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IDENTITY

What race/ethnicity do you identify with?

How would you describe the racial demographics of your community?

How important is your identity in your life?

RACE RELATIONS

In the early course of your childhood what was your view, or the viewpoints that
were given to you upon the issue of race?

Did these views change or stay the same as you grew older?

What are your thoughts on social media's influence on the discussion of racism and
how it is impacting America’s views on the issues at hand?

What do you think the recent election means for race relations in the United States?

LAW ENFORCEMENT

What is your first memory of law enforcement?

In your opinion, what is the purpose of Law Enforcement?

Have you ever been pulled over in Riley county, and if so what was/were the
reason/s?

Did your parents ever have conversations with you as a child about police? For
example, did you talk about law enforcement's role in your community, or how
to respond when engaged by law enforcement?

In Detroit, Michigan, law enforcement is given a 48 hour notice before they are
interrogated, while normal citizens are questioned immediately. How do you feel about
about Detroit law enforcement having “special privileges” during the course of an
investigation?
POLICE BRUTALITY

What qualifies as “police brutality?” At what point does it turn from standard
procedure into excessive force?

Police Brutality is a controversial topic that has been overshadowing America for years
but has reached a new level the past two years. Do you think that, that this is because
of social media’s exploitation of the issues or because it is a modern day issue of
racism?

Does seeing police brutality in the news and media in general affect the way white
people act around law enforcement?

CIVIC ACTIVISM

What do you know about the Black Lives Matter?

Do you agree with the Black Lives Matter Movement? Why or Why not?

Can Police Brutality today prevented? If so, how do you think that police
brutality can be prevented? What tactics do you think are viable?

What do you think is the future for race relations looks like in America?

Introduction:
It’s no secret that our country has a history of establishing and sustaining racial hierarchy.
America’s laws and social structures have not always been in place to protect all, but to protect
some. In regards to African American lives specifically, we know that slave trade, indentured
servitude, and the civil rights movement are all examples of how the opportunity for blacks in
America to fight for their rights, is often overshadowed by the neglect and ill-will of a majority.
The willingness to take a firm, active stand often comes to a halt when blacks are pushed away
by the use of fear tactics. Earlier in history, the public display of lynching, using dogs to attack
protesters, and burning crosses were all used to bully blacks into conformity. Today, police
brutality towards blacks has been extremely prevalent and publicised in the media, to once
again, destroy the lives and ambition of a people who only want to be treated as equals and live
in peace. Our class wanted to know how others view the issue of racism in America today and
police brutality, so we met with students and faculty members to hear what they had to say.
● Start rolling footage from questions from RACE RELATIONS, LAW ENFORCEMENT,
and POLICE BRUTALITY.
○ What are your thoughts on social media's influence on the discussion of racism
and how it is impacting America’s views on the issues at hand?
○ In your opinion, what is the purpose of Law Enforcement? Do you see this
purpose being fulfilled in today’s society?
○ What qualifies as “police brutality?” At what point does it turn from standard
procedure into excessive force?
○ Police Brutality is a controversial topic that has been overshadowing America for
years but has reached a new level the past two years. Do you think that this is
because of social media’s exploitation of the issues or because it is a modern
day issue of racism?

Civic Activism:
Civic activism has been a very powerful, straightforward approach to racism, in both the past
and the present. It allows citizens to get involved and express their voice, creating the
opportunity for a discussion that would enable our country to push forward. Today, movements
like Black Lives Matter have dominated social media and television, often being seen with a light
of aggression and anger. Is this true? How much do average citizens know about what they
stand for?
● Roll footage of answers to “What do you know about the Black Lives Matter?”
○ Begin with footage of people who say “I’m not sure”
○ Move on to answers that explain ACCURATELY what BLM is
○ Do you agree with the Black Lives Matter Movement? Why or Why not?
○ Can Police Brutality today prevented? If so, how do you think that police brutality
can be prevented? What tactics do you think are viable?

Identity- Race relations:


How does the way you see yourself relate to the way you see others? What we are taught about
race and who we interact with can greatly impact our perceptions.
● Footage of answers to identity questions and race relation questions
○ In the early course of your childhood what was your view, or the viewpoints that
were given to you upon the issue of race?
“They give me a stick they give me a gun they pay me 50 g’s to have some fun.” – Unidentified
Los Angeles police officer.
Those were the words spoken by a Los Angeles police officer who was associated with the
beating of Rodney King. After Kings Incident police departments began to take major
precautions for the things happening with their officers and the civilians. The King incident,
happening in 1991 records to over a decade ago. The old saying history repeats itself almost
becomes true with the police brutality sightings to young African American teen males today.
Trayvon Martin, and Michael Brown are of two African American teens who have been
rudimentary standpoints for the argument against police brutality.

However, the activism has changed. In some aspects more of actual riot and revolt against not
being heard. “A riot is the language of the unheard.” - Martin Luther King Jr.