Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 46

UD5221: Urban Case

Universal City, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Leandro Poco
Peggy Lu Ye
Ravinder Ramesh
Shrijian Joshi
MAUD
Universal Studios

Getty Center
Hollywood

Downtown
Santa Monica 
Beach

Disneyland

ƒ Originally a collection of Spanish Townships
ƒ “Entertainment Capital of the World”  ‐ home to Hollywood, Universal Studios, Disneyland, 
Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, Etc.
ƒ Sprawled, suburban condition with large grids, over 12,560 sq km.
ƒ Diverse Ethnic/Migrant Population : 48+% Caucasian, 11% African American, 10% Asian, 
25% Latino, 6% other… 17 million metropolitan population
ƒ Valley Basin, located at a seismically active zone
Dodgers
Stadium

4 Level 
Interchange
Civic Centre

Financial Centre
Staples Centre

ƒ Compact CBD 
ƒ Initial planning framework based on the Spanish Town Plaza – “Laws of the Indies”
ƒ Dominated by freeway infrastructure, weak yet emergent rail 
ƒ Staples Center, Dodgers Stadium, Walt Disney Concert Hall, 
ƒ Notorious for racial tension, gangs, automobile related crimes, etc.
Dodgers Stadium
Disney Music Hall

4‐Level Freeway

Downtown Edge
Our Lady of the Angels
City Skyline

Biltmore Hotel and 
Staples Center Pershing Square
Disneyland 
Themepark

Disney Support  Disney Downtown
and Offices

Disney California 
Adventure

ƒ Originally planned just as a theme park
ƒ Expanded to include Disney downtown, Disney California Adventure and Hotel Districts
ƒ Thematic = Nostalgic, futuristic and fantastic all at the same time
ƒ Major Tourist anchor for the city
ƒ Suburban grid gives way to terrain
ƒ Northern L.A. includes areas such as Universal Studios and Hollywood Boulevard
ƒ Homebase of the Entertainment Industry (film studios, production, etc.)
ƒ Terrain formed by fault lines crossing/scarring the landscape. 
ƒ Hollywood Walk of the Stars
ƒ Collection of Entertainment related businesses and landmarks, shops, studios, theatres, etc. 
(Graumann’s Chinese Theatre, Capitol Records Bldg. etc.)
ƒ Underwent decay during the 70s‐80s when these studios moved out. 
ƒ New Subway line completed in 2002‐2003 – helped start redevelopment initiatives. 
Hollywood Boulevard 
during the 50s 

Hollywood Bowl Hollywood Highland  Capitol Records Tower


Station

Graumann’s Chinese 
Theatre

Walk of Stars
Postwar Car Culture
Early Spanish  Mission  Streetcars
Settlement

L.A. Chinatown during  Bustling Downtown w/ 
the 1800s Streetcars Postwar Strip‐Mall

Olveda Street 
(Spanish Downtown)
Spanish district
Suburban Sprawl

Gated Residential Suburbs Chinatown Metro

Beverly Hills Cluttered Streets
Northridge Earthquake

O.J. Simpson  Smog
Car chase

San Andreas Fault
Race Riots

Race Riots Jammed Freeways

Police Brutality
Beach Culture

Disneyland
• Designed in 1989 to create a regional hub 
for jobs, entertainment and service.
• It clusters workplace, shopping, eating, 
entertainment, cultural facility, hotel and 
recreation uses into low‐rise districts and 
public plazas amid the existing studios, tour  Conceptual sketch
facilities and adjacent residential areas.

Site area: 23 acres
Total building area: 540,000 sq ft
Program: 178,900 sq ft Office ﹠Classroom

155,000 sq ft  Entertainment ﹠Cinema
113.000 sq ft  Dinning
91,200 sq ft  Retail
‐‐‐‐‐The plan reinforces the natural 
gradients of the site, and re‐creates the 
image of a “city on the hill

Sketch of “city roof”
Aim to ‐‐‐‐‐introduce notions of urbanity to the experience of 
consumption

Forms the central spine of the  amphitheater

Universal City masterplan, it’s a 
1,500 foot  (450m),long 
pedestrian “street” ,connecting 
the scattered elements of 
Universal City, linking between 
the site’s three disparate existing 
destinations: the 6,200 –seat 
amphitheater, 18‐screen cinema, 
theme park and tour.
Two Spatial Observations:
“Urban Collage”
The streetscape of the two major boardwalks (East Walk and West 
Walk), joined by the Fountain Court, is patterned after many of the 
small scale buildings in Los Angeles ,it is a collage of the images of the 
city, but doesn’t actually replicate any of its buildings.

“Disneyland effect”
Which means the design of city is design of a theme park. The “Disneyland 
effect” is essential to the shaping of contemporary commercial space, which 
is part of phenomenon of “global tourism” 
‐‐‐‐‐an American architect, principal of The Jerde
Partnership , known for innovative mall design 
and experience architecture."

Jon Jerde’s practice relates primarily to retail, 
his projects consist  mostly of large‐scale retail 
development.

Jerde's first big break was the 1977 design for 
the Horton Plaza Center , across from Horton 
Plaza Park in downtown San Diego 
,embodying a new integration of public space 
and retail and, on another ,as being highly 
lucrative.
ƒ Large urban artifact as a driver
ƒ Universal Studios/Citywalk is a large artifact in Los Angeles’ 
Suburban Fabric

ƒ Transformation of Emblematic Parts of the City 
ƒ Universal Studios: From Tourist Attraction to Urban Anchor 
for Visitors and Locals Alike

ƒ Establishing New Centralities: Recycling and 
Restructuring its Surrounding Fabric
ƒ This has created a new core for people to visit and enjoy. 
Producing a new center in an otherwise generic field.
ƒ Has also served as an example for L.A. and other cities, 
serving as a model for redevelopment of downtown 
ƒ Citywalk vs. 42nd Street Time Square and Hollwood Boulevard
ƒ Authentic vs. Fabricated, different contexts… but convergent in a way
ƒ Urbanism Lite… reintroducing Los Angeles with the concept 
of a real city/urbanity through stage‐managed scenery of a 
streetscape
Design Brief/Vision
"They came to us for a vision of the city that Universal City never has been. It was the 
city they forgot to build. There are a lot of these suburban cities which are faceless 
and tailless. This is especially true of Los Angeles.” 

Jerde’s Vision
“We came up with the concept of the urban village. Of course, that's an oxymoron." 

‐To create a place to "flaner" ‐‐ another word not often heard in the normal 
course of business. This French verb means to saunter or wander around. 

‐Aims to erect a "centroid" in the middle of a city that didn't have a center. He 
hoped this new center would act as "collagen," binding together the various 
organs of the dispersed cityscape.

‐Citywalk attracts a real ethnic mix

‐Material Context ‐ City Walk of the same materials out of which much of Los 
Angeles is built: stucco, bright paint, metal panels, neon, signage, etc.

‐This encapsulates and distills Los Angeles as a city, and compresses it into a 
reduced version ‐> Citywalk
“Only a Californian would observe that it is becoming increasingly 
difficult to tell the real fake from the fake fake. All fakes are clearly not 
equal; there are good fakes and bad fakes. The standard is no longer real 
versus phony but the relative merits of the imitation. What makes the 
good ones better is their improvement on reality.  The real fake reaches 
its apogee in places like Las Vegas and Citywalk.”

“Yes, City Walk's facade is fake, but the 
fun is authentic.”
Ada Louise ‐ Huxtable
ƒ Geography/Context limits its immediate effects 
on its surroundings. 
ƒ Citywalk will struggle to remain relevant 
because crowds will always choose the new over 
the old.  – that is the nature of retail.
ƒ Citywalk is actually a success, its just too 
thematic… if it was more soberly done, it would 
have probably been just as commercially 
succesful, and be seen by critics in a more 
positive light by critics.
Pier 39, San Francisco, CA

Fanueil Hall, Boston, MA

South Street Seaport, NY, NY

Main Street USA, Disney
Candy wrapped retail with urban activities

A veneer of vernacular LA, hiding boxes of consumerism.

Collage of LA : a sense of collective identity

An enactment of Urban Chaos in a controlled set.

The Spatial flux hemmed by a series of apparent individual facades
Pre History – Indus valley, retail in China/ 
Greek Agora, Roman etc.
Middle ages, Marketplace as civic center
16th century, Royal Exchange, London 
18th century, First Arcade, Paris
1851 , Crystal Palace, London
1852 , First Dept. Store. Au Bon Marche, Paris 
Development of Department Stores‐ Harrods, 
Macy’s, Bloominton
1922, First Unified Shopping Mall, Kansas
1930, Department store Branches  out to suburbs.
1930, First Super Market, Kin Kullen, N.Y.

1950, First Open Air Mall
1950, First Dumb Bell Plan

1955, First Disneyland Park Opens
1956, First Enclosed Mall, Southdale Minneapolis
(Victor Gruen – Father of Modern Mall)
1957, First Duty Free shop in airports, ireland
1960, 40% Americans shop in 10000 supermarkets 
Evolution of Retail / Shopping

1962, First Wal‐Mart by 2000 was $165 billion in sales

1965, Modern Singapore

1985, World’s Largest Mall, West Edmonton Mall
1987, Marina Square, Singapore
1990, Avg. time Americans spend in malls drops  by half of 1980
1993, Universal City Walk, LA. 
1996, EBay
2000, Universal City Walk‐ II 
Gruen Transfer = When order disarms and initiates purchase
Internalization of the City Streetscape            
……tailored for shopping

Victor Gruen
Invented the mall

ƒ Proposes Malls as a form of urbanity
ƒ Antiseptic, Orderly Urbanity..an idea of the perfect core
ƒ Coined the strategy of neutral interiors… to highlight 
shop fronts, signage and products
ƒ Legible order… versus the chaotic city
ƒ Progression along linear procession
= f (Disneyland – entry fee)
Walt Disney
Disney Urbanism

ƒ Disney Space… root of all modern themed settings
ƒ Wienie = Centerpiece
ƒ Scale Manipulation‐ 5/8th reduced proportions
ƒ Forced Perspective
ƒ Cinematography‐ Accelerated sequence of events
ƒ Disneyland Influencing the Traditional City, merging 
commercial… creating an image of inauthenticity… real main 
streets are redressing themselves like the Disney Main Street
ƒ Commodified Urbanism, (Entry Fee:  Adult $63 Child $53)
ƒ Urbanism Supporting Entertainment and Commerce
Jerde Transfer:
Complexity and Bombardment…

ƒEnvironment disarms through overstimuli = shopping

ƒEnd‐goal = commercial consumption/profit

ƒShopping/entertainment hybrid celebrates chaos of 
the city

ƒAmplification:Bombardment:Entertainment=“$$$$$”

ƒEntertainment as a form of urbanism 
City
Street Retail

Suburbanization

Enclosed Suburban Mall

Attract life back 
Disneyland Thematic Shopping to the city

Entertainment City Walk
(mall with city as its theme)

Urban Renewal of City using 
concepts derived from Retail 
and Thematic Shopping
ƒ Shopping Mall = Bane of Urbanity
ƒ Victor Gruen was demonized because suburbs/malls drained life out 
of cities/downtown
ƒ Irony:  Gruen meant the mall to be:
ƒ the cleaned‐up heart of old 
downtowns and new suburbs
ƒ Core of a Template for new 
cities/towns

ƒ The city is dead without the activity brought in by retail/shopping‐ as 
advocated by Jane Jacobs
ƒ Retail as a means of rejuvenating old cities

ƒ Before, retail existed as only one of the programmes within the city… now 
the city is reduced to only being a theme of retail… 
ƒ Influenced numerous similar projects both by Jerde and other retail designers:

Fremont St. Experience
Canal City, Japan Greenbelt, Makati, Philippines
Citywalk Florida

Xintiandi
Disney Village, France Bonifacio High Street, 
Philippines
ƒ Cities in need of rejuvenation have 
adopted:
ƒ Pedestrianization
ƒ Retail‐Entertainment Mixes
ƒ Anchor Tenants/Retail Outlets
ƒ Climatization/Environmental Quality

ƒ All of which are retail based elements, 
cleaned‐up, tested and successfully done 
within Malls. As if distilled in a lab
ƒ Retail Urbanism:    
City ‐> Suburb/Mall ‐> back to the City
ƒ Rejuvenation of Hollywood Boulevard using concepts applied in Citywalk:
(Retail, Theatre, Entertainment elements, Signage, Scale Manipulation, etc.)
ƒ Reintroduction of Mixed‐use Ground‐Level Retail within the CBD
ƒ Redevelopment of “Main Streets” in ethnic neighbourhoods, with a 
specific flavour.
Koolhaas, R; Sze T.L. and Inaba, J. (2001), The Harvard Design School Guide to Shopping / Harvard Design School Project 
on the City 2, Massachusetts: Harvard Graduate School of Design.

Wall, A. (2003), Victor Gruen: From Urban Shop to New City,  New Your: Actar Press.

Anderton, F. (2000), You Are Here: The Jerde Partnership International, New York: Phaidon Press.

Gruen, V. (1964), The Heart of Our Cities. New York: Simon and Schuster.

Jacobs, J. (1961), The Death and Life of Great American Cities. New York: Random House.

Web Links:

www.archrecord.com

www.jerde.com

en.wikipedia.org

www.lacity.org