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Florida International University

Department of Political Science

Comprehensive Examination Reading List

THEORY AND METHODS IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS

revised summer 2005

The comprehensive examination assesses whether the candidate has a broad command of the
literature in the comparative politics subfield, especially regarding the literature that falls outside
of the geographic area and/or topical focus of the student. Thus, the reading list below is not
organized by the traditional geographic divisions of area studies in political science. Regarding
area-specific literature in comparative politics, the student is responsible for consulting his/her
committee members and other departmental faculty who specialize in a given world region
(Europe, Latin America, etc.). The candidate and faculty will work together to develop an
appropriate reading program that includes course syllabi and additional literature necessary to
understanding area-specific politics. Meanwhile, the list below emphasizes literature that is
essential to developing a command of the intellectual history, theoretical debates, and
methodological diversity of the subfield.

Candidates should complement the readings below by paying close attention to current trends in
research and publication. Although general political science journals such as American Political
Science Review, Journal of Politics, American Journal of Political Science, etc., give preference
to American politics, they do continue to publish articles with broad implications for
comparative politics. However, it tends to be in the three major subfield journals—Comparative
Politics, Comparative Political Studies, and World Politics—that one finds the most important
ongoing debates. Students should pay particular attention to these three publications, but should
complement them by frequent reference to the appropriate area-specific outlets. For example,
students of European politics should be reading the European Journal of Political Research and
West European Politics; students working on Latin America should be following Latin
American Research Review and Journal of Interamerican Studies and World Affairs; and so on.
Finally, there are a number of topical and "specialty" journals that may be relevant to a student's
research program. For example, debates on political institutions appear in Electoral Studies and
Party Politics; exchanges on democratization theory appear in Journal of Democracy; research
on developing societies can be found in Studies in Comparative International Development and
the Journal of Developing Areas, and so forth. Only by frequent consultation of these
publication outlets can one acquire a good sense of intellectual directions in the subfield: who is
publishing, what they are writing about, and why the journal felt compelled to print it.
Therefore, students should get in the habit of going to the library and "walking the journals," at
least once a month.

To help students study for this exam, this reading list organizes the readings by sections.
(Students should understand that the creation of these sections, and the assignment of specific
works to a given section, is necessarily somewhat arbitrary.) Within each section, the readings
are organized chronologically, and they should probably be read that way, in order to gain an
appreciation of the cumulative nature of social-scientific research. The readings with an asterisk
(*) are “absolutely essential” readings. Other “important” sources are preceded by a plus (+)
sign. The remaining readings are items which are “influential” in the field and which all
comparativists, no matter what their specific interests are, should know.

Organization of Readings

1. General Readers/Intellectual Histories


2. The Comparative Method
3. Modernization and Political Development
4. Political Culture
5. Development
5. 1. Dependency
5. 2. World Systems
5. 3. Macropolitical Economy
6. Interest Intermediation
6.1. Pluralism
6.2. Corporatism
6.3. Consociationalism
7. The State
8. Political Regimes: Authoritarianism and Democratization
9. Political Institutions
9.1. Presidentialism and Parliamentarism
9.2. Parliamentary Government
9.3. Political Parties
9.4. Electoral Systems and Party Competition
9.5. Voting Turnout and Behavior
9.6 Legislative Institutions
9.7 Judicial Institutions
9.8 Public Policy and Bureaucracy
10. Collective Action and Contentious Politics

1. General Readers/Intellectual Histories

*Harry Eckstein, “A Perspective on Comparative Politics, Past and Present,” Comparative


Politics: A Reader (Free Press, 1962), pp. 3-32.
*Joel Migdal, “Studying the Politics of Development and Change: The State of the Art,” pp. 309-
38, in Ada W. Finifter (ed.), Political Science: The State of the Discipline (Washington,
D.C.: The American Political Science Association, 1983).
Myron Weiner and Samuel Huntington (eds.), Understanding Political Development (Boston:
Little Brown, 1987).
Gabriel Almond, "Separate Tables: Schools and Sects in Political Science," PS: Political Science
and Politics 21: 828-842.
Howard J. Wiarda (ed.), New Directions in Comparative Politics (Boulder, Col.: Westview
Press, 1991, 2nd. ed.).
+William Keech, Robert Bates and Peter Lange, “Political Economy within Nations,” pp. 219-
63, in William Crotty (ed.), Political Science: Looking to the Future Vol. 2. Comparative
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Politics, Policy, and International Relations (Evanston, Il.: Northwestern University
Press, 1991).
Barbara Geddes, “Paradigms and Sand Castles in Comparative Politics of Developing Areas,”
pp. 45-75, in William Crotty (ed.), Political Science: Looking to the Future Vol. 2.
Comparative Politics, Policy, and International Relations (Evanston, Il.: Northwestern
University Press, 1991).
Dankwart Rustow and Kenneth Paul Erickson, eds., Comparative Political Dynamics: Global
Research Perspectives (New York: Harper-Collins Publishers, 1991),
Kathleen Thelen and Sven Steinmo, “Historical Institutionalism in Comparative Politics,” pp. 1-
32, in Thelen Steinmo and Frank Longstreth (eds.), Structuring Politics. Historical
Institutionalism in Comparative Analysis (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,
1992).
*Ronald Rogowski, “Comparative Politics,” in Ada W. Finifter (ed.), Political Science: The
State of the Discipline II (Washington, D.C.: The American Political Science
Association, 1993).
*Philippe Schmitter, “Comparative Politics,” pp. 171-77, in Joel Krieger (ed.), The Oxford
Companion to the Politics of the World (New York: Oxford University Press, 1993).
*Ronald Chilcote, Theories of Comparative Politics, 2nd edition (Boulder, Col.: Westview Press,
1994).
*Peter Mair, “Comparative Politics: An Overview,” pp. 309-35, in Robert Goodin and Hans-
Dieter Klingemann (eds.), The New Handbook of Political Science (Oxford: Oxford
University Press, 1996).
*Mark I. Lichbach and Alan S. Zuckerman (eds.), Comparative Politics: Rationality, Culture and
Structure (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997).
*Laitin, David D., "Comparative Politics: The State of the Subdisicipline," pp. 630-659 in Ira
Katznelson and Helen V. Milner (eds.), Political Science: State of the Discipline (New
York: W.W. Norton & Washington, DC: American Political Science Association, 2002).

2. The Comparative Method

+Adam Przeworski and Henry Tuene, The Logic of Comparative Social Inquiry (New York:
Wiley, 1970).
Giovanni Sartori, “Concept Misformation in Comparative Politics,” American Political Science
Review 64, no. 4 (December 1970).
*Arend Lijphart, “Comparative Politics and the Comparative Method,” American Political
Science Review Vol. 65, Nº 3 (1971): 682-93.
Lijphart, Arend. The Comparable-Cases Strategy in Comparative Research. Comparative
Political Studies 8, 2 (July 1975): 158-177.
Charles Tilly, Big Structures, Large Processes, Huge Comparisons (N.Y.: Russell Sage
Foundation, 1984).
+Robert W. Jackman, “Cross-National Statistical Research and the Study of Comparative
Politics,” American Journal of Political Science 29, no. 1 (February 1985).
+Charles Ragin, The Comparative Method: Moving Beyond Qualitative and Quantitative
Strategies (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1987).
*Harry Eckstein, "Case Study and Theory in Political Science," pp. 117-178 in Regarding
Politics: Essays on Political Theory, Stability and Change (Berkeley: University of
California Press, 1988).
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+Jon Elster, Nuts and Bolts for the Social Sciences (New York: Cambridge University Press,
1989).
George Tsebelis, Nested Games: Rational Choice in Comparative Politics (Berkeley: University
of California Press, 1990), esp. chaps. 1 and 2.
Barbara Geddes, “How the Cases You Choose Affect the Answers You Get: Selection Bias in
Comparative Politics,” in James A. Stimson (ed.), Political Analysis Vol. 2 1990 (Ann
Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 1991).
*David Collier, “The Comparative Method,” in Ada W. Finifter (ed.), Political Science: The
State of the Discipline II (Washington, D.C.: The American Political Science
Association, 1993).
Theda Skocpol and Margaret Somers, “The Uses of Comparative History in Macrosocial
Inquiry,” Comparative Studies in Society and History 22(2) 1980:174-197. [Reprinted in
Skocpol, Social Revolutions in the Modern World (New York: Cambridge University
Press, 1994).
*Gary King, Robert O. Keohane and Sidney Verba, Designing Social Inquiry. Scientific
Inference in Qualitative Research (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1994).
David Collier and James Mahoney, “Insights and Pitfalls: Selection Bias in Qualitative
Research,” World Politics 49, 1 (1996): 56-91.
+Charles Ragin, Dirk Berg-Schlosser, and Gisèle de Meur, “Political Methodology: Qualitative
Methods,” pp. 749-68, in Robert E. Goodin and Hans-Dieter Klingemann (eds.), A New
Handbook of Political Science (New York: Oxford University Press, 1996).
Robert Bates, Avner Greif, Margaret Levi, Jean-Laurent Rosenthal, and Barry Weingast,
Analytic Narratives (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1998).
Douglas Dion, "Evidence and Inference in the Comparative Case Study," Comparative Politics
30, 2 (January 1998): 127-145.
James Mahoney and Dietrich Rueschmeyer (eds.), Comparative Historical Analysis in the Social
Sciences (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003).

3. Modernization and Political Development

*Gabriel Almond, “Introduction: A Functional Approach to Comparative Politics,” in G.


Almond and James Coleman (eds.), The Politics of the Developing Areas (Princeton:
Princeton University Press, 1960).
*Seymour M. Lipset, Political Man: The Social Bases of Politics (N.Y.: Doubleday/Anchor
Books, 1960), Chapters 2, 3.
David Easton, A Systems Analysis of Political Life (New York: Wiley, 1965).
*Barrington Moore, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy. Lord and Peasant in the
Making of the Modern World (Boston: Beacon Press, 1966).
*Samuel Huntington, Political Order in Changing Societies (New Haven, CT.: Yale University
Press, 1968).
Reinhard Bendix, Kings or People: Power and the Mandate to Rule (Berkeley: University of
California Press, 1978).
Gabriel Almond and G. Bingham Powell, Jr., Comparative Politics: Systems, Processes, and
Policy (Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1978).
Myron Weiner and Samuel Huntington (eds.), Understanding Political Development (Boston:
Little Brown, 1987). [Huntington and Almond Chapters]

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+Larry Diamond, “Economic Development and Democracy Reconsidered,” American
Behavioral Scientist 35 (4/5) 1992: 450-99.
+Seymour Martin Lipset, Kyoung-Ryung Seong, and Juan Carlos Torres, “A Comparative
Analysis of the Social Requisites of Democracy,” International Social Science Journal
no. 136 (May 1993): 155-75.
Seymour Martin Lipset, “The Social Requisites of Democracy Revisited,” American
Sociological Review Vol. 59 (February 1994): 1-22
*Adam Przeworski and Fernando Limongi, “Modernization: Theory and Facts,” World Politics
49, 2 (January 1997): 155-83.
Howard Wiarda and Steven Boilard, eds., Non-Western Theories of Development: Regional
Norms Versus Global Trends (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1998).

4. Political Culture

*Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (various editions).
*Gabriel Almond and Sidney Verba, The Civic Culture: Political Attitudes and Democracy in
Five Nations (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1963).
Scott, James C. 1976. The Moral Economy of the Peasant: Rebellion and Subsistence in
Southeast Asia. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.
Gabriel Almond and Sidney Verba (eds.), The Civic Culture Revisited (Boston: Little, Brown,
1980).
Ronald Inglehart, Culture Shift in Advanced Industrial Society (Princeton: Princeton University,
1990).
*Robert Putnam, Making Democracy Work (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993).
+Larry Diamond (ed.), Political Culture and Democracy in Developing Countries (Boulder, Col.:
Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1993). [See Diamond Introduction and Conclusion.]
Paul R. Abramson and Ronald Inglehart, Value Change in Global Perspective (Ann Arbor:
University of Michigan Press, 1995).
*Ronald Inglehart, Modernization and Postmodernization: Cultural, Economic, and Political
Change in 43 Societies (Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, 1997).

5. Development

5. 1. Dependency

+J. Samuel Valenzuela and Arturo Valenzuela, “Modernization and Dependency: Alternative
Perspectives in the Study of Latin American Politics,” Comparative Politics 10 (4) 1978:
535-52.
James A. Caporaso, "Dependence, dependency, and power in the global system: a structural and
behavioral analysis," International Organization 32, 1 (Winter 1978): 13-43.
*Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Enzo Faletto, Dependency and Development in Latin America
(Berkeley: University of California Press, 1979).
Peter Evans, Dependent Development: The Alliance of Multinational, State, and Local Capital in
Brazil (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1979).
Robert Packenham, The Dependency Movement: Scholarship and Politics in Development
Studies (Harvard University Press, 1992).

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5. 2. World Systems

Immanuel Wallerstein, “The Rise and Future Demise of the World Capitalist System: Concepts
for Comparative Analysis,” Comparative Studies in Society and History 16 (4) 1974:
387-415.
+Immanuel Wallerstein, The Modern World-System: Capitalist Agriculture and the Origins of
the European World-Economy in the Sixteenth Century (New York: Academic Press,
1974).
Immanuel Wallerstein, The Modern World-System II: Mercantilism and the Consolidation of the
European World-Economy, 1600-1750 (New York: Academic Press, 1980).
Andrew Janos, Politics and Paradigms. Changing Theories of Change in Social Science
(Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1986), Chapter 3.

5. 3. Macropolitical Economy

+Alexander Gerschenkron, Economic Backwardness in Historical Perspective (Cambridge:


Cambridge University Press, 1962), Chapter 1, Postscript.
Douglas North, Structure and Change in Economic History (New York: Norton, 1981).
Robert Bates, Markets and States in Tropical Africa: The Political Basis of Agricultural Policies
(Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1981).
+Mancur Olson, The Rise and Decline of Nations (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1982).
*Peter Hall, Governing the Economy: The Politics of State Intervention in Britain and France
(Oxford University Press, 1986).
*Margaret Levi, Of Rule and Revenue (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1988).
+Ronald Rogowski, Commerce and Coalitions (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1989).
*Stephen Haggard, Pathways from the Periphery: The Politics of Growth in the Newly
Industrializing Countries (Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 1990).
Jeff Frieden, Debt, Development, and Democracy. Modern Political Economy and Latin
America, 1965-1985 (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1991).
+Stephan Haggard and Robert Kaufman, The Political Economy of Democratic Transitions
(Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995).
Peter A. Hall and David W. Soskice (eds.), Varieties of Capitalism: The Institutional
Foundations of Comparative Advantage (Oxford University Press, 2001).

6. Interest Intermediation

6.1. Pluralism

*Robert Dahl, Who Governs? (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1961).

6.2. Corporatism

*Philippe C. Schmitter, “Still the Century of Corporatism?” Review of Politics Vol. 36 (1974):
85-131.
Alfred Stepan, The State and Society. Peru in Comparative Perspective (Princeton: Princeton
University Press, 1978), Chapters 1, 2, 8.

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Philippe Schmitter and Gerhard Lehmbruch (eds.), Trends Toward Corporatist Intermediation
(Beverly Hills: Sage Publishers, 1979).
*Suzanne Berger (ed.), Organizing Interests in Western Europe: Pluralism, Corporatism and the
Transformation of Politics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981). [See
especially Berger’s “Introduction”.]
Gerhard Lehmbruch and Philippe Schmitter (eds.), Patterns of Corporatist Policy-Making
(Beverly Hills: Sage Publishers, 1982).
+John Goldthorpe (ed.), Order and Conflict in Contemporary Capitalism: Studies in the Political
Economy of Western European Nations (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1984).
Dougles Chalmers, “Corporatism and Comparative Politics,” in Howard J. Wiarda (ed.), New
Directions in Comparative Politics (Boulder, Col.: Westview Press, 1991, 2nd. ed.),
Chapter 4.
David Collier, “Trajectory of a Concept: ‘Corporatism’ and Latin American Politics,” in Peter H.
Smith, Latin America in Comparative Perspective (Boulder: Westview Press, 1995).

6.3. Consociationalism

+Arend Lijphart, Democracy in Plural Societies (New Haven, CT.: Yale University Press, 1977).
Brian Barry, “Political Accomodation and Consociational Democracy,” British Journal of
Political Science 5 (October 1975): 477-505.
Markus Crepaz and Arend Lijphart, “Linking and Integrating Corporatism and Consensus
Democracy: Theory, Concepts and Evidence,” British Journal of Political Science Vol.
25, Nº 2 (1995): 281-88.
Ian S. Lustick, “Lijphart, Lakatos, and Consociationalism,” World Politics Vol. 50, Nº 1
(October 1997): 88-117.
*Arend Lijphart, Patterns of Democracy: Government Forms and Performance in Thirty-Six
Countries (New Haven, CT.: Yale University Press, 1999).

7. The State

Charles Tilly (ed.), The Formation of National States in Western Europe (Princeton: Princeton
University Press, 1975).
*Theda Skocpol, States and Social Revolutions: A Comparative Analysis of France, Russia, and
China (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1979).
+Stephen Krasner, “Approaches to the State: Alternative Conceptions and Historical Dynamics,”
Comparative Politics Vol. 16 (1984): 223-46.
*Peter Evans, D. Rueschemeyer and Theda Skocpol (eds.), Bringing the State Back In
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985).
Joel S. Migdal, Strong Societies and Weak States. State-Society Relations and State Capabilities
in the Third World (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1988).
Gabriel Almond, “The Return of the State,” American Political Science Review Vol. 82, Nº 3
(September 1988): 853-74.
+Adam Przeworski, The State and the Economy Under Capitalism (New York: Harwood
Academic Publishers, 1990), esp. Part 2.
*Margaret Levi, "The State of the Study of the State," pp. 33-55 in Ira Katznelson and Helen V.
Milner (eds.), Political Science: State of the Discipline (New York: W.W. Norton &
Washington, DC: American Political Science Association, 2002).
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8. Political Regimes: Authoritarianism and Democratization

Reinhard Bendix, Nation-Building and Citizenship (New York: John Wiley, 1964).
*Barrington Moore, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy. Lord and Peasant in the
Making of the Modern World (Boston: Beacon Press, 1966).
+Dankwart Rustow, “Transitions to Democracy: Toward a Dynamic Model,” Comparative
Politics 2 (3) 1970: 337-63.
*Robert Dahl, Polyarchy (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1971).
*Guillermo O’Donnell, Modernization and Bureaucratic Authoritarianism: Studies in South
American Politics (Berkeley: Institute of International Studies, 1973).
*Juan Linz, Totalitarian and Authoritarian Regimes (Boulder: Lynne Rienner, 2000).
(Reprinted from Nelson Polsby, ed., Handbook of Political Science, 1975.)
*Juan Linz, The Breakdown of Democratic Regimes: Crisis, Breakdown, and Reequilibration
(Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 1978).
*Guillermo O’Donnell and Philippe Schmitter, Transitions From Authoritarian Rule. Tentative
Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press,
1986).
Robert Dahl, Democracy and its Critics (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1989).
Larry Diamond, Juan J. Linz, and Seymour Martin Lipset, “Introduction: Comparing
Experiences with Democracy,” pp. 1-38, in Larry Diamond, Juan J. Linz, and Seymour
Martin Lipset (eds.), Politics in Developing Countries: Comparing Experiences with
Democracy (Boulder, Col.: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1990).
+Adam Przeworski, Democracy and the Market. Political and Economic Reforms in Eastern
Europe and Latin America (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991), Chapters 2 and
4.
*Samuel Huntington, The Third Wave. Democratization in the Late Twentieth Century
(Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1991).
Dietrich Rueschemeyer, Evelyne Huber Stephens and John D. Stephens, Capitalist Development
and Democracy (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992).
*Juan Linz and Alfred Stepan, Problems of Democratic Transition and Consolidation: Southern
Europe, South America and Post-Communist Europe (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins
University Press, 1996).
+Larry Diamond, Developing Democracy: Toward Consolidation (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins
University Press, 1999).

9. Political Institutions

9.1. Presidentialism and Parliamentarism

+Matthew S. Shugart and John M. Carey, Presidents and Assemblies: Constitutional Design and
Electoral Dynamics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992).
Arend Lijphart (eds.), Parliamentary Versus Presidential Government (N.Y.: Oxford University
Press, 1992). [Especially Introduction, Linz and Horowitz exchange.]
+Scott Mainwaring, “Presidentialism, Multipartism, and Democracy: The Difficult
Combination,” Comparative Political Studies 26 (2) 1993: 198-228.

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*Juan J. Linz and Arturo Valenzuela (eds.), The Failure of Presidential Democracy. Volume 1.
Comparative Perspectives (Baltimore, Md.: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994),
especially Linz essay.
Scott Mainwaring and Matthew S. Shugart, “Juan Linz, Presidentialism, and Democracy: A
Critical Appraisal,” Comparative Politics Vol. 29, Nº 4 (July 1997): 449-71.
*George Tsebelis, Veto Players: How Political Institutions Work (Princeton: Princeton
University Press, 2002).

9.2. Parliamentary Government

Gary Cox, The Efficient Secret (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987).
+Kaare Strom, Minority Government and Majority Rule (New York: Cambridge University
Press, 1990).
Michael Laver and Norman Schofield, Multiparty Government: The Politics of Coalition in
Europe (New York: Oxford University Press, 1990).
*Michael Laver and Kenneth Shepsle, Making and Breaking Governments (New York:
Cambridge University Press, 1996).
John Huber, “The Vote of Confidence in Parliamentary Democracies,” American Political
Science Review 90 (2) 1996: 269-282.
*Arend Lijphart, Patterns of Democracy: Government Forms and Performance in Thirty-Six
Countries (New Haven, CT.: Yale University Press, 1999).

9.3. Political Parties

Robert Michels, Political Parties (New York: Free Press, 1911/1962).


*Maurice Duverger, Political Parties (London: Methuen & Co., 1954).
+Otto Kirchheimer, “The Transformation of the Western European Party Systems,” in J.
LaPalombara and M. Weiner (eds.), Political Parties and Political Development
(Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1966).
*Seymour M. Lipset and Stein Rokkan, “Cleavage Structures, Party Systems, and Voter
Alignments: An Introduction,” in Seymour M. Lipset and Stein Rokkan (eds.), Party
Systems and Voter Alignments: Cross-National Perspectives (New York: Free Press,
1967).
*Giovanni Sartori, Parties and Party Systems (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1976).
Angelo Panebianco, Political Parties: Organization and Power (New York: Cambridge
University Press, 1988).

9.4. Electoral Systems and Party Competition

+Anthony Downs, An Economic Theory of Democracy (New York: Harper and Row, 1957).
Douglas W. Rae, The Political Consequences of Electoral Laws (New Haven: Yale University
Press, 1969).
*William Riker, “The Two-Party System and Duverger’s Law: An Essay on the History of
Political Science,” American Political Science Review 76, 1982: 753-66.
Adam Przeworski and John Sprague, Paper Stones: A History of Electoral Socialism (Chicago:
University of Chicago Press, 1986).

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*Giovanni Sartori, “The Influence of Electoral Systems: Faulty Laws or Faulty Method?” in
Bernard Grofman and Arend Lijphart (eds.), Electoral Laws and Their Political
Consequences (New York: Agathon, 1986).
Rein Taagepera and Matthew Shuggart, Seats and Votes: The Effects and Determinants of
Electoral Systems (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1989).
Arend Lijphart, Electoral Systems and Party Systems. A Study of Twenty-Seven Democracies
(New York: Oxford University Press, 1994).
*Gary Cox, Making Votes Count: Strategic Coordination in the World’s Electoral Systems (New
York: Cambridge University Press, 1997).

9.5. Voting Turnout and Behavior

* G. Bingham Powell, Elections as Instruments of Democracy (Yale University Press, 2000).


+Robert Jackman, “Political Institutions and Voter Turnout in the Industrial Democracies,”
American Political Science Review 81, 1987: 405-23.
Michael S. Lewis-Beck, Economics and Elections: The Major Western Democracies (Ann
Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1988).
*Lawrence LeDuc, Richard G. Niemi, and Pippa Norris, eds., Comparing Democracies:
Elections and Voting in Global Perspective (Sage Publications, 1996).
Samuel Barnes, “Electoral Behavior and Comparative Politics,” in Mark I. Lichbach and Alan S.
Zuckerman (eds.), Comparative Politics: Rationality, Culture and Structure (New York:
Cambridge University Press, 1997).

9.6 Legislative Institutions

+Jean Blondel, Comparative Legislatures (New York: Prentice-Hall, 1973).


Michael Mezey, Comparative Legislatures (Durham: Duke University Press, 1979).
Michael Mezey, “The Functions of Legislatures in the Third World,” in Gerhard Loewenberg,
Samuel C. Patterson, and Malcolm E. Jewell, eds., Handbook of Legislative Research
(Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1985).
David M. Olson, Democratic Legislative Institutions: A Comparative View (New York: M.E.
Sharpe, 1994).

9.7 Judicial Institutions

Mirjan Damaska, The Faces of Justice and State Authority (New Haven: Yale University Press,
1986).
R.S. Atiyah and R.S. Summers, Form and Substance in Anglo-American Law (New York:
Cambridge University Press, 1987).
Alec Stone Sweet, The Birth of Judicial Politics in France (New York: Oxford University Press,
1992).
*Alec Stone Sweet, Governing with Judges (New York: Oxford University Press, 1998).
T. Koopmans, Court and Political Institutions: A Comparative View (New York: Cambridge
University Press, 2003)

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9.8 Public Policy and Bureaucracy

+Joel D. Aberbach, Robert D. Putnam, and Bert A. Rockman, Bureaucrats and Politicians in
Western Democracies Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1981).
Guy B. Peters, Comparing Public Bureaucracies: Problems of Theory and Method (Tuscaloosa:
University of Alabama Press, 1988).
Arnold J. Heidenheimer, Hugh Heclo, and Carolyn Teich Adams, Comparative Public Policy:
The Politics of Social Choice in America, Europe, and Japan (New York: St. Martin's
Press, 1990).

10. Collective Action and Contentious Politics

Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte (various editions).


*Mancur Olson, The Logic of Collective Action (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1966).
Ted Gurr, Why Men Rebel (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1970).
Jeffrey Paige, Agrarian Revolution: Social Movements and Export Agriculture in the
Underdeveloped World (New York: Free Press, 1975).
James C. Scott, The Moral Economy of the Peasant: Rebellion and Resistance in Southeast Asia
(New Haven: Yale University Press, 1976).
Charles Tilly, From Mobilization to Revolution (Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1978).
Samuel L. Popkin, The Rational Peasant: The Political Economy of Rural Society in Vietnam
(Berkeley: University of California Press, 1979).
+Frances Fox Piven and Richard Cloward, Poor People's Movements: Why They Succeed, How
They Fail (Vintage Books, 1979).
Russell Hardin, Collective Action (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1982).
James C. Scott, Weapons of the Weak: Everyday Forms of Peasant Resistance (New Haven:
Yale University Press, 1985).
Elinor Ostrom, Governing the Commons: The Evolution of Institutions for Collective Action
(New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990).
+Sidney Tarrow, Power in Movement: Social Movements, Collective Action and Politics (New
York: Cambridge University Press, 1994).
+Theda Skocpol, Social Revolutions in the Modern World (New York: Cambridge University
Press, 1994).
*Doug McAdam, Sidney Tarrow, and Charles Tilly, “Toward an Integrated Perspective on
Social Movements and Revolution,” in Mark I. Lichbach and Alan S. Zuckerman (eds.),
Comparative Politics: Rationality, Culture and Structure (New York: Cambridge
University Press, 1997).

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