Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 24

Multiple Antenna Pairs

and The Image Antenna

Civil Aviation Training Center


David Lee(DooHyun Lee) 1
Introduction
When two or more antenna pairs comprise an array, knowledge of 
t for each pair at all angular positions is vital to the 
determination of the radiating characteristics of the array.

In the case of two antenna pairs, located about a common center, 
the overall pattern of the array could be obtained from the phasor 
addition of the two combined fields at points throughout 360 of 
angular position.  
All normally operated ILS/VOR antenna arrays, however, consist of 
various combinations of in‐phase and out‐of‐phase pairs.  
Specifically, the basic properties of the localizer, glide‐slope, and 
VOR arrays can be considered in terms of two antenna pairs 
having a common center and fed currents that are:
2
Introduction
• in‐phase in both pairs
• oppositely‐phased in both pairs
• in‐phase in one pair and oppositely‐phased in the other, where, 
in all instances, currents in one pair bear a definite phase 
relationship with currents in the other pair

Analysis of the three simple arrays mentioned will point out the 
significance of t while providing the foundation for the analysis of 
the more complicated arrays found in the actual ILS/VOR facilities.

3
Objectives
Calculate the total field magnitude and phase at any point of 
observation, and given “a” spacing and antenna current 
magnitude and phase for two specific pairs of antennas located 
about a common center (multiple antenna pairs)

Image antenna – use the equation for field strength in a vertical 
plane to determine field intensity and phase at any angle of 
elevation for a single isotropic antenna, given “h”, antenna current 
magnitude, antenna current phase, and polarization.

Evaluate the directivity factor for a half wave dipole.

4
Combined Radiation from Two Antenna
Pairs
Combined Radiation from Two SIP Antenna Pair
It should be apparent that in the first two bullets the combined 
Et1 E t2
fields from the pairs (     and       ) would be either in‐phase or 
oppositely‐phased in every direction.  Consequently, the overall 
radiation from such an array (in a particular direction) could be 
obtained by simple algebraic addition of field strength magnitudes. 
As an example, consider that the currents fed to the two pairs of 
Figure 6‐1 are all equal, so that:

I1 = I1 = I2 = I2 = 130

5
Combined Radiation from Two Antenna
Pairs
Combined Radiation from Two SIP Antenna Pair

6
FIGURE 6‐ 1. Layout of an Array Consisting of Two Antenna Pairs, Having a Common Midpoint.
Combined Radiation from Two Antenna
Pairs
Combined Radiation from Two SIP Antenna Pair
In that event, for either pair, t = 30 or 210, the total radiation in 
any direction could be obtained by algebraic addition of the 
Et1 E t2
magnitudes (     and       ) for the same direction.  Thus, in the 
direction  = 0 and 180 the combined field from either pair is 
230, hence the total radiation in the same direction will have 
the relative amplitude of four (4).

7
Combined Radiation from Two Antenna
Pairs
Combined Radiation from Two SIP Antenna Pair

Example 6‐1

If in the array of Figure 6‐1 all four currents are 130 and the 
pairs are spaced so that a1 = 135 and a2 = 225, what is the 
total radiation in the direction  = 25?

8
Combined Radiation from Two Antenna
Pairs
Combined Radiation from SIP and SOP Antenna pair
The antenna combination noted in the third bullet above deserves 
special mention.  If an array consists of an in‐phase pair and an 
oppositely‐phased pair, particular current phasing conditions must 
exist if the combined fields from each pair are to add algebraically in 
all directions.  Remembering that for the in‐phase pair t =  or  + 
180, and t = 1  90 for the oppositely‐phased pair, the combined 
fields from the two pairs of Figure 6‐1 will always add algebraically if 
the currents in one pair are in quadrature with the currents in the 
other pair.  Use is made of this fact in the localizer array.  In which the 
sideband antenna pairs are fed currents with relative phase angles of 
0 and 180 and the carrier pair is fed currents at the relative phase 
angle 90, so that the effective radiation in any direction is readily 
9
obtained by simple algebraic addition of the various combined fields.
Combined Radiation from Two Antenna
Pairs
Combined Radiation from SIP and SOP Antenna pair

Example 6‐2

Considering only the 150 Hertz sideband energy, the carrier pair 
and first sideband pair in the localizer array can be represented 
by Figure 6‐1 if assigned the values:  , a1 = 55, and a2 = 190.  
Determine the total 150 Hertz energy from these two pairs in 
the direction  = 10.

10
Combined Radiation from Two Antenna
Pairs
Combined Radiation from SIP and SOP Antenna pair
When the phase of the total field from all antenna pair of an array is 
limited to only two possible values, it is convenient to indicate the 
relative phasing of individual fields by assuming them to be either 
positive “+” or negative ”‐“.

It will be seen later that the relative phasing of the combined field 
from any antenna pair of a normally operating ILS/VOR array is 
either 0 or 180, (or else 90 or ‐90), so that any lobe of a pattern 
having the phasing t = 0 can be designated “+”, and all lobes of 
180 phasing can be designated “‐“ (similarly for patterns having 
phasing  90).  When current phasing in an ILS/VOR array is other 
than normal, or other conditions are disturbed so that t has values 
other than the two normally possible, then the designations “+” or 
“‐“ cannot be used.  Instead the exact values of t must be used to 
11
find the power amplitude of total fields.
The Image Antenna
Reflectivity
Radiated electromagnetic waves, in common with other types of 
waves, possess the property of being reflected.  Although the 
reflection of light waves is probably the most familiar example, the 
radiated electric field from an antenna can be reflected from a 
conducting surface.  The angle of incidence will always equal the 
angle of reflection and, if the surface is a perfect conductor, the field 
will be totally reflected, i.e., without loss of energy. 

12
The Image Antenna
Reflectivity

FIGURE 6‐ 2. The Energy at Point P in the Vertical Plane Received from an Antenna Located a 
13
Distance “d” Above Ground Consists of Both Direct and Reflected Components.
The Image Antenna
Reflectivity
Consider an antenna located a distance “d” above ground as in 
Figure 6‐2.  Assume that the ground is absolutely level and perfectly‐
conducting, and that the current Ir flows in antenna Ar, the real 
antenna.  At some point P, energy will be received via the direct path 
“r1” as well as by way of the reflected path “r2”.  Remembering that 
the angle of incidence is always equal to the angle of reflection, the 
point of reflection (Pr) will be located such that angles 1 and “2” 
are equal. 

14
The Image Antenna
Image Antenna
Observe from the geometry of the figure that the wave reflected at 
point Pr could be considered to have been radiated by an antenna 
located the distance “d” below the ground plane.  Because of its 
similarity to a mirror image of antenna Ar (considering the ground 
plane as a mirror), antenna A1 is called an image antenna.

15
The Image Antenna
Reflected Wave Analysis
Assuming the reflected wave to be radiated by the image antenna 
makes the mathematical analysis of the problem much simpler. 
Following an analysis similar to that used for real antennas, if P is a 
distance point with respect to the antenna, the paths “r1”, “r2”, and 
“r0” can be considered parallel.  Thus, an antenna located at an 
effective height “h” above ground can be represented as the 
antenna pair of Figure 6‐3 fed currents Ir and Ii, where Ir is the 
current actually fed to the real antenna, and Ii is the current 
assumed to flow in the image antenna. 

16
The Image Antenna
Reflected Wave Analysis

FIGURE 6‐ 3. Geometrical Relation Between a Real Antenna and its Image. 17
The Image Antenna
Polarization
If the antenna Ar of Figure 6‐3 is assumed to be horizontally 
polarized and located above an ideal ground plane, then the current 
equations for the real and image antennas can be written:

Ireal = Ir                                            (6‐1)
And
Iimage = Ir + 180 (6‐2)

where :
I is the relative amplitude and 
r is the relative phase of the current in the real antenna. 

18
The Image Antenna
Polarization
Note the resemblance of the antennas of Figure 6‐3 which are fed 
Ir Ii
currents       and      to the oppositely‐phased antenna pairs of the 
previous chapter, the equation for the relative field strength should 
be identical to Equation 5‐11, but with a change in symbols.

Thus, a horizontally polarized antenna situated “h” electrical degrees 
above a perfectly‐conducting ground plane and fed the current 
Ir = Ir radiates a field in the vertical plane of relative strength.

Et = 2 I sin (h sin ) r + 90 (6‐3)

where:  “” denotes the angle of elevation of point P above the 
ground plane.
19
The Image Antenna
Polarization
Figure 6‐4 shows the radiation in the vertical plane for a point‐
source antenna situated such that h = 360 (i.e., one wavelength 
above ground, in both polar and rectangular coordinates.  Since the 
antenna in this instance is a point‐source, its radiating characteristics 
in the vertical plane are independent of azimuth.  Note the similarity 
between the pattern of Figure 6‐4 (a) and the pattern shown for an 
oppositely‐phased antenna pair of spacing a = 360 in Table 5‐2 of 
the previous chapter.

20
The Image Antenna
Polarization

FIGURE 6‐ 3 (a) & (b).  Vertical‐plane Radiation from a Horizontally Polarized Antenna Located 
21
360 Above the Effective Ground Plane.
Summary
Key Points
Radiation patterns from two antenna pairs can be plotted by 
plotting the pattern from first one pair then the other and then 
combining the two patterns.

If the combined fields from two antenna pairs, one SIP and one 
SOP, are to add algebraically in all directions, the currents in one 
pair must be in quadrature with the currents in the other pair.

If the combined fields from two antenna pairs, both SIP or both 
SOP, are to add algebraically in all directions, the currents in one 
pair must be in phase with the currents in the other pair.

22
Summary
Key Points
When a horizontally polarized antenna is located near a reflecting 
surface, (ground counterpoise, etc.) energy will be reflected from 
the surface undergoing a phase‐reversal at the point of reflection
One way to visualize the performance of a horizontal antenna 
above a perfectly conducting earth is to imagine that the antenna 
sees its image reflected in the surface.
The image antenna, in order to account for the phase reversal of 
reflections, will carry a current flowing in the direction opposite 
(SOP) to that in the actual antenna.
The radiation from a practical antenna never has the same 
intensity in all directions.
23
Thank You
^.^

24