature and Study Will be made available on Blackboard
Materials
Assessment Verbal exam (semester 2A) and Design Exercise (semester 2B)
Percentage of Design 90%
Design Content Mechanical design principles for high precision applications
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

WB5400-08 Mechatronic System Design 2 4


Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. A. van Beek
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Required for wb2454-05
Expected prior knowledge wb3201
Course Contents In this course you are asked to carry out a small research project related to the mechanical design of precision machines and
equipment. Examples are

- The preparation of an experimental research project that may include the design of a test rig, setting up a test procedure,
making a time schedule and the budgeting of costs. For example, the design of a test rig to measure stick in MEMS devices.

- Performing an experimental research project that may include to set up a test with data acquisition (labview), to carry out some
experiments and to evaluate the results. For example, testing the limitations of an ultra high speed rotating spindle, testing
lubricants or testing materials of slide surfaces and evaluating the results.
Study Goals The student is able to
- Apply design principles for high precision test rigs, machines or measuring equipment.
- Set up experimental research projects (selecting the experimental method, planning, budgeting)
- Set up data acquisition programs (labview).
- Perform data analyses (Evaluating measuring data, applied statistics).
Education Method Personal coaching
Computer Use Labview, Pro Engineer / Solid Works, Comsol Multiphysics
Literature and Study Beek, A. van, "Advanced Engineering Design: lifetime performance and reliability", 534 pp., edition 2009, available at
Materials Leeghwater

References from literature:


see references in the course book
Assessment Written report as a small paper with attachments
Remarks Topics treated in the course wb3201 are to be applied.
Design Content 100%
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 62 of 150
Year 2009/2010
Organization Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Education Master Mechanical Engineering

Recommended Elective Courses ME-PME-MSD

Page 63 of 150
ET4289 Integrated Circuits and MEMS Technology 4
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. P.M. Sarro
Instructor Dr.ing. H.W. van Zeijl
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/3
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period 4
Course Language English
Course Contents This lecture is an introduction in the fabrication technologies used for Integrated Circuits (IC’s) and Micro Electro-
Mechanical Systems (MEMS). The aim of this lecture is to build a bridge between the physical world (the device physics) and
the electronic world (the device characteristics). In this way, students gain more insight in the critical aspects and challenges in
IC fabrication.
The series of lectures starts with the discussion of basic microelectronic devices with a brief review of the physics involved. The
associated basic fabrication technology, required to fabricate these devices is also discussed. After that, the mainstream IC
fabrication technology (CMOS) will be discussed in more detail. In separate chapters, silicon crystal growth, epitaxy, ion
implantation, chemical vapor deposition, etching and photolithography will be introduced. Their physical motivation and the
impact on the device characteristics will be discussed.
Finally, silicon bulk and surface micromachining technologies are introduced to illustrate the potential of 3D micro structuring in
the development of Microsystems or MEMS. These IC compatible technologies are employed to realize multi-function systems
for many scientific and industrial application areas.
introduction in the fabrication technologies used for Integrated Circuits (ICs) and Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS).
The aim of this lecture is to build a bridge between the physical world (the device physics) and the electronic world (the device
characteristics). In this way, students gain more insight in the critical aspects and challenges in IC fabrication.
The series of lectures starts with the discussion of basic microelectronic devices with a brief review of the physics involved. The
associated basic fabrication technology, required to fabricate these devices is also discussed. After that, the mainstream IC
fabrication technology (CMOS) will be discussed in more detail. In separate chapters, silicon crystal growth, epitaxy, ion
implantation, chemical vapor deposition, etching and photolithography will be introduced. Their physical motivation and the
impact on the device characteristics will be discussed.
Finally, silicon bulk and surface micromachining technologies are introduced to illustrate the potential of 3D micro structuring in
the development of Microsystems or MEMS. These IC compatible technologies are employed to realize multi-function systems
for many scientific and industrial application areas.
Education Method <>lectures
Assessment <>written exam

SC4032 Physical Modelling for Systems and Control 4


Responsible Instructor Nabestaanden van O.H. Bosgra
Course Coordinator Dr. P.S.C. Heuberger
Contact Hours / Week 0/4/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period 2
3
Course Language English
Course Contents SC 4032 Physical Modelling for Systems and Control

Contents 2009/2010

1.Formulation of dynamic models for physical plants and equipment. Role of System boundary, choice of input- and output
variables. Causality and properness of input-output behaviour. Microscopic versus macroscopic conservation laws. Linearization
around steady-state operating conditions or around trajectory. Linear parameter-varying versus nonlinear and linearized models.
Frozen behaviour versus time-varying behaviour.
2.Simple process models. Role of residence-time distribution. Distributed-parameter models versus compartmental models.
Characterization of flow behaviour with respect to mixing and backflow. Series connection of flow systems.
3.Bilateral coupling between subsystems. Causality, exchange of power between subsystems.2-port behaviour. Relationships
with choice of boundary conditions in distributed-parameter systems. Hydraulic transmission line, heat conduction as examples
of bilateral coupling
4.Time scales of dynamic phenomena. Equation ordering and scaling of model equations. Modal approximation, time moments
and Padâe approximation. Singular perturbations.
5.Model reduction by projection and residualization Model reduction through ba;lancing and truncation. Role of Hankel singular
values. Closed-loop relevant model reduction. Examples, finite dimensional approximation of distributed-parameter systems.
Realization theory, approximate realization as model reduction step.
6.Rosenbrock's system matrix. System equivalence, interconnection of subsystems. Models in differential-algebraic equations for
interconnected subsystems Index problems as result of interconnection of state variables. Nonproper internal or external
behaviour, use of Kronecker-Weierstrass form

Study Goals The student must be able to formulate dynamic models on the basis of an understanding of underlying physical principles. In
addition, understanding major system properties must enable the student to manipulate the models, make them simpler (if
desired) and bring them in a suitable format that allows implementation in a software platform. The student must be able to
explain properties and behaviour of the system models under study.
Education Method There will be handouts of course notes, also available electronically, in addition to copies of the course slides.
Assessment A set of Matlab/Simulink/theory exercises will be available. Solving the exercises constitutes the basis for the assessment. The
results of the exercises must be summarized in a short report, and will be discussed and examined during an oral examination,
during which also the contents of the course notes will be the subject of discussion. The report on the exercises has to be handed
in ultimately April 16, 2010. The exam can in principle be executed throughout the year (restrictions during april/may and
october 2010), both individually as well as in groups of 2 students.
Department 3mE Department Delft Center for Systems and Control

Page 64 of 150
SC4110 System Identification 5
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. X.J.A. Bombois
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. P.M.J. van den Hof
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/6/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Course Contents Experimental modelling of dynamic systems; methodology.
Discrete-time signal- and system-analysis. Identification of transferfunctions.
Representations of linear models; black-box models.
Identification of prediction-error-methods; least squares-method.
Approximation modelling; algorithms. Experiment design and
data-analysis. Identification in time- and frequency-domain;
closed-loop identification; model validation; Matlab toolbox;
laboratory assignment.
Study Goals General learning objectives

System identification deduces and subsequently validates mathematical models of real-life dynamical systems (industrial
processes, mechanical servo-systems, ) based on experimental data collected from those systems. This course can be considered
as a follow up of the course Sc4010 Filtering and Identification where different solutions to identify a model are presented (note
nevertheless that Sc4010 is in no way a prerequisite for this course). The course Sc4110 selects two widely-used linear
identification methodologies: Empirical Transfer Function Estimate (ETFE) and Prediction Error Identification (PEI) and
provides the students with engineering and theoretical skills to perform the identification in a suitable way. In particular, after
this course, the students are able to set up an experiment, identify a nominal model, assess the accuracy/precision of this model,
and make appropriate design choices to arrive at a validated model.

Detailed learning objectives:

1)Based on time-domain input-output data collected on the true system in open loop, the student is able to deduce a frequency-
domain model of a system using the ETFE identification method
2)The student is able to specify the bias and variance properties of models identified by the ETFE identification method.
3)For the ETFE identification method, the student is able to interpret the bias and variance properties of identified models, and
knows how these properties can be influenced by input signal design and by applying windowing techniques.
4)The student is able to specify different linear model structures, and to characterize their computational and statistical properties
in prediction error identification.
5)The student masters the statistical properties (bias, variance, consistency) of prediction error estimators both for the situation of
exact plant and noise model sets, and for the situation of exact plant model sets only.
6)The student can interpret estimated models as approximations of an underlying physical systems, through the specification of
well-defined approximation criteria in the frequency domain, and is able to select design variables so as to arrive at identified
models that have prechosen approximative properties.
7)The student is able to specify how experiment design and signal to noise ratio affect estimated models. This includes mastering
the concept of sufficiently exciting input signals, and the design of appropriate input signals.
8)The student is able to apply and interpret correlation-based model structure validation tests, and to draw conclusions on the
(in)validity of model structures, distinguishing between plant models and noise models.
9)For both ETFE and PE identification methods, the student is able to appropriately acquire digital data from a real-life system
(choice of sampling frequency, data processing).

Required level for the assignment

1)the student is able to explain in details the presented theory, to demonstrate important properties and to make links and
comparisons between the different parts of the course
2)the student is able to use the presented tools in practice on a laboratory setup and to interpret his/her result with a critical
attitude

Education Method Lectures and project 0/0/6/0


Assignment form: final project on a laboratory setup followed by an oral examination
Literature and Study lecture notes and slides
Materials
Prerequisites Basics in linear algebra and signal theory
Assessment Oral and project
Assignment form: final project on a laboratory setup followed by an oral examination
Remarks Course load: 14 theory courses, 3 exercise sessions and 2 computer sessions
Department 3mE Department Delft Center for Systems and Control

Page 65 of 150
TN2053(-10) Elektromagnetism 6
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr. P.C.M. Planken
Instructor Dr.ir. N.H. van Dijk
Instructor Dr. K.W.A. van Dongen
Education Period 1
Start Education 1
Exam Period 2
Course Language Dutch
Course Contents Maxwell's equations,solving Laplace equations, electrodynamics, potentials,fields, electromagnetic waves and radiation
Study Goals Solving elementary problems in electrostatics, magnetostatics and electrodynamics. Based on the list of chapters to be treated
Education Method Lecture 2/2/0/0; instruction 2/2/0/0
Literature and Study Introduction to electrodynamics, by Griffiths, Chapters 1-7, parts of chapters 8,9, and 10
Materials
Assessment Written test half way during the course, and final written exam

Page 66 of 150
WB1413-04 Multibody Dynamics B 4
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. A.L. Schwab
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period none
Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge wb1113wb, wb1216, (wb1310).
Course Contents In this course we will cover a systematic approach to the generation and solution of equations of motion for mechanical systems
consisting of multiple interconnected rigid bodies, the so-called Multibody Systems. This course differs from 'Advanced
Dynamics', which mostly covers theoretical results about classes of idealized systems (e.g. Hamiltonian systems), in that the goal
here is to find the motions of relatively realistic models of systems (including, for example, motors, dissipation and contact
constraints). Topics covered are:
-Newton-Euler equations of motion for a simple planar system, free body diagrams, constraint equations and constraint forces,
uniqueness of the solution.
-Systematic approach for a system of interconnected rigid bodies, virtual power method and Lagrangian multipliers.
-transformation of the equations of motion in terms of generalized
independent coordinates, and lagrange equations.
-Non-holonomic constraints as in rolling without slipping, degrees of freedom and kinematic coordinates.
-Unilateral constraints as in contact problems.
-Numerical integration of the equations of motion, stability and accuracy of the applied methods.
-Numerical integration of a coupled differential and algebraic system of equations (DAE's), Baumgarte stabilisation, projection
method and independent coordinates.
-Newton-Euler equations of motion for a rigid three-dimensional body, the need to describe orientation in space, Euler angles,
Cardan angles, Euler parameters and Quaternions.
-Equations of motion for flexible multibody systems, introduction to Finite Element Method approach, Linearised equations of
motion.

Upon request and if time and ability of the instructor allows, related topics are open for discussion.
Study Goals The student is able to find the motions of linked rigid body systems in two and three dimensions including systems with various
kinematic constraints, like there are: sliding, hinges and rolling, and closed kinematic chains.

More specifically, the student must able to:


1.derive the Newton-Euler equations of motion for a simple planar system, draw free body diagrams, set-up constraint equations
and introduce constraint forces, and demonstrate the uniqueness of the solution
2.derive the equations of motion for a system of interconnected rigid bodies by means of a systematic approach: virtual power
method and Lagrangian multipliers
3.transform the equations of motion in terms of generalized independent coordinates, and derive and apply the Lagrange
equations of motion
4.apply the techniques from above to systems having non-holonomic constraints as in rolling without slipping, degrees of
freedom and kinematic coordinates
5.apply the techniques from above to systems having unilateral constraints as in contact problems
6.perform various numerical integration schemes on the equations of motion, and predict the stability and accuracy of the applied
methods
7.perform numerical integration on a coupled system of differential and algebraic equations (DAE's), apply Baumgarte
stabilization, the coordinate projection method and transformation to independent coordinates
8.derive the Newton-Euler equations of motion for a general rigid three-dimensional body system connected by constraints,
identify the need to describe orientation in space
describe the orientation in 3-D space of a rigid body by means of: Euler angles, Cardan angles, Euler parameters and
Quaternions, derive the angular velocity and accelerations in terms of these parameters and their time derivatives, and their
inverse
9.derive the equations of motion for flexible multibody systems by means of a Finite Element Method approach, and extend this
to linearised equations of motion
Education Method Lectures (2 hours per week)
Computer Use The course is computer-oriented. In doing the assignments you will be using Matlab, Maple or related computer software.
Literature and Study Course material: Arend L. Schwab, `Applied Multibody Dynamics', Delft, 2003
Materials
References from literature:
A.A.Shabana, ' Dynamics of multibody systems', Wiley, New York, 1998.
E.J.Haug, ' Computer aided kinematics and dynamics of mechanical systems, Volume I: Basic methods', Allyn and Bacon,
Boston, 1989.
P.E.Nikravesh, ' Computer-aided analysis of mechanical systems', Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, 1988.
M. Géradin, A. Cardano, ' Flexible multibody dynamics: A finite element approach', J. Wiley, Chichester, New York, 2001.
Assessment Final Project
Remarks There will be weekly assignments and a final project. You have to make a report on the final project. In doing the assignments I
strongly encourage you to work together. The final project is individual. Check out the up-to-date web page at
http://tam.cornell.edu/~als93/
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

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WB1416 Numerical Methods for Dynamics 3
Responsible Instructor Prof. D.J. Rixen
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. A. van Keulen
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge Statics and Strength of materials, Dynamics (e.g. wb1418, wb1419), Linear Algebra, Numerical Analysis (e.g. wi3097wb),
Finite Elements (e.g. wb1212-1214)
Course Contents Using engineering tools as black boxes can be dangerous and inefficient. This is especially true when performing dynamic
analysis of structures in a finite element package. Choosing the right finite element types and the suitable solution procedure is
critical to get accurate results and to compute solutions efficiently. In order to discuss basic principles of numerical methods for
dynamics and to explain fundamental concepts related to dynamic analysis, the course will cover the following topics:
- Elastodynamic equations for a continuous media (short recap)
- Discretization techniques: Rayleigh-Ritz and Finite elements (bar, beam)
- Linear solvers, storage techniques and singular systems
- Free vibration modes, mode superposition techniques and eigensolvers for large systems
- Accuracy of modal superposition, modal acceleration, system excited through support
- model reduction, including dynamic substructuring
- time-integration of linear and non-linear systems
- computing senstitivity of modes and eigenfrequency to design parameters, model updating
- Parallel computing techniques for fast solvers
Some topics might be dropped depending on students background. Specific topics might also be discussed if time permits.
In this courses emphasis will be put on understanding fundamental concepts of numerical methods and how they relate to the
mechanics of structures. Therefore, the oral (open book) exam will concentrate on the mastering of concepts rather than on
formulation details. A computational project will be included (using Matlab pre-cooked routines and/or Ansys-Nastran).
Study Goals The student is able to grasp the basic numerical concepts underlying the methods used to perform the analysis of models in
engineering statics and dynamics. He can choose the appropriate methods in specific applications and analyse the reasons why
methods can result in erroneous solutions. He is aware of computational and programming issues relative to specific numerical
techniques and implementations.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1. understand the assumption underlying the discretization process and the associated limitations in terms of spatial and
frequential accuracy
2.describe the solutions steps needed to solve linear systems and choose the proper algorithm according to the problem (LU,
Cholesky, LDLT) including storage techniques
3.identify singular matrices arising from mechanical systems and compute a generalized inverse of a singular matrix and its
nullspace
4.use the concept of eigenmodes to write the dynamic solution as a modal superposition and the system matrices in the form of
spectral expansions
5.choose the proper eigensolvers and implement standard techniques from the family of the power iteration including shifting
6.evaluate the approximations inherent to modal truncation in the mode displacement method and apply the mode acceleration
method to correct for the static truncated part
7.solve by mode superposition the dynamics of systems excited by their support and apply the technique of additional mass to
replace imposed displacements
8.describe the concept of effective modal mass and explain how it can be used to evaluate the contribution of modes to the
approximation by modal series of the response of systems excited by the support
9.describe the concept of model reduction and write the reduced equations and write the reduced dynamic equations according to
the static Guyan-Iron reduction
10.outline the idea of substructuring and derive the substructure approximation in the Craig-Bampton method, derive the
associated reduced matrices and describe how accurate the Craig-Bampton approximation is in practice
11.solve the normal equations using Laplace transforms and put the solution procedure of the normal equations in a recursive
matrix
12.discuss the concepts of consistency, stability and accuracy for simple implicit and explicit direct time-integration schemes
13.derive the time-integration formulas belonging to the Newmark family and discuss the stability limits and the accuracy of the
Newmark schemes
14.write the explicit and implicit time-integration algorithms for non-linear systems
15.write the sensitivity of eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies of dynamic systems
16.describe the basic principles of parallel computing and explain the concept of domain decomposition and write the
decomposed problem in a dual and primal interface problem suitable for parallel computing
17.write a small program (in Matlab for instance) to perform a dynamic analysis according to the Finite Element method, and
implement the proper numerical techniques
Education Method Lectures, computer use (16 hours)
Computer Use Use of ANSYS and/or Matlab for assignment and illustration.
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials
Lecture notes (available through blackboard)

References from literature:

Mechanical Vibrations, Theory and Application to Structural Dynamics, M. Géradin and D. Rixen, Wiley, 1997.
The Finite Element Method: Linear Static and Dynamic Finite Element Analysis, T.J.R. Hughes Prentice-Hall, 1987.
Finite Element Procedures, K.J. Bathe, Prentice-Hall, 1996
Structural Dynamics: an introduction to computer methods, R.R. Craig, Wiley, 1981, ISBN 0-471-04499-7
Matrix Computation, G.H. Golub and C.F. Van Loan, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996.
Assessment Oral exam
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

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WB1418-07 Engineering Dynamics 4
Responsible Instructor Prof. D.J. Rixen
Instructor Dr.ir. A.L. Schwab
Contact Hours / Week 2/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
2
Start Education 1
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Required for Engineering Dynamics and Mechanicsms (wb1419, extension of wb1418), Multibody Dynamics A (wb1310), Multibody
Dynamics B (wb1413), Numerical Methods in Dynamics (wb1416), Non-Linear Vibrations (wb1412).
Expected prior knowledge Statics and Strength of materials (e.g. wb1214), Dynamics (e.g. wb1311), Linear Algebra
Course Contents The dynamic behavior of structures (and systems in general) plays an essential role in engineering mechanics and in particular in
the design of controllers. In this master course, we will discuss how the equations describing the dynamical behavior of a
structure and of a mechatronical system can be set up. Fundamental concepts in dynamics such as equilibrium, stability,
linearization and vibration modes are discussed. If time permits, also an introduction to discretization techniques to approximate
continuous systems is proposed.

The course will discuss the following topics:

- Review of the virtual work principle and Lagrange equations


- linearization around an equilibrium position: vibrations
- elastodynamics in a solid and continuous systems
- discretization techniques (Rayleigh-Ritz and Finite Elements)
- Free vibration modes and modal superposition
- Forced harmonic response of non-damped and damped structures

Study Goals The student is able to select different ways of setting up the dynamic equations of mechanical systems, to perform an analysis of
the system in terms of linear stability and vibration modes and to properly use mode superposition techniques for computing
transient and harmonic responses. He also understands the concept of displacement approximation techniques for discretizing
continuous dynamic systems.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1. explain the relations between the principle of virtual work and the Lagrange equations for dynamics to the basic Newton laws
2. describe the concept of kinematic constraints (holonomic/non-holonomic, scleronomic/rheonomic) and choose a proper set of
degrees of freedom to describe a dynamic system
3. write the Lagrange equations for a minimum set of degrees of freedom and extend it to systems with additional constraints
(Lagrange multiplier method)
4. linearize the dynamic equations by considering the different contributions of the kinetic and potential energies (both for
system with and without overall motion imposed by scleronomic constraints)
5. analyze the linear stability of dynamic systems (damped and undamped) according to their state space formulation if necessary
6. explain and use the concept of free vibration modes and frequencies
7. interpret and apply the orthogonality properties of modes to describe the transient and harmonic dynamic response of damped
and undamped systems
8. evaluate the approximations introduced when using truncated modal series (spatial and spectral)
9. explain how mode superposition can be used to identify the eigenparamters of linear dynamic systems
Education Method Lecture
Computer Use The assignement will require using Matlab-like software.
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Lecture notes (available through blackboard)

References from literature:


Mechanical Vibrations, Theory and Application to Structural Dynamics, M. Géradin and D. Rixen, Wiley, 1997.
Applied Dynamics, with application to multibody and mechatronic systems, F.C. Moon, Wiley, 1998, isbn 0-471-13828-2.
Engineering vibration, D.J. Inman, Prentice Hall, 2001, isbn 0-13-726142-X
The Finite Element Method: Linear Static and Dynamic Finite Element Analysis, T.J.R. Hughes Prentice-Hall, 1987.
Structural Dynamics in Aeronautical Engineering, M.N. Bismark-Nasr, AIAA education series, 1999, isbn 1-56347-323-2
Assessment Oral exam + assignment
Remarks An assignment will be given which will make up part of the final mark. SInce the enphasis of the lectures will be on
understanding concepts in dynamics more than memorizing formulas, the oral exam will be open book to evaluate your
understanding of the concepts.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

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WB1440 Eng. Optimization: Concept & Applications 3
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. A. van Keulen
Instructor Dr.ir. M. Langelaar
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Required for wb1441
Expected prior knowledge Basic knowledge of mechanical engineering and mathematics
Course Contents Formulation of optimization problems
Typical characteristics of optimization problems
Minimization without constraints
Constrained minimization
Simple optimization algorithms
Discrete design variables
Approximation concepts
Sensitivity analysis
Study Goals The student is able to formulate a proper optimization problem in order to solve a given design problem, and is able to select a
suitable approach for solving this problem numerically. Furthermore, he is able to interpret results of completed optimization
procedures.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.formulate an optimization model for various design problems
2.identify optimization model properties such as monotonicity, (non-)convexity and (non-) linearity
3.identify optimization problem properties such as constraint dominance, constraint activity, well boundedness and convexity
4.apply Monotonicity Analysis to optimization problems using the First Monotonicity Principle
5.perform the conversion of constrained problems into unconstrained problems using penalty or barrier methods
6.compute and interpret the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker optimality conditions for constrained optimization problems
7.describe the complications associated with the use of computational models in optimization
8.illustrate the use of compact modeling and response surface techniques for dealing with computationally expensive and noisy
optimization models
9.perform design sensitivity analysis using variational, discrete, semi-analytical and finite difference methods
10.identify a suitable optimization algorithm given a certain optimization problem
11.perform design optimization using the optimization routines implemented in the Matlab Optimization Toolbox
12.derive a linearized approximate problem for a given constrained optimization problem, and solve the original problem using a
sequence of linear approximations
13.describe the basic concepts used in structural topology optimization
Education Method Lectures (2 hours per week), exercises
Computer Use MATLAB is used for exercises.
Literature and Study Course material: P.Y. Papalambros et al. Principles of Optimal Design: Modelling and Computation.
Materials
References from literature: R.T. Haftka and Z. Gürdal: Elements of Structural Optimization.
Assessment MATLAB exercises
Percentage of Design 80%
Design Content The course is focusing on design optimization.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 70 of 150
WB1441 Engineering Optimization 2 3
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. A. van Keulen
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week This course will not be given as lecture, but can be followed by self study (in consultation with prof. van Keulen)
x/x/x/x
Education Period None (Self Study)
Start Education 3
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge wb1440
Course Contents The course is intended as a follow-up course to wb1440. However, the focus is more on the use of numerical models. Aspects
that will be presented are:
Optimization techniques
Sensitivity analysis
Coupling with simulation techniques
Multi-objective optimization
Multi-disciplinary optimization

The course will be organized as a special topics course.


Study Goals The course targets at a comprehensive understanding of structural optimization, ranging from the optimization strategies
available, up to the inherent complications related to the simulation techniques used.
Education Method Computer-based projects.
Literature and Study R.T. Haftka and Z. Gürdal: Elements of Structural Optimization.
Materials
Assessment Project work
Percentage of Design 80%
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 71 of 150
WB1443 Matlab in Engineering Mechanics 2
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. A.L. Schwab
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Required for wb1413 Multibody Dynamics B, wi 4141TU: Matlab for advanced users.
Expected prior knowledge wi3097wb Numerieke Wiskunde (DUP)
Course Contents Matlab in Engineering Mechanics is an introductory course in technical computing, Matlab, and numerical methods. The
emphasis is on informed use of mathematical software. We want you to learn enough about the mathematical functions in
MATLAB that you will be able to use them correctly, appreciate their limitations, and modify them when necessary to suit your
own needs. The topics include:

- introduction to MATLAB
- linear equations
- zero finding
- least squares
- ordinary differential equations
- eigenvalues and singular values

The weekly homework assignments are on these topics. The final project is an individual choice from various fields of
application like: Multibody System Dynamics with Matlab, Control Theory with Matlab/Simulink, or Finite element calculations
with FEMLab.
Study Goals The student is able to write his own MATLAB code to solve a technical computing problem in Engineering Mechanics on
graduate level. The emphasis is on informed use of mathematical software. The student is able to use the mathematical functions
in MATLAB correctly, appreciate their limitations, and modify them when necessary to suit his own needs.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.identify the finite accuracy of numerical results obtained in general due to the finite word length of the computer
2.solve a system of linear equations and understand the effect on the solutions of close to singular systems
3.apply numerous root finding algorithms and evaluate the speed and accuracy
4.apply various curve fitting techniques and identify the least square solutions, both in linear and nonlinear curve fitting
5.apply various numerical integration schemes to obtain the solutions of ordinary differential equations, determine and compare
the amount of computational effort, and the stability and accuracy of the solutions
6.apply and understand Fourier analysis on measured data in order to extract basic frequencies
7.calculate eigenvalues and do singular value decomposition on a system of equations and discuss the efficiency and accuracy
for large systems
Education Method Lecture (1 hour per week)
Computer Use The course and the assigments are fully computer oriented.
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Cleve Moller, "Numerical Computing with MATLAB", SIAM, 2004
An electronic edition published by The MathWorks is available for free at:
http://www.mathworks.com/moler/chapters.html

References from literature:


Rudra Pratap, "Getting Started With MATLAB 6", Oxford University Press, 2002.
Assessment homework assignments + final project
Remarks There will be weekly homework assignments and a final project. The homework is normally due a week after hand out and will
be graded. In doing the homework I encourage you to work in pairs. You have to make a report on the final project. After
handing in the report you make an appointment for the oral exam which is mainly on the assignments and the final project. The
exam is individual. For up-to-date information check out the webpage at http://tam.cornell.edu/~als93/
Percentage of Design 0%
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 72 of 150
WB2305 Digital Control 3
Responsible Instructor T. Keviczky
Contact Hours / Week 0/4/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period 2
3
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge wb2207 and wb2420 or sc4025
Knowledge of classic control techniques as well as the state space theory is required.
Course Contents Computer control. Sampling of continuous-time signals. The sampling theorem. Aliasing. Discrete-time systems. State-space
systems in discrete-time. The z-transform. Selection of sampling-rate. Analysis of discrete-time systems. Stability.
Controllability, reachability and observability. Disturbance models. Reduction of effects of disturbances. Stochastic models.
Design methods. Approximations of continuous design. Digital PID-controller. State-space design methods. Observers. Pole-
placement. Optimal design methods. Linear Quadratic control. Prediction. LQG-control. Implementational aspects of digital
controllers.
Study Goals The student must be able to:
1.describe the essential differences between continuous time and discrete-time control
2.transform a continuous time description of a system into a discrete-time description
3.calculate input-output responses for discrete-time systems
4.analyse the system characteristics of discrete-time systems
5.employ a pole-placement method on a discrete-time system
6.implement an observer to calculate the states of a discrete time system
7.apply optimal control on discrete-time systems
8.describe the functioning of the Kalman-filter as a dynamic observer
Education Method Lectures and computer exercises
Computer Use Matlab is used to carry out the exercises of this course.
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Lecture notes are made available on Blackboard

References from literature:


K.J. Åström, B. Wittenmark 'Computer-controlled Systems', Prentice Hall ,1997, 3rd edition
B.C. Kuo 'Digital Control Systems', Tokyo, Holt-Saunders, 1980
G.F. Franklin, J.D. Powell 'Digital Control of Dynamic Systems', 1989, 2nd edition, Addison-Wesley
Assessment Final quiz in class + project assignment
Design Content The design aspects of digital controllers are discussed.
Department 3mE Department Delft Center for Systems and Control

Page 73 of 150
WB2415 Robust Control 6
Responsible Instructor Nabestaanden van O.H. Bosgra
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr. C.W. Scherer
Course Coordinator Dr. P.S.C. Heuberger
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/4/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Required for wb2416
Expected prior knowledge Requires solid background on state-space descriptions of multivariable linear systems.
sc4022/sc4025, wb2421
Course Contents · Recap on background in linear systems theory
· Stabilizing controllers and the concept of the generalized plant
· Uncertainty descriptions
· The general framework of robust control
· The structured singular value: Definition, properties, computation
· Robust stability analysis
· Nominal and robust performance analysis
· Excursion: The algebraic Riccati equation
· The H-infinity control problem and its solution in terms of Riccati equations
· Design of robust controllers
Study Goals The student is able to reproduce theory and apply computational tools for robust controller analysis and synthesis.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.substantiate relation between frequency-domain and state-space description of dynamical systems
2.define stability and performance for multivariable linear time-invariant systems
3.construct generalized plant for complex system interconnections
4.describe parametric and dynamic uncertainties
5.translate concrete controller synthesis problem into abstract framework of robust control
6.reproduce definition, properties and computation of the structured singular value
7.master application of structure singular value for robust stability and performance analysis
8.sketch derivation and precisely formulate the solution of the H-infinity control problem
9.specify the role of Riccati equation within H-infinity control
10.design robust controllers on the basis of the H-infinity control algorithm
11.apply controller-scalings iteration for robust controller synthesis
Education Method Lectures (4 hours per week)
Computer Use Computer exercises with Matlab's Robust Control Toolbox.
Literature and Study Course material: Lecture notes
Materials
References from literature:
S. Skogestad, I. Postlethwaite, Multivariable Feedback Control, John Wiley & Sons, 1997.
K. Zhou, J.C. Doyle, K. Glover, Robust and optimal control, Prentice Hall, 1996
Assessment Written exercise and oral examination
Department 3mE Department Delft Center for Systems and Control

Page 74 of 150
WB2421 Multivariable Control Systems 6
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. A.J.J. van der Weiden
Contact Hours / Week 0/4/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Required for wb2411
Expected prior knowledge wb2207
Course Contents The lectures are divided into blocks. At first a review of elementary single-loop feedback design is given. A standard design
problem is given and especially the limitations on performance are treated. In the second block of lectures a system theoretical
approach is used to explain the properties and the computation of the poles and zeros of multivariable feedback systems.
Furthermore internal stability and the generalized Nyquist stability is discussed. The third block treats performance and
robustness of multivariable feedback systems. The use of principal gains (singular values) for assessing performance is
introduced. Different representations of uncertainties are given. The use of the H-infinty norm and the structured singular value
to analyse the robust stability and robust performance will be introduced. Examples are given of how to choose weighting
functions to gain specified performance in the H-infinty control design context. Finally a block is spent on multivariable control
design for real practical systems using Nyquist like techniques. In MATLAB implemented algorithms are explained and applied
to different design examples.
Study Goals The objective of the course is to gain a basic understanding of the problem formulation and solution for control design of
(uncertain) multivariable systems. The mix of tutorial lectures and computer exercises on realistic examples provides a good
learning environment.
Education Method Lectures (4 hours per week)
Computer Use MATLAB, the Control and mu-toolbox may be used for the exercises.
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Multivariable Feedback Control Analysis and Design. S.Skogestad, I.Postlethwaite. John Wiley & Sons, ISBN 0-470-01168-8
Lecture notes: The poles and zeros of multivariable systems, A.J.J. van der Weiden.

References from literature:


Many references are available in the Central Library.
Assessment Oral examination and exercises based on MATLAB
Remarks Each year a new set-up of design examples is considered.
Department 3mE Department Delft Center for Systems and Control

Page 75 of 150
WB2454-07 Multiphysics Modelling using COMSOL 4
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. R.A.J. van Ostayen
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Summary finite element method, multiphysics modelling, MATLAB, COMSOL
Course Contents In applied mechanics one is often confronted with a multi-physics or coupled problem: A problem that requires the
(simultaneous) solution of more than one type of physical process or phenomenon in order to accurately describe the problem.
Examples of multiphysics problems are fluid-structure interaction, thermal-structure interaction and electro-thermal-structure
interaction, possibly combined with a control problem. Particularly in the field of Mechatronic design and MEMS multiphysics
problems are frequently encountered.

COMSOL MultiPhysics is a finite element code, which can be used both as a MATLAB toolbox and as a standalone program,
which is particularly suited for the simulation of multi-physics systems.

In this course the student will learn to recognize different types of multi-physics coupling and methods for their efficient
numerical solution using COMSOL. Short homework assignments are used to practise the use of COMSOL on different types of
problems and in a final assignment the student is asked to study a multi-physics problem using COMSOL.
Study Goals The student must be able to:
1. recognize multiphysics coupling in complex problems
2. distinguish between different types of coupling
one-directional vs. bi- or multi-directional
interface vs. field
strong vs. weak
3. describe numerical solution techniques applicable to coupled problems
4. use COMSOL MultiPhysics on coupled problems
Education Method Lectures (2 hours per week) / Self study
Computer Use COMSOL MultiPhysics and MATLAB
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Lecture notes and online COMSOL manual
References from literature:
Zienkiewicz, O.C. and Taylor, R.C., The finite element method, Vol.1, 2 and 3, Fifth edition.
Assessment Written report
Remarks A basic knowledge of engineering mechanics, fluid mechanics and the finite element method is required. The student is expected
to have some working knowledge of MATLAB.

The assessment is based on homework assignments and a more complex final assignment and report.
Design Content None
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 76 of 150
WB3404A Vehicle Dynamics A 3
Responsible Instructor Ir. E.J.H. de Vries
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Course Contents Basic elements of the dynamics of road vehicles (car, truck, motorcycle). Ride vibration response to road unevenness. Sine and
stochastic roadprofile. Single, two and three mass/spring/damper systems. Linear and non-linear models. Vibrational modes and
stability. Discomfort analysis. System identification. Roadholding: vehicle handling and stability. Response to stear input and
side wind. Singel two-wheel vehicle model to discuss effects of tyres, inertia and geometry. Influence of several design
variables: steering and wheel suspension, kinematics and compliance, toe angle, camber, roll axis, roll stabilizer, load transfer.
Motorcycle stability and modal shapes (brief discussion of results)
Study Goals The student is able to apply dynamics methods and knowledge on vehicle specific problems

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.quantify comfort and road holding: recognise the paradox for optimal suspension design
2.realize that linear models are approximations of reality in many aspects
3.employ single mass and higher order models for vertical vibration analysis, and justify the choice for single d.o.f., quarter car
or half car model
4.implement the most common non linear elements in vehicle(models) and discover some analytical solution methods
5.solve non-Linear problems with numerical integration routines
6.apply Lagrange method to derive equations of motion
7.analyze driving stability in the horizontal plane using Hurwitz criterion
8.characterize vehicle handling in terms of under- and oversteer, apply critical and characteristic velocity on the vehicle
behaviour
9.derive the single track model, linear and including elementary non-linear properties
Education Method Lectures (4 hours per week), practical exercises
Computer Use In working out the problems the computer will be helpful.
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Lecture notes: Voertuigdynamica A

References from literature:


Mitschke, Wong, Gillespie, Newland.
Assessment Oral exam, by appointment
Remarks Laboratory project(s):
About 10 problems (exercises) are requested to prepare at home.
Percentage of Design 25%
Design Content The effect of design parameters of wheel suspension and stearing system are discussed.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 77 of 150
WB5430-05 Engineering Informatics 3
Responsible Instructor Dr. T. Tomiyama
Contact Hours / Week 0/4/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period 2
Course Language English
Required for Machine Intelligence (Wb 5435-05)
Expected prior knowledge Computer programming courses
Course Contents The aims of this course are twofold. One is to give fundamental knowledge about computer systems including both hardware and
software. The other is to give theoretical foundations behind computer-based engineering tools and systems which play an
increasingly important role in mechanical engineering.

The course comprises of lectures in a classroom and practices in the form of homework. It emphasizes homework (mostly
programming) that will be included in the final evaluation. While no preference is given to a particular programming language,
basic programming capabilities are needed.

Topics:
1. Fundamental Logic and the Definition of Engineering Tasks
2. Fundamentals of Semiconductors and Logic Gates
3. Fundamentals of Computer Architecture
4. Fundamentals of Operating Systems
5. Data Representation and Data Structures
6. Numerical Computation and Computational Errors
7. Computational Complexity
8. Object Representation and Reasoning
9. Databases Concepts
10. Constraint-based Problem Solving
11. Optimization and Search
12. Discrete Event Simulation
13. Geometric Modeling and CAD
14. Industrial Engineering Information Systems (PDM, ERP, SCM, LCM)
Study Goals The student must be able to:
1.describe fundamental principles of computers systems including both hardware and software
illustrate mechanisms for digital computers
explain software architecture and its working principles
illustrate data representation methods and data structure
analyze computational errors and computational complexity
2.describe theoretical foundations of modeling and computing behind computer-based engineering tools
explain such data modeling principles as object oriented representation and programming, relational data model, and entity-
relationship data model
explain an appropriate computing algorithm for constraint-based problem solving, optimization, search, and discrete event
simulation
explain fundamentals of geometric modeling
illustrate architecture and functionalities of industrial engineering information systems such as PDM (Product Data Modeling),
ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning), SCM (Supply Chain Management), and LCM (Life Cycle Modeling)
Education Method Lectures (4 hours per week) plus regular homework assignments (around ten homeworks, individual work), final-homeworks
(three final-homeworks, individual and creative self implementation of the techniques in programming enviroenments).
Computer Use Access to a programming environment (any language of your choice, such as C++, C, Visual Basic, Java, MATLAB, etc.) is
necessary.
Literature and Study Benny Raphael, Ian F. C. Smith, Fundamentals of Computer Aided Engineering, ISBN: 0-471-48715-5, (2003), Wiley & Sons.
Materials
Assessment Assessment will be based on the three final-homework assignments and regular homework assigments.

In order to pass this course, students have to submit all homework assignments as well as the final ones. (If you miss one, you
don't pass.) In case a student did not pass in the previous year, he/she needs to re-submit all homework assignments and final
ones on time even if questions are the same. There is no automatic carry-over of grades from previous years.

Homework assignments (around ten homeworks, individual work), around 30%.

Final-homework (three final-homeworks, individual and creative self implementation of the techniques in programming
environment), around 70%.

The ratio is variable year to year.

The students will need on average and approximately ten hours per final-homework and two hours per homework. The final-
homeworks will test the practical and creative capabilities of implementation on computer; the homeworks will test the
theoretical knowledge.
Remarks
Percentage of Design 20%
Design Content Although the course does not directly aim at "design of software", it will nonetheless include principles of building engineering
applications.
Department 3mE Department Biomechanical Engineering
3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 78 of 150
Year 2009/2010
Organization Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Education Master Mechanical Engineering

Specialisation Micro and Nano Enigineering (ME-PME-MNE)


Program Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Program Title Specialisation Micro and Nano Enigineering (ME-PME-MNE)
Introduction 1 Prof. Dr. U. Staufer, tel. +31 (0)15 27 86804, e-mail u.staufer@tudelft.nl

Information and enrolment: J.J.L. Neve, room 4B-1-38, tel. +31 (0)15 27 86581, e-mail j.j.l.neve@tudelft.nl

Secretary: Ms M.E.M. Guffens, tel. +31 (0)15 27 86578, e-mail m.e.m.guffens@tudelft.nl

Micro and Nano Engineering specialisation (MNE)

Would it be possible to dose pico liters of fluid at well controlled places at MHz rate?
How could one sense the structure at atomic level of biological tissue?
Can surfaces be made self-cleaning?
Can surfaces locally be made insensitive to chemical reactions?
How can carbon nanotubes be used to create artificial gecko legs that would adhere to any surface under any angle?
How could one handle a 20µm thin chip in a fast assembly process?
What does it take to transform a prototype microsystem device into a reliably high volume manufacturable product?
These are examples of the fascinating questions from the domain of micro and nano engineering.
Science, in particular Physics, Chemistry, Material- and Life-Sciences, made in the last ten to twenty years tremendous progress
in understanding complex, fundamental processes at micro and nano scale. However, in order to harvest the enormous potential
these phenomena offer, functions, systems, applications and reliable manufacturing processes need to be developed.
The core of the specialisation Micro and Nano Engineering is to provide the knowledge and skills to conceptualize, research and
design micro and nano systems, as well as the methodology and techniques to produce them in series. The basis of the study is
the understanding of the physics as well as the enabling manufacturing technologies from the semiconductor domain as well as
the precision and micro mechanical engineering domain. The general applicability of this knowledge allows addressing a variety
of applications; in the practice of our education they come from the national and international research and industrial projects we
are involved in.

Future Professions
Micro and Nano Engineers will find job positions in industrial, research and service organizations. One should think of line- or
fab managers, device and application developers, process and processing engineers, fundamental researchers in nano-science and
technology, applied researcher in instrumentation, device conceptualization and production, and (technology) consultants.
Introduction 2 Goal
The objective of the MNE specialisation program is to guide the students towards active research at the interface between the
macro and the nanoworld, and laying the base for successfully exploiting new findings in the small world by developing
applications and production techniques.

The individual assignments are carried out in the context of MNE's research using PMEs en TU Delfts lab infrastructure and in
cooperation with our industrial partners, and offer a wide variety of opportunities for acquiring a broad spectrum of skills.
Recent assignments include:
design, realisation and test of a MEMS structure for extreme precision alignment of optical fibers;
controlling the liquid flow of at the pico-liter scale in nanochannels
self-assembly of ultra thin chips on polymer foils in a high volume production scheme (co-operation with the Holst Centre)
Development of a thermal sensor concept (co-operation with Demcon)
investigate fabrication methods for carbon nanotubes

The obligatory industrial traineeship, which is an important step in giving the future engineers professional experience, has taken
students all over the world, including China, the UK, Australia, South Africa, Brazil, Germany, Switzerland, Japan, the USA,
Taiwan, Spain.

Page 79 of 150
Year 2009/2010
Organization Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Education Master Mechanical Engineering

Obligatory Courses ME-PME-MNE

Page 80 of 150
ME1613-09 Operations Management for Microsystems Production 3
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. M. Tichem
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/4
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period 4
5
Course Language English
Required for Micro and Nano Engineering (specialisationwithin the MSC Mechanical Engineering variant PME)
Expected prior knowledge Basics of microsystems, microfabrication technology. Several courses exist on these topics.
Summary Next to mastering the key technologies, the introduction and management of technology in an industrial context is important for
microsystem realisation. The course provides basic concepts for operation management, taylored to the specific demands
originating from microsystems production.
Course Contents - General operations management theory and models
- Clean room design, clean room layouts
- Volume ramp-up
- Quality control, contamination control, continuous improvement
- Reliability and yield
- Order planning and control
- New product / new technology introduction
- Product Creation Processes (PCP) for microsystems
Study Goals The course aims at providing students the basis to function in plant operation management, industrialisation of microsystems and
technology transfer to industrial processes.
Through this course, students
- Gain basic knowledge on general operations management theory, as well as skills in applying operations management theory;
- Gain understanding of the larger context of technological innovation;
- Gain specific knowledge on the operations management for microproducts and microsystems production.
Education Method Lectures by staff members and guest speakers.
Cases/exercises related to the the course topics.
Literature and Study Literature and study material will be specified and made available upon start of the lecture.
Materials Suggested reading: Operations management, N. Slack, S. Chambers, R. Johnston, Prentice hall (will probably be specified as
obligatory basic source for the course)
Assessment The assessment is done on the basis of a written, closed book, exam.
Participation in the exercises/case studies performed during the lectures/ the lecture period is a prerequisite to get a mark.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 81 of 150
ME1614 Micro en Nano Fabrication Challenge 3
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr. U. Staufer
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/4
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Required for MNE specialization of PME track
Expected prior knowledge wb1442-08 Microsystems or equivalent; sound knowledge in micro fabrication technology and understanding of process-
flowcharts is mandatory.
Summary Competition to develop a generic MEMS fabrication process, based on the infrastructure available at TU Delft (nanofabrication
facility at Kavli and microfabrication facilities at DIMES)
Course Contents Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are generally built using a very device specific fabrication process. This allows
tailoring all the processes and their sequences to optimize the performance of the device. What is attractive from the device
optimization point of view can become a burden when looking at manufacturing: A microfabrication process is only
economically competitive, when a huge amount of devices is needed, which is often not the case in the beginning of a new
product. Therefore many attractive sensors, actuators or other devices become not commercially available. In microelectronics,
this challenge has been addressed long ago by standardizing processes and sequences, which allows manufacturing different
devices on the same wafer and within the same fabrication cycle. A similar approach could help bringing more MEMS devices to
the market.
The goal of the competition is to propose a MEMS fabrication process, which can produce several, different devices on the same
wafer. The team proposing the process that allows manufacturing the largest diversity of devices is the winner. In the course of
the project, the teams will have to study different MEMS devices, which had actually been built in the past at TU Delft. They
have to look for devices which originally were built using an identical fabrication process or which they think could be
fabricated using the same process. In the later case, the teams must document that their suggestion is indeed feasible, i.e. has
been demonstrated and is documented in literature e.g. within another context.
Study Goals Learning to applying previously acquired knowledge in micro- and nanofabrication for analyzing and comparing fabrication
processes reported in literature.
Learn to compile processing unites into functional modules and technologies.
Develop competence in scientific reasoning.
Education Method Project within teams, self-study, literature study, interviews, input lecture, help desk
Assessment Project defense in a final seminar
Special Information This project will be in the form of a competition. The team size will be 2 to 3 persons. The team which proposes a process that
allows fabricating the largest amount of devices within a single multi-project wafer run wins the competition. Further details
about the competition will be explained in the introduction lecture.

The bases, from which devices can be selected, are PhD theses from DIMES and Kavli in first priority. Devices described in the
general literature can be considered, if the corresponding paper provides a complete process description.

The competition builds on the results of the previous years, such that after a few iterations, a process with a generic TU Delft
MEMS process will be distilled.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 82 of 150
ME1615 Micro-Assembly, Packaging and Test 3
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. M. Tichem
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/4/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period 3
5
Course Language English
Required for Micro and Nano Engineering (specialisation within the MSc Mechanical Engineering variant PME)
Summary Assembly and packaging processes are very important for the realisation of microsysems, and determine to a high degree their
technical and economic performance. The course teaches the basic principles of and technology for micro-assembly and
packaging processes.
Course Contents The course explains the basic principles of as well as the technology for the assembly and packaging of miniaturised
products/systems. The products focused on originate both from the micro-mechanical engineering domain and from the
semiconductor domain (complex microelectronics and microsystems/ MEMS).

More specifically, the course addresses the following topics: example microproducts and microsystems and their integration
challenges; trends and roadmaps; scaling laws and the consequences for assembly; micro-part gripping; accurate part alignment;
precision and micro-robots; haptic assembly; self-assembly and batch assembly; micro-assembly systems, design; general
packaging flows for IC packaging and MEMS packaging; packaging architectures (including SoC, MCM, SiP); materials and
processes; thermal management; hermeticity; packaging-induced failures; reliability and test.
Study Goals The course enables students to research, to design and to implement micro-assembly and packaging processes. More specifically,
students
- Gain understanding of the state-of-the-art in industrial assembly and packaging processes, as well as knowledge on the state-of-
the-art in research in the domain;
- Gain knowledge and skills to develop innovative micro-assembly and packaging processes.
Education Method A variety of methods will be used: lectures, guest lectures, analysis of scientific and technical papers/ mini-workshop,
exercises/case studies during the lectures/ the course period.
Literature and Study Lecture notes Micro-assembly, most recent version available upon start of the course.
Materials Scientific papers, made available during the course.
Handouts with presentation slides.
Assessment Written exam
Assignments
Percentage of Design 25%
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 83 of 150
WB2303-08 Measurement in Engineering 4
Responsible Instructor Prof.ir. R.H. Munnig Schmidt
Instructor Ir. J.W. Spronck
Gast Instructor Dr.ir. J.F. Creemer
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Required for Students Mechatronic System Design
Expected prior knowledge The master course "Mechatronic System Design" (WB 2414-08) is very much advised. Especially some basic knowledge on
electromechanics, dynamics and electronics is needed. Preparation by studying the related course material of WB 2414-08 is
almost compulsory.
This will be published on blackboard
Course Contents The course will focus on measurement techniques that are usually applied in Mechanical Engineering so integrated in larger
equipment but also in stand alone setups.

Topics include:

General performance characteristics of measurement instruments.


Elements in measurement systems: Sensors, Signal conditioning and Signal processing.
Electronics used in measurement systems and EMC. Signal manipulation and transmission, filtering, noise suppression.
Maesurement uncertainty, error sources, correction methods. Interfering and modifying error sources.
Calibration, traceability and standards.
Dynamics of measurement systems and measurement of dynamics. Transfer functions in the frequency and time domain.
Amplitude modulation.
Measuring devices for both linear and angular motion (displacement, velocity, acceleration)
Force, torque and pressure sensors.
Strain gauge principles
Optical measurement systems, encoders and laser interferometry
Temperature sensors.
MEMS related sensors
Study Goals * The student will be capable of understanding the fundamental approach in measuring fysical quantities
* The student will be capable of applying the basic principles of measurement of mechanical magnitudes.
* The student will be capable of determining the suitable measurement systems for a given metrology problem.
* The student will be able to design a concept measurement system for a given measurement problem by using different physical
principles.
Education Method Classroom Lectures. Basic theory and application by the main teacher and max. 4 invited speakers on a certain theme. These can
be from industry, another faculty or phd students about their research topic.
Computer Use No computer is needed. The course deals basically on the understanding of measurement systems rather than calculations.
Course Relations Strong relation with Mechatronic System Design (WB 2414-09)
Literature and Study A course book is used
Materials
Books Principles of Measurement Systems, J.P. Bentley, Pearson Education Ltd
Assessment Written examination, closed book
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

WB2427 Predictive Modelling 3


Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. H.H. Langen
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. J. van Eijk
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/4/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Course Contents Steps in a Modelling Activity
Stepwise Refined Modelling
Practical Modelling
Mixed Dynamics/Control Simulations
Effect of Modal Truncation and Accuracy
Model Reduction Techniques
Static Reduction Techniques
Component Mode Techniques
Study Goals The student is going to be able to model (lump sum) some high precision engineering applications (positioning and vibration
isolation) with structural resonances using 20-sim, and is able to modify and optimize the mechanical structure for better
performances
Education Method Lecture and computer room exercises
Literature and Study Machine Dynamics in Mechatronics Systems - An Engineering Approach (Rankers)
Materials
Assessment Oral
Percentage of Design 30%
Design Content System level design and modelling - Improving mechanical design
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 84 of 150
WB5414-08 Design of Machines and Mechanisms 4
Responsible Instructor Dr. T. Tomiyama
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. J.L. Herder
Contact Hours / Week 2/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
2
Start Education 1
Exam Period 2
Course Language English
Course Contents 1. Introduction (Grouping, Assignments)
2. Conceptual Design of Machines (first quarter)
- Design Methods
- Requirement Analysis
- Function Modeling and Function Decomposition
- Generating Concepts
- Evaluation of Concepts
- Selection of Solutions
3. Design of Mechanisms
- Diagram of Motion
- Diagram of Goal Functions
- Available Mechanism Types
- Type- and Dimension Synthesis of Mechanisms
4. Presentation of Assignments
5. Industrial Application of Mechanization and Mechanisms (Factory Visit)
Study Goals The student must be able to:
1. describe the conceptual design process for systematic design
perform requirement analysis and build function structure
derive physical phenomena necessary for achieving required function and combine different options to systematically develop
different candidate solutions
compare different candidate solutions and choose the best solution
2. describe the basic design process of mechanisms
calculate the performance of various kinds of mechanisms (such as four bar link, cam, gear pairs, etc.) with software packages
for mechanisms design
determine the dimensions and other design parameters of a mechanism
3. employ these design methods for a real industrial problem in a teamwork environment
perform the design task at the both conceptual and basic design levels in a team
present their design in drawings or as a CAD model
Education Method Project: Students will be divided into groups of 4 to 5 students and each group is given its assignment.

At every lecture, in principle, first half of lecture hours is used for presenting students homework and the other for instructions.
During presentation of homework, students are expected to participate in discussions actively.
Computer Use Use of dedicated PC software. Software programs will become available for downloading from the blackboard.
Literature and Study Lecture notes wb5414 (in Dutch available from the blackboard).
Materials Pahl, G., Beitz, W., Feldhusen, J., Grote, K.-H: Engineering Design, A Systematic Approach (Third Edition), Translated by K.
Wallace and L. Blessing, Springer, London, ISBN: 978-1-84628-318-5, (2007). Available from TU Delft Library as an e-book.
Other appropriate literature and software programs will be specified during the lectures and uploaded to the Blackboard.
Books Lecture notes wb5414 (in Dutch available from the blackboard).
Pahl, G., Beitz, W., Feldhusen, J., Grote, K.-H: Engineering Design, A Systematic Approach (Third Edition), Translated by K.
Wallace and L. Blessing, Springer, London, ISBN: 978-1-84628-318-5, (2007). Available from TU Delft Library as an e-book.
Assessment Attendance (compulsory) including a factory visit scheduled at the end of the semester or the beginning of 2A: if you are absent
twice, the end of the story.

Written reports (intermediate and final).

Final presentation (taking place during the exam period).


Enrolment / Application Since this course involves team working, good command of English is required. In particular, foreign students should make sure
that their English level is high enough for intensive communication with teachers and other students.

While any specific knowledge about machine design is not required, it is desirable that students have some experiences of
machine design (such as BSc mechanical engineering design courses and projects).
Remarks During the course, a real industrial design case will be assigned to a group of students. Attendance is obligatory, including a
factory visit planned at the end of the lecture.
The project has two parts, conceptual design (largely following the Pahl & Beitz method) and mechanisms design (using various
analysis and synthesis software).
Percentage of Design 100%
Design Content Design of industrial machinery for discrete production (mechanization). Design aspects: technical and economical demands,
conceptual design, finding mechanisms to perform the required motions (synthesis), analysis and evaluation of solutions.
Department 3mE Department Biomechanical Engineering

Page 85 of 150
Year 2009/2010
Organization Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Education Master Mechanical Engineering

Recommended Elective Courses ME-PME-MNE

Page 86 of 150
AE3X01 Modern Materials for Aerospace Appllications Part A 3
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. S. van der Zwaag
Instructor Prof.dr. T.J. Dingemans
Instructor Dr.ir. P.E.J. Rivera Diaz del Castillo
Contact Hours / Week 2/0/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
Start Education 1
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge The students will have to have completed the materials science
and engineering courses in the first 2 years of the Aerospace
Engineering Curriculum.
Course Contents The course aims at introducing modern topics in materials
science to Aerospace Engineers and other TUD master students
in engineering subjects. In this course we will concentrate on
innovations both in materials and in materials technology.
Study Goals Familiarize students with the latest developments in the field
of materials science and engineering. In addition, to stimulate
innovative thinking the students are made to elaborate on these
new developments by defining additional developments and/or
new applications. A public defence of the proposals is part of
the course.
Education Method Lectures and group presentations
Literature and Study A compilation of recent review articles
Materials
Assessment Group presentation and paper
Set-up The course will consist of a number of lectures by the staff
on recent developments in materials science, using wellselected
review and trend articles. In addition to these lectures,
students will give lectures on modern developments (either
based on pre-selected topics or own suggestions) too. In these
lectures, not only the current status of the developments are
presented, but own suggestions for further improvements/
developments/applications in aerospace environment will have
to be addressed. Grading of the students will be on the basis
of the presentation as well as the short (<4 pages) proposal
for further development opportunity.

Page 87 of 150
AE4786 Sheet Metal Forming 3
Responsible Instructor Ir. J. Sinke
Contact Hours / Week 0/4/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period 2
4
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge AE1-701
AE2-600
Parts Week arrangement
Lecture and study material
1. Introduction, formability, deformations, formability testing.
2. Stress- and strain states, forming limit curves, yield criteria,
anisotropy, heat treatments.
3. Theory of plasticity
4. Forming processes, bending, stretching.
5. Several press forming processes like deepdrawing, rubber
forming.
6. Non-conventional processes and materials
7. Application of numerical tools, questions.
Course Contents One part of the course deals with the theory of sheet metal
forming processes, including topics like: stress-strain curves
and workshop properties, forming limit curves, yield criteria,
(an)isotropy, heat treatments, spring back, workhardening and
strain measurements and evaluation.
Another part of the lectures series deals with different
production processes for sheet metal forming, like bending
operations, rubber forming processes, deepdrawing, explosive
forming, stretching, superplastic forming. In addition some
aspects like manufacturability analyses, production in batches,
etc. will be discussed.
Study Goals - Extending the knowledge of plastic deformation of metal
sheets and its application in production processes for sheet
materials.
- Improvement of the students capability to work with the
problems involving design, material selection, and production
processes
Education Method Lecture
Literature and Study Hand-outs (English)
Materials
A list of recommended literature will be given during the first
lecture
Assessment Written

AE4X04 Materials Selection in Mechanical Design 3


Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. S. van der Zwaag
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period 3
4
Course Language English
Required for The course AE4-X02 - Designing Materials with Aerospace
Specific Properties, might be a good companion course.
Course Contents The course aims at training the students in the field of material
and process selection on the basis of objective and quantitative
criteria. The concept of material selection on the basis of socalled
Ashby diagrams will be presented in a number of lectures.
Study Goals Providing the student with the tools to make material and
process selection on the basis of objective and quantitative
criteria.
Education Method Lectures
Literature and Study The book Materials Selection in Mechanical Design by M.F.
Materials Ashby. Butterworth Heineman. 3rd Edition 2005
Assessment Written exam (open book)
Set-up The course will consist of a number of lectures in which the
quantitative selection process involving an increasing
number of constraints and objectives will be introduced. During
the lectures students are invited to solve a number of simpeler cases.

Page 88 of 150
ET4245ME Elektromechanics in Mechatronic Systems 3
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. H. Polinder
Instructor Ir. J.W. Spronck
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/3
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period 4
5
Course Language English
Course Contents Electromechanics in mechatronic systems
Study Goals Students who have followed this course should be able to
1 Use the terminology of electromechanics.
2 Use the principles of electric and magnetic circuits to calculate voltages, currents, magnetic flux densities, magnetic fluxes,
magnetic flux linkages, forces, torques, power, and (stored) energy.
3 Recognize different types of permanent-magnet machines, derive the voltage equations and the equivalent circuits, sketch the
characteristic voltage and current waveforms and calculate forces and torques using the power balance.
4 Recognize magnetic bearings, explain their strength and weaknesses, calculate magnetic bearing forces from the power
balance, explain that magnetic bearings can be linearised by making them double-sided, explain zero-stiffness and gravity
compensation.
5 Explain the important limitations and characteristics of materials (magnets, iron, conductors), and machines (losses and heat
dissipation, mechanical commutation, safe operating area, cogging, force density), indicate if there are methods to get around
these limitations and do calculations on these limitations.
6 Distinguish between the different construction forms of permanent-magnet machines and explain their strengths and
weaknesses.
7 Explain which criteria play an important role in choosing a machine and how these criteria influence the choice, explain which
part of the safe operating area is most attractive and why, explain which criteria play a role in selecting transmissions and in
selection motional profiles.
8 Explain why linear motor are used, recognize different types of linear permanent-magnet machines, derive the voltage
equations and the equivalent circuits, calculate forces.
9 Recognise different types of amplifiers (analogue, switching, one quadrant, four quadrant, resonant) and know their strength
and weaknesses, sketch current and voltage waveforms of switching amplifiers, explain how they can be used to control speed.
Education Method Lectures, assignments, demonstrations
Literature and Study J.C. Compter, 'Mechatronics, Introduction to Electromechanics', lecture notes
Materials
Assessment Written examination (closed book) or group assignment

ET4248 Introduction to Microelectronics 3


Responsible Instructor Prof.dr. C.I.M. Beenakker
Responsible Instructor Dr. R.A.C.M.M. van Swaaij
Assistent R.D. Peeters
Contact Hours / Week 3/0/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
Start Education 1
Exam Period 1
Course Language English
Course Contents This introduction to microelectronics provides an overview of the different challenges in het field of Microelectronics, as
reflected by the research areas of the groups that comprise the department of microelec-tronics. The course includes visits to the
various labora-tories, a visit to the DIMES facility.

In addition, part of this course is used to learn presentation skills, like writing an essay/thesis and giving a presentation.
Study Goals Obtaining an overview of Microelectronics field, writing an essay, giving a presentation
Education Method Lectures
Literature and Study Handouts
Materials
Assessment Essay and 3-minute presentation on subject in Microelectronics

Page 89 of 150
ET4257 Sensors and Actuators 4
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr. P.J. French
Contact Hours / Week 0/3/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period 2
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge P-study
Course Contents The course silicon sensors gives an overview of the most important principles related to sensors fabricated in integrated silicon
technology. The sensors are divided into those for optical, mechanical, thermal, magnetic and chemical signals. These domains
will be dealt with from basic principles leading to the applications. The second part of the course will deal with actuators. The
actuators lectures give the range from large machines down to silicon micromachined device in the micron range.
The course is designed for students who will perform their thesis work in one of the laboratories within the faculty working on or
using sensors
Education Method Lectures
Literature and Study Lecture notes
Materials Part 1 Silicon Sensors
part 2 Actuators
Assessment Written, essay or oral. Assessment material: at least 5 chapters of the lecture notes including at least one chapter from Actuators.

ET4258 Displays and Imaging sensors 4


Responsible Instructor Prof.dr. P.J. French
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. A.J.P. Theuwissen
Contact Hours / Week 3/0/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
2
Start Education 1
Exam Period 1
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge P-study.
Course Contents This course gives an overview of the most important principles which are applied to modern display techniques. We all work
with displays, whether they be for clocks, pc or information boards. The mechanisms to create the display make use of a wide
range of principles including electrical, magnetic, chemical and mechanical. These will be considered and a large number of
applications given. The second area of this course is image sensing techniques and therefore CMOS image sensors are included
as a special topic. This part of the course will deal with the most important principles, possibilities and limitations of image
sensors which are fabricated in a standard CMOS process. All different imaging aspect of the solid-state image sensors ranging
from photons in till digital numbers out will be studied. Special attention will go to the combination of the imaging function with
the analogue and digital circuitry on-chip.
Education Method Lectures
Literature and Study displays and storage (lecture notes) + handouts
Materials
Assessment Written exam, oral test or essay.

Page 90 of 150
ET4260 Microsystem Integration 4
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. R.F. Wolffenbuttel
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/3
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period 4
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge Electronic Instrumentation (ET8017)
Silicon Sensors & Systems (ET4257)
Course Contents Basically, the Microsystem is a complete instrument on a chip. The challenges associated with the integration of the transducer
and circuits into a single-chip integrated system are more than compensated by the opportunities this concept offers in a wide
range of applications.

Firstly, the general issues related to system structure are discussed within the context of a microsystem. Secondly, a brief
overview of IC-compatible microsystem technologies is given. Thirdly, generic system topologies, such as open-loop cascaded,
analog feedback and digital feedback are discussed, using systems build around a capacitive accelerometer. Only 12 lecture
hours are programmed in this course. The emphasis is on the subsequent individual project that involves the analysis or design of
a microsystem.
Study Goals This course teaches the fundamental and practical aspects of integrated microsystems in silicon. The student will be able to
assess the merits, complications and limitations of this approach and to put these into the perspective of a particular application.
As a result the student will be able to make well-decided conclusions on functional structure of the microsystem and approach
for fabrication to be taken. Finally, the student will be able pass the first phase in the design of a microsystem (on paper with
global verification using software tools).
Education Method Lectures plus final project plus project presentation
Computer Use The student requiers access to computer systems for carrying out the project.
Literature and Study Literature plus lecture notes.
Materials
Assessment Project report (6-10 pages) plus oral presentation (ppt 15 minutes) of the project in front of the entire group.

ET4289 Integrated Circuits and MEMS Technology 4


Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. P.M. Sarro
Instructor Dr.ing. H.W. van Zeijl
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/3
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period 4
Course Language English
Course Contents This lecture is an introduction in the fabrication technologies used for Integrated Circuits (IC&#146;s) and Micro Electro-
Mechanical Systems (MEMS). The aim of this lecture is to build a bridge between the physical world (the device physics) and
the electronic world (the device characteristics). In this way, students gain more insight in the critical aspects and challenges in
IC fabrication.
The series of lectures starts with the discussion of basic microelectronic devices with a brief review of the physics involved. The
associated basic fabrication technology, required to fabricate these devices is also discussed. After that, the mainstream IC
fabrication technology (CMOS) will be discussed in more detail. In separate chapters, silicon crystal growth, epitaxy, ion
implantation, chemical vapor deposition, etching and photolithography will be introduced. Their physical motivation and the
impact on the device characteristics will be discussed.
Finally, silicon bulk and surface micromachining technologies are introduced to illustrate the potential of 3D micro structuring in
the development of Microsystems or MEMS. These IC compatible technologies are employed to realize multi-function systems
for many scientific and industrial application areas.
introduction in the fabrication technologies used for Integrated Circuits (ICs) and Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS).
The aim of this lecture is to build a bridge between the physical world (the device physics) and the electronic world (the device
characteristics). In this way, students gain more insight in the critical aspects and challenges in IC fabrication.
The series of lectures starts with the discussion of basic microelectronic devices with a brief review of the physics involved. The
associated basic fabrication technology, required to fabricate these devices is also discussed. After that, the mainstream IC
fabrication technology (CMOS) will be discussed in more detail. In separate chapters, silicon crystal growth, epitaxy, ion
implantation, chemical vapor deposition, etching and photolithography will be introduced. Their physical motivation and the
impact on the device characteristics will be discussed.
Finally, silicon bulk and surface micromachining technologies are introduced to illustrate the potential of 3D micro structuring in
the development of Microsystems or MEMS. These IC compatible technologies are employed to realize multi-function systems
for many scientific and industrial application areas.
Education Method <>lectures
Assessment <>written exam

Page 91 of 150
ET8017 Electronic Instrumentation 5
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. R.F. Wolffenbuttel
Contact Hours / Week 3/0/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
Start Education 1
Exam Period 1
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge A basic course on Instrumentation and Measurement
Course Contents Firstly, the detection limit in a typical instrument for measurement of an electrical quantity is determined for: offset, finite
common-mode rejection, noise and interference. The dominant source of uncertainty is identified and the equivalent input
voltage/current sources are calculated. Secondly, the measurement of a non-electrical quantity is discussed. In this case the
detection limit should be expressed in terms of the non-electrical input parameter of interest. Issues discussed are: (cross-
)sensitivities in frequently used transduction effects, non-electrical source loading and noise in the non-electrical signal domain.
Coupled domain formal modeling is subsequently introduced to facilitate analytical multi-domain system analysis. Finally, the
detection limit in typical applications in the mechanical, thermal, optical and magnetic signal domain are analysed, along with
circuit and system techniques to maximize overall system detectivity. The tools that are introduced in the course, such as the
formal modeling and the calculation of the detection limit, are applied in the mid-term project to a real-world measurement
problem
Study Goals This course teaches the student to read measurement specifications and to apply these in the design of an instrument for high
detectivity. After completion of this course the student will be able to design readout circuits on the operational amplifer level.
The student will be able to apply instrumentation techniques for measuring very low-quality signals.
Education Method Lectures plus project
Literature and Study Syllabus. Lecture notes.
Materials
Assessment One mid-term project plus final exam
Permitted Materials during The test is open-book, which implies that any hardcopy material the student deems relevant can be taken up to a pile of 10 cm
Tests high.
Remarks Computer use: the project require use of computer

IN4050TU Java and Object Oriented Design 6


Responsible Instructor Dr. P.G. Kluit
Contact Hours / Week 2/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
2
Start Education 1
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge Knowledge of, and experience in programming
Course Contents Introduction to Java and Object-Oriented programming. Primitive data types, operators. Object types (classes): deployment,
design and implementation. Selection and iterative statements, Arrays, Inheritance, Interfaces, Exceptions, Graphics, AWT,
some Algorithms. Introduction to UML. Design and implementation of OO systems.
Using the API library classes. Designing classes. Object-Oriented Design using UML. Aspects of Software Engineering.
Study Goals The student is able to solve programming problems using an Object-oriented language, more specific Java. The student is able
to design, specify and implement programs, using existing libraries.
Education Method Lecture and lab work
Literature and Study Java in Two Semesters, Quentin Charatan & Aaron Kans
Materials McGraw-Hill ISBN-13 978-0-07-710889-2
Assessment After completion of the lab work, a larger assignment completes the course. This assignment is to be completed in a team of 4/5
students. This assignments includes both design and implementation of software.

Page 92 of 150
IN4073TU Embedded Real-Time Systems 6
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. A.J.C. van Gemund
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/4/0
x/x/x/x Pract.
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge equivalent to IN4024 Real-time Systems / C programming course / in2305-ii Emb. Prog.
Course Contents The course provides an introduction to embedded systems programming. The course is heavily based on a lab project where
students ( in competing teams) will have to develop an embedded control unit for a tethered electrical model quad-rotor aerial
vehicle, in order to provide stabilization such that it can (idealy) hover and (slowly) fly with only limited user control (one
joystick). The control algorithm (which is given) must be mapped onto a Linux PC (C) in conjunction with an FPGA board
(embedded C and/or VHDL) that communicates with the sensors and actuators on the quad-rotor. The students will be exposed
to simple physics/mechanics, electronics, sensors (gyros, accelerometers), actuators (motors, servos), basic control principles,
quad-rotor simulators, and, most importantly, embedded software (C, VHDL), most of which each team is required to develop
themselves. The project work (including written report) covers the entire duration of the course period, and will take
approximately 80 hours, of which 28 hours are spent at the HLO lab facilities.
Study Goals Student is acquanted with real-time programming in an embedded context, along with a basic understanding of embedded
systems, real-time communication, sensor data processing, actuator control, control theory, and simulation. Moreover, the
student has had exposure to integrating the various multidisciplinary aspects at the system level.
Education Method Lectures, lab work
Literature and Study Web
Materials
Assessment Lab. project (120 hours) + written report
Remarks http://www.st.ewi.tudelft.nl/~gemund/Courses/In4073/index.html

Page 93 of 150
MS3021 Metals Science 4
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. L.A.I. Kestens
Instructor Ir. N. Geerlofs
Instructor Dr.ir. W.G. Sloof
Instructor Prof.dr. J.H.W. de Wit
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/4/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period 3
4
Course Language English
Required for Specialisation Course Metals Science & Technology:
- MS3412 Processing of Metals,
- MS3442 Relation between Properties & Microstructure,
- MS3461 Corrosion & Protection against Corrosion,
- MS3452 Total Performance Approach: Case Studies
Summary Microstructure, Nucleation, Growth, Interfaces, Solid-State Transformations, Crystallographic Texture, Solidification, Diffusion,
Segregation, Grain Boundary, Dislocation, Hardening, Hall-Petch Relation, Constitutional Undercooling, Precipitation.
Course Contents Metals represent a vital class of materials for a technological society. This course examines the structure and properties of metals
across a range of length scales, addressing issues of microstructural changes and phase transformations, metals production
techniques and the behaviour of metals in generic applications.

The course covers microstructures, mechanical properties in relation to microstructures and solidification. In addition
introductions are given to the influence of welding on microstructures and properties and on the susceptibility of metals to
corrosion.

Microstructural aspects include:


1)the essential characteristics of different types of interface between either grains of the same phase or
grains of different phases, the formation of metastable phases, and orientation relations.
2)the classical nucleation theory for phase transformations in the solid state, and the relation to
experimental observations on nucleation.
3)the basic features of phase-transformation models for diffusion-controlled, interface-controlled, and
mixed-mode transformations, and the relation to experimental results.
4)diffusionless / martensitic phase transformations occurring under either thermal or mechanical driving
force.
5)the origin of crystallographic texture in metallic microstructures, the representation of texture and the
experimental techniques to measure texture on a macro- or microscopic scale.
6)the characteristics of the microstructure of a range of commercial steels, aluminium alloys, titanium
alloys and magnesium alloys, the main features of the technological processing of these alloys and the
main application areas.

Mechanical properties of metals in relation with their microstructure include descriptions of dislocations, slip systems,
movement of dislocations, interactions between dislocations, lattice defects and precipitates. Concepts of dislocation generation
and multiplication are discussed. Strength of metals is considered including temperature and strain rate dependence of the flow
stress. Strengthening mechanisms such as solute and precipitation hardening, work hardening and grain size refinement are
described. The relation between strength and grain size i.e. the Hall-Petch relation is discussed.

Solidification and melting describe transformations between crystallographic and non-crystallographic states of a metal or alloy.
Basic phenomena during solidification are explained including: nucleation and growth, heat flow and micro segregation. The
effects of major process parameters on these phenomena are described, as well as their effect on as-cast microstructures.
Study Goals The student is able to describe the characteristic features of metals, explain the dominant structures and mechanisms responsible
for their physical and mechanical properties and describe the temperature dependence of these structures and mechanisms.

More specifically, the student is able to:


1. distinguish the different types of interfaces and their characteristic properties.
2. identify the microstructural parameters that play a critical role in the nucleation behaviour of various
solid-state transformation processes based on thermodynamic principles,.
3. differentiate between the different types of growth modes, to make the link with the kinetic features of
the transformation, and to derive the relevance for the microstructural features.
4. identify the mechanism, including the crystallographic features, of a diffusionless transformation.
5. quantitatively describe the crystallographic texture of metals and understands the importance of the
crystallographic texture with regard to the anisotropic behaviour of metals.
6. identify and read the microstructures of various common metallic systems, relate the microstructures to
the corresponding phase diagram and interpret these microstructural features in terms of a selected
group of material properties.
7. describe dislocations, dislocation movement, dislocation interactions with other dislocations, lattice (e.g.
solute atoms, grain boundaries) defects and precipitates in fundamental terms.
8. explain plastic deformation of metals using dislocation theory.
9. illustrate the origin and multiplication of dislocations
10. describe the strengthening mechanisms for metals: solute and precipitation strengthening, work
hardening, grain size effect (Hall-Petch relation)
11. explain the difference between nucleation and growth during solidification.
12. explain the different growth modes
13. formulate the effect of cooling rate on the phase transformation and the resulting microstructure.
14. explain and apply the principle of constitutional undercooling to actual solidification situations.
15. formulate the occurrence of segregation during solidification.
16. formulate the different heat transfer modes during solidification.
17. explain the occurrence of different morphologies by applying principles of heat and mass flow.
18. identify the main materials engineering aspects of solidification and casting.
19. appraise the influence of the welding thermal cycle on material structure and properties
20. recognise corrosion mechanisms and their dependence on microstructures.
21. apply all of the above in problems representing simplified and real cases.
Education Method Lectures
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials D.A. Porter and K.E. Easterling Phase Transformations in Metals and Alloys, Chapman and Hall, 2nd Edition, 1992.
D. Hull and D.J.Bacon Introduction to Dislocations, 4th Edition, Butterworth-Heinemann, 2001.
G. den Ouden Lastechnologie, Delftse Uitgevers Maatschappij, 3rd Edition, 1993. (English translation in progress). Chapter 5 &

Page 94 of 150
6
D.A. Jones Principles and Prevention of Corrosion, Prentice Hall,1996
J. Beddies and M.J. Bibby, Principles of Metal Manufacturing Processes, Arnold, 1999.
Prerequisites - MS4041 Structure of Materials,
- MS4021 Structure Characterisation,
- MS4061 Thermodynamics and Kinetics
Assessment Written exam
Special Information Laboratory project(s): 2 x 1/2 days, Casting / Solidification (5th and 6th week)
Remarks 3 hours examination, closed book
Department 3mE Department Materials Science & Engineering

MS3421 Developments in Production and Processing 2


Responsible Instructor Dr. J. Zhou
Instructor Dr. J. Duszczyk
Contact Hours / Week 3/0/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
Start Education 1
Exam Period 1
2
Course Language English
Summary powder metallurgy, material production, material processing, rapid solidification, compaction, powder injection moulding,
sintering, advanced materials, porous materials, biomaterials

Course Contents The course concerns the fundamentals of the powder-metallurgical technology to prepare metals and alloys from powder and to
consolidate these materials into near-net-shape products for engineering applications or control the porosity of sintered materials
for the bio-functionality of implants in the human body. It introduces the methods to produce powdered materials such as
atomisation, the characterization of the initial materials such as particle size, size distribution, morphology and density, and the
methods to convert the initial materials into engineered shapes such as compaction and powder injectction moulding and to
provide structural integration such as sintering. It details the mechanisms operating during full-density processing to enhance
mechanical properties such as extrusion and isostatic pressing. It also explains the techniques to control porosity to tailor the
mechanical properties and allow tissues to grow into the porous implant. Qua materials, it covers a wide range of metals and
alloys for engineering and medical applications.
Study Goals Upon satisfactory completion of the course, students should be able to:

1. recognise the capabilities and limitations of the modern metal processing technology in comparison with the conventional
technology;
2. select processing routes and process parameters for the end product meeting the specific performance requirements for
engineering or medical applications;
3. predict microstructural evolution and dimensional changes occurring during each processing step and the performance of the
product at the end of the processing chain, on the basis of a fundamental understanding of process physics and related
metallurgy;
4. identify the faults as a result of improper material selection and processing and to propose solutions to the problem;
5. evaluate the gains in product performance against processing complexity.

Education Method Lectures


Literature and Study Dictaat MS3421, lecture notes and recommended literature
Materials
Prerequisites MS3021 - Metals Science, MS4011 - Mechanical Properties, MS4101 - Production of Materials
Assessment Closed-book written exam
Department 3mE Department Materials Science & Engineering

Page 95 of 150
MS4011 Mechanical Properties 3
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. M. Janssen
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. L. Nicola
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/4/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period 3
4
Course Language English
Required for MS3442 - Relation between Properties & Microstructure
Summary crack growth, fracture toughness, fatigue, environmentally assisted cracking, creep, mechanical properties
Course Contents - Stable Crack Growth: R-curve concept, R-curve determination, J-R curve
- Fracture Toughness: Ductile and brittle fracture, Microstructural aspects of fracture toughness
- Fatigue: Fatigue crack growth, Fatigue crack initiation
- Environmentally Assisted Cracking: Mechanisms in metals and polymers, Test methods
- Creep: Creep in crystalline solids, Creep fracture in metals
Study Goals The student is able to identify a number of common mechanical phenomena that cause material failure in terms of the
mechanisms that underly these phenomena and the conditions for which such behaviour can be expected.
Moreover for a number of phenomena the student can identify experimental techniques for determining material behaviour and /
or can make simple failure predictions.

More specifically, the student is able to:


1. explain the rising R-curve concept and the methods for R-curve determination
2. compute the maximum amount of stable crack growth and the critical K, G or J value
3. distinguish the microstructural aspects of brittle and ductile fracture mechanisms
4. identify the principal toughening mechanisms in metals, ceramics and polymers
5. explain the effect of anisotropy on toughness
6. explain the effect on toughness of the cleanliness of a number of specific metal alloys
7. illustrate effective toughening strategies for a number of ferrous alloys, non-ferrous alloys, ceramics, polymers and
composites
8. identify the effects of delta K and load ratio (crack closure) on fatigue crack growth rate
9. predict fatigue lifetime for constant amplitude loading
10. illustrate the effect of peak loads on fatigue crack growth rate
11. explain methods to predict fatigue lifetime under variable amplitude loading
12. describe the relation between the fatigue limit and the fatigue threshold
13. describe the effect of notches on the growth of short fatigue cracks
14. describe the square root area parameter model for predicting fatigue limits
15. list the principle models for environmentally assisted cracking of metals
16. illustrate the mechanisms for physical and chemical environmentally assisted cracking in polymers
17. explain the principle of time-to-failure testing of environmentally assisted cracking
18. explain crack growth rate testing of environmentally assisted cracking and identify experimental pitfalls
19. calculate lifetime of environmentally assisted cracking under constant load
20. indicate the practical significances of the threshold stress intensity and growth rate data for environmentally assisted cracking
21. select the relevant experimental data and use this to calculate a creep activation energy
22. identify the different mechanisms by which creep can occur in crystalline solids, including the conditions that lead to this
creep
23. explain the conditions for which superplastic deformation can occur
24. explain the principle and the use of deformation mechanism maps
25. perform extrapolations of creep rupture data
Education Method Lectures
Literature and Study Fracture Mechanics, M. Janssen, J. Zuidema and R.J.H. Wanhill, 2nd edition, DUP (2002)
Materials Collection of Exercises on Fracture Mechanics, available on Blackboard
Reader based on the book Deformation and Fracture Mechanics of Engineering Materials, R.W. Hertzberg, available on
Blackboard and the online ordering system
Slides (including notes) on Blackboard
Prerequisites MS4081 - Mechanics of Materials
Assessment Written examination during which the book Fracture Mechanics, the reader and the hand-outs provided may be consulted. Other
forms of information, such as notes or worked-out problems, are not allowed!
Department 3mE Department Materials Science & Engineering

Page 96 of 150
SC4032 Physical Modelling for Systems and Control 4
Responsible Instructor Nabestaanden van O.H. Bosgra
Course Coordinator Dr. P.S.C. Heuberger
Contact Hours / Week 0/4/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period 2
3
Course Language English
Course Contents SC 4032 Physical Modelling for Systems and Control

Contents 2009/2010

1.Formulation of dynamic models for physical plants and equipment. Role of System boundary, choice of input- and output
variables. Causality and properness of input-output behaviour. Microscopic versus macroscopic conservation laws. Linearization
around steady-state operating conditions or around trajectory. Linear parameter-varying versus nonlinear and linearized models.
Frozen behaviour versus time-varying behaviour.
2.Simple process models. Role of residence-time distribution. Distributed-parameter models versus compartmental models.
Characterization of flow behaviour with respect to mixing and backflow. Series connection of flow systems.
3.Bilateral coupling between subsystems. Causality, exchange of power between subsystems.2-port behaviour. Relationships
with choice of boundary conditions in distributed-parameter systems. Hydraulic transmission line, heat conduction as examples
of bilateral coupling
4.Time scales of dynamic phenomena. Equation ordering and scaling of model equations. Modal approximation, time moments
and Padâe approximation. Singular perturbations.
5.Model reduction by projection and residualization Model reduction through ba;lancing and truncation. Role of Hankel singular
values. Closed-loop relevant model reduction. Examples, finite dimensional approximation of distributed-parameter systems.
Realization theory, approximate realization as model reduction step.
6.Rosenbrock's system matrix. System equivalence, interconnection of subsystems. Models in differential-algebraic equations for
interconnected subsystems Index problems as result of interconnection of state variables. Nonproper internal or external
behaviour, use of Kronecker-Weierstrass form

Study Goals The student must be able to formulate dynamic models on the basis of an understanding of underlying physical principles. In
addition, understanding major system properties must enable the student to manipulate the models, make them simpler (if
desired) and bring them in a suitable format that allows implementation in a software platform. The student must be able to
explain properties and behaviour of the system models under study.
Education Method There will be handouts of course notes, also available electronically, in addition to copies of the course slides.
Assessment A set of Matlab/Simulink/theory exercises will be available. Solving the exercises constitutes the basis for the assessment. The
results of the exercises must be summarized in a short report, and will be discussed and examined during an oral examination,
during which also the contents of the course notes will be the subject of discussion. The report on the exercises has to be handed
in ultimately April 16, 2010. The exam can in principle be executed throughout the year (restrictions during april/may and
october 2010), both individually as well as in groups of 2 students.
Department 3mE Department Delft Center for Systems and Control

Page 97 of 150
SC4070 Control Systems Lab 4
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. G. Schitter
Instructor Prof.dr. R. Babuska
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/4/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge Control Systems (SC3020ET) or similar
Course Contents In this course, students have the opportunity to design and implement their own controllers for various laboratory systems
(helicopter model, inverted pendulum, inverted wedge, gantry crane). In this way, they gain more insight in the use of control
theory and gain experience with the practical implementation of computer-controlled systems. MATLAB and SIMULINK are
used as the basic platform for the design, analysis, simulation and real-time implementation. The control design methods to be
used include standard techniques (digital state feedback, output feedback, PID control) as well as more advanced methods
(adaptive control, linear quadratic control, systems identification). In the beginning of the course, a refresher is given in which
the essential topics from theoretical control courses are reviewed. See also: http://www.dcsc.tudelft.nl/~sc4070
Study Goals Main objective: make operational and apply in practice the knowledge from control theory and system identification courses.
Gain hands-on experience with the design and implementation of a computer-controlled system.

After successfully completing the course, the student is able to:

* Implement in Matlab / Simulink a given mathematical model of a mechatronic laboratory system. Estimate unknown
parameters in the model by using experimental data measured on the process. Validate the model against measured process data.

* Linearize the model around an operating point. Assess the accuracy of the linearized model with respect to the nonlinear one
and with respect to the real process. Identify limitations of the linearized model. Choose a suitable sampling period, discretize
the linearized model.

* Define meaningful performance specifications for a control system to be designed for the given process. Selected a suitable
type of controller. Compute the controller's parameters such that the above specifications are met. Verify the closed-loop
performance in realistic simulations.

* Apply the controller to the process in real-time experiments. Evaluate the performance of the control system. Identify reasons
for possible discrepancies between simulations and real-time results. Suggest possible improvements.

* Demonstrate proficiency in using Matlab and Simulink as the primary tool for the achievement of the above objectives.

* Document the design steps, considerations, choices and the achieved control results effectively in a written report. Present and
defend the results in an oral presentation.
Education Method Lectures, laboratory sessions
Literature and Study Book: Åström K.J. and Wittenmark B. Computer Controlled Systems Theory and Design (Third Edition). Prentice Hall, 1997.
Materials
Assessment Written report, presentation
Remarks Computer use: laboratory assignment. Design content (60%): control design.
Department 3mE Department Delft Center for Systems and Control

Page 98 of 150
SC4150 Fuzzy Logic and Engineering Applications 3
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. J. Hellendoorn
Contact Hours / Week 3/0/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
Start Education 1
Exam Period 1
2
Course Language English
Required for Core curriculum
Course Contents Fuzzy logic techniques can be applied in various engineering domains, mainly in fields where reasoning under uncertainty plays
an important role. This course provides background in fuzzy set theory, fuzzy logic and related soft-computing techniques with
applications in control, information and data processing, artificial intelligence and decision making. See also:
http:/www.dcsc.tudelft.nl/~sc4150.
Study Goals Main objective: understand fuzzy logic, fuzzy decision making and fuzzy control, and be able to translate linguistic expressions
into fuzzy sets and derive conclusions.
Understand the difference between fuzziness, probability and possibility.
Understand characteristic functions, operations on fuzzy sets and fuzzy relations.
Apply the Compositional Rule of Inference and the Generalized Modus Ponens.
Analyze the defuzzification procedure.
Know fuzzy data bases.
Apply Mamdani and Gödel inference for fuzzy control.
Understand look-up tables for fuzzy controllers, stability and robustness.
Apply sliding mode fuzzy control.
Synthesize fuzzy decision making.
Know subjectivity and single-step, single-person decision making.
Apply measures, weights, and criteria-criteria dependency.
Analyze decision operators.
Education Method Lectures
Literature and Study Course notes (sold online via Blackboard)
Materials
Assessment Written, open book
Department 3mE Department Delft Center for Systems and Control

Page 99 of 150
WB1406-07 Experimental Dynamics 3
Responsible Instructor D. de Klerk
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Parts The course consists of two parts:
- part A Classes
- part B Laboratory experiments (four in total)
Course Contents Part A: Theory
- How does a modern measurement system work?? In specific how does it minimize desturbances and does it cope with filter
effects?
- Pitfalls in Frequency Analysis: Descrete algorithms, Leakage, Aliasing. Know it or you'll mess up your experements.
- The power of Transfer and Frequency Response Functions (FRF); why are the so usefull?
- Experimental Modal Analysis: Does and don't, pitfalls & challenges in practice.
- Harmonic excitation (with frequency stepping), impulsive excitation, stochastic excitation.
- Sensors, how do they work, what is important when using them.
- Rotoranalysis, operational system analysis.
- Latest advances in measurement technology.

Moto: In theory, theory and practice are the same... In practice they are not.
This course concentrates on pointing where those differences orignate from, valuable for any who'll perform measurements,
needs to analyse measurements or who tries to match his / her simulation to the experiment.

Part B: Experimental analysis


The second part of the course involves working on assigments meant to illustrate concepts described in Part A and to deepen
insight.
Teams of three students each, carry out multi´ple experiments. Last year students got to simulate in Matlab a measurement
system as a first assignment. Their final project involved analyzing measurement data measured by them selves on my car on the
Rotterdamsestraatweg. Can it be more exciting? Yes, maybe you have always wanted to analyze a different product like a boat,
train, motorbike, music instrument, etc. maybe we can come up with that exciting experiment in this year's course!
Study Goals In general the student is able to perform dynamic measurements, being aware of possible pitfalls.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1. describe the effects of Quantization, Leakage, Aliasing in measurements and measurement equipment.
2. explain the principle of extracting modal parameters (resonance frequency, spring constant, damping ratio) from system
response both in the time domain and in the frequency domain
3. explain the principle of extracting modal parameters (modal frequencies, modal gains, modal damping ratios) from system
response both in the time domain and in the frequency domain
4. discuss relative merits of different excitation techniques (shaker with frequency sweep, impact hammer, shaker with random
excitation)
5. discuss the prinicples and the elative merits of different sensing techniques (strain gauge, seismic mass, piezo crystal,
electromagnetic induction, laser vibrometer)
6. carry out dynamic experiments, analyze the data, and report and discuss his findings.
Education Method Classes followed by laboratory projects.
Computer Use Matlab
Word
LaTeX
PowerPoint
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials - Part A: Course notes
- Part B: Laboratory assignments manual

References from literature:


- see the reference list in the Course notes.
Assessment Written report, and oral discussion of experiment activities and of report.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 100 of 150


WB1418-07 Engineering Dynamics 4
Responsible Instructor Prof. D.J. Rixen
Instructor Dr.ir. A.L. Schwab
Contact Hours / Week 2/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
2
Start Education 1
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Required for Engineering Dynamics and Mechanicsms (wb1419, extension of wb1418), Multibody Dynamics A (wb1310), Multibody
Dynamics B (wb1413), Numerical Methods in Dynamics (wb1416), Non-Linear Vibrations (wb1412).
Expected prior knowledge Statics and Strength of materials (e.g. wb1214), Dynamics (e.g. wb1311), Linear Algebra
Course Contents The dynamic behavior of structures (and systems in general) plays an essential role in engineering mechanics and in particular in
the design of controllers. In this master course, we will discuss how the equations describing the dynamical behavior of a
structure and of a mechatronical system can be set up. Fundamental concepts in dynamics such as equilibrium, stability,
linearization and vibration modes are discussed. If time permits, also an introduction to discretization techniques to approximate
continuous systems is proposed.

The course will discuss the following topics:

- Review of the virtual work principle and Lagrange equations


- linearization around an equilibrium position: vibrations
- elastodynamics in a solid and continuous systems
- discretization techniques (Rayleigh-Ritz and Finite Elements)
- Free vibration modes and modal superposition
- Forced harmonic response of non-damped and damped structures

Study Goals The student is able to select different ways of setting up the dynamic equations of mechanical systems, to perform an analysis of
the system in terms of linear stability and vibration modes and to properly use mode superposition techniques for computing
transient and harmonic responses. He also understands the concept of displacement approximation techniques for discretizing
continuous dynamic systems.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1. explain the relations between the principle of virtual work and the Lagrange equations for dynamics to the basic Newton laws
2. describe the concept of kinematic constraints (holonomic/non-holonomic, scleronomic/rheonomic) and choose a proper set of
degrees of freedom to describe a dynamic system
3. write the Lagrange equations for a minimum set of degrees of freedom and extend it to systems with additional constraints
(Lagrange multiplier method)
4. linearize the dynamic equations by considering the different contributions of the kinetic and potential energies (both for
system with and without overall motion imposed by scleronomic constraints)
5. analyze the linear stability of dynamic systems (damped and undamped) according to their state space formulation if necessary
6. explain and use the concept of free vibration modes and frequencies
7. interpret and apply the orthogonality properties of modes to describe the transient and harmonic dynamic response of damped
and undamped systems
8. evaluate the approximations introduced when using truncated modal series (spatial and spectral)
9. explain how mode superposition can be used to identify the eigenparamters of linear dynamic systems
Education Method Lecture
Computer Use The assignement will require using Matlab-like software.
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Lecture notes (available through blackboard)

References from literature:


Mechanical Vibrations, Theory and Application to Structural Dynamics, M. Géradin and D. Rixen, Wiley, 1997.
Applied Dynamics, with application to multibody and mechatronic systems, F.C. Moon, Wiley, 1998, isbn 0-471-13828-2.
Engineering vibration, D.J. Inman, Prentice Hall, 2001, isbn 0-13-726142-X
The Finite Element Method: Linear Static and Dynamic Finite Element Analysis, T.J.R. Hughes Prentice-Hall, 1987.
Structural Dynamics in Aeronautical Engineering, M.N. Bismark-Nasr, AIAA education series, 1999, isbn 1-56347-323-2
Assessment Oral exam + assignment
Remarks An assignment will be given which will make up part of the final mark. SInce the enphasis of the lectures will be on
understanding concepts in dynamics more than memorizing formulas, the oral exam will be open book to evaluate your
understanding of the concepts.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 101 of 150


WB1440 Eng. Optimization: Concept & Applications 3
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. A. van Keulen
Instructor Dr.ir. M. Langelaar
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Required for wb1441
Expected prior knowledge Basic knowledge of mechanical engineering and mathematics
Course Contents Formulation of optimization problems
Typical characteristics of optimization problems
Minimization without constraints
Constrained minimization
Simple optimization algorithms
Discrete design variables
Approximation concepts
Sensitivity analysis
Study Goals The student is able to formulate a proper optimization problem in order to solve a given design problem, and is able to select a
suitable approach for solving this problem numerically. Furthermore, he is able to interpret results of completed optimization
procedures.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.formulate an optimization model for various design problems
2.identify optimization model properties such as monotonicity, (non-)convexity and (non-) linearity
3.identify optimization problem properties such as constraint dominance, constraint activity, well boundedness and convexity
4.apply Monotonicity Analysis to optimization problems using the First Monotonicity Principle
5.perform the conversion of constrained problems into unconstrained problems using penalty or barrier methods
6.compute and interpret the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker optimality conditions for constrained optimization problems
7.describe the complications associated with the use of computational models in optimization
8.illustrate the use of compact modeling and response surface techniques for dealing with computationally expensive and noisy
optimization models
9.perform design sensitivity analysis using variational, discrete, semi-analytical and finite difference methods
10.identify a suitable optimization algorithm given a certain optimization problem
11.perform design optimization using the optimization routines implemented in the Matlab Optimization Toolbox
12.derive a linearized approximate problem for a given constrained optimization problem, and solve the original problem using a
sequence of linear approximations
13.describe the basic concepts used in structural topology optimization
Education Method Lectures (2 hours per week), exercises
Computer Use MATLAB is used for exercises.
Literature and Study Course material: P.Y. Papalambros et al. Principles of Optimal Design: Modelling and Computation.
Materials
References from literature: R.T. Haftka and Z. Gürdal: Elements of Structural Optimization.
Assessment MATLAB exercises
Percentage of Design 80%
Design Content The course is focusing on design optimization.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 102 of 150


WB1443 Matlab in Engineering Mechanics 2
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. A.L. Schwab
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Required for wb1413 Multibody Dynamics B, wi 4141TU: Matlab for advanced users.
Expected prior knowledge wi3097wb Numerieke Wiskunde (DUP)
Course Contents Matlab in Engineering Mechanics is an introductory course in technical computing, Matlab, and numerical methods. The
emphasis is on informed use of mathematical software. We want you to learn enough about the mathematical functions in
MATLAB that you will be able to use them correctly, appreciate their limitations, and modify them when necessary to suit your
own needs. The topics include:

- introduction to MATLAB
- linear equations
- zero finding
- least squares
- ordinary differential equations
- eigenvalues and singular values

The weekly homework assignments are on these topics. The final project is an individual choice from various fields of
application like: Multibody System Dynamics with Matlab, Control Theory with Matlab/Simulink, or Finite element calculations
with FEMLab.
Study Goals The student is able to write his own MATLAB code to solve a technical computing problem in Engineering Mechanics on
graduate level. The emphasis is on informed use of mathematical software. The student is able to use the mathematical functions
in MATLAB correctly, appreciate their limitations, and modify them when necessary to suit his own needs.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.identify the finite accuracy of numerical results obtained in general due to the finite word length of the computer
2.solve a system of linear equations and understand the effect on the solutions of close to singular systems
3.apply numerous root finding algorithms and evaluate the speed and accuracy
4.apply various curve fitting techniques and identify the least square solutions, both in linear and nonlinear curve fitting
5.apply various numerical integration schemes to obtain the solutions of ordinary differential equations, determine and compare
the amount of computational effort, and the stability and accuracy of the solutions
6.apply and understand Fourier analysis on measured data in order to extract basic frequencies
7.calculate eigenvalues and do singular value decomposition on a system of equations and discuss the efficiency and accuracy
for large systems
Education Method Lecture (1 hour per week)
Computer Use The course and the assigments are fully computer oriented.
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Cleve Moller, "Numerical Computing with MATLAB", SIAM, 2004
An electronic edition published by The MathWorks is available for free at:
http://www.mathworks.com/moler/chapters.html

References from literature:


Rudra Pratap, "Getting Started With MATLAB 6", Oxford University Press, 2002.
Assessment homework assignments + final project
Remarks There will be weekly homework assignments and a final project. The homework is normally due a week after hand out and will
be graded. In doing the homework I encourage you to work in pairs. You have to make a report on the final project. After
handing in the report you make an appointment for the oral exam which is mainly on the assignments and the final project. The
exam is individual. For up-to-date information check out the webpage at http://tam.cornell.edu/~als93/
Percentage of Design 0%
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 103 of 150


WB1444-07 Advanced Micro Electronic Packaging 3
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr. G.Q. Zhang
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Instructor Dr.ir. W.D. van Driel
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Required for wb1445-05
Summary Introduction to (advanced) wafer technology, microelectronic packaging and assembly, design and reliability qualification.
Course Contents As the bridge between IC and various electronics systems, microelectronic packaging controls more than 90% of the size, 60%
of the cost, and largely the system performance and reliability. It is one of the most fascinating and rapid developing technology
and business fields of Semiconductors. Due to the recent progress of Cu/Low-k CMOS and advanced SiP technologies,
microelectronic packaging is playing a dominant role in the development of future microelectronics and Microsystems.
Course outline:
- Application needs (Ambient Intelligence drives) for Semiconductors
- Technology and business development trends of Semiconductors
- Overview of advanced CMOS process technologies (including Cu/Low-k), and advanced packaging technologies (covering the
packaging glossary, design specification, materials and properties, process flows and process characteristics for both peripheral
and Area Array interconnects, etc.)
- Designing and qualification of advanced packages (QFN, BGA, FlipChip, CSP, WLP, three level SiP)
- Emerging packaging technologies, such as Cu/low-k packaging, Nanopackaging, MEMS packaging, opto-packaging and Bio-
packaging
- Second level assembly
- International technology roadmap and future packaging perspectives
Study Goals To master the knowledge of advanced packaging technologies, via learning the basics and critical aspects of designing and
qualification of advanced packages; knowing the technology roadmap, future perspectives and business trend of advanced
packaging.
Education Method Lectures
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Handout (presentations)
Book 'Mechanics of Microelectronics' by G.Q. Zhang, W.D. van Driel, and X.J. Fan
Excursion to Philips
Assessment Two possibilities of course assessment: 1) participating in real and mini industrial R&D project team, or 2) conducting literature
study
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 104 of 150


WB1445-05 Mechanics of Micro Electronics and Microsystems 3
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr. G.Q. Zhang
Course Coordinator Dr.ir. W.D. van Driel
Instructor Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Instructor Dr.ir. O. van der Sluis
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Summary Virtual prototyping and qualification, designing for reliability, thermo-mechanical and multi-physics modeling, simulation-based
optimisation.
Course Contents The technology trends of microelectronics and microsystems are mainly characterized by miniaturization down to nanoscale,
increasing levels of technology and function integration and introduction of new materials, while the business trends are mainly
characterized by cost reduction, shorter time to market, and outsourcing. Combination of these trends leads to increased chances
and consequences of failures, increased design complexity,decreased product development and qualification times, dramatically
decreased design margins, and increased difficulties to meet quality, robustness and reliability requirements.
Most importantly, for the new product/process development, trial-error based design methods are still the common practice,
while reliability qualification methods are still empirical. This situation, however, is becoming the bottleneck for the future
development, especially for the advanced Cu/Low-k CMOS and higher level SiP technologies. To achieve competitive
product/process development, it is vital to know and to apply the state-of-the-art of virtual prototyping and qualification.
Course outline:
Major reliability problems in Semiconductors industries
Status quo of current reliability paradigm
The state-of-the-art of virtual prototyping and qualification, including the basic theories and methodologies
Case study of covering important failure modes related with wafer backend, IC packaging and board level assembly, such as
(not limited to):
Various cracks, and delamination
Wire bonding failures
Solder fatigues
Moisture-induced failures
Warpage
Challenges and future perspective
Study Goals To know the current and expected reliability problems of and industry's concern for Microelelctronics and Microsystems; to
master the state-of-the-art of theories, methodologies and industrial practices of virtual prototyping and qualification, in
combination with some real industrial case studies; to know the challenges and future perspectives of virtual prototyping and
qualification.
Education Method Lectures
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Handout (presentations)
Reference books and papers
Book 'Mechanics of Microelectronics' by G.Q. Zhang, W.D. van Driel, and X.J. Fan
References from literature
Proceedings of IEEE conference of EuroSimE

Assessment Presentation
Remarks Two possibilities of course assessment: 1) participating in real and mini industrial R&D project team, 2) conducting literature
study.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 105 of 150


WB1451-05 Engineering Mechanics Fundamentals 4
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. E.H. van Brummelen
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period 4
5
Course Language English
Course Contents In this course the students will be given the basic knowhow to formulate the equations describing the mechanical behavior of
continuum media and learn the theory underlying the elastic behavior of solids. The course will also cover the concepts of
energies and variational analysis relevant to mechanical analysis. Two-dimensional and three dimensional classical problems
will be handled. Also the theory of plates and shells will be outlined.
Study Goals The student is able to choose the proper formulation to describe the continuous description of mechanical systems and of the
material behaviour. He/she can apply energy principles to derive the governing equations and he/she can use the fundamental
solutions for basic two and three-dimensional elasticity problems.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.formulate in a proper way the deformations in contiuum media (small and finite deformations), including the relation between
different strain and stress tensors
2.describe the relations between Lagrangian/Eulerian representation
3.write, in solid mechanics, the constitutive laws of elastic materials
4.use variational energy principles and apply them to derive approximation techniques
5.describe the special formulations relative to plates and shells
Education Method Lecture 0/0/2/2
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Gerhard A. Holzapfel, "Nonlinear Solid Mechanics: a Continuum Approach for Engineering", Wiley, 2000.

References from literature:


R. Aris, "Vectors, Tensors and the Basic Equations of Fluid Mechanics", Dover, 1962.
Fung, Y.C., "Foundations of Solid Mechanics", Prentice-Hall, 1965.
M.E. Gurtin, "An Introduction to Continuum Mechanics, Mathematics in Science and Engineering", vol. 158, Academic Press,
New York, 1982.
R.W. Ogden, "Nonlinear elastic deformations", Ellis Horwood Ltd., 1984
Prerequisites A basic knowledge of engineering mechanics and linear algebra is required (see mechanics and dynamics courses from BSc
engineering mechanics)
Assessment Written assignment and oral exam
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

WB2428-03 Mechanical Design in Mechatronics 5


Responsible Instructor Ir. P.C.J. van Rens
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. J.L. Herder
Instructor Dr.ir. R.A.J. van Ostayen
Instructor Dr.ir. D.H. Plettenburg
Instructor Dr.ir. A. van Beek
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/4/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period 3
4
Course Language English
Course Contents Mechanical design principles for high precision positioning, controlling degrees of freedom
Stress and strain, design for stiffness
Design principles to eliminate friction, wear and hysteresis

Study Goals To gain sound understanding of mechanical design principles for high precision applications in mechatronics
Education Method Lectures (4 hours per week)
Literature and Study Will be made available on Blackboard
Materials
Assessment Verbal exam (semester 2A) and Design Exercise (semester 2B)
Percentage of Design 90%
Design Content Mechanical design principles for high precision applications
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 106 of 150


WB2454-07 Multiphysics Modelling using COMSOL 4
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. R.A.J. van Ostayen
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Summary finite element method, multiphysics modelling, MATLAB, COMSOL
Course Contents In applied mechanics one is often confronted with a multi-physics or coupled problem: A problem that requires the
(simultaneous) solution of more than one type of physical process or phenomenon in order to accurately describe the problem.
Examples of multiphysics problems are fluid-structure interaction, thermal-structure interaction and electro-thermal-structure
interaction, possibly combined with a control problem. Particularly in the field of Mechatronic design and MEMS multiphysics
problems are frequently encountered.

COMSOL MultiPhysics is a finite element code, which can be used both as a MATLAB toolbox and as a standalone program,
which is particularly suited for the simulation of multi-physics systems.

In this course the student will learn to recognize different types of multi-physics coupling and methods for their efficient
numerical solution using COMSOL. Short homework assignments are used to practise the use of COMSOL on different types of
problems and in a final assignment the student is asked to study a multi-physics problem using COMSOL.
Study Goals The student must be able to:
1. recognize multiphysics coupling in complex problems
2. distinguish between different types of coupling
one-directional vs. bi- or multi-directional
interface vs. field
strong vs. weak
3. describe numerical solution techniques applicable to coupled problems
4. use COMSOL MultiPhysics on coupled problems
Education Method Lectures (2 hours per week) / Self study
Computer Use COMSOL MultiPhysics and MATLAB
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Lecture notes and online COMSOL manual
References from literature:
Zienkiewicz, O.C. and Taylor, R.C., The finite element method, Vol.1, 2 and 3, Fifth edition.
Assessment Written report
Remarks A basic knowledge of engineering mechanics, fluid mechanics and the finite element method is required. The student is expected
to have some working knowledge of MATLAB.

The assessment is based on homework assignments and a more complex final assignment and report.
Design Content None
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 107 of 150


WB3423-04 The Delft Systems Approach 3
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. H.P.M. Veeke
Contact Hours / Week 2/0/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
Start Education 1
Exam Period 1
Course Language English
Course Contents Complete modeling of industrial systems includes both function models for static structures and time-dependent behaviour
models.

A fundamental approach leads to the proper model, the steady state model and the control paradigm. For multi-aspect modelling
the PROPER model will be explained and applied to the field of logistics and organization.

Modelling of the design process itself with a clear distinction between interdisciplinary function design and monodisciplinary
process design.

Study Goals The course aims to learn the students the basics of the Delft Systems Approach for Industrial Organizations (DSA).
Therefore the student should learn to:

- Structure complex industrial systems into the conceptual models: Steady State Model, Innovation Model, Proper Model
- Describe all types of activities in terms of functions
- Recognize both the operational and the control functionality
- Differentiate between operational and innovation management.
- Use the models for analysis and design of industrial systems
Education Method Lectures (2 hours per week)
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Book: The Delft Systems Approach: Analysis and Design of Industrial Systems, H. Veeke, J. Ottjes, G. Lodewijks, Springer,
2008

Assessment Written exam


Percentage of Design 50%
Design Content Understanding the design process itself and the transition of using conceptual models to concrete process models.
Department 3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology

WB3424-08 Production Organisation Principles 3


Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. H.P.M. Veeke
Instructor Ir. F.P.M. Sopers
Contact Hours / Week 0/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period 2
Course Language English
Course Contents This course focuses on production organisation structures. Between the extreme structures of flow shop and job shop there is a
continuum of other structures.

Characteristics and practical selection criteria for each specific structure are explained. The relation between notions like
effectiveness, productivity and flexibility are studied.

Control principles are highlighted by the distinction between function control (e.g. planning) and process control (e.g.
scheduling, feed back, feed forward). The use of simulation in control functions is explained. Finally decision support for project
planning is explained by classical approaches like CPM and PERT, but also by new approaches using simulation.
Study Goals The course aims to learn the students to:

- Explain the characteristics of all different production organization structures


- Explain the technological implications of an organization structure
- Explain the connections between organization structure and production control
- Explain the connections between organization structure and decision support systems.
- Differentiate between different types of information
- Express performance in terms of productivity and flexibility
Education Method Lectures
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Lecture notes + reader (see blackboard)

Recommended:
- Ray Wild, "Operations Management", Continuum, London,
ISBN 0 8264 4927 1
- M.Groover,"Automation, Production Systems, and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing,Prentice Hall, ISBN 0 13 088978 4
(also needed for WB3421)
Assessment Written exam
Department 3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology

Page 108 of 150


WB5400-08 Mechatronic System Design 2 4
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. A. van Beek
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Required for wb2454-05
Expected prior knowledge wb3201
Course Contents In this course you are asked to carry out a small research project related to the mechanical design of precision machines and
equipment. Examples are

- The preparation of an experimental research project that may include the design of a test rig, setting up a test procedure,
making a time schedule and the budgeting of costs. For example, the design of a test rig to measure stick in MEMS devices.

- Performing an experimental research project that may include to set up a test with data acquisition (labview), to carry out some
experiments and to evaluate the results. For example, testing the limitations of an ultra high speed rotating spindle, testing
lubricants or testing materials of slide surfaces and evaluating the results.
Study Goals The student is able to
- Apply design principles for high precision test rigs, machines or measuring equipment.
- Set up experimental research projects (selecting the experimental method, planning, budgeting)
- Set up data acquisition programs (labview).
- Perform data analyses (Evaluating measuring data, applied statistics).
Education Method Personal coaching
Computer Use Labview, Pro Engineer / Solid Works, Comsol Multiphysics
Literature and Study Beek, A. van, "Advanced Engineering Design: lifetime performance and reliability", 534 pp., edition 2009, available at
Materials Leeghwater

References from literature:


see references in the course book
Assessment Written report as a small paper with attachments
Remarks Topics treated in the course wb3201 are to be applied.
Design Content 100%
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 109 of 150


WB5430-05 Engineering Informatics 3
Responsible Instructor Dr. T. Tomiyama
Contact Hours / Week 0/4/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period 2
Course Language English
Required for Machine Intelligence (Wb 5435-05)
Expected prior knowledge Computer programming courses
Course Contents The aims of this course are twofold. One is to give fundamental knowledge about computer systems including both hardware and
software. The other is to give theoretical foundations behind computer-based engineering tools and systems which play an
increasingly important role in mechanical engineering.

The course comprises of lectures in a classroom and practices in the form of homework. It emphasizes homework (mostly
programming) that will be included in the final evaluation. While no preference is given to a particular programming language,
basic programming capabilities are needed.

Topics:
1. Fundamental Logic and the Definition of Engineering Tasks
2. Fundamentals of Semiconductors and Logic Gates
3. Fundamentals of Computer Architecture
4. Fundamentals of Operating Systems
5. Data Representation and Data Structures
6. Numerical Computation and Computational Errors
7. Computational Complexity
8. Object Representation and Reasoning
9. Databases Concepts
10. Constraint-based Problem Solving
11. Optimization and Search
12. Discrete Event Simulation
13. Geometric Modeling and CAD
14. Industrial Engineering Information Systems (PDM, ERP, SCM, LCM)
Study Goals The student must be able to:
1.describe fundamental principles of computers systems including both hardware and software
illustrate mechanisms for digital computers
explain software architecture and its working principles
illustrate data representation methods and data structure
analyze computational errors and computational complexity
2.describe theoretical foundations of modeling and computing behind computer-based engineering tools
explain such data modeling principles as object oriented representation and programming, relational data model, and entity-
relationship data model
explain an appropriate computing algorithm for constraint-based problem solving, optimization, search, and discrete event
simulation
explain fundamentals of geometric modeling
illustrate architecture and functionalities of industrial engineering information systems such as PDM (Product Data Modeling),
ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning), SCM (Supply Chain Management), and LCM (Life Cycle Modeling)
Education Method Lectures (4 hours per week) plus regular homework assignments (around ten homeworks, individual work), final-homeworks
(three final-homeworks, individual and creative self implementation of the techniques in programming enviroenments).
Computer Use Access to a programming environment (any language of your choice, such as C++, C, Visual Basic, Java, MATLAB, etc.) is
necessary.
Literature and Study Benny Raphael, Ian F. C. Smith, Fundamentals of Computer Aided Engineering, ISBN: 0-471-48715-5, (2003), Wiley & Sons.
Materials
Assessment Assessment will be based on the three final-homework assignments and regular homework assigments.

In order to pass this course, students have to submit all homework assignments as well as the final ones. (If you miss one, you
don't pass.) In case a student did not pass in the previous year, he/she needs to re-submit all homework assignments and final
ones on time even if questions are the same. There is no automatic carry-over of grades from previous years.

Homework assignments (around ten homeworks, individual work), around 30%.

Final-homework (three final-homeworks, individual and creative self implementation of the techniques in programming
environment), around 70%.

The ratio is variable year to year.

The students will need on average and approximately ten hours per final-homework and two hours per homework. The final-
homeworks will test the practical and creative capabilities of implementation on computer; the homeworks will test the
theoretical knowledge.
Remarks
Percentage of Design 20%
Design Content Although the course does not directly aim at "design of software", it will nonetheless include principles of building engineering
applications.
Department 3mE Department Biomechanical Engineering
3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 110 of 150


WB5431-05 Life Cycle Engineering 3
Responsible Instructor Dr. T. Tomiyama
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/4
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period 4
Course Language English
Course Contents This course deals with fundamentals and technology of life cycle engineering that require a systematic and holistic approaches to
product life cycles, rather than just end-of-pipe technologies.
First, we will discuss the fundamental concepts of life cycle engineering, in particular, the relationships among environment,
design, manufacturing, and economy. Second, we will look at details of life cycle stages including marketing, design,
production, logistics, operation (use), maintenance, recovery, reuse, remanufacturing, and recycling. Third, we will discuss the
motivation behind life cycle engineering and its philosophy. We will understand that in particular design has a big influence on
any other aspect of product life cycle. Fourth, we will particularly highlight maintenance and remanufacturing. Fifth, we will
look at design methodologies (Design for Environment) as a technology.
Homeworks and excersises are important part of evaluation.

Contents
1. Introduction
2. Environment, Design, Manufacturing and Economy
3. Basic Concepts
4. Product Life Cycle Stages
5. Business and Environment
LCA, Tools (SCM, Green Purchase, ISO 14000 Series, Benchmarking)
6. DfX (Design for X), DfE (Design for Environment)
7. Maintenance and Self-Maintenance
8. Recycling
9. Remanufacturing and Reuse
10. Life Cycle Simulation and Life Cycle Design
11. Service Engineering and Product-Service Systems
12. Summary
Study Goals The student must be able to:
1.describe fundamental principles and philosophy toward a sustainable society from the viewpoint of manufacturing
explain the relationships among environment, design, manufacturing, and economy
classify and compare various strategies toward a sustainable society
explain various tools related to sustainability, such as LCA, Green Purchase, ISO 14000 series, etc.)
2.identify the motivation and background philosophy of life cycle engineering
3.illustrate details of product life cycle stages, including marketing, design, production, logistics, operation (use), maintenance,
recovery, reuse, remanufacturing, and recycling
explain, among other things, the roles of design in a product life cycle
explain, among other things, the roles of maintenance in a product life cycle
explain, among other things, the roles of remanufacturing, reuse, and recycling in a product life cycle
4.explain various methods of Design for Environment through concrete examples
Education Method Lectures (4 hours per week) including homework assignments (around 5) and a design for environment exercise (group work).
Literature and Study Powerpoint presentations. A copy of the presentaiton will be available through the Blackboard.
Materials Any other handouts.
Recommended Book: T.E. Graedel and B.R. Allenby: Industrial Ecology (2nd Edition), Pearson Education, Inc., New Jearsey
(2003), ISBN 0-13-046713-8 (58 at Amazon)
Assessment Assessment includes three components.

1. Homework (individual, around 20%): Students need to submit all homework assignments on time. If you did not pass in
previous years, you still need to re-submit homework assignments. If the question is the same, you can resubmit your old
assignments.

2. Design for Environment exercise (group work, around 20%): Students will be given a DfE task and will need to present during
the lecture and to submit a mini report.

3. Final exams (individual, around 60%): Written/Oral exams.

The ratio is variable year to year.


Percentage of Design 75%
Design Content A large portion of the course deals with sustainability issues in design.
Department 3mE Department Biomechanical Engineering
3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 111 of 150


WM0516TU Turning Technology into Business 6
Module Manager Dr. L. Hartmann
Contact Hours / Week 0/X/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Course Contents Turning Technology into Business (TTiB) aims to equip participants with a strong conceptual foundation to actively understand
the dynamic process of technology-based entrepreneurship. Participants learn how business strategies are best formulated and
how (through entrepreneurship) technology can create value. TTiB consists of seven lectures, introducing the theoretical
backgrounds of technological, market and business analyses. A unique aspect of TTiB is that existing technologies (developed
and patented by the TU Delft) are used as case subjects. The patent project is the focal point of the curriculum. Each group of 4-5
students will be assigned an original patent, and is expected to evaluate the commercial potential of this technology. This
includes choosing promising applications (products) for the technology, and making recommendations for the most suitable
business model to commercialize the technology. The patent project should provide a coherent and structured answer to the
central question: which strategy is most likely to generate business from this patent? In addition to equipping participants with a
thorough knowledge of the course subject, the section Technology, Strategy & Entrepreneurship (TSE) hopes that this course
will be the starting point for a variety of university spin-offs in which the students will participate. To accommodate this, TSE
offers the course WM0506TU - Writing a Business Plan.
Study Goals The course "Turning Technology into Business" aims to equip students with a strong conceptual foundation to an active
understanding of two domains:

The dynamic process of technological innovation through concepts such as technology life-cycles, dominant design, disruptive
technologies, Schumpeterian competition and the diffusion of innovations
How business strategies are formulated and, through entrepreneurship, technology can create value. This multi-faceted process
of technology commercialization process is addressed in terms of assessing technology position, discovering market
opportunities, competitive analysis, appropriability and the various modes of entrepreneurship.
Education Method Lectures, assignments, individual group coaching
Assessment Each group writes a report on their analysis, findings and recommendations for the technology (patent) they used as a case, and
give a 20 minute oral presentation. The reports will be discussed and graded individually.

Targetgroup Multi-disciplinairy groeps of Master students, Ph.D. Students, and staff researchers from all faculties within the TU Delft.

WM0605TU Business Economics for Engineers 4


Module Manager Dr. G. van der Velde
Contact Hours / Week 2/0/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
Start Education 1
Exam Period 1
Course Language Dutch

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Year 2009/2010
Organization Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Education Master Mechanical Engineering

Specialisation Automotive (ME-PME-AUT)


Program Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Program Title Specialisation Automotive Specialisation Automotive (ME-PME-AUT)
Introduction 1 Information: E.J.H. de Vries, tel: +31 (0)15 27 86980, e-mail E.J.H.deVries@tudelft.nl
Enrolment: J.J.L. Neve, tel. +31 (0)15 27 86581, e-mail j.j.l.neve@tudelft.nl
Secretary, Ms. C.P. du Burck, tel. +31 (0)15 27 85733, e-mail c.p.duburck@tudelft.nl

Automotive specialisation (ME-PME-AUT)


Modern cars consist of ever more sophisticated mechanical parts with integrated electronics and therefore form an important
field of application for precision- and micro systems. Further system integration requires an interdisciplinary mechatronic
approach in future vehicle development. In this multidisciplinary approach, the generic fields of engineering mechanics and -
dynamics play a central role, as it forms the basis for understanding important aspects such as road handling (vehicle and tyre
dynamics, multi-body modelling) and passenger comfort and safety (vibration analysis, modal analysis and acoustics, crash
response)
Examples of masters theses: Feasibility of a novel ABS-controller (Bridgestone Rome); Modelling of the subsystems of a
toroidal Continuously Variable Transmission (DaimlerChrysler AG); Analysis and experimental techniques to accurately predict
the noise transmission in a car (BMW München).

Automotive is a coordinated specialisation in the tracks Control Engineering (ME-CE), Precision and Microsystems Engineering
(ME-PME) and BioMechanical Design. (ME-BMD)

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Year 2009/2010
Organization Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Education Master Mechanical Engineering

Obligatory Courses ME-PME-AUT

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ME1100 Automated Driving, Automotive Human Factors and Safety 3
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. R. Happee
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/4
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period 4
5
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge WB3404A Vehicle Dynamics A can be followed in parallel (recommended).
Summary Automotive Safety technologies are covered with a focus on potential benefits, test procedures, sensing, control and human
machine interfacing.
Course Contents Contents as stated below may be adapted based on the interests of students and time constraints
Course Contents 1.The road safety problem
Continuation Review of fatalities, injuries and vehicle damage in a national and international perspective. Outlook on safety in first, second
and third world countries.
Comparison of safety of different transport modes. Breakdown into injuries of car occupants, pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists
and others. Breakdown of costs into life years lost, medical and rehabilitation costs, vehicle damage and congestion due to
accidents.

Road safety countermeasure overview: Pre-crash, In-crash and Post-crash measures (Haddon Matrix). Vehicle safety
technologies, road infrastructure, enforcement of speed, alcohol and other regulations, education.

2.Accident causation
Introduction of aspects like perception of speed, direction and distance, awareness, reaction times & failure to act.
Illustration of loss of control due to wheel slip etc.

3.Active Safety 1
Vision and Visibility.
Obstacle & vehicle detection technologies.
Vehicle to vehicle communication and vehicle to infrastructure communication.
Driver assistance systems.

4.Active Safety 2
The role of tyre, suspension, steering and braking system.
Antilock Braking Systems (ABS) and Electronic Stability Programs (ESP).

5.Crash dummies & Injury Criteria


Development and validation of crash test dummies using cadaver testing for high severity and volunteer testing for low severity
loading.
- Mathematical human body models.
- Injury severity scales (AIS, MAIS, )
- Injury criteria and tolerances and their derivation from cadaver testing and real accidents.

6.Passive Safety 1 frontal impact


Frontal car impact will be used to explain how occupant safety is enhanced by the deformable vehicle front structure, the
protective vehicle compartment, belt system, airbag and seat. The mechanical interaction will be illustrated quantitatively
including some practical calculation assignments.
- Injuries to car occupants in Frontal Impact.
- Demonstrated benefits of belts and airbags.
- Full vehicle front overlap versus partial overlap impact.
- Compatibility of vehicle shape and stiffness across the diversifying car fleet.
- Triggering of belt pretensioner and airbag(s)
- Adaptation of belt and airbag operation towards crash conditions and occupant size and position. Potential benefits of real time
control of belt and airbag.

7.Passive Safety 2 other impact modes


Other impact modes will be reviewed in a global manner:
SIDE IMPACT: Injuries. Test procedures & dummies. Protection offered by the protective vehicle compartment, airbags and
vehicle interior padding.
ROLLOVER: Injuries and ejection. Test procedures & dummies. Effectiveness of curtain airbags and belts to prevent ejection.
REAR IMPACT: Injuries. Test procedures & dummies. Passive and active seat systems for rear impact.
PEDESTRIANS AND CYCLISTS impacted by vehicle fronts: Injuries. Test procedures & dummy subsystems representing
body parts. Deformable vehicle front and bonnet structures. Compromises between pedestrian, frontal impact, durability and
repair costs for marginal accidents (parking).

8.Safety from a sensing & control perspective


Review of safety systems described in previous chapters in terms of:
- Sensing, identification and state estimation.
- Human machine interfacing.

9.Safety test procedures


Review of regulated test procedures, consumer test procedures and best practice for active and passive safety as introduced in
previous chapters.
- Safety in the vehicle development process.
- Subsystem versus full system testing.
- Hardware versus virtual testing.
- Gaps where accident types and injury types are not well covered.
- Gaps where innovative safety systems are not well covered.
- Discussion of political and financial forces driving safety enhancement including: Governments, Car manufacturers, Suppliers,
Vehicle and health Insurance companies.
Study Goals The student must be able to analyse the potential benefits of current or future active and/or passive safety systems
Education Method Lectures (4 hours per week)
Plus Self-study & Exercises
Assessment Written exam
Enrolment / Application Register on Blackboard and mail r.happee@tudelft.nl
Percentage of Design 10%

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Department 3mE Department Biomechanical Engineering

SC4210 Vehicle Mechatronics 4


Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. E.G.M. Holweg
Responsible for assignments Prof.dr.ir. E.G.M. Holweg
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/4
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Course Contents In the modern cars of today, electronic components, hence mechatronic components and systems are more and more embedded
in the vehicle, especially in the areas of entertainment, driving comfort, engine management and active safety. Currently about
30% of the cost of a car can be contributed to electronic components and it is expected that this trend will continue in the years to
come, since the car manufacturers are further improving the functionality of these systems. The introduction of electronic
stability programs (ESP) has greatly contributed to road safety and more cars will be equipped with ESP and more advanced ESP
systems are being developed. Besides safety, electronics can also contribute to influencing the driving behaviour of the vehicle,
creating an even stronger brand identity (e.g., safety, fun to drive, etc.). In order to accomplish this, new control architectures
need to be developed such as Global Chassis Control. It may be clear that by introducing electronics in vehicles it is paramount
to focus on the robustness and reliability of embedded mechatronic components and systems.
The Vehicle Mechatronics course will focus on this trend with special attention to the integration of the electrical and mechanical
domains (mechatronics) and the control aspects of the vehicle and its sub-systems. The following car systems will be reviewed;
steering, braking, suspension, engine & powertrain and tires. Special focus will be given to sensors & sensor networks and
actuators (e.g., drive-by-wire) within these respective systems. In the design of new vehicle control architectures such as global
chassis control, a proper understanding of vehicle dynamics, robustness aspects such as fail safe and fault tolerant behaviour and
the mathematical modelling and simulation (e.g., Matlab/Simulink) of the vehicle, its components and the controller shall be
addressed.
Study Goals Car systems (steering, braking, suspension, engine & powertrain, tires)
Sensors & sensor networks
Actuators (e.g., drive-by-wire)
Design of new vehicle control architectures such as global chassis control
Vehicle dynamics
Robustness aspects (fail safe and fault tolerant behaviour)
Mathematical modelling and simulation
Education Method Lectures
Assessment Written exam
Department 3mE Department Delft Center for Systems and Control

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WB3404A Vehicle Dynamics A 3
Responsible Instructor Ir. E.J.H. de Vries
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Course Contents Basic elements of the dynamics of road vehicles (car, truck, motorcycle). Ride vibration response to road unevenness. Sine and
stochastic roadprofile. Single, two and three mass/spring/damper systems. Linear and non-linear models. Vibrational modes and
stability. Discomfort analysis. System identification. Roadholding: vehicle handling and stability. Response to stear input and
side wind. Singel two-wheel vehicle model to discuss effects of tyres, inertia and geometry. Influence of several design
variables: steering and wheel suspension, kinematics and compliance, toe angle, camber, roll axis, roll stabilizer, load transfer.
Motorcycle stability and modal shapes (brief discussion of results)
Study Goals The student is able to apply dynamics methods and knowledge on vehicle specific problems

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.quantify comfort and road holding: recognise the paradox for optimal suspension design
2.realize that linear models are approximations of reality in many aspects
3.employ single mass and higher order models for vertical vibration analysis, and justify the choice for single d.o.f., quarter car
or half car model
4.implement the most common non linear elements in vehicle(models) and discover some analytical solution methods
5.solve non-Linear problems with numerical integration routines
6.apply Lagrange method to derive equations of motion
7.analyze driving stability in the horizontal plane using Hurwitz criterion
8.characterize vehicle handling in terms of under- and oversteer, apply critical and characteristic velocity on the vehicle
behaviour
9.derive the single track model, linear and including elementary non-linear properties
Education Method Lectures (4 hours per week), practical exercises
Computer Use In working out the problems the computer will be helpful.
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Lecture notes: Voertuigdynamica A

References from literature:


Mitschke, Wong, Gillespie, Newland.
Assessment Oral exam, by appointment
Remarks Laboratory project(s):
About 10 problems (exercises) are requested to prepare at home.
Percentage of Design 25%
Design Content The effect of design parameters of wheel suspension and stearing system are discussed.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

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Year 2009/2010
Organization Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering
Education Master Mechanical Engineering

Recommended Elective Courses ME-PME-AUT

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CT5820 Sociology and Psychology in Transport 3
Responsible Instructor Dr. E. de Boer
Instructor Dr.ir. J.F.M. Molenbroek
Instructor Prof.dr. H.J. van Zuylen
Instructor Prof.dr. K.A. Brookhuis
Contact Hours / Week 0/4/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Course Contents replaced with ct4820

replaced with ct4820

physical ergonomy: needed space for human functioning in rest and movement

psychology: from physiology to cognitive aspects and communication science

sociology: from primary group through social structures to western culture and norm and value systems

human behavioural research methods and their utility

Analysis of transportation engineering themes with human sciences, illustrations:

location choice for societal activities

trip behaviour based on activity patterns with fixed locations

transport behaviour based on trip patterns, infrastructural conditions and quality of transport systems

route choice based on vehicle flows and the quality of the infrastructure network

driver behaviour based on road conditions

ET4245ME Elektromechanics in Mechatronic Systems 3


Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. H. Polinder
Instructor Ir. J.W. Spronck
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/3
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period 4
5
Course Language English
Course Contents Electromechanics in mechatronic systems
Study Goals Students who have followed this course should be able to
1 Use the terminology of electromechanics.
2 Use the principles of electric and magnetic circuits to calculate voltages, currents, magnetic flux densities, magnetic fluxes,
magnetic flux linkages, forces, torques, power, and (stored) energy.
3 Recognize different types of permanent-magnet machines, derive the voltage equations and the equivalent circuits, sketch the
characteristic voltage and current waveforms and calculate forces and torques using the power balance.
4 Recognize magnetic bearings, explain their strength and weaknesses, calculate magnetic bearing forces from the power
balance, explain that magnetic bearings can be linearised by making them double-sided, explain zero-stiffness and gravity
compensation.
5 Explain the important limitations and characteristics of materials (magnets, iron, conductors), and machines (losses and heat
dissipation, mechanical commutation, safe operating area, cogging, force density), indicate if there are methods to get around
these limitations and do calculations on these limitations.
6 Distinguish between the different construction forms of permanent-magnet machines and explain their strengths and
weaknesses.
7 Explain which criteria play an important role in choosing a machine and how these criteria influence the choice, explain which
part of the safe operating area is most attractive and why, explain which criteria play a role in selecting transmissions and in
selection motional profiles.
8 Explain why linear motor are used, recognize different types of linear permanent-magnet machines, derive the voltage
equations and the equivalent circuits, calculate forces.
9 Recognise different types of amplifiers (analogue, switching, one quadrant, four quadrant, resonant) and know their strength
and weaknesses, sketch current and voltage waveforms of switching amplifiers, explain how they can be used to control speed.
Education Method Lectures, assignments, demonstrations
Literature and Study J.C. Compter, 'Mechatronics, Introduction to Electromechanics', lecture notes
Materials
Assessment Written examination (closed book) or group assignment

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ID5242 Automotive Design 6
Responsible Instructor E.D. van Grondelle
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/4/4
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Required for Automotive Design ID5242 is a general elective for students in any of the Master Programs. It covers an autonomous area in the
field of automotive design.
For students following the specialisation Advanced Automotive Design the course is mandatory.
Course Contents Due to relatively long life cycles in the automotive industry, a long term vision on how the car should be experienced in the
future by its user, is essential.

A vision that looks further than merely the next generator of vehicles. This vision has to be founded in cultural and social, as
well as on technological developments.
Formulating a long term vision creates a desired car character, which will act as a guiding principle for the visual theme, new
technological principles and the configuration and package of the vehicle: the starting points for exterioir and interior
concepting.

The history of automotive form and design, automotive technology and branding strategies provide a lexicon which can
influence new design proposals. Insight in main issues as for example active safety, like under- and over-steer, and aerodynamics
can form a base for the development of new automotive concepts.
In several lectures external automotive experts are involved.
Study Goals Meaning & coherence:
Learning how to design inside -> out, based on what you want to achieve for, and with, people in the future domain of mobility.
The future design is instrumental, with a specific meaning, inspiring peoples behaviour, thus triggering the foreseen experience.
The desired automotive character in form (expression), usability and driving experience must be expressed in one coherent
design.

Product strategy & product acceptance:


How can a designer contribute in achieving the company's strategy? Learning how to maintain consistency in future product
generations (long term), while in the course of that, designing a first next generation that consumers desire (short term).

Appearance & styling:


Learning and understanding that the consumers first confrontation with the car is its overall appearance, it's styling. Even though
it might be merely the final outcome of an in-depth design process that starts with a vision, the product must be instantly
convincing in its appearance and its expression of the desired character, function and meaning.
This expression, the product character, and its brand identity form the inspiration towards a visual leitmotiv (guiding form
principle) that guides all aesthetical parameters into a coherent, aesthetically appreciated, whole.
Education Method Throughout the semester the course is a combination of lectures and project work.

Lectures address subjects such as history, aesthetics, package, vehicle dynamics, safety systems, aerodynamics,s tructures &
wheel suspensions, branding, performance/sustainability/economics and the use of new technologies.
Lectures are given by the automotive staff, as well as specialist guest lecturers.

The final project goal is the design of a car, as an intermediate between a long term future concept and a contemporary car. The
objectives along this journey include the deconstruction of a contemporary car, vision development, mission forming, interaction
design and the design of a long term future concept.

The course may include visiting a car factory and one day will be spend in the National Car Museum (Louwman Collection).

Please note that, although an artefact is the visual outcome of the process, the foundation phases (e.g. vision and mission) are
considered to be at least as important, as is the coherence overall.

Literature and Study Papers and presentation hand-outs will be distributed as the course goes along. Please note that the papers are often
Materials complementary to the lectures, not a substitute. Presence in class is mandatory.
Prerequisites Students must have good understanding of spoken and written English.

Students should preferably have passed: Vision in Product Design (ID5161) and Automotive Sketching (ID5247). The latter may
also be attended simultaneously.

For students who wish to follow both this course and Strategic Automotive (ID5249), it is recommended to attend this course
first.

Some experience with CAD software (for package design) is recommended. Recommended software for students following the
specialisation Advanced Automotive Design, is Alias. Licenses are available and an Alias course is under development.

Please issue a brief, written, motivation and your portfolio. Automotive work in the portfolio may help but is NOT necessary.

Maximum group size: 20 students.


Assessment Please refer to the section 'Education method' for an overview of subjects that are being inroduced in the course, and are
expected to become part of the student's project result.

Students are expected to present their results on a regular basis.

The final deliverables include a number of poster that present the process, its outcome as well as the artefacts: the long term
future concept, the intermediate design interior and exterior.

Please note that, although an artefact is the visual outcome of the process, the foundation phases (the story telling, the vision,
mission, interaction design and character and coherence) are considered to be AT LEAST as important!!
Special Information E.D. van Grondelle MBA Ba, e.d.vangrondelle@tudelft.nl
Prof.ir. M.B. van Dijk, m.b.vandijk@tudelft.nl
Room 10-2B-07, phone +31 (0)15 27 89488

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MT216 Introduction Combustion Engines 3
Responsible Instructor Nabestaanden van H.T. Grimmelius
Contact Hours / Week 0/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period 2
3
Course Language English
Course Contents Basic thermodynamic principles.

Piston engines both diesel and otto engines.

Working principle: 4 stroke, 2 stroke, trunk piston, crosshead construction, low/medium/high speed
Indicator diagram: work, mean indicated and effective pressure
Ignition and combustion: mixture formation, ignition methods, ignition delay, premixed and diffusive combustion
Performance: efficiency, power and torque, fuel consumption, air consumption, emissions, methods to reduce emissions,
exhaust gas cleaning
Pressure charging: turbocharging, single stage and two stage
Operating envelope: naturally aspirating, turbocharged engines
Power density
Thermodynamic analysis: air standard cycles, Otto, Diesel and Seiliger cycle
Construction

Gas turbines

Working principle
Ideal simple Brayton cycle with and without losses
Regenerative cycle
Advanced cycles
Operating envelope
Construction and installation

Fuel characteristics
Study Goals The student must be able to:
1.describe the main characteristics of diesel and otto engines and gas turbines
2.describe the main characteristics of fuels
3.describe the working principles of the 2-stroke engine and of the 4-stroke engines and sketch the associated indicator (p-V)
diagram
4.define and apply the thermodynamic concepts power, work, heat, mean effective pressure and efficiency
5.define compression ratio, stroke-bore ratio, specific fuel consumption, air-fuel ratio, air excess ratio and mean piston speed
6.explain the purpose and working principle of turbocharging and to distinguish the different types
7.explain the limits of the operating envelope of a diesel and otto engine and the influence of turbocharging
8.explain methods to broaden the operating envelope
9.explain the limits to power and power density
10.describe the pollutant emissions of combustion engines, the measures to reduce these and methods of exhaust gas cleaning
11.describe for Otto engines the methods of mixture formation (carburettors and fuel injection), the requirements with regard to
afr, the advantages of injection systems compared to carburettors
12.describe for diesel engines the differences between direct injection (DI) and indirect injection (IDI) systems with their
advantages and disadvantages
13.explain the influence of design parameters to engine performance by using air-standard cycles
14.apply the Otto cycle to calculate/predict Otto engine performance
15.apply Seiliger cycle, also called dual cycle, to calculate/predict diesel engine performance
16.describe the working principles of the gas turbine
17.apply the Brayton cycle to calculate/predict gas turbine performance for simple and advanced gasturbine cycles
18.explain the influence of the pressure ratio and of the temperature ratio on efficiency and power density
19.explain the influence of compressor, turbine and heat exchanger losses on gas turbine performance (efficiency and power
density)
20.explain the operating envelope of a twin-shaft gas turbine and the influence of power on sfc
21.describe the effect of ambient conditions and intake and exhaust losses on power and fuel consumption
22.describe the necessary measures for installation on board: acoustical enclosure, air filtration, up- and down-takes and fuel
treatment
Education Method Lectures 0/2/0/0
Course Relations wb4408A, wb4408B, wb4420, wb4421
Literature and Study Marine Engineering. Design of Propulsion and Electric Power Generation Systems. J. Klein Woud and D. Stapersma. Institute of
Materials Marine Engineering, Science and Technology, London, 2003. ISBN 1-902536-47-9. The book can be obtained from Gezelschap
Leeghwater with a considerable discount.
Some prints will be provided.
Prerequisites wb4100
Assessment Written exam
Percentage of Design 50%
Design Content Application and installation of piston engines and gas turbines
Department 3mE Department Maritime & Transport Technology

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SC4032 Physical Modelling for Systems and Control 4
Responsible Instructor Nabestaanden van O.H. Bosgra
Course Coordinator Dr. P.S.C. Heuberger
Contact Hours / Week 0/4/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period 2
3
Course Language English
Course Contents SC 4032 Physical Modelling for Systems and Control

Contents 2009/2010

1.Formulation of dynamic models for physical plants and equipment. Role of System boundary, choice of input- and output
variables. Causality and properness of input-output behaviour. Microscopic versus macroscopic conservation laws. Linearization
around steady-state operating conditions or around trajectory. Linear parameter-varying versus nonlinear and linearized models.
Frozen behaviour versus time-varying behaviour.
2.Simple process models. Role of residence-time distribution. Distributed-parameter models versus compartmental models.
Characterization of flow behaviour with respect to mixing and backflow. Series connection of flow systems.
3.Bilateral coupling between subsystems. Causality, exchange of power between subsystems.2-port behaviour. Relationships
with choice of boundary conditions in distributed-parameter systems. Hydraulic transmission line, heat conduction as examples
of bilateral coupling
4.Time scales of dynamic phenomena. Equation ordering and scaling of model equations. Modal approximation, time moments
and Padâe approximation. Singular perturbations.
5.Model reduction by projection and residualization Model reduction through ba;lancing and truncation. Role of Hankel singular
values. Closed-loop relevant model reduction. Examples, finite dimensional approximation of distributed-parameter systems.
Realization theory, approximate realization as model reduction step.
6.Rosenbrock's system matrix. System equivalence, interconnection of subsystems. Models in differential-algebraic equations for
interconnected subsystems Index problems as result of interconnection of state variables. Nonproper internal or external
behaviour, use of Kronecker-Weierstrass form

Study Goals The student must be able to formulate dynamic models on the basis of an understanding of underlying physical principles. In
addition, understanding major system properties must enable the student to manipulate the models, make them simpler (if
desired) and bring them in a suitable format that allows implementation in a software platform. The student must be able to
explain properties and behaviour of the system models under study.
Education Method There will be handouts of course notes, also available electronically, in addition to copies of the course slides.
Assessment A set of Matlab/Simulink/theory exercises will be available. Solving the exercises constitutes the basis for the assessment. The
results of the exercises must be summarized in a short report, and will be discussed and examined during an oral examination,
during which also the contents of the course notes will be the subject of discussion. The report on the exercises has to be handed
in ultimately April 16, 2010. The exam can in principle be executed throughout the year (restrictions during april/may and
october 2010), both individually as well as in groups of 2 students.
Department 3mE Department Delft Center for Systems and Control

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SC4040 Filtering & Identification 6
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. M.H.G. Verhaegen
Instructor Dr.ir. P.R. Fraanje
Contact Hours / Week 0/4/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period 2
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge BSc-degree in Engineering or Mathematics with basic knowledge of linear algebra, stochastic processes, signals and systems and
control theory.
Course Contents The objective of this course is to show the use of linear algebra and its geometric interpretation in deriving computationally
simple and easy to understand solutions to various system theoretical problems. Review of some topics from linear algebra,
dynamical system theory and statistics, that are relevant for filtering and system identification. Kalman filtering as a weighted
least squares problem. Prediction error and output error system identification as nonlinear least squares problems. Subspace
identification based on basic linear algebra tools such as the QR factorization and the SVD. Discussion of some practical aspects
in the system identification cycle. See also: http:/www.dcsc.tudelft.nl/~sc4040.
Study Goals At the end of the course the student should be able to:
Derive the solution of the weighted stochastic and deterministic linear least squares problem.
Proof the properties of unbiasedness and minimum variance of the weighted stochastic and deterministic linear least squares
problem.
Use an observer to estimate the state sequence of a linear time invariant system.
Use the Kalman filter to estimate the state sequence of a linear time invariant system using knowledge of the system matrices,
the system input and output measurements, and the covariance matrices of the uncertainty of these measurements.
Describe the difference between the predicted, filtered and smoothed state estimates.
Formulate and solve the Kalman filter problem as a weighted stochastic least squars problem.
Use the Kalman filter theory to estimate unknown inputs of a linear dynamical system in the presence of noise perturbations on
the model.
Use the Kalman filter theory to design filters for detection (sensor, actuator or component) failures in a linear dynamical system
in the presence of noise perturbations on the model.
Derive subspace identification methods for different noise models and relate the different subspace identification methods via the
solution of a linear least squares problem.
Implement a least squares solution in matlab for elementary linear estimation and subspace identification problems.
Apply the filtering and identification methods to derive a mathematical model from real-life data sequences. In this application
the students use the systematic identification cyclic approach to refine the model.
Education Method Lectures 0/4/0/0
Literature and Study Book Filtering and System Identification: A Least Squares Approach by Michel Verhaegen and Vincent Verdult.
Materials ISBN: 13-9780521875127

Deliverable by the Studentsociety Gezelschap Leeghwater.


Assessment Written exam (open book) and practical exercise.
Remarks The software package Matlab is needed to solve the practical exercise.
Department 3mE Department Delft Center for Systems and Control

Page 123 of 150


SC4070 Control Systems Lab 4
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. G. Schitter
Instructor Prof.dr. R. Babuska
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/4/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
Start Education 3
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge Control Systems (SC3020ET) or similar
Course Contents In this course, students have the opportunity to design and implement their own controllers for various laboratory systems
(helicopter model, inverted pendulum, inverted wedge, gantry crane). In this way, they gain more insight in the use of control
theory and gain experience with the practical implementation of computer-controlled systems. MATLAB and SIMULINK are
used as the basic platform for the design, analysis, simulation and real-time implementation. The control design methods to be
used include standard techniques (digital state feedback, output feedback, PID control) as well as more advanced methods
(adaptive control, linear quadratic control, systems identification). In the beginning of the course, a refresher is given in which
the essential topics from theoretical control courses are reviewed. See also: http://www.dcsc.tudelft.nl/~sc4070
Study Goals Main objective: make operational and apply in practice the knowledge from control theory and system identification courses.
Gain hands-on experience with the design and implementation of a computer-controlled system.

After successfully completing the course, the student is able to:

* Implement in Matlab / Simulink a given mathematical model of a mechatronic laboratory system. Estimate unknown
parameters in the model by using experimental data measured on the process. Validate the model against measured process data.

* Linearize the model around an operating point. Assess the accuracy of the linearized model with respect to the nonlinear one
and with respect to the real process. Identify limitations of the linearized model. Choose a suitable sampling period, discretize
the linearized model.

* Define meaningful performance specifications for a control system to be designed for the given process. Selected a suitable
type of controller. Compute the controller's parameters such that the above specifications are met. Verify the closed-loop
performance in realistic simulations.

* Apply the controller to the process in real-time experiments. Evaluate the performance of the control system. Identify reasons
for possible discrepancies between simulations and real-time results. Suggest possible improvements.

* Demonstrate proficiency in using Matlab and Simulink as the primary tool for the achievement of the above objectives.

* Document the design steps, considerations, choices and the achieved control results effectively in a written report. Present and
defend the results in an oral presentation.
Education Method Lectures, laboratory sessions
Literature and Study Book: Åström K.J. and Wittenmark B. Computer Controlled Systems Theory and Design (Third Edition). Prentice Hall, 1997.
Materials
Assessment Written report, presentation
Remarks Computer use: laboratory assignment. Design content (60%): control design.
Department 3mE Department Delft Center for Systems and Control

SC4091 Optimization in Systems and Control 4


Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. B.H.K. De Schutter
Contact Hours / Week 4/0/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
Start Education 1
Exam Period 1
2
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge Basic knowledge about linear state space models and stability, and basic experience with Matlab
Course Contents In this course we study numerical optimization methods, mainly from a user point of view, and we discuss several applications
of optimization in systems and control. First we discuss the basic characteristics and properties of various optimization methods.
We also provide guidelines to determine which algorithms are most suited for a given optimization problem. Next, the
previously treated optimization methods are used in a multi-criteria controller design application. We also focus on the
translation of the design constraints into mathematical constraints. Another important topic is the determination of good initial
conditions. For more information, see: http://www.dcsc.tudelft.nl/~sc4091
Study Goals After this course the students should be able to select the most efficient and best suited optimization algorithm for a given
optimization problem. They should also be able to reformulate an engineering problem into a (mathematical) optimization
problem starting from the given specifications. They should be able to reduce the complexity of the problem using
simplifications and/or approximations so as to augment the efficiency of the solution approach.
Education Method Lectures
Literature and Study Lecture notes "Optimization in systems and control" by T. van den Boom and B. De Schutter, Delft, 2009 + handouts
Materials
Assessment written examination (closed book) + report on the practical assignment
Department 3mE Department Delft Center for Systems and Control

Page 124 of 150


WB1406-07 Experimental Dynamics 3
Responsible Instructor D. de Klerk
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period none
Course Language English
Parts The course consists of two parts:
- part A Classes
- part B Laboratory experiments (four in total)
Course Contents Part A: Theory
- How does a modern measurement system work?? In specific how does it minimize desturbances and does it cope with filter
effects?
- Pitfalls in Frequency Analysis: Descrete algorithms, Leakage, Aliasing. Know it or you'll mess up your experements.
- The power of Transfer and Frequency Response Functions (FRF); why are the so usefull?
- Experimental Modal Analysis: Does and don't, pitfalls & challenges in practice.
- Harmonic excitation (with frequency stepping), impulsive excitation, stochastic excitation.
- Sensors, how do they work, what is important when using them.
- Rotoranalysis, operational system analysis.
- Latest advances in measurement technology.

Moto: In theory, theory and practice are the same... In practice they are not.
This course concentrates on pointing where those differences orignate from, valuable for any who'll perform measurements,
needs to analyse measurements or who tries to match his / her simulation to the experiment.

Part B: Experimental analysis


The second part of the course involves working on assigments meant to illustrate concepts described in Part A and to deepen
insight.
Teams of three students each, carry out multi´ple experiments. Last year students got to simulate in Matlab a measurement
system as a first assignment. Their final project involved analyzing measurement data measured by them selves on my car on the
Rotterdamsestraatweg. Can it be more exciting? Yes, maybe you have always wanted to analyze a different product like a boat,
train, motorbike, music instrument, etc. maybe we can come up with that exciting experiment in this year's course!
Study Goals In general the student is able to perform dynamic measurements, being aware of possible pitfalls.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1. describe the effects of Quantization, Leakage, Aliasing in measurements and measurement equipment.
2. explain the principle of extracting modal parameters (resonance frequency, spring constant, damping ratio) from system
response both in the time domain and in the frequency domain
3. explain the principle of extracting modal parameters (modal frequencies, modal gains, modal damping ratios) from system
response both in the time domain and in the frequency domain
4. discuss relative merits of different excitation techniques (shaker with frequency sweep, impact hammer, shaker with random
excitation)
5. discuss the prinicples and the elative merits of different sensing techniques (strain gauge, seismic mass, piezo crystal,
electromagnetic induction, laser vibrometer)
6. carry out dynamic experiments, analyze the data, and report and discuss his findings.
Education Method Classes followed by laboratory projects.
Computer Use Matlab
Word
LaTeX
PowerPoint
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials - Part A: Course notes
- Part B: Laboratory assignments manual

References from literature:


- see the reference list in the Course notes.
Assessment Written report, and oral discussion of experiment activities and of report.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 125 of 150


WB1413-04 Multibody Dynamics B 4
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. A.L. Schwab
Course Coordinator Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period none
Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge wb1113wb, wb1216, (wb1310).
Course Contents In this course we will cover a systematic approach to the generation and solution of equations of motion for mechanical systems
consisting of multiple interconnected rigid bodies, the so-called Multibody Systems. This course differs from 'Advanced
Dynamics', which mostly covers theoretical results about classes of idealized systems (e.g. Hamiltonian systems), in that the goal
here is to find the motions of relatively realistic models of systems (including, for example, motors, dissipation and contact
constraints). Topics covered are:
-Newton-Euler equations of motion for a simple planar system, free body diagrams, constraint equations and constraint forces,
uniqueness of the solution.
-Systematic approach for a system of interconnected rigid bodies, virtual power method and Lagrangian multipliers.
-transformation of the equations of motion in terms of generalized
independent coordinates, and lagrange equations.
-Non-holonomic constraints as in rolling without slipping, degrees of freedom and kinematic coordinates.
-Unilateral constraints as in contact problems.
-Numerical integration of the equations of motion, stability and accuracy of the applied methods.
-Numerical integration of a coupled differential and algebraic system of equations (DAE's), Baumgarte stabilisation, projection
method and independent coordinates.
-Newton-Euler equations of motion for a rigid three-dimensional body, the need to describe orientation in space, Euler angles,
Cardan angles, Euler parameters and Quaternions.
-Equations of motion for flexible multibody systems, introduction to Finite Element Method approach, Linearised equations of
motion.

Upon request and if time and ability of the instructor allows, related topics are open for discussion.
Study Goals The student is able to find the motions of linked rigid body systems in two and three dimensions including systems with various
kinematic constraints, like there are: sliding, hinges and rolling, and closed kinematic chains.

More specifically, the student must able to:


1.derive the Newton-Euler equations of motion for a simple planar system, draw free body diagrams, set-up constraint equations
and introduce constraint forces, and demonstrate the uniqueness of the solution
2.derive the equations of motion for a system of interconnected rigid bodies by means of a systematic approach: virtual power
method and Lagrangian multipliers
3.transform the equations of motion in terms of generalized independent coordinates, and derive and apply the Lagrange
equations of motion
4.apply the techniques from above to systems having non-holonomic constraints as in rolling without slipping, degrees of
freedom and kinematic coordinates
5.apply the techniques from above to systems having unilateral constraints as in contact problems
6.perform various numerical integration schemes on the equations of motion, and predict the stability and accuracy of the applied
methods
7.perform numerical integration on a coupled system of differential and algebraic equations (DAE's), apply Baumgarte
stabilization, the coordinate projection method and transformation to independent coordinates
8.derive the Newton-Euler equations of motion for a general rigid three-dimensional body system connected by constraints,
identify the need to describe orientation in space
describe the orientation in 3-D space of a rigid body by means of: Euler angles, Cardan angles, Euler parameters and
Quaternions, derive the angular velocity and accelerations in terms of these parameters and their time derivatives, and their
inverse
9.derive the equations of motion for flexible multibody systems by means of a Finite Element Method approach, and extend this
to linearised equations of motion
Education Method Lectures (2 hours per week)
Computer Use The course is computer-oriented. In doing the assignments you will be using Matlab, Maple or related computer software.
Literature and Study Course material: Arend L. Schwab, `Applied Multibody Dynamics', Delft, 2003
Materials
References from literature:
A.A.Shabana, ' Dynamics of multibody systems', Wiley, New York, 1998.
E.J.Haug, ' Computer aided kinematics and dynamics of mechanical systems, Volume I: Basic methods', Allyn and Bacon,
Boston, 1989.
P.E.Nikravesh, ' Computer-aided analysis of mechanical systems', Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, 1988.
M. Géradin, A. Cardano, ' Flexible multibody dynamics: A finite element approach', J. Wiley, Chichester, New York, 2001.
Assessment Final Project
Remarks There will be weekly assignments and a final project. You have to make a report on the final project. In doing the assignments I
strongly encourage you to work together. The final project is individual. Check out the up-to-date web page at
http://tam.cornell.edu/~als93/
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 126 of 150


WB1418-07 Engineering Dynamics 4
Responsible Instructor Prof. D.J. Rixen
Instructor Dr.ir. A.L. Schwab
Contact Hours / Week 2/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
2
Start Education 1
Exam Period Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Required for Engineering Dynamics and Mechanicsms (wb1419, extension of wb1418), Multibody Dynamics A (wb1310), Multibody
Dynamics B (wb1413), Numerical Methods in Dynamics (wb1416), Non-Linear Vibrations (wb1412).
Expected prior knowledge Statics and Strength of materials (e.g. wb1214), Dynamics (e.g. wb1311), Linear Algebra
Course Contents The dynamic behavior of structures (and systems in general) plays an essential role in engineering mechanics and in particular in
the design of controllers. In this master course, we will discuss how the equations describing the dynamical behavior of a
structure and of a mechatronical system can be set up. Fundamental concepts in dynamics such as equilibrium, stability,
linearization and vibration modes are discussed. If time permits, also an introduction to discretization techniques to approximate
continuous systems is proposed.

The course will discuss the following topics:

- Review of the virtual work principle and Lagrange equations


- linearization around an equilibrium position: vibrations
- elastodynamics in a solid and continuous systems
- discretization techniques (Rayleigh-Ritz and Finite Elements)
- Free vibration modes and modal superposition
- Forced harmonic response of non-damped and damped structures

Study Goals The student is able to select different ways of setting up the dynamic equations of mechanical systems, to perform an analysis of
the system in terms of linear stability and vibration modes and to properly use mode superposition techniques for computing
transient and harmonic responses. He also understands the concept of displacement approximation techniques for discretizing
continuous dynamic systems.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1. explain the relations between the principle of virtual work and the Lagrange equations for dynamics to the basic Newton laws
2. describe the concept of kinematic constraints (holonomic/non-holonomic, scleronomic/rheonomic) and choose a proper set of
degrees of freedom to describe a dynamic system
3. write the Lagrange equations for a minimum set of degrees of freedom and extend it to systems with additional constraints
(Lagrange multiplier method)
4. linearize the dynamic equations by considering the different contributions of the kinetic and potential energies (both for
system with and without overall motion imposed by scleronomic constraints)
5. analyze the linear stability of dynamic systems (damped and undamped) according to their state space formulation if necessary
6. explain and use the concept of free vibration modes and frequencies
7. interpret and apply the orthogonality properties of modes to describe the transient and harmonic dynamic response of damped
and undamped systems
8. evaluate the approximations introduced when using truncated modal series (spatial and spectral)
9. explain how mode superposition can be used to identify the eigenparamters of linear dynamic systems
Education Method Lecture
Computer Use The assignement will require using Matlab-like software.
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Lecture notes (available through blackboard)

References from literature:


Mechanical Vibrations, Theory and Application to Structural Dynamics, M. Géradin and D. Rixen, Wiley, 1997.
Applied Dynamics, with application to multibody and mechatronic systems, F.C. Moon, Wiley, 1998, isbn 0-471-13828-2.
Engineering vibration, D.J. Inman, Prentice Hall, 2001, isbn 0-13-726142-X
The Finite Element Method: Linear Static and Dynamic Finite Element Analysis, T.J.R. Hughes Prentice-Hall, 1987.
Structural Dynamics in Aeronautical Engineering, M.N. Bismark-Nasr, AIAA education series, 1999, isbn 1-56347-323-2
Assessment Oral exam + assignment
Remarks An assignment will be given which will make up part of the final mark. SInce the enphasis of the lectures will be on
understanding concepts in dynamics more than memorizing formulas, the oral exam will be open book to evaluate your
understanding of the concepts.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 127 of 150


WB1440 Eng. Optimization: Concept & Applications 3
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. A. van Keulen
Instructor Dr.ir. M. Langelaar
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Required for wb1441
Expected prior knowledge Basic knowledge of mechanical engineering and mathematics
Course Contents Formulation of optimization problems
Typical characteristics of optimization problems
Minimization without constraints
Constrained minimization
Simple optimization algorithms
Discrete design variables
Approximation concepts
Sensitivity analysis
Study Goals The student is able to formulate a proper optimization problem in order to solve a given design problem, and is able to select a
suitable approach for solving this problem numerically. Furthermore, he is able to interpret results of completed optimization
procedures.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.formulate an optimization model for various design problems
2.identify optimization model properties such as monotonicity, (non-)convexity and (non-) linearity
3.identify optimization problem properties such as constraint dominance, constraint activity, well boundedness and convexity
4.apply Monotonicity Analysis to optimization problems using the First Monotonicity Principle
5.perform the conversion of constrained problems into unconstrained problems using penalty or barrier methods
6.compute and interpret the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker optimality conditions for constrained optimization problems
7.describe the complications associated with the use of computational models in optimization
8.illustrate the use of compact modeling and response surface techniques for dealing with computationally expensive and noisy
optimization models
9.perform design sensitivity analysis using variational, discrete, semi-analytical and finite difference methods
10.identify a suitable optimization algorithm given a certain optimization problem
11.perform design optimization using the optimization routines implemented in the Matlab Optimization Toolbox
12.derive a linearized approximate problem for a given constrained optimization problem, and solve the original problem using a
sequence of linear approximations
13.describe the basic concepts used in structural topology optimization
Education Method Lectures (2 hours per week), exercises
Computer Use MATLAB is used for exercises.
Literature and Study Course material: P.Y. Papalambros et al. Principles of Optimal Design: Modelling and Computation.
Materials
References from literature: R.T. Haftka and Z. Gürdal: Elements of Structural Optimization.
Assessment MATLAB exercises
Percentage of Design 80%
Design Content The course is focusing on design optimization.
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 128 of 150


WB1451-05 Engineering Mechanics Fundamentals 4
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. E.H. van Brummelen
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period 4
5
Course Language English
Course Contents In this course the students will be given the basic knowhow to formulate the equations describing the mechanical behavior of
continuum media and learn the theory underlying the elastic behavior of solids. The course will also cover the concepts of
energies and variational analysis relevant to mechanical analysis. Two-dimensional and three dimensional classical problems
will be handled. Also the theory of plates and shells will be outlined.
Study Goals The student is able to choose the proper formulation to describe the continuous description of mechanical systems and of the
material behaviour. He/she can apply energy principles to derive the governing equations and he/she can use the fundamental
solutions for basic two and three-dimensional elasticity problems.

More specifically, the student must be able to:


1.formulate in a proper way the deformations in contiuum media (small and finite deformations), including the relation between
different strain and stress tensors
2.describe the relations between Lagrangian/Eulerian representation
3.write, in solid mechanics, the constitutive laws of elastic materials
4.use variational energy principles and apply them to derive approximation techniques
5.describe the special formulations relative to plates and shells
Education Method Lecture 0/0/2/2
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials Gerhard A. Holzapfel, "Nonlinear Solid Mechanics: a Continuum Approach for Engineering", Wiley, 2000.

References from literature:


R. Aris, "Vectors, Tensors and the Basic Equations of Fluid Mechanics", Dover, 1962.
Fung, Y.C., "Foundations of Solid Mechanics", Prentice-Hall, 1965.
M.E. Gurtin, "An Introduction to Continuum Mechanics, Mathematics in Science and Engineering", vol. 158, Academic Press,
New York, 1982.
R.W. Ogden, "Nonlinear elastic deformations", Ellis Horwood Ltd., 1984
Prerequisites A basic knowledge of engineering mechanics and linear algebra is required (see mechanics and dynamics courses from BSc
engineering mechanics)
Assessment Written assignment and oral exam
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 129 of 150


WB2301-5 System Identification and Parameter Estimation 7
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr. F.C.T. van der Helm
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. A.C. Schouten
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. E. de Vlugt
Instructor Ir. A. Klomp
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge wb2207
Summary System identification based on estimators of spectral densities (nonparametric black-box) and on discrete time domain models
(parametric grey-box). Translation of identified system dynamics into physical parameters using physical models (parameter
estimation). Application to open-loop and closed-loop systems. Estimation accuracy, perturbation signal design.
Course Contents Analysis of unknown dynamic systems in the time-domain and the frequency domain.
Application to relation between transferfunctions and spectral densities in open-loop and closed-loop systems.
Modelling of systems: Choice of model structure and parametrisation.
Linear and non-linear model structures.
Parameter estimation by optimization.
Optimization techniques: Gradient methods, random-search methods, genetic algorithms.
Experimental validation of models: Coherence, Variance-Accounted-For (VAF).
Special non-linear model structures: Expert systems, neural networks, fuzzy models.
Study Goals The student is able to:
1design test signals to identify an unknown system
a.design proper experimental measurement conditions
b.understand the differences between stochastic and deterministic signals
c.indicate the differences in application between transient and continuous signals
2estimate a nonparametric model of the unknown system from recorded signals
a.recognize and identify open-loop and closed-loop relations between measured signals
b.employ proper techniques to identify models in the frequency and time domain
c.validate the nonparametric models using different indicators
3parameterize nonparametric models
a.derive the best model structure based on a priori knowledge from physics
b.parameterize the dynamic relation between the recorded signals using linear and non-linear parameter estimation techniques
c.implement different optimization techniques
d.assess the uniqueness of the parameters using correlation analysis
e.evaluate the derived parameterized model through validation techniques
f.recognize three non-linear model structures, and their applicability in a given situation
Education Method Lectures (2 hours per week), practical assignments.
Computer Use Practical assignments on a PC with a number of available programs in MATLAB/SIMULINK.
Literature and Study Course material (available through Blackboard website):
Materials Lecture slides, Assignment guide, Formula sheet.
Demonstration programs in Matlab.
Book Chapters: Identification of Nonlinear Physiolocal Systems, Westwick and Kearney.
Assessment Written exam, graded assignments.
Remarks At the end of the course, a choice can be made out of several final assignments, for which recorded signals are available. The
available demonstration programs have to be adapted in order to estimate proper transfer functions and model parameters.
Percentage of Design 0%
Department 3mE Department Biomechanical Engineering

Page 130 of 150


WB2303-08 Measurement in Engineering 4
Responsible Instructor Prof.ir. R.H. Munnig Schmidt
Instructor Ir. J.W. Spronck
Gast Instructor Dr.ir. J.F. Creemer
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/2/2
x/x/x/x
Education Period 3
4
Start Education 3
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Required for Students Mechatronic System Design
Expected prior knowledge The master course "Mechatronic System Design" (WB 2414-08) is very much advised. Especially some basic knowledge on
electromechanics, dynamics and electronics is needed. Preparation by studying the related course material of WB 2414-08 is
almost compulsory.
This will be published on blackboard
Course Contents The course will focus on measurement techniques that are usually applied in Mechanical Engineering so integrated in larger
equipment but also in stand alone setups.

Topics include:

General performance characteristics of measurement instruments.


Elements in measurement systems: Sensors, Signal conditioning and Signal processing.
Electronics used in measurement systems and EMC. Signal manipulation and transmission, filtering, noise suppression.
Maesurement uncertainty, error sources, correction methods. Interfering and modifying error sources.
Calibration, traceability and standards.
Dynamics of measurement systems and measurement of dynamics. Transfer functions in the frequency and time domain.
Amplitude modulation.
Measuring devices for both linear and angular motion (displacement, velocity, acceleration)
Force, torque and pressure sensors.
Strain gauge principles
Optical measurement systems, encoders and laser interferometry
Temperature sensors.
MEMS related sensors
Study Goals * The student will be capable of understanding the fundamental approach in measuring fysical quantities
* The student will be capable of applying the basic principles of measurement of mechanical magnitudes.
* The student will be capable of determining the suitable measurement systems for a given metrology problem.
* The student will be able to design a concept measurement system for a given measurement problem by using different physical
principles.
Education Method Classroom Lectures. Basic theory and application by the main teacher and max. 4 invited speakers on a certain theme. These can
be from industry, another faculty or phd students about their research topic.
Computer Use No computer is needed. The course deals basically on the understanding of measurement systems rather than calculations.
Course Relations Strong relation with Mechatronic System Design (WB 2414-09)
Literature and Study A course book is used
Materials
Books Principles of Measurement Systems, J.P. Bentley, Pearson Education Ltd
Assessment Written examination, closed book
Department 3mE Department Precision & Microsystems Engineering

Page 131 of 150


WB2306 The Human Controller 3
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr. F.C.T. van der Helm
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. P. Breedveld
Contact Hours / Week 0/0/0/4
x/x/x/x
Education Period 4
Start Education 4
Exam Period 4
5
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge wb2207
Summary Cybernetical ergonomics, human controller, sensory organs, motoric system, physical load, mental load, supervisory control,
ergonomic design.
Course Contents 1. Introduction; definition, history and classification of ergonomics.
2. Sensory organs, perception window (frequency, intensity, just noticable difference).
3. Properties of the auditory, visual, tactile and vestibulary system.
4. Properties of sensory organs in relation to ergonomic design.
5. Motoric system: muscles, joints, propriocepsis, human movement control.
6. Human operator models, cross-over model, critical instability system.
7. Human operator models applied to airplane control.
8. Mental load, measurement methods.
9. Physical load, mechanical and physiological.
10. Antropometric (human) measures, design strategies.
11. Supervisory control.
Study Goals The student must be able to:
1.make a Problem Analysis of a given assignment in the field of a human in control of a technical device, e.g. a surgical tool, a
vehicle, a prosthesis or a chemical or nuclear plant
a)identify the dynamic relationships between the human and the device in terms of sensor input and actuation
b)describe and explain the properties of the human controller in the system under 1a, with reference to the performance and
stability limitations of the feedback loop
c)translate the result of 1a and 1b into technical Design Objectives of the controlled system without reference to any solutions
d)derive qualitative and quantitative Design Specifications from the Design Objectives of the controlled system, and categorize
and prioritize these.
e)assess feedback on the Design Specification from Assignor
2.understand the physical limitations and official load regulations of the human musculoskeletal system and its sensors
a)identify the relevant dynamic characteristics of human sensor systems (auditory, tactile, visual, vestibulary systems), muscles
and the central nervous system
b)indicate the mechanical, physiological and mental load and sustainable load of the human being, while at work and/or in a
human control situation (direct control or supervisory control)
c)select appropriate models and measurement methods for the load mentioned in 2b
d)generate a variety of Conceptual Designs to decrease the mechanical, physiological and mental load
e)judiciously select the most appropriate Conceptual Design
f)demonstrate the plausibility or feasibility of the Conceptual Design, with special emphasis to the workers benefits
Education Method Lectures (4 hours per week)
Literature and Study Reader: Cybernetical ergonomics.
Materials
Assessment Written exam
Percentage of Design 50%
Department 3mE Department Biomechanical Engineering

Page 132 of 150


WB2404 Man-machine systems 4
Responsible Instructor Prof.dr.ir. P.A. Wieringa
Contact Hours / Week 0/4/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Exam by appointment
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge wb2310, wb2306
Course Contents The entire spectrum between manual and supervisory control is treated using examples from the litrature, own research results en
ongoing work. The student is encouraged to use a system & control engineering approach: the operator is considered to be part
of a control loop which is either 1) continuously closed (manual control situations called 'direct control'), 2) quicly changing
between open and closed control (intermittent control e.g. car-driving or ship navigation), or 3) mainly open loop control
(supervisory control e.g. operators in control rooms).

The course is split into two parts:

A) theoretical and conceptual overview of the specialisation: Conceptual models for human behaviour (Rasmussen, Sheridan,
Stassen) and human error (Reason, Swain) and cognitive control (Hollnagel) will be treated. Some classical accidents will be
treated from the Human Factors point of view.

B) Analysis and design tools: For the design and analysis of human interaction with (complex) systems it is essential to perform
a (Cognitive) Task Analysis (Kirwan, Klein). An operator communicates with a system at different abstraction levels
(Rasmussen, Vincente, Lind). A hierarchy of abstraction levels is used to analysis human behaviour and interface design. Alarm
handling will be discussed used practical examples.

Each year an excursion will be held to a research centre or industrial plant to show some of the items discussed during this
course.
Study Goals A)Students will understand the different conditions for manual, intermittent and supervisory control.
a.The Cross-Over model is treated to qualitatively understand stability of manually controlled systems.
b.The Time to Line Crossing Concept is explained to understand and apply the Internal Representation Concept.
c.An example of the Optimal Control Theory is used to appraise monitoring and control problems during supervisory control.
d.Finally the monitoring and sampling behaviour (Shannon,Morray & Senders) as well as concepts for human operator control
(Rasmussen SRK-model, Sheridan Supervisory Control Tasks) are treated to support Human-Machine System and Cognitive
Engineering evaluations.

B)Design and evaluation tools are illustrated


a.Student will be capable to select and perform a Task Analysis
b.Fault Trees and Event Trees are applied to the Human-Machine Interaction domain
c.Barrier Crossing, Alarm/warning Systems are discussed to identify potentional problems in Human-Interaction design.
d.Functional Modeling and Abstraction Theory are explained.
e.Definitions and classification of Human Error and Human Error Assessment is treated using examples (Three Miles Island,
Harald of Free Enterprise) to assess the complexity and implications of design decisions.
Education Method Lectures (4 hours per week)
Computer Use Internet
Literature and Study Course material:
Materials
Reader +sheets: Man-Machine Systems, Peter A. Wieringa (Blackboard)

References from literature:

T.B. Sheridan, W.R. Rusell: Man-Machine Systems. Information, Control, and Decision Models of Human Performance.
Cambridge (MA) MIT, 1974, 452 pp.
T.B. Sheridan, Telerobotics, Automation and Human Supervisory Control, Cambridge (MA) MIT, 1992, 393 pp.
Assessment Written exam and/or oral exam depending on number of students attending
Remarks The course takes the system and control engineering approach. Students with a strong focus on information technology without a
basic understanding of control loops will have difficulties during the first part of the course.
An appropriate date for the exam will be negotiated with the students.

Laboratory project(s): a short hands-on activity may be considered.


Percentage of Design 70%
Design Content Concepts and tools for design and evaluation of Human Interaction with complex systems are discussed
Department 3mE Department Biomechanical Engineering

Page 133 of 150


WB2407 Human Movement Control 4
Responsible Instructor Dr.ir. A.C. Schouten
Instructor Prof.dr. F.C.T. van der Helm
Instructor Dr.ir. E. de Vlugt
Contact Hours / Week 2/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
2
Start Education 1
Exam Period 2
Course Language English
Expected prior knowledge Systems and Control Engineering (wb2207)
Course Contents 1. Introduction, joints, ligaments, muscles.
2. Three-dimensional motion description, Euler angles, helical axis.
3. 3-D motion recording.
4. Muscle properties, muscle models.
5. Musculo skeletal models, parameters, EMG-recordings.
6. Inverse dynamics, forward dynamics, optimization.
7. Motion control, stabilization.
8.'Equilibrium point' hypothesis.
9. Internal representation, adaptive model reference control.
10. Propriocepsis, muscle spindles, Golgi tendon organs.
11. A-reflexive muscles, reflexive muscles, neural transmission delays.
12. Muscle stiffness, joint stiffness, stabilization.
13. Applications to the human arm, shoulder and elbow.
14. Artificial neural networks as a model of the central nervous system.
15. Comparison with robotics.
Study Goals The student must be able to:
1.describe the basic anatomy and physiology of components of the neuromuscular system
a)describe basic biomechanics of biological tissues
b)describe the physiology of force generation in muscles
c)describe the anatomy and physiology of the important sensor systems in the neuromuscular system
d)describe the structure and functioning of the Central Nervous System
2.understand the system theoretical approach and control principles of the human control of his/her motions
a)explain the most appropriate way to describe three-dimensional motions of human beings
b)identify on a detailed level the relevant dynamic characteristics of human sensor systems (auditory, tactile, visual, vestibulary
systems), muscles and the central nervous system
c)explain the components of the neuromuscular control system from a control engineering perspective
3.make a Problem Analysis of a given assignment in the field of a human motion control
a)select appropriate measurement techniques for motion recording
b)derive motions equations of a part of the human body, build a simulation model and answer biomechanical questions using
simulations
c)apply musculoskeletal models to analyse the properties of muscles needed for specified tasks
d)identify the contribution of feedforward and feedback mechanisms in the Central Nervous System for the generation of
motions
e)apply control engineering techniques to assess the dynamics and (in)stability of the neuromuscular system, including the effect
of nested feedback loops and time-delays.
f)identify the interrelation between intrinsic muscle visco-elasticity and reflexive position, velocity and force feedback.
g)apply the models to solve biomechanical questions related to the upper and lower extremities, the eye, etc.
Education Method Lectures (2 hours per week)
Computer Use Homework assignments (four), using Matlab/Simulink.
Literature and Study Reader 'Human movement control' and additional scientific papers handed out during the course.
Materials
Assessment Written exam.
Remarks A visit to the dissection room of the VU Amsterdam will be organized.
Department 3mE Department Biomechanical Engineering

Page 134 of 150


WB5414-08 Design of Machines and Mechanisms 4
Responsible Instructor Dr. T. Tomiyama
Instructor Prof.dr.ir. J.L. Herder
Contact Hours / Week 2/2/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 1
2
Start Education 1
Exam Period 2
Course Language English
Course Contents 1. Introduction (Grouping, Assignments)
2. Conceptual Design of Machines (first quarter)
- Design Methods
- Requirement Analysis
- Function Modeling and Function Decomposition
- Generating Concepts
- Evaluation of Concepts
- Selection of Solutions
3. Design of Mechanisms
- Diagram of Motion
- Diagram of Goal Functions
- Available Mechanism Types
- Type- and Dimension Synthesis of Mechanisms
4. Presentation of Assignments
5. Industrial Application of Mechanization and Mechanisms (Factory Visit)
Study Goals The student must be able to:
1. describe the conceptual design process for systematic design
perform requirement analysis and build function structure
derive physical phenomena necessary for achieving required function and combine different options to systematically develop
different candidate solutions
compare different candidate solutions and choose the best solution
2. describe the basic design process of mechanisms
calculate the performance of various kinds of mechanisms (such as four bar link, cam, gear pairs, etc.) with software packages
for mechanisms design
determine the dimensions and other design parameters of a mechanism
3. employ these design methods for a real industrial problem in a teamwork environment
perform the design task at the both conceptual and basic design levels in a team
present their design in drawings or as a CAD model
Education Method Project: Students will be divided into groups of 4 to 5 students and each group is given its assignment.

At every lecture, in principle, first half of lecture hours is used for presenting students homework and the other for instructions.
During presentation of homework, students are expected to participate in discussions actively.
Computer Use Use of dedicated PC software. Software programs will become available for downloading from the blackboard.
Literature and Study Lecture notes wb5414 (in Dutch available from the blackboard).
Materials Pahl, G., Beitz, W., Feldhusen, J., Grote, K.-H: Engineering Design, A Systematic Approach (Third Edition), Translated by K.
Wallace and L. Blessing, Springer, London, ISBN: 978-1-84628-318-5, (2007). Available from TU Delft Library as an e-book.
Other appropriate literature and software programs will be specified during the lectures and uploaded to the Blackboard.
Books Lecture notes wb5414 (in Dutch available from the blackboard).
Pahl, G., Beitz, W., Feldhusen, J., Grote, K.-H: Engineering Design, A Systematic Approach (Third Edition), Translated by K.
Wallace and L. Blessing, Springer, London, ISBN: 978-1-84628-318-5, (2007). Available from TU Delft Library as an e-book.
Assessment Attendance (compulsory) including a factory visit scheduled at the end of the semester or the beginning of 2A: if you are absent
twice, the end of the story.

Written reports (intermediate and final).

Final presentation (taking place during the exam period).


Enrolment / Application Since this course involves team working, good command of English is required. In particular, foreign students should make sure
that their English level is high enough for intensive communication with teachers and other students.

While any specific knowledge about machine design is not required, it is desirable that students have some experiences of
machine design (such as BSc mechanical engineering design courses and projects).
Remarks During the course, a real industrial design case will be assigned to a group of students. Attendance is obligatory, including a
factory visit planned at the end of the lecture.
The project has two parts, conceptual design (largely following the Pahl & Beitz method) and mechanisms design (using various
analysis and synthesis software).
Percentage of Design 100%
Design Content Design of industrial machinery for discrete production (mechanization). Design aspects: technical and economical demands,
conceptual design, finding mechanisms to perform the required motions (synthesis), analysis and evaluation of solutions.
Department 3mE Department Biomechanical Engineering

Page 135 of 150


WBP202 Haptic Experiment Design 4
Responsible Instructor Dr. J.J. van den Dobbelsteen
Instructor Dr.ir. D.A. Abbink
Instructor Dr.ir. D.J. van Gerwen
Instructor Dr.ir. A.J. Knulst
Contact Hours / Week 0/x/0/x
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
4
Start Education 2
4
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Required for wb2407, wb2308
Expected prior knowledge Admission to MSc phase, wb2306, wb2311, wb3303
Summary Haptics, master-slave, control, manipulator, psychophysics, human-machine interaction
Course Contents In this course, students carry out self-contained projects which contribute to the realization of haptic (force-feedback) interfaces
for medical or automotive applications.

Key in this course is that students, in groups of two, identify their individual assignment themselves. You (together with your
team partner) will select and define a sub-project that will contribute to solve a part of the very complex problems encountered in
above-mentioned research fields. You will set up your own experiment and investigate how users respond to your experimental
manipulations and from that you should be able to draw conclusions that are relevant for the development of a haptic interface
for automotive or medical applications (e.g. feedback or control requirements).

Different experimental set-ups are available, including FCS Haptic Master, Omega, Phantom, Falcon Novint, Steering wheels
and custom made haptic devices. Often other hardware needs to be build for specific experiments.
Study Goals The student must be able to:
1Formulate a self-contained subproject within the framework of a given long-term research project in the field of haptics.
Get acquainted with background knowledge on the research subject.
Identify a subproject that has sufficient profundity and that can be completed in the allotted time.
Formulate the Research Questions or Objectives without reference to methods or solutions.
2Execute the self-defined subproject.
Select and apply appropriate Research Methods.
generate a variety of Research Questions.
Select the most appropriate Research Question.
Create an Experimental Platform.
Use suitable methods to analyse the data.
Present the results in a concise report and podium presentation.
Self-reflect on intended and actual project outcome.
Education Method Students preferably work in groups of two. They acquire basic knowledge through self-study, guided by instructors.
Subsequently, they define a project that fits in the overall project that is (a) sufficiently profound, and (b) doable in the allotted
time. Finally they execute this self-defined project and conclude with a presentation and a brief report.
The underlying educational idea is that students not only familiarize themselves in a subject that is new to them but also obtain
hands-on experience in handling big projects by subdividing them into multiple smaller ones. This experience is useful in their
graduation project and future profession.
Computer Use Depending on individual project between 20 and 80%
Literature and Study Course material: Blackboard
Materials
References from literature:
Depending on individual assignment, Reports from previous students, materials in 'Course Documents' folder in Blackboard.
Assessment 1. About one page containing self-defined project (background, problem statement, research objective, limitations, relevance to
overall project) and planning.
2. Intermediate progress presentation.
3. Final presentation (10-15 mins).
4. Written report (around 4 pages, two-column scientific paper format).
Remarks The course incorporates a fair amount of self-reliance, and is intended to be Self-Developing in two senses. Firstly, this term
emphasizes the responsibility of the students to acquire the appropriate knowledge. Secondly, it indicates that students do not
execute predefined yearly repetitive projects but rather define and execute small, not previously conducted research projects
within the framework of the innovative overall projects. Thus, the course aims to bridge the gap between regular courses and the
graduation project. Meanwhile, the students efforts add up to the completion of major research projects.
Percentage of Design 60%
Design Content Students will be familiarized with the following aspects, all of which are important for the design of the haptic systems:
specification of demands, conceptual design, optimization for the human operator, kinematics, dynamics, control (master-slave),
identification, modelling, biomechanics, psychophysics. Every student group specializes in one or more of these for their self-
defined assignment.
Department 3mE Department Biomechanical Engineering

Page 136 of 150


WM0808TU Safety in Transportation 5
Module Manager Dr.ir. H.M. Jagtman
Instructor Dr. S. Sillem
Contact Hours / Week 0/4/0/0
x/x/x/x
Education Period 2
Start Education 2
Exam Period Different, to be announced
Course Language English
Summary The course presents a systematic approach towards safety in different modes transportation, integrated in traffic design and
management. The focus is on the role of humans in causing safety related problems and in controlling them. The course provides
methods for analysis of safety problems and tools to prevent and control safety in transportation systems. Keywords: Safety
(design) principles & approaches, human factors & traffic control, research methodology
Course Contents This course discusses safety in different modes of transportation.
The following subjects will be presented:

* system description of different transport modes using safety models


* measures to prevent and/or control unsafe situations
* consequences of human behaviour for safety in transportation
* the concept of risk in relation to transport systems
* specific measures to control risk: design & implementation
* control of risk during the life-cycle of a transportation
* system and possible government interventions
* applicability of research methods for safety in transportation, including: accident analysis, observation studies, risk
identification, statistics, casuistics and simulation
Study Goals To make students familiar with various tools for safety analysis and control during design and operation of different transport
modes. After taking this course the student will have knowledge of:

* systematic and conceptual modelling for safety;


* human behaviour in (control of) transportation systems;
* structured method(s) for risk identification;
* the use of incident/accident databases and statistic and casuistic analysis.
Education Method The course consists of weekly lectures (4 hours), two scheduled workshops and two home assignments. Students will write and
individual essay. For further details check the blackboard.
Literature and Study Syllabus
Materials
Prerequisites Acceptance to a TUD Msc program or participant of the Minor Risicoanalyse en Risicomanagement.
Assessment The mark for this course is based on the results of four assignments and on an individual final essay. A minimum grade of 5.0 is
required for each assignment and the essay. The final grade is based on the following division assignments count for 15% each
and the essay for 40%.
Enrolment / Application Visit the blackboard site
Remarks After following this course, students can deepen their knowledge of this subject by following wm0802TU, Project Work Safety
Science.

Page 137 of 150


A. Abate
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Hybrid & Distributed Sys&Con
Telephone +31 15 27 85606

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Hybrid & Distributed Sys&Con
Telephone +31 15 27 85606

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Hybrid & Distributed Sys&Con
Telephone +31 15 27 85606

Dr.ir. D.A. Abbink


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Human-Robot Interaction
Telephone +31 15 27 82077
Room 34.F-1-140

W.A. Aprile
Unit Industrieel Ontwerpen
Department Design Concept. & Comm.
Telephone +31 15 27 83537

Prof.dr. R. Babuska
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Learning & Autonomous Control
Telephone +31 15 27 85117
Room 34.C-2-330

Dr.ir. A. van Beek


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Mechatronic Systems Design
Telephone +31 15 27 86984
Room 34.G-1-420

Prof.dr. C.I.M. Beenakker


Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department Electr Compon Techn & Mat
Telephone +31 15 27 83868

Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.


Department Elektr Compon Techn & Mat
Telephone +31 15 27 83868

Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.


Department Beijing Research Centre
Telephone +31 15 27 83868

Prof.dr.ir. H. Bijl
Unit Luchtvaart- & Ruimtevaarttechn
Department Aerodynamics
Room 62.NB 1.47.1

Unit Luchtvaart- & Ruimtevaarttechn


Department Luchtvaart- & Ruimtevaarttechn
Room 62.NB 1.47.1

Dr. E. de Boer
Unit Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch
Department Transportplanning

Unit Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Department Transportplanning

Page 138 of 150


Unit Universiteitsdienst
Department Directie Communication

Dr.ir. X.J.A. Bombois


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Intelligent Control & Robotics

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Intelligent Control & Robotics

Nabestaanden van O.H. Bosgra


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Support Delft Cent Syst & Cont

Prof.dr.ir. P. Breedveld
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Med. Instr.& Bio-Inspired Tech
Telephone +31 15 27 85232
Room 34.E-3-340

Prof.dr. K.A. Brookhuis


Unit Techniek, Bestuur & Management
Department Transport & Logistics

Unit Techniek, Bestuur & Management


Department Transport & Logistics

Dr.ir. E.H. van Brummelen


Dr.ir. J.F. Creemer
Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department EWI - Algemeen

Prof.dr. J. Dankelman
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Med. Instr.& Bio-Inspired Tech
Telephone +31 15 27 85565
Room 34.E-1-330

Prof.dr.ir. B.H.K. De Schutter


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Hybrid & Distributed Sys&Con
Telephone +31 15 27 85113
Room 34.C-3-340

Dr. K. Dekker
Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department Mathematical Physics
Telephone +31 15 27 87230
Room 36.HB 05.320

Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.


Department Mathematical Physics
Telephone +31 15 27 87230
Room 36.HB 05.320

Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.


Department Mathematical Physics
Telephone +31 15 27 87230
Room 36.HB 05.320

Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.


Department Mathematical Physics
Telephone +31 15 27 87230
Room 36.HB 05.320

Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.


Department Mathematische Fysica

Page 139 of 150


Telephone +31 15 27 87230
Room 36.HB 05.320

Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.


Department Mathematische Fysica
Telephone +31 15 27 87230
Room 36.HB 05.320

Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.


Department Mathematical Physics
Telephone +31 15 27 87230
Room 36.HB 05.320

Dr.ir. N.H. van Dijk


Unit Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Department RST/Fund. Asp. of Mat.&Energy
Telephone +31 15 27 86775
Room 50.02.01.300

Prof.dr. T.J. Dingemans


Unit Luchtvaart- & Ruimtevaarttechn
Department Novel Aerospace Materials
Room 62.NB 1.34

Unit Luchtvaart- & Ruimtevaarttechn


Department Novel Aerospace Materials
Room 62.NB 1.34

Unit Technische Natuurwetenschappen


Department ChemE/Organic Mat. & Interf.
Room 62.NB 1.34

Unit Technische Natuurwetenschappen


Department ChemE/Organic Mat. & Interf.
Room 62.NB 1.34

Dr. J.J. van den Dobbelsteen


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Med. Instr.& Bio-Inspired Tech
Telephone +31 15 27 89515
Room 34.F-0-200

Dr. K.W.A. van Dongen


Unit Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Department ImPhys/Acoust. Wavefld Imaging
Telephone +31 15 27 83378
Room 22.D 205

Dr.ir. W.D. van Driel


Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department Electr Compon Techn & Mat

Dr. J. Duszczyk
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department 3mE General

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department 3ME Algemeen

Dr.ir. A.C. van der Eijk


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Medical Instruments

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Medical Instruments

Page 140 of 150


Prof.dr.ir. J. van Eijk
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Mechatronic Systems Design

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Mechatronic Systems Design

Prof.dr.ir. L.J. Ernst


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Fundamentals of Microsystems

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department 3mE Algemeen

Dr.ir. P.R. Fraanje


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Systems and Control
Telephone +31 15 27 85189

Prof.dr. P.J. French


Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department Electronic Instrumentation
Telephone +31 15 27 84729
Room 36.HB 15.260

Ir. N. Geerlofs
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department MSE-3
Telephone +31 15 27 84920
Room 34.J-0-310

Prof.dr.ir. A.J.C. van Gemund


Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department Embedded Software
Telephone +31 15 27 86411

Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.


Department Embedded Software
Telephone +31 15 27 86411

Dr.ir. D.J. van Gerwen


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Med. Instr.& Bio-Inspired Tech
Telephone +31 15 27 86574
Room 34.F-0-200

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Med. Instr.& Bio-Inspired Tech
Telephone +31 15 27 86574
Room 34.F-0-200

Dr.ir. J.F.L. Goosen


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Struc Optimization & Mechanics
Telephone +31 15 27 86500

Prof.dr.ir. C.A. Grimbergen


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Medical Instruments
Telephone +31 15 27 83607
Room 34.F-1-080

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Med. Instr.& Bio-Inspired Tech
Telephone +31 15 27 83607
Room 34.F-1-080

Page 141 of 150


Nabestaanden van H.T. Grimmelius
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Ship Design, Prod & Operations
Telephone +31 15 27 82746

E.D. van Grondelle


Unit Industrieel Ontwerpen
Department Design Aesthetics
Telephone +31 15 27 89488
Room 32.C-3-220

Prof.dr.ir. M.A. Gutierrez De La Merced


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department 3mE Algemeen
Telephone +31 15 27 81610

Dr.ir. R. Happee
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Intelligent Vehicles
Telephone +31 15 27 83213
Room 34.E-0-240

Dr. L. Hartmann
Unit Techniek, Bestuur & Management
Department Centre for Entrepreneurship
Telephone +31 15 27 88073
Room 31.C2.150

Prof.dr.ir. J. Hellendoorn
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Delft Cent for Systems & Contr
Telephone +31 15 27 89007
Room 34.C-1-230

Prof.dr. F.C.T. van der Helm


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Biomech.&Human-Machine Control
Telephone +31 15 27 85616
Room 34.E-1-340

Prof.dr.ir. J.L. Herder


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Precision & Microsystems Eng
Telephone +31 15 27 84713
Room 34.G-1-270

Dr. P.S.C. Heuberger


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Support Delft Cent Syst & Cont

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Support Delft Cent Syst & Cont

Dr.ir. D.R. van der Heul


Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department Numerical Analysis
Telephone +31 15 27 82632
Room 36.HB 03.080

Prof.dr.ir. P.M.J. van den Hof


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Model-based Measurem & Contr

Page 142 of 150


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Model-based Measurem & Contr

Prof.dr.ir. E.G.M. Holweg


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Systems and Control
Room 34.E-3-300

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Engineering Dynamics
Room 34.E-3-300

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Int. Vehicles&Cogniti Robotics
Room 34.E-3-300

Dr. S.J. Hulshoff


Unit Luchtvaart- & Ruimtevaarttechn
Department Aerodynamics
Telephone +31 15 27 81538
Room 64.HSL 0.36

Dr.ir. H.M. Jagtman


Unit Techniek, Bestuur & Management
Department Safety and Security Science

Prof.dr.ir. K.M.B. Jansen


Unit Industrieel Ontwerpen
Department Emerging Materials
Telephone +31 15 27 86905
Room 32.B-3-170

Dr.ir. M. Janssen
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department MSE-5
Telephone +31 15 27 85866
Room 34.H-1-230

Prof.dr.ir. L.A.I. Kestens


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department MSE-1
Telephone +31 15 27 84353
Room 34.H-3-330

Prof.dr.ir. A. van Keulen


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Struc Optimization & Mechanics
Telephone +31 15 27 86515
Room 34.G-1-430

T. Keviczky
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Network Cyber-Physical Systems
Telephone +31 15 27 82928
Room 34.C-3-310

A. Khiat
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Micro and Nano Engineering
Telephone +31 15 27 86547

D. de Klerk
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Dynamics of Micro Nano Systems
Room 34.G-1-200

Page 143 of 150


Ir. A. Klomp
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Biomechatronics & Biorobotics
Room -

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Biomechatronics & Biorobotics

Dr. P.G. Kluit


Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department Software Engineering
Room -

Dr.ir. A.J. Knulst


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Med. Instr.& Bio-Inspired Tech

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Medical Instruments

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Medical Instruments

Dr.ir. S. Koussios
Unit Luchtvaart- & Ruimtevaarttechn
Department Struc Integrity & Composites
Telephone +31 15 27 88164
Room 62.NB 0.37

Dr. D.J.P. Lahaye


Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department Numerical Analysis
Telephone +31 15 27 87257
Room 36.HB 03.040

Dr.ir. M. Langelaar
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Struc Optimization & Mechanics
Telephone +31 15 27 86506
Room 34.G-1-300

Dr.ir. H.H. Langen


Dr.ir. J.F.M. Molenbroek
Unit Industrieel Ontwerpen
Department Applied Ergonomics & Design
Telephone +31 15 27 83086
Room 32.C-2-210

Unit Industrieel Ontwerpen


Department Applied Ergonomics & Design
Telephone +31 15 27 83086
Room 32.C-2-210

Prof.ir. R.H. Munnig Schmidt


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Mechatronic Systems Design
Telephone +31 15 27 86663

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Mechatronic Systems Design
Telephone +31 15 27 86663

Page 144 of 150


Ir. J.J.L. Neve
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Precision & Microsystems Eng
Telephone +31 15 27 86581
Room 34.G-1-290

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Micro and Nano Engineering
Telephone +31 15 27 86581
Room 34.G-1-290

Prof.dr.ir. L. Nicola
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department MSE-7
Telephone +31 15 27 88806

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department MSE-7
Telephone +31 15 27 88806

Dr.ir. R.A.J. van Ostayen


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Mechatronic Systems Design
Telephone +31 15 27 81647
Room 34.G-1-460

R.D. Peeters
Unit Universiteitsdienst
Department HR Advies CiTG
Telephone +31 15 27 82780
Room 23.HG 2.41

Prof.dr. P.C.M. Planken


Unit Technische Natuurwetenschappen
Department ImPhys/Optics

Unit Technische Natuurwetenschappen


Department ImPhys/Optics

Dr.ir. D.H. Plettenburg


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Biomech.&Human-Machine Control
Telephone +31 15 27 85615
Room 34.E-1-230

Dr.ir. H. Polinder
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Transport Eng & Logistics
Telephone +31 15 27 81844

Ir. P.C.J. van Rens


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Mechatronic Systems Design

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Mechatronic Systems Design

Dr.ir. P.E.J. Rivera Diaz del Castillo


Prof. D.J. Rixen
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Engineering Dynamics
Telephone +31 15 27 81523
Room 34.G-1-455

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng

Page 145 of 150


Department Dynamics of Micro Nano Systems
Telephone +31 15 27 81523
Room 34.G-1-455

Prof.dr.ir. P.M. Sarro


Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department Electr Compon Techn & Mat
Telephone +31 15 27 87708
Room 36.DI 00.041

Prof.dr. C.W. Scherer


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Support Delft Cent Syst & Cont

Ir. J.P. van Schieveen


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Mechatronic Systems Design

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Mechatronic Systems Design

Dr.ir. G. Schitter
Dr.ir. A.C. Schouten
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Biomech.&Human-Machine Control
Telephone +31 15 27 85247
Room 34.F-1-240

Dr.ir. A.L. Schwab


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Biomech.&Human-Machine Control
Telephone +31 15 27 82701
Room 34.F-2-120

Ir. A. Segal
Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department Numerical Analysis
Telephone 85535

Dr. S. Sillem
Unit Techniek, Bestuur & Management
Department Safety and Security Science
Telephone +31 15 27 87320
Room 31.c1.130

Ir. J. Sinke
Unit Luchtvaart- & Ruimtevaarttechn
Department Struc Integrity & Composites
Telephone +31 15 27 85137
Room 62.NB 0.54

Dr.ir. W.G. Sloof


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department MSE-1
Telephone +31 15 27 84924
Room 34.H-4-260

Prof.dr.ir. L.J. Sluijs


Unit Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch
Department Structural Engineering
Telephone +31 15 27 82728
Room 23.HG 6.49

Page 146 of 150


Dr.ir. O. van der Sluis
Ir. F.P.M. Sopers
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Transport Eng & Logistics
Telephone +31 15 27 85292

Ir. J.W. Spronck


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Mechatronic Systems Design
Telephone +31 15 27 81824
Room 34.G-1-455

Prof.dr. U. Staufer
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Micro and Nano Engineering
Telephone +31 15 27 86804
Room 34.G-1-350

Dr. R.A.C.M.M. van Swaaij


Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department Photovolt. Materials & Devices
Telephone +31 15 27 87259
Room 36.LB 03.410

Prof.dr.ir. A.J.P. Theuwissen


Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department Electronic Instrumentation
Telephone +31 15 27 89464
Room 36.HB 15.250

Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.


Department Electronic Instrumentation
Telephone +31 15 27 89464
Room 36.HB 15.250

Dr.ir. M. Tichem
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Micro and Nano Engineering
Telephone +31 15 27 81603
Room 34.G-1-310

Dr. T. Tomiyama
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department 3mE Algemeen

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Intelligent Mechanical Systems

Dr.ir. G.J.M. Tuijthof


Department Conversie
Room 34.E-3-320

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Med. Instr.& Bio-Inspired Tech
Room 34.E-3-320

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Med. Instr.& Bio-Inspired Tech
Room 34.E-3-320

S.R. Turteltaub
Unit Luchtvaart- & Ruimtevaarttechn
Department Aerospace Struc & Comp Mech
Telephone +31 15 27 85360
Room 62.NB 2.24

Page 147 of 150


Dr.ir. H.P.M. Veeke
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Transport Eng & Logistics
Telephone +31 15 27 82706
Room 34.B-4-290

Dr. G. van der Velde


Unit Techniek, Bestuur & Management
Department Economie van Innovatie

Prof.dr.ir. M.H.G. Verhaegen


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Numerics for Contr.& Identific
Telephone +31 15 27 85204
Room 34.C-1-340

Dr.ir. F.J. Vermolen


Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department Numerical Analysis
Telephone +31 15 27 87298
Room 36.HB 03.310

Dr.ir. E. de Vlugt
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Biomech.&Human-Machine Control
Telephone +31 15 27 85247
Room 34.F-1-240

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Biomech.&Human-Machine Control
Telephone +31 15 27 85247
Room 34.F-1-240

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Biomechatronics & Biorobotics
Telephone +31 15 27 85247
Room 34.F-1-240

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Biomechatronics & Biorobotics
Telephone +31 15 27 85247
Room 34.F-1-240

Ir. E.J.H. de Vries


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Engineering Dynamics

Prof.ir. A.C.W.M. Vrouwenvelder


Unit Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch
Department Constructiemechanica
Telephone +31 15 27 84782
Room 23.HG 6.44

Unit Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch


Department Structural Mechanics
Telephone +31 15 27 84782
Room 23.HG 6.44

Prof.dr.ir. C. Vuik
Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department Numerical Analysis
Telephone +31 15 27 85530

Page 148 of 150


Dr.ir. A.J.J. van der Weiden
Ir. J. Wesselingh
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Mechatronic Systems Design
Telephone +31 15 27 81259

Prof.dr.ir. P.A. Wieringa


Unit Universiteitsdienst
Department College van Bestuur
Telephone +31 15 27 83164
Room 34a.H-0-340

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Medical Instruments
Telephone +31 15 27 83164
Room 34a.H-0-340

Dr. P. Wilders
Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department Mathematical Physics
Telephone +31 15 27 87291
Room 36.HB 05.050

Dr.ir. J.C.F. de Winter


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Biomech.&Human-Machine Control
Telephone +31 15 27 86794
Room 34.F-2-100

Prof.dr. J.H.W. de Wit


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department MSE-1
Telephone +31 15 27 82196
Room 34.H-2-240

Dr.ir. P.T.L.M. van Woerkom


Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department Support Precision & Microsys E
Telephone +31 15 27 82792

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Engineering Dynamics
Telephone +31 15 27 82792

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Engineering Dynamics
Telephone +31 15 27 82792

Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng


Department Struc Optimization & Mechanics
Telephone +31 15 27 82792

Dr.ir. R.F. Wolffenbuttel


Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department Elektronische Instrumentatie
Telephone +31 15 27 86287
Room 36.HB 15.030

Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.


Department Electronic Instrumentation
Telephone +31 15 27 86287
Room 36.HB 15.030

Dr.ing. H.W. van Zeijl


Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department Electr Compon Techn & Mat

Page 149 of 150


Telephone +31 15 27 81092
Room 36.DI 01.110

Prof.dr. G.Q. Zhang


Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.
Department Elektr Compon Techn & Mat
Telephone +31 15 27 89495
Room 36.DI 00.030

Unit Elektrotechn., Wisk. & Inform.


Department Electr Compon Techn & Mat
Telephone +31 15 27 89495
Room 36.DI 00.030

Dr. J. Zhou
Unit Mech, Maritime & Materials Eng
Department BioMaterials and Tissue BioMec
Telephone +31 15 27 85357
Room 34.E-3-310

Prof.dr. H.J. van Zuylen


Unit Civiele Techniek & Geowetensch
Department Transportplanning
Room -

Prof.dr.ir. S. van der Zwaag


Unit Luchtvaart- & Ruimtevaarttechn
Department Novel Aerospace Materials
Telephone +31 15 27 82248
Room 62.NB 1.30

Page 150 of 150