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THIRD PARTY FACILITY

HEALTH, SAFETY, SECURITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL


ASSESSMENT

Site:
Date:

This document has been prepared for use by members of the BP Group of Companies and, if it should come
into the possession of third parties, the advice contained herein is to be construed by such third parties as a
matter of opinion only and not as a representation or statement of any kind as to the effect of following
such advice and no responsibility for the use of it can be assumed by BP.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT 2
Section Page

1.  HSSE ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT ................................................................................ 8 


1.1.  Leadership ......................................................................................................................... 8 
1.2.  Incident Prevention Policies ................................................................................................................. 10 
1.3.  Manning ....................................................................................................................... 12 
1.4.  Contractor Selection and Management................................................................................................ 14 
1.5.  Training ....................................................................................................................... 16 
1.6.  Procedures & Documentation .............................................................................................................. 18 
1.7.  Control of Work ....................................................................................................................... 20 
1.8.  Management of Change....................................................................................................................... 24 
1.9.  Accident/Incident investigation ............................................................................................................ 26 
1.10.  Communications ....................................................................................................................... 28 
1.11.  Legislative & Regulatory Compliance ................................................................................................... 30 

2  PRODUCT QUALITY, SAMPLING & MEASUREMENT ..................................................................... 32 


2.1  Facility Design ....................................................................................................................... 32 
2.2  Laboratory ....................................................................................................................... 36 
2.3  Measurement and Sampling Equipment .............................................................................................. 38 
2.4  Measurement and Sampling Procedures ............................................................................................. 44 

3.  INSPECTION & MAINTENANCE ........................................................................................................ 48 


3.1  Planned General Inspections ................................................................................................................ 48 
3.2  Engineering Inspections ....................................................................................................................... 50 
3.3  Preventative Maintenance.................................................................................................................... 54 
3.4  Corrosion ....................................................................................................................... 56 

4.  EMERGENCY RESPONSE .................................................................................................................. 58 


4.1  Emergency Preparedness .................................................................................................................... 58 
4.2  Emergency Training ....................................................................................................................... 66 
4.3  Fire Protection ....................................................................................................................... 68 
4.4  First Aid ....................................................................................................................... 72 

5.  SECURITY ....................................................................................................................... 74 


5.1  Security ....................................................................................................................... 74 

6.  HEALTH ....................................................................................................................... 76 


6.1  Occupational Health ....................................................................................................................... 76 
6.2  Personal Protection Equipment ............................................................................................................ 78 

7.  ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE ................................................................................................. 80 


7.1  Emissions, Discharges & Waste .......................................................................................................... 80 
7.2  Oil Spill Response ....................................................................................................................... 84 

8.  ATMOSPHERIC ABOVEGROUND STORAGE ................................................................................... 88 


8.1  Tankfarm Layout & Design ................................................................................................................... 88 
8.2  Safety & Fire Fighting Physical Checks ................................................................................................ 94 
8.3  Maintenance & Inspection Physical Checks....................................................................................... 100 
8.4  Procedures & Operations Physical Checks ........................................................................................ 102 

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 2 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT 3
Section Page

8.5  Environmental Physical Checks.......................................................................................................... 104 

9.  WASTE WATER TREATMENT AREA .............................................................................................. 106 


9.1  Safety & Fire Fighting Physical Checks .............................................................................................. 106 
9.2  Maintenance & Inspection Physical Checks....................................................................................... 108 
9.3  Procedures & Operations Physical Checks ........................................................................................ 110 
9.4  Environmental Physical Checks.......................................................................................................... 112 

10.  ROAD (UN)LOADING FACILITIES .................................................................................................... 114 


10.1  Layout & Equipment ..................................................................................................................... 114 
10.2  Operations & Procedures ................................................................................................................... 116 
10.3  Safety & Fire Fighting Physical Checks .............................................................................................. 118 
10.4  Maintenance & Inspection Physical Checks....................................................................................... 120 
10.5  Environmental Physical Checks.......................................................................................................... 122 
10.6  Road Tanker Facilities Loading Liquefied Gas .................................................................................... 124 

11.  RAIL (UN)LOADING FACILITIES ...................................................................................................... 126 


11.1  Layout & Equipment ..................................................................................................................... 126 
11.2 Operations & Procedures ................................................................................................................... 128 
11.3  Safety & Fire Fighting Physical Checks .............................................................................................. 130 
11.4  Maintenance & Inspection Physical Checks....................................................................................... 132 
11.5  Environmental Physical Checks.......................................................................................................... 134 

12.  MARINE OPERATIONS..................................................................................................................... 136 


12.1  Management and Organisation .......................................................................................................... 136 
12.2  Port Operations ..................................................................................................................... 158 
12.3  Marine Facility Layout/Physical Considerations .................................................................................. 172 
12.4  Ship/Shore Interface ..................................................................................................................... 184 
12.5  Cargo Transfer ..................................................................................................................... 196 
12.6  Safety, Health and Fire Protection...................................................................................................... 206 
12.7  Environmental Protection ................................................................................................................... 220 
12.9  Maintenance ..................................................................................................................... 232 
12.10 Operations at Buoy Moorings ............................................................................................................ 234 

13.  CROSS-COUNTRY & OFFSITE PIPELINES ...................................................................................... 240 


13.1 Cross-country and Offsite Pipeline Layout & Design ......................................................................... 241 
13.2  Procedures & Operations Physical Checks ........................................................................................ 244 
13.3  Maintenance & Inspection Physical Checks....................................................................................... 246 
13.4  Safety & Security Physical Checks ..................................................................................................... 248 
13.5  Environmental & Emergency Response Physical Checks .................................................................. 250 

14.  PROCESS UNITS ..................................................................................................................... 252 


14.1  Process Units Layout & Design .......................................................................................................... 253 
14.2  Procedures and Operations ................................................................................................................ 256 
14.3  Maintenance and Inspection Programmes and Checks ..................................................................... 258 
14.4  Safety, Emergency Response and Fire Fighting Provisions ............................................................... 260 
14.5  Environmental Controls and Checks .................................................................................................. 266 

15.  REFRIGERATED STORAGE .............................................................................................................. 268 

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 3 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT 4
Section Page

15.1 Refrigerated Layout & Design ............................................................................................................ 269 


15.2  Procedures and Operations Physical Checks ..................................................................................... 276 
15.3  Maintenance and Inspection Physical Checks ................................................................................... 278 
15.4  Safety and Fire Fighting Physical Checks ........................................................................................... 280 
15.5  Environmental Physical Checks.......................................................................................................... 286 

16.  PRESSURISED STORAGE ................................................................................................................ 288 


16.1 Pressurised Storage Layout and Design ............................................................................................ 288 
16.2  Procedures and Operations Physical Checks ..................................................................................... 294 
16.3  Maintenance and Inspection Physical Checks ................................................................................... 296 
16.4  Safety and Fire Fighting Physical Checks ........................................................................................... 298 
16.5  Environmental Physical Checks.......................................................................................................... 308 

17.  UNDERGROUND STORAGE ............................................................................................................ 310 


17.1  Underground Storage Layout and Design .......................................................................................... 313 
17.2  Procedures & Operations ................................................................................................................... 316 
17.3  Maintenance & Inspection Programmes and Checks ........................................................................ 320 
17.4  Safety and Fire & Gas Physical Checks .............................................................................................. 322 
17.5  Environmental Controls & Checks...................................................................................................... 324 

Appendixes
A – HSE PROGRAMME
B – APPLICATION RATES ON HYDROCARBONS (UP TO 15% MTBE / ETBE) FOR TOP POURERS
C - FOAM APPLICATION USING PORTABLE EQUIPMENT

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 4 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Revision Record:

Rev Date By Main Changes Remarks


Section 2 revised to include weighbridges.
M Catherall / Additional questions in Sections 2 and
Section 10 aligned with EoR FVC checklist.
10.1 Jun 14 D Vopat / R 10. Highlighting of questions required in
Questions required to provide an assessment
Bickford STREAM to provide a risk level.
in STREAM have been highlighted.
M Catherall /
Additional questions and wording to all Revision to scope and wording of all sections.
10.0 Aug 13 D Vopat /
sections Incorporation of OCIMF MTMSA elements
R Bickford
Updated to allow Product Quality Section to
9.0 Jan 12 M Catherall Additional Questions added in Section 2
be used as a stand-alone protocol
Additional Sections added, on Cross-
Updated to provide an IST document, that
country Pipelines, Gas Processing,
8.3 Jan 11 J Kershaw covers not only 3rd Party Oil Facilities, but
Refrigerated Storage, Pressurised
also 3rd Party Gas Facilities
Storage and Underground Storage
Additional questions relating to licensing
8.2 Jan 08 M Catherall and sensitive areas in Section 1. Also Incorporating recommendations of GC&E
correction to numbering.
Incorporation of Integrity Management
8 Sept 05 M Catherall & Control of Work Standards. General Re-numbered and formatted.
revision.
7C Aug 03 M Catherall Updated of Section 8 In-line with BP Shipping Minimum Standards
7B Mar 03 M Catherall Update Numbering and Format Section 8
7A Feb 03 A. Clarke Update of Section 8 In-line with BP Shipping Minimum Standards
7 Dec 02 A. Clarke Shipping sections combined & rewritten In-line with BP Shipping Minimum Standards

Next Revision Due: January 2015

Document Owner: M Catherall, S&OR IST (S&OR Assurance Manager)


Document Approver: J Naccache, S&OR IST (Vice President)

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 5 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
GUIDANCE FOR ASSESSORS

This Third Party Facility Health, Safety, Security and Environmental Assessment is the means by which a
BP can be assured that its 3rd Party facility operations are being conducted in accordance with industry
standards and guidance. The assessment will encompass all shore and marine activities identified as
potentially having an impact on any BP business at the facility.

Facilities that achieve the standards required are typically granted three years operation for BP subject to
commercial contracts. In some circumstances this duration will be reduced, based on the decision of the
approving authority (typically the Regional HSE Manager). The assessor will report back their findings,
based on this protocol, to the relevant approving authority, who will make the final decision on a facility’s
standard and acceptability. This process is governed by the IST Control Process for Facilities & Pipelines.

The Sections in this document fall into two distinct categories;

a) Sections 1 to 7 which refer to the procedures that are followed by a facility, including the keeping of
records

b) Sections 8 to 17 which relate more to the physical inspection of the facility by the assessor.

Questions in this protocol that are highlighted in yellow are those that contribute to the risk score in the
STREAM risk management database tool. These should always be assessed in order to provide a
sufficient assessment of the risk level.

Key

Y = Yes
N = No
NS = Not Seen
NA = Not Applicable

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 6 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 7 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1. HSSE ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT

1.1. Leadership
Every Facility should have a management team who are committed to operating the Facility in HSSE
compliant manner.

Guidance

HSSE Policy statement


If large company with multiple sites then there should be a company policy and also a site specific
endorsement.

Safety Manual / Safety Management System


The purpose of an HSSE Reference Manual is to clearly describe to managers and employees the
what, who, when, where and how issues relating to the various elements of the HSSE programme:

o What - are the various aspects of the HSSE programme element (see example below),
o Who - is the person or post responsible for implementing the various aspects of the element,
o When - are the various aspects of the element to be implemented,
o Where - are they to be implemented?
o How - detailed instructions on how various programme elements are to be implemented,
however, in some cases these may be contained in a separate manual, e.g. in a set of Safety
Regulations.

The document should be brief and easily understood.

Credit should not be given for copies of legislation or regulations alone.

HSSE Objectives
Objectives may be in the form either of:

o Targets for performance indicators (ie outputs, typically loss measures such as numbers of
incidents / accidents, level of emissions, losses of goods through thefts, etc.
o Targets based on programme activities (ie inputs such as numbers of inspections carried out,
training programmes completed, etc)
o Targets based on actions overdue for HAZOPS, audits, incident investigations etc and
percentage overdue plant inspections and tests

Audit Follow up system


Should identify actions, who is responsible for dealing with them and a target completion date.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 8 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.1 Leadership
Key Question Y N NS N/A
1.1.1 Does the Facility have a comprehensive, clear and well
enforced HSSE policy?

Guidance Questions
1.1.1.1. Has an HSSE co-ordinator been appointed who reports directly
to senior management (either onsite or corporate organisation)?
1.1.1.2. Is there a reference manual or management system that
communicates Management Policies and Practices? (ie a Safety
Manual)
1.1.1.2.1 Are roles and responsibilities defined in the management
system and clear to the Management Team?
1.1.1.2.2 Are formal checks made to ensure the functioning of the
management system?
1.1.1.3. Are annual HSSE objectives established for the Facility?
1.1.1.4. Are HSSE objectives communicated to personnel?
1.1.1.5. Are HSSE objectives being met (eg KPI metrics)?
1.1.1.5.1 Are HSSE practices benchmarked against others in the
industry?
1.1.1.6. Are there formal tours and inspections by management
personnel (eg SOCs, area walkthroughs)?
1.1.1.7. Does the Facility have periodic major HSSE and fire audits (both
external authorities and internal corporate)?
1.1.1.8. Is there a structured follow-up system for tracking inspection
and audit findings which identifies when these are not closed
on schedule?
1.1.1.9. Have recommendations from previous audit or inspections
been implemented?
1.1.1.10. Does the Facility have an internal audit plan which is followed
and procedure describing the internal audit requirements (eg
structure of the team, establishment of audit scope, reporting
requirements, audit format and timescales)?
1.1.1.11. Are internal auditor appropriately trained?
1.1.1.12. Do the management team review the effectiveness of the audit
action close-out process?
1.1.1.13. Are the results of audits fed into a continuous improvement
cycle (eg where weaknesses are identified, trends highlighted
and improvements are identified)?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 9 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.2. Incident Prevention Policies
Every Facility should have and enforce specific policies/rules to ensure that the risk of incidents is
minimised

Guidance

Portable Electrical Equipment in Hazardous Areas


Are portable radios, flashlights, or other portable, battery operated devices used in hazardous areas of
approved types meeting approved Facility or national standards?

The Facility should have a hazardous area diagram of the site in order to determine the areas that
particular equipment can be used.

Smoking
It should be clear where smoking is permitted and the designated smoking areas are located. This
should have been determined by assessing potential hazardous areas at the site. Control of matches
and lighters at entry to operational areas is a good practice.

Mobile Telephones
Personal mobile phones should not be allowed as they may be a potential source of ignition and
personal calls are likely to be a distraction to personnel conducting safety critical work.

Drug & Alcohol Policy


This should be clearly defined in a policy document and / or terms of employment and communicated
to employees. A good practice is to monitor personnel either randomly or before after a shift.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 10 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.2 Incident Prevention Policies
Key Questions Y N NS N/A
1.2.1. Does the Facility have a control of smoking policy?
1.2.2. Does the Facility have a control of personal mobile (cell) phone
policy?
1.2.3. Does the Facility have a control of portable electrical equipment
in hazardous areas?
1.2.4. Does the Facility have a control of use of drugs and alcohol
policy?
1.2.5. Does the Facility have a policy for the control of vehicles
entering hazardous areas?
1.2.6. Does the Facility have hazardous area classification diagram(s)?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 11 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.3. Manning
Does the Facility have sufficient qualified personnel (supervisors and operators) available to run the
Facility in a safe and effective manner?

Guidance

o Examine lone operations closely.


o Check that roles and reporting structures are clearly defined.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 12 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.3 Manning
Key Question Y N NS N/A
1.3.1. Are there sufficient qualified personnel (supervisors and
operators) available to run the Facility in a safe and effective
manner?

Guidance Questions
1.3.1.1. Is there an organisational chart of the facility?
1.3.1.2. Are there individual job descriptions available?
1.3.1.3. Do individual job descriptions include emergency responsibilities
(eg volunteer fire fighter)?
1.3.1.4. Has the Facility carried out a risk assessment of its staffing
levels?
1.3.1.5. Are there policies relating to personnel management (eg drug
and alcohol, hours of work and decipilnary procedures)?
1.3.1.6. Are Facility manning levels formally reviewed on a periodic
basis?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 13 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.4. Contractor Selection and Management
Does the Facility ensure that contractors employed are suitable for the task(s) for which they are
employed?

Guidance

Selection Criteria
Examples are:
o DAFW numbers and frequencies
o Total accident numbers and frequencies
o Management systems verified as meeting appropriate international standards e.g. ISO 9001 /
ISO 14001
o Number of prosecutions / fines / improvement notices received•
o Appropriate authorisations / permits / licences in place
o Competence / experience / qualifications / fitness and health of personnel
o Pro-active HSE monitoring / auditing / reporting programme in place
o Visit / inspection of the contractors’ / suppliers’ premises
o Training programme for contractors’ / suppliers’ employees
o Provision and use of suitable personal protective equipment (PPE)
o Appropriate insurance / indemnity cover
o Condition and suitability of plant and equipment
o Suitability of pre-prepared method statements and HSE plans

Contractor Compliance
The Facility should ensure contractors are compliant by:
o Conducting HSSE inspections / audits
o Encourage provision of a ‘self assessment’ from the contractor / supplier
o Joint HSSE meetings
o Training - induction / toolbox

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 14 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.4 Contractor Selection and Management
Key Question Y N NS N/A
1.4.1. Does the Facility have a suitable set of HSSE criteria for the
selection and control of contractors?

Guidance Question
1.4.1.1. Does the Facility evaluate contractors’ performance by
undertaking periodic and / or post-job reviews of their work?
1.4.1.2. Do contractors demonstrate and document that their staff are
competent to carry out their assigned work?
1.4.1.3. Does the Facility have a contractor selection and management
procedure?
1.4.1.4. Do procedures require that a scope of work is in place for each
contract?
1.4.1.5. Does the Facility ensure that contractor’s equipment is fit for
purpose and properly maintained?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 15 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.5. Training
Does the Facility have a training system that ensures that all employees are correctly trained for their
jobs?

Guidance

Training System
A formal approach to identifying training needs must be used to ensure that all necessary training is
made available to employees. Training needs discussed here are primarily those of operational and
service employees (production operators, maintenance personnel, warehousing and shipping
personnel, quality inspectors, lab technicians, etc). The goal is to derive a comprehensive listing of the
training required to enable an employee to perform his / her job properly, which means performing in
compliance with requirements for production, quality, health, safety, security and environmental
control. A list of 'HSSE' training requirements alone, then, is not the objective of this exercise.

Safety Induction
All employees and contractors must undergo a safety induction that covers (at least) the key safety
rules and precautions for the site.

Do not give credit for sites that only induct foremen and expect them to pass on the induction
messages to individuals.

Ideally the induction should be followed up with a short test to ensure that individuals have taken the
key messages onboard.

A safety passport system is an example of best practice.

Does the induction cover:

o Hazard awareness and reporting.


o General rules and procedures.
o Organisational health, safety, security and environment policy and local environmental
sensitivities.
o Legislative requirements.

Competencies
Systems which quantitatively assess and record whether staff meet the requirements of their job
description, both on appointment and at defined intervals.

A training and development process designed to bring staff up to the required level of competence for
their role and refresher training to maintain them at that level.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 16 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.5 Training
Key Question Y N NS N/A
1.5.1. Have all employees received the necessary training to allow
them to carry out their tasks safely & competently?

Guidance Questions
1.5.1.1 Has a systematic approach been adopted to identify all
employee-training needs (eg employee training matrix)? Is there
a process to identify and close any gaps in competence?
1.5.1.2 Are employee training requirements formally reviewed and
updated annually?
1.5.1.3 Are personnel trained in the relevant operating and / or
engineering, maintenance procedures and in the potential
hazards associated with their work. Is periodic verification of
their understanding of the training received and assessment of
competency carried out through refresher training?
1.5.1.4 Do management encourage staff to particpate in forums or
seminars and further education?

Key Question
1.5.2 Do contractors and employees undergo a site-specific safety
course before working on the Facility?
1.5.3 Is the Facility’s safety course adequately assessed (eg quiz,
test)?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 17 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.6. Procedures & Documentation
Does the Facility have sufficient written procedures to provide employees with the information they
require to run the facility correctly?

Guidance

Operating Manuals
o All copies must be controlled (numbered) to ensure that they are kept up to date.
o Manuals should make good use of diagrams and pictures.
o Check for oily thumb marks as an indication of usage!
o Typical contents:
 Engineering diagrams, equipment drawings, blueprints, P&IDs.
 Operating procedures, work practices etc.
 Safe operating parameters and risk assessment reports
 Critical task analysis and procedures
 General and specialised work permits / rules
 Emergency procedures
 Existing risk assessment documentation

It should be ensured that hazard identification, risk assessments, and process hazard analyses are
performed by persons that have comprehensive experience, knowledge of the relevant processes and
current hazard assessment techniques. These analyses should cover design, procurement,
construction, commissioning, operation, and decommissioning, i.e the full lifecycle. Relevant
recommendations and actions from these assessments should be communicated to those members of
the workforce that may be affected by specific hazards. (Reference BP Integrity Management
Standard)

Safety Rules
General Rules, typically about a dozen, apply to everybody on the site, including contractors and visitors
as well as employees. General Rules are the simple ‘dos and don’ts’ which apply essentially throughout
an organisation, eg ‘wear a hard hat’.

They are stated once only, rather than repeated within the requirements for every activity, and hence
simplify and minimise the volume of documentation required. They can be thought of as the
requirements to be obeyed whether or not work is undertaken, ie in just moving around the site. They
are not occupation or area specific. These rules must be prominently displayed and distributed.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 18 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.6 Procedures and Documentation
Key Question Y N NS N/A
1.6.1 Does the Facility have readily available risk assessed operating
manuals and procedures for routine activities?

Guidance Questions
1.6.1.1 Are the operating manuals and procedures in a user friendly
format?
1.6.1.2 Are operating manuals and procedures formally reviewed and
updated periodically by relevant members of staff?
1.6.1.3 Are relevant regulations and industry standards periodically
reviewed to ensure compliance in operating manuals and
procedures?
1.6.1.4 Has the Facility designated a person responsible for overall site
hazard identification, risk assessment and risk management as
defined in their job description?

Key Question
1.6.2 Are there written site-specific health, safety, security and
environmental rules translated into sufficient languages for all
employees, contractors & visitors to understand?

Key Question
1.6.3 Are there Process and Instrumentation Diagrams (P&IDs),
Process Flow Diagrams (PFDs) and as-built drawings, which are
accurate, version-controlled and approved by the accountable
person.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 19 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.7. Control of Work
Does the Facility have sufficient written procedures to provide employees with the information they
require to run the facility correctly?

Guidance

Ensure that every Control of Work (CoW) procedure has been issued in accordance with a Document
Control Management System and that any changes or developments are subject to a formal
Management of Change control process before authorization and adoption.

Check that the work permit system includes:

o definitions of classes of work requiring permits (eg hot, cold, excavation, entry etc) and routine
work not requiring permits
o delineation of areas, eg hazardous / safe, where permits are applied or not
o designation of operating authority (ie persons issuing permits)
o designation of performing authority (ie persons receiving permits and in control of work)

Ensure that all roles and responsibilities required to operate the CoW procedure are identified,
articulated to the designated persons and that those persons are competent, authorised and auditable
evidence is available. The levels of authority for approval to proceed with work should be
commensurate with the level of risk. Persons with identified roles should demonstrate they understand
and accept their accountabilities. There should be a Single Point Accountable.

There should be assurance that everyone involved with the CoW process has the required training and
reached the level of competence required to ensure correct application of the process. All roles should
have defined competency. Training, including refresher training, should be available for all roles within
the CoW process and linked to the defined competency. Competence levels should be regularly
checked. Training and competency records should be kept and updated.

Ensure that Planning and Scheduling of work delivers an integrated planning function, which accurately
reflects the work to be carried out, use of resources and time period required for the safe completion
of work. Planning and scheduling should consider time and resource requirements for risk assessment,
preparation and permitting. Simultaneous operations should be identified and consideration given to
their compatibility. When work is dependent on or effects another activity their planning, scheduling
and implementation should be coordinated and priorities of execution defined. Good practice is for the
control room / permit office to have a display board indicating the location of all work taking place.

Ensure risk assessment is conducted and is capable of coping with various levels of complexity,
dependant upon the hazards, likelihood of those hazards being realized and the extent of the controls
and mitigation needed to ensure that the work can be completed safely. A member(s) of the workforce
performing the task should participate in the Risk Assessment, which should be communicated in
writing and signed off by all involved in the task. The work site should be inspected by a competent
person as a pre-requisite for conducting the Risk Assessment. Routine tasks may be covered by a
procedural approach, providing a documented risk assessment has been conducted. All equipment
used in performing work should be assessed as fit for purpose by a competent person through
inspection and / or review of any certification.

To reduce risk, Risk Assessments should consider these measures in the following order:
o elimination
o substitution
o control
o mitigation

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 20 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Emergency response plans, based on potential emergencies, should be in place before commencing
work.

To ensure that a formal process of ‘permitting’ is utilized for the specific high risk work mentioned
above and to allow such work to be safely carried out using the appropriate level of control.
a permit should:

o define the scope of work and its duration,


o identify hazards and reference risk assessments,
o identify isolation of energy sources required to carry out the job,
o establish control measures to eliminate or mitigate risks,
o link the work to other associated work permits or simultaneous operations,
o ensure that where there are isolations common to more than one permit, the isolations are not
removed before all permits have been signed off,
o specify those carrying out the work and verify that the risks and control measures have been
communicated to them,
o be authorized, monitored and re-validated by the responsible person,
o ensure adequate control over the return to normal operations.

Many Facilities have developed a single Work Permit form to cover all types of work. While many of
these appear to meet the overall requirement and can exercise adequate control of work, BP’s
preference and the recommendation of the OIAS Guidance on Permits to Work is for separate, colour
coded, forms for each category.

Only work covered under the task description of the permit can be performed. The work-site should be
inspected by a competent person before permit issue to ensure that conditions have not materially
changed.

It is vital for the safe execution of work that everyone involved is acquainted with the identified
hazards, likelihood of those hazards being realised and the controls and mitigation actions which have
been applied in order to reduce the possibility of an incident or accident. The person responsible for
issuing the permit should confirm that the person(s) accepting the permit:

o understand the scope and requirements of the work permit, adjacent activities/hazards and
initial emergency actions,
o are shown the correct equipment addressed by the permit, which should be clearly identified,
o are able to identify when changes in the work environment invalidate the original permit, and
should cease all activity until a re-assessment has been completed,
o should have a copy of the permit available at the worksite at all times.

The person accepting the permit should ensure that all involved in the task sign to confirm
understanding of the scope, hazards, controls and mitigation. Operations and other relevant personnel
should be informed of and understand the impact and status of all work, which may affect them prior to
commencement of the work. The persons performing work at remote locations off site should:

o have the skills and competency to identify the required work scope, hazards, controls and
mitigation measures,
o establish and maintain regular communication,
o validate the permit requirements with another competent person.

In order to protect those completing the work it is essential that competent persons regularly visit and
inspect the work site to ensure that the conditions detailed on the permit have not been compromised;
that only the work as described on the permit is carried out and the work is continuing in a safe
manner. Those issuing the permit should provide monitoring of the work, and maintain regular
REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 21 of 332
THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
communication with those performing the work. Before work re-commences after interruption, the site
conditions and appropriate control measures should be reassessed. At shift change, before work re-
commences, hand-over arrangements between all involved in the work should include the status of
continuing work, a re-appraisal of site conditions and the appropriate control measures. The responsible
person charged with monitoring the ongoing work should:

o identify when the site conditions have changed,


o assess when the original permit no longer accurately covers the task, stop the job if necessary
and request a re-assessment.

The status of permits (including a register of inhibits / overrides / isolations) should be accurate, up to
date and available at a designated location.

On completion or interruption of any work activity, it is essential that prior to the permit being closed,
the work site is visited by a competent person to ensure that no potential sources of accidents remain
and that the equipment can be safely brought back into service without incident. The work site should
be inspected and confirmed as being in a safe condition on completion or interruption of work (except
where the interruption is an emergency in which case it should be undertaken after the emergency has
been cleared). Upon completion of the work, the permit should be closed by signature from the
appropriate authority. The CoW process should include de-isolation, reinstatement and testing of the
system’s integrity.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 22 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.7 Control of Work
Key Question Y N NS N/A
1.7.1 Do written procedures exist describing Control of Work (CoW)
processes?

Guidance Questions
1.7.1.1 Before conducting work that involves confined space entry,
work on energy systems, ground disturbance, hot work or other
hazardous activities, is a permit obtained and a lock-out, tag-out
procedure used where necessary?
1.7.1.2 Have all identified roles within CoW procedures been defined
and have clear accountabilities?
1.7.1.3 Is (are) the permit(s) signed off by all those carrying out the work
to denote their understanding of the hazards, risks and
mitigating controls?
1.7.1.4 Are historical records of permits archived?
1.7.1.5 Is the Facility’s CoW process regularly audited by HSSE
personnel or equivalent?
1.7.1.6 Does the planning and scheduling of work identify simultaneous
operations and job tasks at the Facility to assesss their potential
impact on each other?
1.7.1.7 Are all persons involved in the CoW process appropriately
trained and competent to carry out their roles, eg permit
authorisor, lift operator, confined space supervisor, gas testers)?
1.7.1.8 Are all tasks conducted after being risk assessed?
1.7.1.9 Are step-by-step work plans (eg method statements, Plan de
Prevention) written & followed for complex non-routine tasks?
1.7.1.10 Is all ongoing work requiring a permit regularly monitored and
managed by a responsible person?
1.7.1.11 Is the work site inspected by the responsible person to ensure it
is left in a safe condition upon completion or interruption of the
work? Upon completion of the work is the permit signed off by
the responsible person?
1.7.1.12 Does the CoW procedure make it clear to everyone that they
have an obligation to stop unsafe work?

Key Question
1.7.2 Are portable devices available to test for flammable gases,
oxygen and toxics?

Guidance Questions
1.7.2.1 Are these devices calibrated in line with manufacturers
recommendations and are using the correct calibration gas (eg
pentane or pentane equivalent calibration gas for gasoline
vapours - Note: May need to apply device correction factors.)?
1.7.2.2 Are gas test results recorded on permits?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 23 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.8. Management of Change
The Facility should have a robust management of change system to ensure that the impact of all
procedural and engineering changes does not have an adverse effect on safety and efficiency.

Guidance

Sites should have in place a formal Management of Change programme to enable the assessment of
hazards and risks associated with the introduction of new facilities, modification of existing facilities,
and changes to operating methods. This should include temporary measures such as by-passes etc. A
check should be made to confirm that changes are reflected in updates to operating procedures.

The facility’s Engineering Manager should have access and a direct communication line to the leader of
the operation (Reference: BP Integrity Management Standard). The Engineering Manager must have
access to engineering standards and good practice.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 24 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.8 Management Of Change
Key Question Y N NS N/A
1.8.1 Are systematic reviews used to identify hazards and assess
risks associated with permanent, emergency and temporary
change (includes technical, administrative and organisational
changes)?

Guidance Questions
1.8.1.1 Is there a documented process?
1.8.1.2 Does the process involve formal sign off by relevant members
of the management team?
1.8.1.3 Is a HAZOP study (or similar) conducted for engineering
(technical) changes?
1.8.1.4 Does the Facility ensure that competent discipline experts are
involved in the management of change process?
1.8.1.5 Does the Facility maintain a Management of Change register?
1.8.1.6 Do procedures require that equipment is re-certified prior to
being put back into service after being modified?
1.8.1.7 Does the management of change system ensure that temporary
changes do not exceed the initial timeframe for which they are
authorised without review and reapproval?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 25 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.9. Accident/Incident investigation
The Facility should have a simple yet comprehensive incident and near miss reporting and investigation
system that gets to the root cause of an incident and allows lessons to be learnt

Guidance

Reporting & Investigation Procedure


The procedure should include coverage of:
o What kinds of accidents / incidents are to be reported?
o When they are to be reported and investigated.
o Who is to be notified under various conditions?
o Who is to be responsible for conducting and participating in the accident / incident
investigation?
o Who is to be contacted (and how) for various accident / incident investigations?
o Instructions to be followed in conducting an accident / incident investigation.
o Reports to be prepared.

The accident / incident investigation procedure should require that employees report each type of event
mentioned above. Broad comments such as ‘employees are required to report all down-grading events
or losses, or all incidents or all accidents’, are too ambiguous. Incidents should be reported as soon as
practicable, certainly within 24 hours after they have occurred, for the sake of accuracy. An incident can
be said to be ‘reported’ when a formal record (possibly incomplete) is first created on paper or
electronic medium and submitted to the relevant authority. Subsequent updating of the report will take
place as the investigation proceeds. Who is to be notified is a local matter, except for major incidents.
For installations, which are nominally self-supporting, all power failures should also be investigated.

Accident/Incident Investigation
o Formal training should be provided to all personnel responsible for investigating accidents and
incidents. This training should be integrated with other training requirements.
o There is an important distinction between performing an incident investigation, and the purely
clerical activity of completing a standardised incident investigation report once the investigation
is complete. For credit to be given training in both must be provided. The former is often
overlooked.

Follow up of actions from accident / incident reports


Actions to control identified causes are the most important part of an investigation When evaluating a
remedial action or follow-up programme, look for evidence that:

o Time frames and position accountabilities for reporting are clear defined.
o There are periodic reviews of the status of incomplete actions.
o Adequate attention is given to co-ordination among various areas of functions affected by
remedial actions.
o Information about problems and progress is communicated adequately to all personnel
concerned.
o Broad statements of intention about remedial actions or follow-up programmes should not be
evaluated.

Lesson sharing Organisations


Either internal to the company or external (eg IChemE in UK, GESIP in France, CCPS in US…)

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 26 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.9 Accident/Incident Investigation
Key Question Y N NS N/A
1.9.1 Is there an accident / incident / non-conformance investigation
system?

Guidance Questions
1.9.1.1 Does the procedure require that injuries, occupational illnesses,
non-conformances, non-compliance, property damage,
environmental damage / complaints, security breaches and other
accidents and incidents (near-misses) be reported?
1.9.1.2 Do selected staff receive formal training in accident / incident
investigation and reporting?
1.9.1.3 Is there a standard form for accident/incident reporting?
1.9.1.4 Is there a standard form for accident/incident investigation?
1.9.1.5 Do investigation teams have sufficient independence from the
incident?
Key Question
1.9.2 Are HSSE statistics used for evaluating the performance of the
facility?

Guidance Questions
1.9.2.1 Are safety statistics maintained for employees?
1.9.2.2 Are safety / incident statistics maintained for contractors?

Key Question
1.9.3 Is a system being used by appropriate personnel that ensure
that remedial actions, and follow-up of those actions, are carried
out as recommended in the accident / incident (near-miss)
investigation report?

Key Question
1.9.4 Is the Facility part of lessons learned sharing organisations?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 27 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.10. Communications
In order to ensure effective & safe operation the Facility must communicate effectively with
employees, neighbouring operations and the local community.

Guidance

Determine whether contact is made directly with the facility management, or through a remote office,
or a third party.

Local Authorities/Emergency responders

Look for evidence such as minutes of meetings with local emergency response and harbour
authorities.

Employee HSSE Meetings

These meetings must include all employees on a regular and frequent basis and must be mainly, if not
exclusively, devoted to safety and health.

Employee Awareness

Posters should address specific problems and provide specific solutions. They should be posted near
the locations where problems are encountered. There should be either special bulletin board for HSSE
or special portions of boards devoted to HSSE material.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 28 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.10 Communications
Key Question Y N NS N/A
1.10.1 Does the Facility maintain effective communications with the
local authorities in charge of licence to operate and emergency
response?

Guidance Questions
1.10.1.1 Does the Facility have regular communication with the port /
harbour authority?
1.10.1.2 Does the Facility have regular communication with the
emergency response organisations?
1.10.1.3 Does the Facility maintain a good relationship with local safety
and environmental authorities?
1.10.1.4 Is the Facility aware of sensitive populations in the immediate
area?

Key Question
1.10.2 Are any group meetings held with employees to discuss current
topics relating to health, safety, security and environmental
control?

Guidance Questions
1.10.2.1 Are these group meetings formalised and documented (ie
agenda, minutes, etc)?
1.10.2.2 Are there adequate bulletin boards around the Facility site for
HSSE purposes?
1.10.2.3 Do all staff have understanding of HSE excellance through their
participation in safety and toolbox meetings?
1.10.2.4 Do managers and supervisors demonstrate by their behaviours
commitment to HSE excellance?
1.10.2.5 Does the Facility organise health and safety campaigns and
initiatives?
1.10.2.6 Is relevant safety information communicated to staff and
relevant third parties (eg details of past incidents both internal
and external, analysis of LTIs, potential for injury from near
misses and actions to prevent reoccurance)?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 29 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
1.11. Legislative & Regulatory Compliance
The Facility must comply with all legislation relevant to its operations and impacts.

Guidance

It is necessary to ensure the Facility has all its environmental licenses (air, water and waste), any
certification required by the fire authorities (including major accident hazard risk plans), and any licenses
required for the storing and handling of hydrocarbons.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 30 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT

1.11 Legislative & Regulatory Compliance


Key Question Y N NS N/A
1.11.1 Has all training required by regulatory authorities been
completed (eg pipeline DOT operator qualification, ADN,
HAZMAT)?

Key Question
1.11.2 Has the Facility obtained all licenses required such as:
 License to operate
 Petroleum Handling (Dangerous Goods)
 Fire Authority Approvals
 Emissions to Air
 Discharges to Water Bodies or Collection
Systems
 Waste Handling
 Waste Disposal

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 31 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
2 PRODUCT QUALITY, SAMPLING & MEASUREMENT

2.1 Facility Design


Every Facility should be built to applicable International, National, State and Local regulations so that it
can ensure that products can be measured accurately and that their quality can be maintained.

Guidance

These Guidance Notes below are directed at tankfarms in facilities, but are equally applicable to many
other facilities.

Contamination prevention measures


o Double block & bleed valves.
o Backflow prevention devices.
o Spectacle blinds on single valve segregation.

Heat Tracing
o If no heat tracing the check procedure for flushing and draining.

Tank Bottom Design


o Flat bottoms not ideal.
o Cone down preferred.
o Cone up acceptable. It is good to have multiple drain lines around the tank circumference to
ensure there are no pockets of water remaining.

Only effective if used in conjunction with effective water detection and removal procedures.

Tank Coatings
o Base and ~bottom 1-meter of tank wall when in corrosive service.
o Under roof coating will prevent corrosion where sulphur containing stocks are stored.
o Jet tanks supplying into plane (on or near airports) should have full lining (See Air BP Intranet for
current accepted lining materials).

Blending Equipment
o Side mixers can take 24hrs to mix.
o Jet mixers blend faster.

Tank Calibration
o Standard methods include strapping, electro-optical surveying methods, incremental fill with a
master meter.
o International standards covering recognised techniques are covered by ISO 7507

Tank calibration tables should reference a temperature and density. This should be broadly inline with
stored stock and typical stock temperatures. Where this is not the case corrections should be applied.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 32 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
2.1 Facility Design
Key Question Y N NS N/A
2.1.1.0 Are sufficient measures in place to ensure product quality is
maintained?

Guidance Questions
2.1.1.0.1 Is the type of facility suitable to avoid any impacts on product
quality, eg proprietary or commercial (public storage facility)?
2.1.1.0.2 Is the means of storing product suitable to avoid impacting on
maintaining product quality, eg co-mingled storage or
dedicated (segregated) storage?
2.1.1.0.3 Does the facility have product integrity procedures for all
operations?
2.1.1.0.4 Is there an established process for reviewing the quality
assurance procedures of the facility's shippers?
2.1.1.1 Is there an adequate accurate pipeline diagram for the facility?
2.1.1.2 Does the Facility have effective contamination prevention
measures and are they adequate?
2.1.1.2.1 Is the method of handling product or grade switches (pipeline
cuts) in multi-product systems adequate?
2.1.1.2.2 Does the Facility test for sulphur in diesel when there is a
switch of grade in multi-product pipelines?
2.1.1.2.3 For receipts by pipeline is there adequate testing of parcels
during discharge and at an appropriate frequency?
2.1.1.2.4 For receipts by ship or barge is there adequate testing of
cargoes before and / or during discharge?
2.1.1.2.5 After a receipt from a vessel or pipeline is there adequate
testing of the parcel.
2.1.1.2.6 Is there adequate testing of the tank stock prior to release for
sale?
2.1.1.3 If selected lines are used for multiple grades are there
adequate means to drain or flush lines in order to prevent
cross-contamination?
2.1.1.4 For viscous products or low pour point crude oils are the lines
and tanks adequately heated and insulated?
2.1.1.5 Are lines and valves colour coded or marked to identify
different products and product grades?

Key Question
2.1.1.5.1 Are manifolds and headers segregated for each product type?

Key Question
2.1.1.5.2 Are the type of valves used on manifolds, jump-overs etc
appropriate to main product quality specification?
2.1.1.5.3 Are tank water draw, roof drains and sampling facilities
adequate segregated from suction lines?
2.1.1.6 Is bottom design of the tanks adequate to ensure good water
drainage from products?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 33 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 34 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Key Question Y N NS N/A
2.1.1.7 Are adequate facilities and procedures available / used to drain
water from products?
2.1.1.7.1 Does the Facility have a criteria for draining tank bottoms?
2.1.1.7.2 Do the tank drain lines permit the identification of water
interfaces either visually or automatically?
2.1.1.7.3 Does the Facility determine the level of tank bottoms
frequently enough?
2.1.1.8 Are any coatings used on the inside of tanks when storing
quality sensitive product?
2.1.1.9 Are tanks fitted with suitable equipment for blending where
appropriate?
2.1.1.10. Does Is the Facility ensure adequately equipped to ensure
products are adequately dosed with additives to meet safety
and specification requirements?

Guidance Questions
2.1.1.10.1 Does the Facility have procedures for the introduction of
additives into vessels’ tanks?

Key Question
2.1.1.11 Where the facility returns vapors from a VRU appropriately
routed back into storage?

Guidance Questions
2.1.1.11.1 Is vapour return pipework designed to prevent contamination?

Key Question
2.1.2 Do tanks have a calibrated, clearly identified datum point and
adequate access to allow manual measurement and the
drawing of relevant samples?

Guidance Questions
2.1.2.1 Are tanks suitably calibrated using a recognised industry
method and at appropriate temperature / density for stored
products?
2.1.2.2 Are calibration tables (charts) appropriate for the tank service
in terms of stock density and temperature?

Key Question
2.1.3 Does the Facility operate some form of hydrocarbon loss
monitoring across the site?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 35 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
2.2 Laboratory
Any laboratory facilities used by the Facility should be operated to applicable International, National,
State and Local regulations so that it can ensure that products are accurately measured and analysed.

Guidance

Laboratory Accreditation
o ISO 17025 or equivalent accreditation.
o Does it use IP, ISO, EN, ASTM or GOST Methods of analysis?

Sample Handling
Sample handling procedures should cover:
o Sample receipt
o Sample tracking
o Sample labelling
o Sample storage
o Sample retention period (eg 90 days)
o Sample distribution (eg Facility lab, cargo surveyors, clients)
o Sample disposal

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 36 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
2.2 Laboratory
Key Question Y N NS N/A
2.2.1 Has the Facility laboratory been accredited against an
internationally recognised standard?

Guidance Questions
2.2.1.1 Do test methods used comply with IP, ASTM or other
acceptable national standards?
2.2.1.2 Are copies of the analytical methods held alongside the relevant
apparatus?
2.2.1.3 Are sample handling procedures acceptable?
2.2.1.4 Is equipment calibrated regularly and are written records and
calibration procedures kept?
2.2.1.5 Are the techniques used, the ones preferred by BP contractural
requirements?

Key Question
2.2.2 Are safe working practices and conditions in place (eg eye wash
/ showers / antidotes, fume extraction, good housekeeping)?

Guidance Questions
2.2.2.1 Is the storage of gas bottles adequate (ie secured, not located
indoors)?
2.2.2.2 Do engine test facilities for Cetane / Octane testing have
specific extraction and hearing protection requirements /
facilities?
2.2.2.3 Are laboratory personnel given both task and facility specific
HSSE training?
2.2.2.4 Are facilities for sample retention adequate with respect to
safety?
2.2.2.5 Does the Facility have suitable measures in place for the
disposal of retained samples?
2.2.2.6 Are there adequate safety signs displayed?
2.2.2.7 Is PPE worn by staff adequate for the hazards encountered?
2.2.2.8 Are fire detection and fighting equipment appropriate?
2.2.2.9 Is there adequate separation between hazards associated with
physical test methods (ie gas test apparatus and test methods
with sources of ignition)?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 37 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
2.3 Measurement and Sampling Equipment
The Facility should ensure that the correct measurement and sampling equipment is installed, used,
maintained and calibrated.

Guidance

Automatic Tank Level Gauges (ATG) and Temperature Gauges (ATT)

From API MPMS 3.1B(ATG) and API MPMS 7.3(ATT)

Factory calibration:
The reading of an ATG to be used for custody transfer application should agree with a certified
measurement instrument within ±1 mm or (± 1/16 inch) over the entire range of the ATG. The certified
measurement instrument should be traceable to the national standards and should be provided with a
calibration correction table.

The reading of an ATG to be used for inventory application should agree with a certified measurement
instrument within ±3 mm (±1/8 inch) over the entire range of the ATG. The certified measurement
instrument should be traceable to the national standards and should be provided with a calibration
correction table.
(prior to 2001, you may not be able to see a factory calibration cert)

For custody transfer:


For ATGs used in custody transfer service, 4 mm (3/16 inch) should be used as the tolerance. If this
tolerance is met, the ATG should be considered within calibration and suitable for custody transfer.

ATGs used in custody transfer service should be inspected and its accuracy verified at a single random
level at least once per month.

For inventory control:


For ATGs used in inventory control service, 25 mm (1 inch) should be used as the tolerance. If this
tolerance is met, the ATG should be considered within calibration and suitable for inventory control.

ATGs used in inventory control service should be inspected and its accuracy verified at a single random
level at least once per quarter.

ACCURACY REQUIREMENTS FOR ATGs:


Requirement Custody Transfer Inventory
Factory calibration 1 mm (1/16 inch) 3 mm (1/8 inch)
Effect of installation 3 mm (1/8 inch) n.a.
Initial verification 4 mm (3/16 inch) 25 mm (1 inch)
Subsequent verification 4 mm (3/16 inch) 25 mm (1 inch)
Frequency of verification monthly quarterly
Effect of installation is how much the roof flexes with someone standing on top.

Minimum Number of Temperature Sensors:


Maximum Filling Height N° of Sensors
<9 m (30 ft) 4
9 m (30 ft) to 15 m (50 ft) 5
15 m (50 ft) to 23 m (75 ft) 6
23 m (75 ft) to 30 m (100 ft) 7

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 38 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
ACCURACY REQUIREMENTS FOR ATTs:
Requirement Custody Transfer Inventory
Factory calibration 0.2°C (0.4°F) 0.2°C (0.4°F)
Effect of installation n/a n/a
Initial verification 0.4°C (0.8°F) 0.4°C (0.8°F)
Subsequent verification 0.4°C (0.8°F) 0.8°C (1.6°F)
Frequency of verification monthly Annually

Manual level measurement


o Standard steel tapes should be used for tank dips or ullages and for checking calibration of
automatic level gauges. Use of portable electronic ullage / interface tapes for level
measurement is not acceptable.
o Acceptable steel tapes: IPM8 for tape / IPM10 for bob (1.5mm [± 1/16 in] uncertainty on full
extension of 30m) or tapes that undergo annual calibration to traceable standards, eg NIST.
o All dip tapes and / or calibration certificates should indicate the temperature at which the tape is
calibrated. Tolerance in a 30m tape should not exceed ±1.5 mm [± 1/16 in].
o The dip weights used should be calibrated for the tape in use.
o Free water finding rule and water finding paste should be used in black oils instead of the dip-
weight.
o Product Finding Paste: Vecom, KolorKut, Shell.

Manual Temperature Measurement


o Portable electronic temperature instruments should read within ±0.3°C [±0.5°F] of the actual
temperature readings as given by a calibrated thermometer, at two different temperatures.
o Cup-case thermometers, in any form, are not acceptable. If portable electronic thermoprobes
are not available the average temperature of samples drawn from the upper, middle and lower
portion of the oil layer will be used.
o NOTE: for every 1degC out in temp results in 0.1%vol error in measurement.
o Portable electronic temperature instruments should be checked weekly if in daily use, or
monthly if used less frequently.
o Mercury-in-glass thermometers should be calibrated every 12 months.

Sampling Equipment
o Sampling container (for hydrocarbons stored under ambient conditions) should preferably be a
wide-necked (glass) bottle of at least 1L [1 quart] capacity (to allow for ullage space for insertion
of homogeniser shaft for water determination), which can be firmly sealed with screw tops to
prevent loss of light ends.
o Sampling cage should be of design to avoid decanting sample into other containers once drawn.
o The sampling cage should be made of brass or stainless steel and the suspending rope should
be made of natural fibres (for safety reasons).

Manually Determined Density Measurement


o Digital Density Meters (DDMs) are suitable for use on Facilities where facilities exist for
calibrations to be conducted according to the approved standards.
o DDM uncertainty should be ± 0.0001kg/L (or equivalent in API gravity).
o The glass hydrometer can be used for both transparent and opaque oils (meniscus correction
factor necessary).
o Hydrometers should comply with BS718 or other local standards, and calibrated to ± 0.0001
kg/L (or equivalent in API gravity).
o Liquid-in-glass thermometers calibrated in degrees Celsius or Fahrenheit of the type IP39C or
IP64C or equivalent local standard and should be used in conjunction with glass hydrometers.
o Hand-held DDMs are not recommended.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 39 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Dynamic Measurement Equipment
o Turbine meters should be used for low viscosity oil (<25 cSt) and positive displacement (PD)
meters or helical rotor turbine meters for this and higher viscosities, subject to their viscosity
limitations.
o The performance of meters on unheated oils when compared against a reference traceable to a
national standard should be:
 Repeatability ±0.05%.
 Error ±0.15% (for all operating flowrates).
 Error ±0.05% (for all operational flowrates after proving is complete).
o A maximumn frequency between proving of 6 months is recommended.
o The performance of meters on heated oils when compared against a reference traceable to a
national standard should be:
 Repeatability ±0.10%.
 Error ±0.20% (for all operating flowrates).
 Error ±0.10% (for all operational flowrates after proving is complete).
o A maximumn frequency between proving of 12 months is recommended.

(Source Energy Institute HM48 Meter Proving - Code of Practice For the Proving of Loading
Gantry Meters)
o Coriolis meters should be considered where there is an advantage in direct mass
measurement, where high water cuts are anticipated or where minimum maintenance
intervention is essential. Coriolis meters do not have the same degree of specification as yet,
but typically have a mass flow rate uncertainty of ±0.15 - ±0.5%.
o Temperature should be measured by a temperature sensitive platinum resistance element
downstream of the meter (5-10 pipe diameters), with a tolerance of ±0.15°C at 0°C and
±0.35°C at 100°C. These should be calibrated against certified IP77C/78C mercury-in-glass
thermometers or digital thermometers.
o Pressure transducers with a calibrated accuracy of ±0.25% of span or better should be installed
as follows:
 At upstream header.
 5 pipe diameters downstream turbine
 Outlet PD or Coriolis.
 At density meters.
 Across DP points of upstream in-line filters.
o Density meters of ±0.1% accuracy should be used, preferably of the vibrating element type.
o Meters should be installed in each meter line.

Weighbridges
o These should be approved by a notified body and verified by an accredited body (eg NWML) or
trading standards organisation (reference EC Non Automated Weighing Instruments Directive,
GOST R8.603)
o Frequency is typically annually (reference ‘Energy Institute HM32: A Guide to Recommended
Measurement Practice for Compliance with the Requirements of HMRC Notice 179’ in the UK)
for verification. The accuracy specification should comply with national or regional regulation
(eg Class III in the EU set by EN 45501)
o Dynamic axle weighing system accuracy is critically dependent on the speed of a train.
Because of the difficulty in controlling this speed, the use of dynamic axle weighing is not
recommended.
o If mass (weight in vacuum) is required to determine volume, a buoyancy correction should be
applied to the weight in air determined (eg from Table 56 of the ASTM Petroleum Measurement
Tables.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 40 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
2.3 Measurement and Sampling Equipment
Key Question Y N NS N/A
2.3.1 Is the manual level measurement equipment acceptable?

Guidance Questions
2.3.1.1 Do tapes undergo acceptable annual calibration and / or of
appropriate design specification?
2.3.1.2 Does the Facility use appropriate water product & water finding
pastes?

Key Question
2.3.2 Is the automatic level measurement equipment acceptable?

Guidance Questions
2.3.2.1 Are each of the gauges verified for accuracy at frequent
intervals?
2.3.2.2 Are the accuracy limits acceptable?

Key Question
2.3.3 Is the manual temperature measurement equipment
acceptable?

Guidance Questions
2.3.3.1 Is manual temperature measurement equipment calibrated
frequently enough?
2.3.3.2 Is the calibration of manual temperature measurement traceable
to national standards?

Key Question
2.3.4 Is the automatic temperature measurement equipment
acceptable?

Guidance Questions
2.3.4.1 Are the automatic temperature measurement devices proven at
least quarterly?
2.3.4.2 Is the accuracy acceptable?

Key Question
2.3.5 Is the type of sampling equipment used acceptable?

Key Question
2.3.6 Is the type of manually determined density methodology used
acceptable (eg hydrometer, densitometer, calculation for gas
samples)?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Y N NS N/A
Key Question
2.3.7 Is the type of dynamic measuring equipment used acceptable?

Guidance Questions
2.3.7.1 Is the configuration of the dynamic equipment likely to maintain
low uncertainties?
2.3.7.2 Is the dynamic measurement equipment proven to an
acceptable standard?
2.3.7.3 Are associated measurements (temperature and density)
undertaken to an acceptable standard and corrections applied?

Key Question
2.3.8 Is the weighbridge approved for conformity to a standard set by
the regulatory authority (at either national or regional level)?

Guidance Questions
2.3.8.1 Is the weighbridge proved regularly by a party accredited by a
certification body or a trading standards organisation?
2.3.8.2 Is the accruracy specification compliant with a national or
regional regulation?
2.3.8.3 If used to convert weight-in-air to mass (weight-in-vacuum) for
open wagons (ie not pressurised wagons such as LPG) is the
buoyancy factor applied from a recognised standard (eg Table 56
of the ASTM Petroleum Measurement Tables) and is an
accurate density value used for further conversion to volume?
2.3.8.4 If dynamic weighings are carried out without uncoupling is it
ensured that wagons are kept at a known constant speed that
allows accurate measurement for the system?
2.3.8.5 Do personnel dismount the vehicle during weighings (unless the
system is designed for this mode and remain in place for all
weighings)?
2.3.8.6 For weighing of road vehicles is it ensured that they are centrally
located and the engine is switched off?
2.3.8.7 Is weighing of each end of the vehicle separately and then
summing the weights avoided?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 43 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
2.4 Measurement and Sampling Procedures
The Facility should ensure that the correct measurement and sampling procedures are used in order to
ensure accurate quantification of products.

Guidance
Tank Depth Measurement Procedures (for custody transfer)
o Energy Institute: Three measurements taken to agree within ±2mm [± 1/8 in].
o Manual measurements should not be made for at least 30 minutes after the completion of any
movement, to allow static electricity to dissipate.
o For manual readings, three dip or ullage readings must agree within ±3mm.
o Tanks should be recalibrated every 10 years if used for custody / fiscal transfers, or when tanks
have been modified.
o Water finding paste, and not sonic tapes, should be used to detect the oil / water interface.

Temperature Measurement Procedures (for custody transfer)


o Manual temperature measurements should be made using a calibrated portable electronic
thermometer. All instruments should be earthed while in use.
o As a minimum, the number of temperature measurements should be:
 for less than 2m [6ft] oil, one mid-point temperature is required
 for 2-3.5m [6 – 10ft] oil, 1/4 and 3/4 depth temperatures required
 >3.5m [10ft] 1/6, 3/6 and 5/6 depth temperature readings required
o The probe should be moved up and down through 30cm [1ft] until a steady temperature reading is
obtained for 20 - 30 seconds.
o If the mid-point temperature differs from the mean of the other two temperatures, it is
recommended that measurements be taken throughout the whole oil depth at 1m intervals,
commencing 0.5m below the liquid surface and not finishing within 0.5m of the bottom.

Sampling Procedures (for custody transfer)


o Sampling for density should be carried out immediately after water, level and temperature gauging.
o Samples should be taken from the top downwards to prevent unnecessary disturbance.
o The number of samples should be:
 For less than 2m [6ft] oil, one mid-point sample is required;
 for 2 - 3.5m [6 – 10ft] oil, 1/4 and 3/4 depth samples required;
 >3.5m [10ft] 1/6, 3/6 and 5/6 depth samples required.
o After removal from the tank, the samples should be protected from the effects of the weather and
tested in the laboratory as soon as possible.
o Samples should not be decanted.

Density Measurement (for custody transfer)


o The hydrometer reading should normally be taken as soon as possible after sampling the tank, at a
temperature within 3°C of the temperature at which the bulk oil was measured. If appreciable
amounts of light ends could be lost in this way, the sample should first be cooled to 18°C or below
before transferring to a clean hydrometer cylinder.
o After the hydrometer is placed in the cylinder containing the sample, the temperature should be
recorded using an approved mercury-in-glass thermometer, to an accuracy of ±0.1°C [±0.1°F].
o When the hydrometer has come to rest, the density should be read to the nearest 0.0001. This
should be taken as the point at which the principle surface of the liquid cuts the scale.
o The temperature reading should then be repeated and should agree with the initial reading within
0.3°C [0.5°F].
o If DDM is used, the sample should be injected carefully to avoid the ingress of air or vapour
bubbles. The light in the measuring chamber should be extinguished as soon as the sample has
been successfully injected into the measuring cell.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 44 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
2.4 Measurement and Sampling Procedures
Key Question Y N NS N/A
2.4.1 Are the Facility’s manual tank depth measurement procedures
acceptable?

Key Question
2.4.2 Are the Facility’s manual temperature measurement procedures
acceptable?

Key Question
2.4.3 Are the Facility’s sampling procedures acceptable (manual or
automatic)?

Guidance Questions
2.4.3.1 Do procedures require ullaging and sampling operations on
vessels to be undertaken under ‘closed’ conditions?

Key Question
2.4.4 Are the Facility’s density measurement procedures acceptable
(manual or automatic)?

Key Question
2.4.5 Are the Facility's water level measurement procedures
acceptable?

2.4.6 Do staff have an understanding of the roles and responsibilities of


independent cargo surveyors and are their activities monitored?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
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REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 46 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
2.5 Operating Procedures
Key Question Y N NS N/A
2.5.1 Are the Facility's measurement and quality standard operating
procedures detailed, easy to understand, risk assessed and
periodically formally reviewed for accuracy and to reflect industry
changes?

Key Question
2.5.2 Are the Facility's measurement and quality standard operating
procedures detailed for the loading of marine vessels, rail tank cars
and trucks to ensure product integrity?

Key Question
2.5.3 Are the Facility's measurement and quality standard operating
procedures detailed for the unloading of marine vessels, rail tank
cars and trucks to ensure product integrity?
2.6 Operator Training and Competencies
Key Question Y N NS N/A
2.6.1 Are the Facility's operator trained in the relevant standard
operating, maintenance and engineering procedures and the
potential hazards associated with their work related to
measurement and quality integrity, and is the verification of their
understanding of the content carried out, with annual assessment
made of training needs?

Key Question
2.6.2 Do the competencies cover product integrity and product
movement sufficiently?

Key Question
2.6.3 Are the relevant competencies recorded and periodically reviewed?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 47 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
3. INSPECTION & MAINTENANCE

3.1 Planned General Inspections


All Facilities should have a general inspection programme that ensures that all HSSE critical equipment
is regularly visually checked.

Guidance

Planned General Inspections

Planned General Inspections are regular visual checks of safety and environmentally critical equipment
conducted on a regular basis throughout all areas of the assessed facility. These are normally
conducted by Operators using a checklist, and should not be confused with integrity and engineering
inspections carried out by specialists.

The programme of Planned General inspections should include:

o Identification of areas to be inspected


o Assignation of responsibility for conducting planned inspections
o Frequency of inspections - which should be determined in accordance with the risks involved,
and should not exceed 6 months in any event.
o Inspection checklists
o Maintaining records

Checklists should be updated regularly and should be specific to the area or equipment being
inspected.

Defects identified during Planned General Inspections should be written up as Work Requests (Work
Orders) to ensure remedial actions are taken on a timely basis and records are maintained. Ideally the
Work Requests should be an inherent part of a comprehensive Planned Maintenance Management
System such as a computerised maintenance management system (CMMS) eg, “Maximo”.
Confirmation should be sought that defects are corrected by the date originally set by the initiator of
the Work Order. Work Orders should be categorised in order of priority, which reflects the HSSE risks
involved.

It should be ensured that communication of defects is communicated in a timely and efficient manner
to maintenance personnel.

Recording defects in log books is not a good way of communicating this type of information unless
these are inspected frequently by maintenance staff and full details are maintained of remedial actions.
If the log books are specific only to an area of the facility rather than specific equipment this
information can get ‘lost’.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 48 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
3.1 Planned General Inspections
Key Question Y N NS N/A
3.1.1 Does the Facility have an effective general inspection
programme (ie operator daily walkarounds)?

Guidance Questions
3.1.1.1 Are operators using a formal checklist approach to conduct
inspections?
3.1.1.2 Are all items found defective corrected in order of priority?
3.1.1.3 Are items found during inspections formally reported?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 49 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
3.2 Engineering Inspections
All Facilities should have an engineering inspection programme that ensures that all HSSE critical
equipment is regularly and thoroughly inspected and tested.

Guidance

Engineering Inspections

An HSSE critical piece of equipment is one whose failure is most likely to result in a major loss (to
people, property, materials and / or environment). Most HSSE critical equipment is already defined in
standards and inspection codes, and credit should be given where these are followed. Must include:

o Piping, valves, fittings.


o Pressure vessels
o Tanks (eg Tank inspection to API 653, 10 yrs or risk based)
o Loading arms (Annual Pressure tests [6 monthly for gases])
o Loading arms should be completely overhauled every 15 years.(Ideally by the manufacturer)
o Loading hoses (Annual Pressure tests [6 monthly for gases])
o Structures, including: access walkways to ships
o Cranes and lifting equipment (If lifting strops are used, are they certified?).
o Jetty structures above and below water

The results of engineering inspections can be used to influence the frequency of subsequent
inspections, provided there is no legal reason for not doing so. This allows a risk-based approach to be
taken which concentrates resources on equipment with least reliability and / or highest risk potential.

Flexible Hoses
Testing should include pressure (at least 1.5 times the working pressure), elongation under pressure
and electrical properties. (Reference BS5173)

Life Sheets. This master list should list all flexible hoses, last test date, next test date and age. Life
sheets should detail all events that occurred during the flexible hose life (storage, in service, repairs,
tests…).

Retirement Criteria. These criteria should include extension while under test pressure and any
mechanical damage to the hose structure.

Tanks
If the Facility has a large number of tanks (>30), it is “best practice” to have a summary sheet listing
tank number, size, product stored, last inspection date and next inspection date.

Pipelines
Pipelines which are over water, underground or travel offsite should be inspected ideally by annual
pressure test or a thorough wall thickness tests. (Reference API RP 1110, API 570)

Jetties
Structural surveys should be carried out at least every 5 years and should take into account issues like
double banking of ships which can result in greater forces. The surveys should include below water
inspections as well.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 50 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
3.2 Engineering Inspections
Key Question Y N NS N/A
3.2.1 Does the Facility have an overall effective engineering inspection
programme?

Guidance Questions
3.2.1.1 Are international & national inspection industry standards / codes
followed?
3.2.1.2 Are detailed inspection records kept?
3.2.1.3 Are follow-up actions tracked to completion?
3.2.1.4 Are the results of periodic inspections used to develop long-
term maintenance plans?
3.2.1.5 Are over-due inspections and action items tracked to closure,
and is the status regularly reported to management?
3.2.1.6 Are the inspections of equipment items that require statutory
inspection (eg relief valves, pressure vessels) well managed?

Key Question
3.2.2 Does the Facility effectively inspect & maintain its flexible
hoses?

Guidance Questions
3.2.2.1 Does the Facility have a flexible hose master list and “life
sheets” for each marine hose?
3.2.2.2 Is there is formal retirement criteria for marine flexible hoses?
3.2.2.3 Is the storage of all the Facility’s flexible hoses acceptable?

Key Question
3.2.3 Does the Facility effectively inspect & maintain its tanks?

Guidance Questions
3.2.3.1 Does the Facility have a complete set of documentation for each
tank?
3.2.3.2 Are monthly in-service inspections conducted and documented?

Key Question
3.2.4 Are marine loading arms effectively maintained and inspected?

Key Question
3.2.5 Is facility piping effectively maintained and inspected / tested
(including valves)?

Guidance Questions
3.2.5.1 Does the Facility have a complete set of documentation for each
pipeline test / inspection?

Key Question
3.2.6 Are structures, walkways, jetty gangways, railings and ladders
effectively maintained and inspected?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Y N NS N/A
Guidance Questions
3.2.6.1 Does the facility undertake structural surveys of the jetties and
berths?

Key Question
3.2.7 Is lifting equipment effectively maintained and inspected?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 53 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
3.3 Preventative Maintenance
All Facilities should have a preventative maintenance programme that ensures that all HSSE critical
equipment is regularly and thoroughly maintained in order to minimise the risk of failure.

Guidance

Preventive Maintenance is predetermined maintenance work performed without specific pre-


knowledge of any defect in the equipment being maintained to prevent breakdown of equipment,
which might result in or exacerbate accidental loss. Flexible hoses, alarm systems and electrical
earthing / grounding and bonding will all be included. Work on most emergency response equipment
will also come into this category.

Mechanical equipment
o Pressure / temperature relief valves.
o Pressure / vacuum valves.
o Emergency shutdown valves (including manual valves remote from the hazard).
o Hydraulic surge alleviators.

Electrical equipment.
o Testing of earthing (grounding) bonding systems.
o Testing of switchgear and other electrical protection systems.
o Testing of insulating flanges for loading hoses and arms (electrical discontinuity – reference
OCIMF ISGOTT).

Instrumented protection systems.


o Calibration and testing of fixed gas detectors
o Independent high level alarms
o Emergency release systems
o Shutdown systems
o “ground hog” and overfill protection systems for road loading systems (where applicable)
o CCTV & other security systems.

Fire protection systems.


o All fire extinguishers.
o Fire alarms.
o Fire pumps (check to see if flow tests are carried out annually and are run weekly).
o Foam pumps and systems.
o Hydrants.
o Monitors and other fixed equipment.
o Hose reels.
o Mobile fire appliances.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
3.3 Preventative Maintenance
Key Question Y N NS N/A
3.3.1 Does the Facility have an overall effective preventative
maintenance programme?

Guidance Questions
3.3.1.1 Is there a preventative maintenance programme for mechanical
equipment (eg pumps, compressors, valves, road and rail gantry
/ rack equipment, pressure and thermal relief valves)?
3.3.1.1.1 Is conditioning monitoring adopted for equipment (eg vibration
monitoring for pumps)?
3.3.1.2 Is there a preventative maintenance programme for electrical
systems (eg grounding / bonding)?
3.3.1.3 Is there a preventative maintenance programme for
instrumented protection systems (eg high level alarms)?
3.3.1.4 Is there a preventative inspection programme for fire protection
systems and equipment?
3.3.1.4.1 Are the fire pumps functionally tested at least once per week
(and records kept)?
3.3.1.4.2 Is fire pump performance tested annually and the performance
curve for each pump compared to the commissioning
performance curve?
3.3.1.4.3 Has the fire water network been tested to confirm that it can
deliver adequate pressure and flow at each location for all
scenarios in the emergency response plans and a comparison
with hydraulic calculations made?
3.3.1.4.4 Are extinguishers checked regularly (at least annually depending
on the environment) for operability and condition?

Key Question
3.3.2 Does the Facility have a list of critical protective systems
devices for maintenance purposes?

Guidance Questions
3.3.2.1 Is there a procedure covering operating with critical equipment
out of service or inoperative and does this require management
approval and the completion of an operational risk assessment?

Key Question
3.3.3 Is it ensured that qualified personnel undertake maintenance of
specialist systems such electrical equipment?

Key Question
3.3.4 Is the management of spare part inventories appropriate for the
Facility’s location and operations?

Key Question
3.3.5 Is the management system for planned and breakdown
maintenance appropriate (eg for a large Facility a computerised
maintenance management system is appropriate)?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 55 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
3.4 Corrosion
Corrosion prevention systems are particularly relevant in harsh environments and where equipment is
vulnerable (eg underground, at the water /air interface etc)

Guidance
Corrosion control standards at Facilities are normally applied to:
o tanks - internal and external
o underground pipelines
o jetty structures

Tank coating
Tanks are typically coated internally with epoxy materials up to at least 1 metre from the base, including
the tank bottom plates where storing corrosive stock. Those stored in fixed roof tanks benefit from
coating under the fixed roof.

Cathodic Protection.
Underground pipelines are coated externally with a coal tar / epoxy coating and provided with cathodic
protection systems.

Jetty structures are particularly vulnerable in the splash zone and are normally coated with an epoxy
coating and provided with impressed current / cathodic protection systems.

The industry standard is to test these systems on an annual basis.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 56 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
3.4 Corrosion
Key Question Y N NS N/A
3.4.1 Does the Facility have an overall effective corrosion monitoring
and control programme (ie painting and cathodic protection)?

Guidance Questions
3.4.1.1 Are there standards (tolerances) for key equipment (eg piping
wall thickness, tank plate thickness, cathodic protection rectifier
readings)?
3.4.1.2 Have protective coating been used on tank internals storing
corrosive stock (eg crude oil, fuel oil)?
3.4.1.3 Is cathodic protection utilised on the Facility?
3.4.1.3.1 Is this utilised on underground pipelines?
3.4.1.3.2 Is this utilised on tanks?
3.4.1.3.3 Is this utilised on jetty structures?

Key Question
3.4.1.4 Are corrosion protection systems tested regularly for
functionality?
3.4.1.4.1 Are deficiencies documented and corrected?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 57 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
4. EMERGENCY RESPONSE

4.1 Emergency Preparedness


All Facilities should have plans in place to respond to likely incidents and should have personnel suitable
equipped to enact the response

Guidance

Response Plans
The introduction to the emergency plan should define the site covered by the plan and outline the
operation and activities that could pose a threat to the workforce, the local community and / or the local
environment.
The plan should demonstrate that an assessment has been made to identify the types of probable
emergencies, both general in nature (such as a flood, tornado, civil disorder or bomb threat) and
specific to the facility (a certain type of chemical spill) that could be expected to occur. Assessors
should confirm that all probable emergencies are addressed prior to awarding points for this question.
Within the potential area for a major accident, the possible effects on the public, environment and
outside companies must be considered. This information should be shown on a map of the site and the
surrounding areas in the form of hazard contours.

o Make sure for example that for tank farm, there is a full bund fire scenario, not only tank
fire ones.
o One phone call is at least one minute: check if one person is not overloaded (eg guard
having to call more than five numbers in case of an emergency…).
o Check that the last built installation is included in the emergency scenarios.
o The phone lists should be updated at least once per year.
o Check that all process areas and storages are included. Check that the scenarios cover all
probable emergencies (fire pump, gas leak, tank fire, bunded area fire…).

Assistance from outside agencies and industries can be essential in controlling an emergency situation
and developing evacuation procedures e.g. fire, bomb threats etc. Activities to keep police, fire
departments, and other such agencies informed of emergency needs could include: periodic,
documented visits by site personnel, and preferably by outside agency personnel, to the site to review
emergency needs; provision of facility layouts, building floor plans, information about process hazards,
chemicals / materials inventories, etc. to such agencies; joint training exercises with facility personnel
and outside agency personnel; and participation in community emergency plans and drills.

Joint exercises must be held annually with the municipal fire brigade and mutual aid partners. No points
should be awarded unless records are kept and review meetings held and minted.

For the outside mutual aid agreements described are agreements in place with other local, private firms
or facilities to provide manpower or equipment in the event of emergency. This does not refer to
agreements with municipal or government agencies unless the agreement includes other local
industries or businesses.

Tugs can be used both for ship / jetty fires but also to provide firewater / foam to shore emergencies.
Check that number of tugs and equipment, along with time of deployment is known.

Check that tugs were used to push water in the facility fire main.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 58 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Key Question Y N NS N/A
4.1.1 Is there an integrated set of scenario-based emergency plans in
writing to address all probable emergencies, and updated on a
regular basis if a significant change occurs?

Guidance Questions
4.1.1.1 Does the emergency plan include evacuation and ‘head-count’
of people to predetermined areas of safety?
4.1.1.2 Does the emergency plan include well-documented, detailed
instructions for each department, building, or area that includes
fire, work shutdown, plant shutdown and other emergency
procedures, including the control of hazardous materials?
4.1.1.3 Does the emergency plan include the removal or protection of
vital equipment and materials?
4.1.1.4 Does the emergency plan include the designation of a central
control area?
4.1.1.5 Does the emergency plan include a search and rescue plan?
4.1.1.6 Does the emergency plan include all clear and re-entry
procedure?
4.1.1.7 Does the emergency plan include procedures to notify
personnel of emergencies?
4.1.1.8 Taking into account the facility layout and prevailing wind
direction, are the muster points and wind socks in appropriate
locations?

Key Question
4.1.2 Does the plan provide clear guidance as to authority and
responsibility for response of various types of incidents?

Key Question
4.1.3 Does the plan address various sizes of emergencies including
the largest realistic scenario with quantification of response
reources?

Key Question
4.1.4 Is there a call-out procedure described in the plan for various
levels of response?

Key Question
4.1.5 Is there a notification procedure for contractors, services and co-
ops that may be needed?

Key Question
4.1.6 Are the company and governmental legal notification and alert
procedures specified?

Key Question
4.1.7 Is there an organisation chart to show personnel and
responsibilities?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Y N NS N/A
Key Question
4.1.8 Is the plan up to date and reviewed at least every 5 years?

Key Question
4.1.9 Is the facility subjected to a major incident prevention
regulation, and if positive, does the facility comply? (e.g.
Seveso II, OSHA PSM, COMAH, BRZO)

Key Question
4.1.10 Are a sufficient number of scenarios developed to ensure all
facilties are covered and hazards identified, and are they
adequate (eg fire fighting tactics, radiant heat exposure control,
personnel protection guidelines, foam quantity calculations,
water flow requirements, and response point locations)?

Guidance Questions
4.1.10.1 Are the scenarios’ guidance simple enough to be used by non-
safety / fire personnel in case of a real emergency (eg,
drawings showing heat distribution and response points that
are preferred)?
4.1.10.2 Do the scenarios include warnings on foresee-able difficulties
(e.g. boil-over, sewer overflowing,…) ?
4.1.10.3 Do the scenarios include guidance if the planned strategy fail
(e.g. non extinguishment of a full surface tank fire: what to do
next; defensive fire fighting strategies)?

Key Question
4.1.11 Has a systematic survey to ensure appropriate and relevant
emergency equipment is in place for all areas within the past
three years?

Guidance Questions
4.1.11.1 Did this cover fire protection and extinguishing systems (eg fire
extinguishers, foam systems)?
4.1.11.2 Did this cover hazard detection and alarm systems?
4.1.11.3 Did this cover emergency and rescue equipment, such as
supplied air respirators, emergency escape air packs, eye baths
and showers, blankets, stretchers, and other rescue
equipment indicated by local exposures?
4.1.11.4 Bunding and containment basins for use in emergencies?

Key Question
4.1.12 Is there a system to keep security agencies / police, fire
departments (services), civil defence groups, (emergency
planning departments) local hospitals, oil spill response centres
and other such groups informed of possible emergency needs?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 61 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Control Centres
An emergency control centre should be an easily accessible control centre with adequate
communications to government agencies, local authorities, and mutual aid partners, operating centres,
support organisations customers and the on-scene commander. Under the ICS approach used by BP, a
senior manager who manages the whole incident, to whom the On-Scene Commander reports, mans
this control centre. He will lead a team of other managers who have specified roles during the
emergency.
This control centre should be sufficiently remote from the hazardous areas not to be threatened by a
major incident (it is worth looking outside the installation to identify major incident which may impact
on the control centre from neighbouring installations).

Where the access may be limited to the control centre as the result of an incident, e.g. a major oil spill
affecting boat access to an island facility, an alternate control centre should be identified.

Joint Facility Plans


Joint plans are intended to cover the situation where an incident at an adjacent facility may threaten the
facility, or vice-versa, rather than mutual aid arrangements.

Emergency Teams
Emergency teams could include internal fire brigades, rescue teams, disturbance control teams, search
and rescue team, security teams, etc. Delegation of emergency functions to municipal agencies (a fire
department, for example) does not qualify for an NA answer for this question, since even in small
facilities it has been shown that prompt and appropriate response to fires and other emergencies prior
to the arrival of outside services greatly reduces the extent of loss.

Are emergency response team personnel and equipment likely to reach possible locations of
emergencies, both on and off site?

Specialised PPE requirement is for emergency response only, e.g. fire fighting and rescue. Those PPE
may be located at any location, including vehicles, where emergency responders can get quick access
under all foreseen situations. Assessors should check the number of PPE sets available. Check
medical records as to assessments of team (SCBA wearers…).

Head Counts
Only a thorough electronic badge check in / check out can allow quick and efficient accountability of all
personnel on site. Check that employee, contractors, visitors, trucks drivers are included.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 62 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Y N NS N/A
Key Question
4.1.13 Are there mutual aid agreements with outside organisations to
provide personnel and equipment in the event of an
emergency?

Key Question
4.1.14 Is the role of tugs and other offsite emergency resources well
defined (eg tugs for pumping into the fire water system, large
capacity mobile pumps)?

Guidance Question
4.1.14.1 Was this tested recently during a full-scale drill?
4.1.14.2 Are fire service connections provided near existing water
sources so that water may be pumped into the Facility fire
water system in sufficient quantity in an emergency to fight
expected fires?
4.1.14.3 Are emergency exercises involving a vessel on the berth
carried out periodically?

Key Question
4.1.15 Are contractors or equipment in the plan secured through
written agreements (e.g. locomotive to pull wagons from a fire
24h / 24h, bulldozer to contain a spill, truck or fork lift to
transport foam …)?

Key Question
4.1.16 Is there a nominated back-up emergency control centre from
which the Incident Commander operates in the event the
primary location is jeopardised?

Key Question
4.1.17 If adjacent facilities are close in proximity, have joint
emergency response plans been developed?

Key Question
4.1.18 Is there an adequate emergency team (or teams) to respond to
emergency situations led by a trained On-Scene Commander?

Guidance Question
4.1.18.1 Is the emergency team of the appropriate size and
competency to deal with probable emergency situations?
4.1.18.2 Is fire fighting and chemical (if applicable) PPE available at
appropriate locations in sufficient numbers?
4.1.18.3 Are employees involved in emergency response given an
adequate annual medical examination?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Y N NS N/A
Key Question
4.1.20
Is there an inventory of substances (chemical agents, biological
agents) that includes:
 All raw materials?
 All products?
 All other substances, e.g. intermediates and by-products?
 The chemical composition of the substances?
 The approximate quantities of the raw materials and
products?
 Fire fighting foam?

Key Question
4.1.21
Is chemical hazard data readily available for all substances, e.g.
Material Safety Data Sheets?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 65 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
4.2 Emergency Training
All Facilities should have personnel suitably qualified and trained
to enact the emergency response plans

Guidance

Crisis Management
It is usual for senior managers who may be called upon to talk to the media to be given specific training
by consultants.

Fire Schools
Examples include: Morton on Marsh, UK; GESIP Vernon, France; College Station, US

Exercises
No credit should be awarded for the emergency plan unless this question about training drills receives a
substantial score. The assessor(s) should be certain that drills and tests are being conducted for all vital,
emergency life-saving equipment as well as general training drills for all employees. There should be at
least on major fire drill once per quarter.

Recommendation is that this training must be done at least once every two years for all employees in
basic extinguisher training.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 66 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Key Question Y N NS N/A
4.2.1 Have personnel been adequately trained to ensure an effective
emergency response?

Guidance Questions
4.2.1.1 Is the Incident Commander and his team trained in crisis
management, including handling government agencies, local
authorities and the media as appropriate to local situation; at
least once every 6 years?
4.2.1.2 Do fire fighting team members receive real situation fire training
in a specialised Industrial Fire School at least once every 6
years?

Key Question
4.2.2 Do records indicate an adequate number of fire drills being
conducted in accordance the fire plan scenarios?

Key Question
4.2.3 Do all personnel (employees & contractors) receive periodic fire-
extinguisher training?

Key Question
4.2.4 Are alternative response team members inluded in planned
exercises?

Key Question
4.2.5 Are exercises used to evaluate the additional training needs of
individual?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 67 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
4.3 Fire Protection
All Facilities should have fire protection systems appropriate to its facilities, scale of operation and
stocks handled

Guidance

Firewater Provision
The following guidelines should be followed for marine Facility fire water mains for Facilities handling
crude oil and petroleum products:
o Tanker berth at a wharf or jetty handling ships of <20 000 tonnes dead-weight and less than one
ship per week - 100m3/h (500 US GPM)
o Tanker berth at a wharf or jetty handling ships of less than 50 000 tonnes dead-weight -
350m3/h (1500 US GPM)
o Tanker berth at a wharf or jetty handling ships of 50 000 tonnes dead-weight or larger - 700m3/h
(3000 US GPM)
Foam solution pipelines should cater for a design minimum of 115m3/h. This is the minimum foam /
water flow rate required for a single elevated foam monitor for berth and shipboard fire-fighting duty.

Firewater Supply
Where the fire water supply is obtained from static storage such as a tank or reservoir, then the
reserve for fire fighting purposes should be equivalent to at least 6 hours continuous use at the
maximum design capacity of the fire fighting system.

Foam
The bulk foam concentrate associated with any berth fixed foam monitor or foam-water sprinkler
system should be sufficient to ensure continuous foam application until the arrival of back-up fire
fighting resources. The bulk foam concentrate supply should be sufficient to ensure not less than 30
minutes of continuous foam application at design flow conditions, and be consistent with the Facility
Emergency Response Plan.

Foam type should be consistent with the hydrocarbons handled at the jetty. Note: alcohol resistant
foams may be required where polar solvents are handled Wherever possible a single foam type should
be used across the whole to prevent confusion. This may also be an issue where there are mutual aid
partners.

Foam concentrates deteriorate with time depending on storage conditions. Foam should be protected
from extremes of temperature undue contact with air, which can cause sludge and sediment to form,
which reduces the effectiveness of the finished foam. The manufacturer’s shelf life recommendations
should not be exceeded. The manufacturer or his agent should test foam quality annually, after 5 years,
preferably.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 68 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Key Question Y N NS N/A
4.3.1 Do the Facility firewater and foam main capacities meet the
minimum good industry practice (eg OCIMF and NFPA
guidelines) and the scenario-based requirements in the
emergency plans?

Key Question
4.3.2 Is the fire water main pressurised at all times?

Key Question
4.3.3 Are the Facility’s firewater sources adequate in terms of quantity
(based on the scenarios) and reliability?

Key Question
4.3.4 Are supplies of bulk foam concentrate adequate in terms of
quantity and type?

Key Question
4.3.5 Is bulk foam concentrate stored properly and tested annually?

Guidance Question
4.3.5.1 Does the foam concentrate conform to a recognised and
relevant fire test (eg EN1568, LASTFIRE)?
4.3.5.2 Is the foam concentrate suitable for all substances on site (eg
alcohols, biofuels, octane enhancers)?

Key Question
4.3.6 Are fire pumps provided on a scale to ensure adequate reserve
capacity is allowed for contingencies such as fire pump
maintenance, repairs or breakdowns during emergencies?

Key Question
4.3.7 Are there sufficient mobile fire fighting appliances available
within the Facility or through mutual aid arrangements to
respond to foreseen fire situations?

Key Question
4.3.8 Is there a comprehensive Facility emergency shutdown system
installed which includes:
 Gas detection systems.
 Emergency shutdown of loading pumps
 Emergency shutdown (isolation) valves at the jetty head
 Emergency release systems.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Guidance
Mobile Appliances
Most sites have some form of fire appliance available as a first response unit to a fire situation. The
capability of such an appliance should depend on the overall fire protection philosophy for the site, and
take account of the availability of fixed systems and other mobile appliances available through mutual
aid arrangements.

Mobile appliances normally have foam generation capability compatible with supply requirements for
semi-fixed systems and the larger non-tank incidents, e.g. pump stations. They can generally carry up
to 2000 litres of foam compound, and may be fitted with roof-mounted monitors to deal with ground
surface fires (it is unlikely that these will be large enough to cater for full surface tank fires).
It is also common to find that mobile units also carry large dry powder units, in the range 0.5 to 2.0
tonnes, depending on the exposures.

Sites generally also have some form of bulk foam carrier, which is necessary to transfer foam from
storage to mobile appliances during an extended fire response.

Emergency Shutdown Systems


The Facility should have a comprehensive emergency shutdown (ESD) system, which is consistent
with the degree of monitoring at the ship / shore interface.

Activation of the ESD system can be by local push buttons at jetty head and jetty root and / or at a
central control room if CCTV is used for ship / shore interface monitoring.

Pendant mounted switches with trailing leads can be provided for the ship to be able to activate the
shore shutdown system. Overfill protection for barges that activates the shore ESD system is
frequently provided in Europe.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
4.4 First Aid
All Facilities should have a level of first aid provision appropriate for the facilities and location

Guidance

To assess the adequacy of the site’s treatment rooms or infirmaries, the assesor(s) should make a
judgement regarding organisational needs as determined by work exposures, employee population,
legislative requirements, and consensus or industry standards.

Equipment should be checked for dates, condition and operability (eg fullness of oxygen bottles, charge
of defibrillator batteries.

Generally training for first aid should be refreshed every 3 years (including respiratory equipment and
defibrillator operation).

Local exposure measures could include special actions to be taken in event of certain chemical
exposures; extrication and rescue techniques; treatment of heat / cold related illnesses; snake bites,
etc. as applicable to the location and operations of the facility.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Key Question Y N NS N/A
4.4.1 Are there sufficient first aid treatment rooms / locations and are
they readily accessible to ensure prompt treatment?

Key Question
4.4.2 Is burn first-aid treatment such as WATERJEL available on site
and in good condition in quantities appropriate to the stocks
handled?

Key Question
4.4.4 Is a semi automatic defibrillator available on site and in working
order if legislation allows its use?

Key Question
4.4.5 Is all first aid equipment formally checked at a regular frequency?

Key Question
4.4.6 Is medical support available on site in less than 15 minutes?

Key Question
4.4.7 Are personnel trained in first aid techniques and in sufficient
numbers to cover all periods of operation?

Guidance Question
4.4.7.1 Are supervisors and employees trained in specialised first aid
techniques appropriate local exposures (e.g. chemicals)?
4.4.7.3 Are first-aiders trained to use a semi-automatic defibrillator?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 73 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
5. SECURITY

5.1 Security
All Facilities must have robust security in place of suitable level to counter the assessed threat in order
to protect assets and people.

Guidance

Risk Assessment.
A threat assessment is a comprehensive evaluation of all security threats to a Facility ranging from
terrorist through to criminal - including vandalism and pilferage, in order to ensure that security
provisions in place are ‘fit for purpose’. These evaluations should be validated through liaison with the
local police / security authority and should be regularly updated as circumstances can rapidly change. It
may also be prudent to liaise with other companies located in the same area that may have similar
security threat potential. Assessors should check that the threat assessment on file is current and that
the Facility representative has regular contact with the authorities. The API’s Security Vulnerability
Assessment Methodology for the Petroleum and Petrochemical Industries is an excellent
document.

Access Control.
o Is an authorisation pass system used?
o Is a log maintained of all personnel entering and leaving the area?
o Are appropriate checks made at points of access and egress (identity cards, vehicle permits,
vehicle searches etc.)?

Fencing.
o Does the fencing meet BP requirement, ie, 2.4 meters high topped with three strands of barbed
wire?
o Is there a routine planned perimeter inspection?

CCTV.
o Are pictures monitored?
o Are pictures recorded?
o Is motion detection installed to monitor activity / activate alarms?
o Is there an adequate response for security incidents and camera failures?
o Does it provide adequate cover for day vision and night vision?
o Is there an adequate maintenance programme?

Security Staff.
o Are there sufficient numbers of guards?
o Have the security officers been vetted / screened?
o Have security personnel attended basic security and fire-fighting training courses?
o Are site security instructions available to officers and regularly updated?
o Are reinforcements available?
o Do the security personnel know how to respond in the event of an emergency?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
5.1 Security
Key Question Y N NS N/A
5.1.1 Is overall security at the Facility effective?

Guidance Questions
5.1.1.1 Has a security risk assessment been carried out and was this
independent?
5.1.1.1.1 Are periodic exercises of the security plan undertaken and do
these involve third parties (eg ships’ crews)?
5.1.1.2 Have all the recommendations from the risk assessment been
implemented?
5.1.1.3 Is access to the Facility for ships’ crews coming ashore
controlled?
5.1.1.4 Are remote areas covered by CCTV, patrols or other monitoring
means?
5.1.1.5 Is there is suitable perimeter fence around the Facility?
5.1.1.6 Are there adequate numbers of appropriate personnel to
maintain security?
5.1.1.7 Is the Facility / Port ISPS certified?
5.1.1.8 Is access control adequate, including identity checks of
personnel and procedures to prevent unauthorised materials,
entering the site and maintenance of records?
5.1.1.9 Are visitors and contractors movements within the facility
controlled with access routes clearly defined?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 75 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
6. HEALTH

6.1 Occupational Health


All Facilities must ensure that all practicable measures are in place to minimise employees exposure to
potentially harmful substances.

Guidance
Substance Inventory
As a basis to the formal assessment of health risks arising from exposure to substances hazardous to
health, each facility should maintain a complete inventory of the substances used, produced or
otherwise encountered. Chemical composition is included because sometimes components present in
small quantities can be toxicologically very significant.

MSDS
Ideally there should be a central database of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) that all staff can
access. Additionally MSDSs should be posted at key areas such as loading bays, hose pits and jetties.

Occupational Health Hazards


The assessor(s) should award credit for this question only if certain that a structured approach was
used to conduct these reviews and that there is evidence of that approach. This should involve
systematic inspections, interviews, and questionnaires, followed up by technical sampling where any
suspected hazards could exist. The evaluation should apply to:
o Chemical hazards. o Vibration hazards
o Noise hazards. o Temperature hazards.
o Radiation hazards. o Biological hazards.
o Illumination hazards. o Ergonomic hazards.

Engineering Controls
These include eliminating the hazard altogether, substituting a less hazardous process, isolation or
enclosure (eg noise suppression) local exhaust or general ventilation; wetting-down process; shielding;
shock or vibration mounting; and machinery or workplace redesign.

Procedural Controls
These involve activities such as job procedures, worker education and training, good housekeeping;
labelling; proper storage; personal hygiene; rules testing; and behaviour reinforcement.

Personnel Protective Equipment


Self-explanatory and should be used as a ‘last resort’.

Hazard Monitoring
The assessor(s) should verify that formal monitoring programmes exist to ensure that monitoring
schedules exist for all identified workplace airborne, waterborne, and other kinds of hazards, such as
radiation exposures, and that monitoring is being done. An industrial hygienist should review the
regular monitoring schedule on at least an annual basis.

Records
Are there records pertaining to the following: o Personal exposure monitoring data?
o Assessments of health risks? o Hearing conservation activities?
o Maintenance, inspection and testing of o Health surveillance (including audiometry)?
engineering controls? o Formal training?

Employee Medicals
These should be at least annually for those working in hazardous areas.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 76 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
6.1 Occupational Health
Key Question Y N NS N/A
6.1.1 Does the Facility, overall, have measures in place to ensure the
safe handling of all products?

Guidance Questions
6.1.1.1 Does the Facility have an inventory of materials?
6.1.1.2 Does the Facility have MSDSs for all products including ancillary
chemicals such as fire fighting foams, WWTP polyelectrolytes,
cleaning fluids & oil dispersants?
6.1.1.3 Have all job roles and / or activities been examined to identify
and evaluate all occupational health hazards?
6.1.1.4 Are sufficient engineering controls in place to minimise
exposure to harmful substances?
6.1.1.5 Are sufficient procedural controls in place to minimise exposure
to harmful substances?
6.1.1.6 Is the correct PPE provided for personnel handling harmful
substances?
6.1.1.7 Are all employees who may be exposed to health risks
associated with work given specific health-related training?
6.1.1.8 Is there a process for HSE personnel approving a new material
brought into the Facility?

Key Question
6.1.2 Is the health of employees exposed to potentially harmful
substances/conditions monitored?

Guidance Questions
6.1.2.1 Do all employees exposed to potentially harmful
substances/conditions undergo pre-employment and
subsequent frequent medical examinations?
6.1.2.2 Does the Facility have access to a qualified health professional?
6.1.2.3 Is there a monitoring programme to measure the exposures and
verify that the hazards are being controlled at a safe level?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
6.2 Personal Protection Equipment
All Facilities must provide fit for purpose PPE in order to protect employees from hazards at work.

Guidance
PPE Programme
An effective PPE programme should include:
o PPE selection and standards (compliance with company, national or international requirements).
o Responsibilities for advising, purchasing, distributing and managing PPE.
o Procedures for purchasing, issuing, checking, maintaining and managing PPE.
o PPE training.
o Procedures should relate to all personal protective equipment at the facility covering:

PPE Usage Rules


These must cover where on site the following protection must be worn and should be backed up by
pictograms at locations where extra PPE is required:
o Head protection.
o Eye / face protection.
o Hearing protection.
o Respiratory protection.
o Hand protection.
o Body protection (arms & legs covered).
o Foot protection.
o Personal gas monitors

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
6.2 Personal Protection Equipment
Key Question Y N NS N/A
6.2.1 Does the Facility, overall, have an effective PPE policy?

Guidance Questions
6.2.1.1 Are the Facility’s PPE rules sufficient to protect personnel from
occupational hazards?
6.2.1.2 Are the PPE rules adhered to?
6.2.1.3 Are there sufficient signs indicating local PPE rules around the
Facility?
6.2.1.4 Does the Facility have a procurement programme for PPE (eg
stated standards for equipment, approved vendors)?
6.2.1.5 Are employees’ PPE managed such that they are inspected (eg
for expiry and condition) and subject to a replacement
programme?
6.2.1.6 Does the Facility provide training on the correct use of PPE?
6.2.1.7 Are appropriate personnel assessments made of personnel
using specialist PPE (eg Breathing apparatus fit tests and
medical assessments)?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 79 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
7. ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE

7.1 Emissions, Discharges & Waste


It is essential that all Facilities control and monitor their atmospheric & aqueous emissions and waste in
order to comply with local & international regulations.

Guidance

General
Credit should be given to Facilities that are thinking ahead; the majority of countries have stricter
emissions targets being imposed over the next few years.

Atmospheric Emissions
Tank Design - The EC Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control Directive Best Available Techniques
Reference document for storage recommends that for light products there should have emission
control to 95% of the uncontrolled condition (atmospheric fixed roof tanks). This is typically translated
in legislation in European countries that those stocks with a vapour pressure at 20ºC 1.4 kPa being
required to be stored in external or internal floating roof tanks.

EFRT - External floating roof tanks often prove an effective form of storage (depending on factors such
as the state of the rim seal system) and are widely used, but in terms of limiting emissions to
atmosphere, fixed roof tanks with an internal floating deck are significantly superior (in general).
Restriction of atmospheric emissions is by no means the only factor to be considered, however, and
economics / operational factors severely limit the latter's use.

Secondary Rim Seals. - Studies within BP have suggested that emission levels from tanks with average
fitting primary seals may be an order of magnitude greater than those from tanks with good fitting
secondary (double) seals. API publication AP42 suggests an emission reduction factor of at least 50%.

Loading Emissions. - Vapour collection with destruction or recovery is best practice for rail, marine or
road loading facilities. However, it is generally only legislated in Europe for volatile products (see
definition under tank design) for inland vessels. But where there is potential for impact on the
environment (eg residential areas receiving odour) it can be mandated by regulators. Top loading will
always lead to higher emission levels and expose personnel to vapour.

Aqueous Effluent Emissions

o Does the Facility have the correct equipment to deal with the aqueous waste it produces?
o Formal environmental regulations on several different levels may apply to the facility (local or
state level, national level and / or international regulations or agreements). These regulations
may well have a subsequent effect on the facility's licence to operate.
o The first stage in ‘compliance’ with regulations is to have proper knowledge of what is
applicable. It is difficult to quantify the seriousness of any breaches of regulations: there are
several parameters involved. The perceived importance of the level of a given contaminant in
the discharge, the frequency and duration of the violation and the level of violation (for example
by per cent) should all be taken into account.
o At any given facility, several of the above may not be applicable ie not regulated.
o Check the data on which the assessment is based for completeness and accuracy. Verification
should be offered in the form of logbooks, on-line data sheets, etc.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
7.1 Emissions, Discharges & Waste
Key Question Y N NS N/A
7.1.1 Does the Facility, overall, monitor and control its atmospheric
emissions?

Guidance Questions
7.1.1.1 Are all the Facility hydrocarbon emissions sources monitored or
estimated through calculation?
7.1.1.2 Does the Facility consistently comply with any atmospheric
emission limits that may apply?
7.1.1.3 Are the tanks’ control equipment of suitable design for the stored
stock (eg external or internal floating roofs; vapour recovery)?
7.1.1.4 Does the Facility utilise vapour recovery and/or destruction where
required by legislation or where appropriate to stocks handled?

Key Question
7.1.2 Does the Facility, overall, monitor and control its aqueous effluent
discharges?

Guidance Questions
7.1.2.1 Are all the Facility’s aqueous effluent discharge points monitored?
7.1.2.2 Does the Facility consistently comply with any discharge limits
that may apply?
7.1.2.3 Is the Facility’s waste water treatment system suitable for dealing
with the effluent generated and the discharge limits imposed (eg
biological treatment for ethanol)?

Key Question
7.1.3 Does the Facility have suitable plans (eg SPCC) and measures in
place to prevent soil/groundwater contamination and contain
spillage (eg pumps on kerbed [curbed] hardstand, drum storage
facility)?

Guidance Questions
7.1.3.1 Are underground storage tanks equipped with leak detection or a
monitoring programme is in place?
7.1.3.2 Are onsite underground pipelines equipped with leak detection or
a monitoring programme is in place?
7.1.3.3 Does the Facility have groundwater monitoring boreholes (wells)
if applicable?
7.1.3.4 Has a survey of soil contamination taken place if applicable?
7.1.3.5 Where there is evidence of contamination to the soil or
groundwater is there a remediation programme underway?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Waste
o Types of waste.
 Oily wastes.
 Wastes containing metals.
 Unstable wastes.
 Leachable wastes (including all liquid wastes).
 Pyrophoric wastes.

o Landfill is not generally the best option for the disposal of facility wastes. In some states it
remains a cheap option (in the short term) but environmental authorities worldwide are tending
to discourage this method. If materials must be landfilled, it is important that proper measures
to restrict contamination are implemented. This usually involves changing the physical form of
the deposited sludge so that leaching (and subsequent groundwater contamination) is restricted
as much as possible.

o The spreading of waste material onto land for the purpose of biological degradation by naturally
occurring micro-organisms has been practised for many years. Opinions vary concerning the
suitability of land farming techniques. It is certainly a cost-effective method of disposal, although
there is some dispute over the environmental effects. Depending on the perceived effects on
land farm soil and groundwater, and operational considerations, land farming is a potentially
attractive means of disposal. Ideally landfarms should be lined to prevent contamination.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Y N NS N/A
Key Question
7.1.4 Does the Facility have suitable measures in place for the
reception, storage and disposal of waste (eg central or auxilliary
waste storage areas)?

Guidance Questions
7.1.4.1 Does the Facility have appropriate waste disposal routes and
records for all types of waste?
7.1.4.2 Is there an appropriate paper trail for analysing all hazardous
waste -disposals?
7.1.4.3 Are means of reception from ships for solid waste (garbage),
waste oil or noxious liquid substances suitable and are vessels
informed of these?
7.1.4.4 Is there a waste management plan in place if applicable which
identifies waste streams, properties, disposal routes and
transportation means?
7.1.4.5 Have those parties disposing of waste (the Facility or contractors)
appropriate licenses from the regulators?
7.1.4.6 Does the Facility use biodegradable hydraulic oils in systems?

Key Question
7.1.5 Is the Facility implementing measures to comply with future
environmental legislation and regulations?

Guidance Questions
7.1.5.1 Is the Facility proactive in identifying emerging requirements and
initiatives relating to environmental protection?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
7.2 Oil Spill Response
It is essential that all Facilities have a viable and well rehearsed oil spill response plan for spills of all
sizes in the Facility and marine facilities.

Guidance

References
IPECA - www.ipieca.org

Training
Senior OSR co-ordinators should have attended an OSRL course or equivalent specialist centre.

Exercises
Suggested frequency:

o Small Scale - Facility/ jetty staff only – 4 per year.


o Large Scale - Includes all relevant 3rd parties such a port authority, coast guard,
emergency services – 1 per year.

Records
Facilities should keep photograph and video (preferred) records of OS training and exercises for training
use.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
7.2 Oil Spill Response
Key Question Y N NS N/A
7.2.1 Does the Facility have a viable, current oil spill response plan
which is approved by the local authorities?

Guidance Questions
7.2.1.1 Does the plan provide clear guidance as to the authority and
responsibility for response in the event of an oil spill?
7.2.1.2 Does the plan address various sizes of spills including the largest
realistic spill scenario?
7.2.1.3 Is there a call-out procedure described in the plan for various
levels of response?
7.2.1.3.1 Have response times been established and agreed for each
response scenario?
7.2.1.4 Is there a notification procedure for company and governmental
contacts, contractors, services and co-ops that may be needed?
7.2.1.5 Is there an organisation chart to show personnel and
responsibilities?
7.2.1.6 Is there a list of the spill response equipment available and with
its location?
7.2.1.7 Are spill containment and clean-up strategies identified for each
scenario?
7.2.1.8 Does the plan identify likely spill trajectories under different
conditions where appropriate?
7.2.1.9 Have sensitive natural, recreational and commercial sites been
identified for priority protection?
7.2.1.10 Is there adequate on-water spill equipment (booms, skimmers,
recovered oil storage) readily available to the Facility and in good
condition?
7.2.1.11 Is ‘First Response’ oil spill response equipment (absorbents -
chippings, matting etc) readily available at key locations (eg
jetties, road & rail loading facilities)?
7.2.1.12 Has a formal assessment been carried out to determine the type
and quantity of spill equipment required?
7.2.1.13 If dispersants form part of the strategy has approval for their use
been obtained from the local or national authorities?
7.2.1.14 Does the Facility utilise the latest technology for the early
detections of spills (eg radar, infra red or electromagnetic
absorption detectors)?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 86 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Y N NS N/A
Key Question
7.2.2 Does the Facility conduct oil spill response exercises and
training?

Guidance Questions
7.2.2.1 Are oil spill response training programmes in place for all
personnel?
7.2.2.2 Are regular oil spill response exercises conducted by the
Facility?
7.2.2.3 Do exercises involve 3rd parties if part of the response plan?
7.2.2.4 Have response times been tested and documented?
7.2.2.5 Are records maintained of exercises which analyse deficiencies
and recommend improvements?
7.2.2.6 Do personnel from the Facility participate in local or national spill
exercises?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 87 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
8. ATMOSPHERIC ABOVEGROUND STORAGE

8.1 Tankfarm Layout & Design


A tankfarm must be set out following internationally recognised guidelines and regulations so as to
make operations efficient and safe.

Guidance

This Section covers the storage and handling of hydrocarbons in conventional tankfarms. It is focussed
on liquid hydrocarbons that are stored at, or close to, ambient conditions in above ground tanks. Other
types of storage facilities are covered in the following sections:

Section Title
15 Refrigerated Storage
16 Pressurised Storage
17 Underground Storage

Plot Plan
This should show location of all roads, tanks, bunds, pumps and fire fighting equipment.

Tank Plots
Roads around Tank Farms are required for a variety of activities such as cleaning, maintenance and
repair as well as to enable rapid response to emergency situations. The recommended layout for tank
farms has changed over time to highlight the need for better access. Roads should separate tank plots.
Major roads should be a minimum width of 6m and be not more than 400m apart.

Tank Location
If they contain products stored at temperatures above their flash point then the tanks must be at least
15m from the boundary fence. All tanks that contain low flashpoint products located must be at least
15m from offices & warehouses.

Pump Location
Pumps located in unventilated pump houses should not be given credit. Look for emergency escape
and fire / smoke alarms in such cases. Pumps should be:
o In the open air or in freely ventilated shelters away from overhead pipe tracks, fans, cables
etc.
o Located outside the bund area.
o If handling products above flash point then located at least 15m from the site boundary.

Tank spacing
Good access to tanks for fire-fighting purposes requires a limit on the number of rows of tanks
between roads. This is especially important with large tanks where ease of access to all sides in the
early stages of the fire may be critical:

o There must be no more than two rows of tanks between adjacent access roads.
o Tanks over 40m in diameter must be arranged in a single row.
o The number of tanks in a bund compound must be less than six.
o Given that it is generally not practical to relocate existing tanks that may be closer than
allowed by NFPA, etc., one method of mitigation for this issue is provision of fixed
foam/water spray nozzles at the tops of these tanks for exposure protection.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 88 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Capacity of tanks in a bund
For Class 1, 2 and 3(2) hydrocarbons the total capacity of tanks in a bund compound should not exceed
60,000m3 (227 million USgal) for fixed roof tanks or 120,000m3 for external floating roof tanks. Small
tanks (less than 10m diameter) may be sited together in groups, no group having a total capacity of
more than 8000m3. Such a group is regarding as 1 tank. There is not such restriction for tanks
containing Class 3(1) and Unclassified hydrocarbons.

Tank Bund Construction


Intermediate walls of less than 0.5m height can be used as a convenient way to containing small
spillages and act as firebreaks.

The net capacity of a tank bund compound should be calculated by:

Bund Capacity = VT – VO - VIB

Where:
VT = Total capacity of bund.
VO = Volume of all tanks (other than the largest) below the level of the top of the bund
VIB = Volume of all intermediate bunds.

Bund Material
Full credit should not be given to bunds made of porous material, such as sand, or where bund integrity
has been compromised by animal burrows or man made excavations.

High level Alarms


Protection against overfill is normally provided by independent high level switches, which initiate an
alarm in a manned control room. The setting of this alarm should give sufficient time for the tank filling
to be terminated. Some Facilities claim that a combination of the frequent calibration of the remote
gauging system, eg Enraf, plus operator supervision negates the requirement for an independent high-
level alarm. This is not BP’s position. In such cases Facilities should provide a reliability analysis to an
accepted code, IEC 61508 is an example, to verify that their particular approach is equivalent to an
independent high level alarm to gain credit.

Clearance of Overhead Piperuns


Typically 4.5m or 5.5m over roads used for heavy equipment.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 89 of 332


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Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 90 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
8.1 Tankfarm Layout & Design
Key Question Y N NS N/A
8.1.1 Does the layout of the Facility comply with industry regulations &
guidance?

Guidance Questions
8.1.1.1 Is there an up to date & accurate plot plan of the Facility?
8.1.1.2 Are the tank areas laid out in plots separated by roads and would
not inhibit for emergency response in the event of incident?
8.1.1.3 Are the tanks suitably located (eg operational areas and
buildings)?
8.1.1.4 Are pipe tracks over access routes arranged to provide sufficient
height (and are they marked with that height)?
8.1.1.5 Is pipework invulnerable to vehicle collisions?
8.1.1.6 Are pumps well located (eg outside bunds, mounted on plinths /
raised slab or in their own secondary containment)?

Key Question
8.1.2 Are the tank bunds sufficient?

Guidance Questions
8.1.2.1 Is the net capacity of the entire tank bund equivalent to 110% the
capacity of the largest tank in that bund?
8.1.2.2 Are the bund walls sufficiently impervious to the product stored?
8.1.2.3 Are the bunds walls designed to withstand the full hydrostatic
head of a complete tank failure?
8.1.2.4 Where more than one tank is located within a bund, are there
intermediate tank separation dikes / bunds between tanks?

Key Question
8.1.3 Are the overall design & condition of the tanks acceptable?

Guidance Questions
8.1.3.1 Are the tanks sufficiently spaced (eg tank to tank distance)?
8.1.3.2 Are the tanks constructed to a recognised standard (API 650, EN
14015, GOST etc)?
8.1.3.3 Are the tanks appurtenances in good condition (eg no evidence of
leaks, blanks in place, all boltholes used etc)?
8.1.3.4 Are the tank bases sound (eg no signs of settlement, corrosion or
dirt build-up on tank chimes, good seal ring wall foundation)?
8.1.3.5 Do tanks have independent high-level alarms and a acceptable
minimum response time between high level and critical fill level?
8.1.3.6 Are tanks and tank fittings bonded and earthed so as to dissipate
static electricity?
8.1.3.7 Have provisions been made to take into account any pressure
surges in lines resulting from emergency shutdown systems (eg
high level alarms linked to motorised valves)?
8.1.3.8 If there are no independent high-level alarms has the Facility
provided for additional response times or other controls (eg
manual monitoring of level) and identified a high level limit?

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Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Key Question Y N NS N/A
8.1.4 Are the overall layout, design & condition of pigging systems
acceptable?

Guidance Questions
8.1.4.1 Are pigging systems well designed (eg pressure indicators
provided, interlocks to prevent opening while pressurised, cranes
for lifting pigs where necessary)?
8.1.4.2 Are pigging systems well maintained (eg pressure indicators
operational)?
8.1.4.3 Do pigging systems have sufficient hazard warning signs (eg
pressure system, asphyxiation risk, confined space, toxic
exposure risk)?
8.1.4.4 Is there a lock-out, tag-out procedure for the pig chamber
operation?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
8.2 Safety & Fire Fighting Physical Checks
All safety & fire fighting equipment must be designed, installed and maintained to international, national
and industry standards.

Guidance

Safety showers
Safety showers and eyewash facilities should be clearly marked and operable, where a need has been
established, eg mogas leading stations. It is acceptable to provide sterile eye wash bottles where
eyewash only is required - confirm acceptable condition.

Firewater systems
Normally coloured red, foam concentrate transfer systems yellow. Potable water systems should be
distinctly painted and clearly marked.

Fire Pumps
Separation - Separation of fire pumps from hazardous areas should ideally be determined using a risk-
based approach. Some plant layout codes may prescribe a distance, e.g. 100 metres. Fire pumps
should in a case protected from the effects of blast and / or thermal radiation from a fire in excess of
3 kW/m2.
Pump Number/ Capacity - Firepumps to be generally in accordance with NFPA20 with performance and
flow/pressure test facilities. A minimum of a 100% back-up driver unit and pump should be provided for
a single 100% duty pump, or back-ups using multiple pumps with split duty i.e. 3 x 50% duty pumps.
Pump drivers should be of alternative types and when electric driven be supplied from alternate power
including a stand-by generator option. Diesel engines should be supplied with twin battery packs and
be arranged for alternate charging. On large installations, pumps should be split between two separate
locations.
Housing - The fire pumps should be housed in an enclosure appropriate to the environment. The pumps
and associated equipment should be clean, without oil leaks, and well maintained. Batteries should be
covered to prevent tools falling onto the battery terminals.
Operation - Fire pumps should be properly lined up for automatic start, where appropriate, with the
start switches set to automatic, with a manual option.
Cold Climates - In cold climates, diesel tanks and fuel supply systems should be traced and lagged,
including the engine jacket, to a minimum of 5 degC.
Automatic/ Remote Starts - Check that diesel fire pumps with automatic or remote start up are
equipped with:
o Fire detection.
o Remote ESD.
o CO2 fire extinguisher.
o Physical separation between engine and diesel tank.
o Fireproof accessories on diesel (no plastic level gauge…).

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
8.2 Safety & Fire Fighting Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
8.2.1 Is all the safety equipment and signage sufficient?

Guidance Questions
8.2.1.1 Are there safety showers and eyewash stations in good
condition and identified with distinctive signs and markings in
the storage area?
8.2.1.2 Are lines and valves colour coded to identify hazardous
products, firewater, potable water etc.?
8.2.1.3 Are emergency evacuation routed clearly marked?
8.2.1.4 Are there at least two safety egress paths away from hazardous
areas?
8.2.1.5 Are all ladders and walkways in good condition?
8.2.1.6 Are toxic material signs in place including precautions (eg H2S
for high sulphur fuel oil or crude oil)?
8.2.1.7 Are fire alarm and emergency shutdown buttons clearly marked?
8.2.1.8 Are below ground pits or vaults, tank manways, tank floating
roofs and double walled tanks designated by signs as ‘confined
spaces with entry by permit only?

Key Question
8.2.2 Do high-risk areas such as pump rooms have gas or fire
detection?

Guidance Question
8.2.2.1 Is fire detection provided for storage tanks as appropriate for
stocks stored and design (eg linear heat detection for external
floating roof tanks)?

Key Question
8.2.3 Are the firewater pumps acceptable?

Guidance Questions
8.2.3.1 Is the physical condition of the fire pumps satisfactory?
8.2.3.2 Are firewater pumps located in a suitable place with good
separation from hazardous areas?
8.2.3.3 Is there an adequate provision of fire pumps with enough
redundancy, both in location and energy supply?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 95 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Guidance
Water and foam main arrangement
The fire mains should be arranged in a grid pattern, with sufficient isolating valves so as to limit the loss
of all fire fighting systems from a single fracture or blockage of the pipeline system, or to better
manage firewater usage in an emergency situation. Where freezing can be a problem, fire mains
should be buried, with hydrants supplied through dry risers. Fire mains are normally installed in steel
pipe, preferably cement lined, but more modern installations may be installed in GRE or HDPE
materials. Fire mains and hydrants should be protected against vehicle impact. Where firemains pass
through potential blast areas they should be buried for security against damage.

Hydrant location & spacing


Hydrants should be NPS4 with 2 X 70mm hose connections located at predetermined risk sources, i.e.
in accordance with a pre-fire plan. In tank farms with tanks > 46 metres diameter, NPS8 hydrants with
at least 6 x 70mm outlets, or 1 x 100 plus 2 x 70mm outlets, should be provided. Larger sized hydrant
connections may be installed to supply special equipment, such as ‘Big guns’.

Fixed & semi-fixed systems


Ensure that the provision conforms with the scenario analysis.

Preferred configuration
o Fixed roof < 18 metres diameter - use mobile or portable monitors
o Fixed roof > 18 metres diameter - sub-surface injection for hydrocarbon liquids; top pourers for
foam destructive liquids and Class 1 hydrocarbons.
o Internal floating deck - top pourers to cover the full surface area.
o External floating roof < 18 metres diameter - use mobile or portable monitors
o External floating roof > 18 metres diameter - fixed or semi-fixed top foam pourers. For very
large tanks multiple foam supply lines to alternate pourers are recommended to prevent the
whole system being disabled through a single system failure.

External floating roof tanks installations can benefit from a foam dry riser terminating at the gauger’s
platform, together with hand rails installed round the wind girder, to facilitate an attack using portable
equipment to extinguish any remaining pockets of fire in a rim seal if fixed / semi-fixed pourers are not
totally effective in extinguishing the fire.

On external floating roof tanks


Fixed and semi-fixed foam system pourers are recommended to fight rim seal fires, the application
rates to be achieved (with foam dams) are 12.3 litres/m2/minute; without foam dams
20.5 litres/m2/minute.

Where high backpressure pourers are provided designed to cover the whole of the tank roof area, the
application rate should be 4.1 litres/m2/minute.

On fixed and internal floating roof tanks


Top pourers should be sized for an application rate of 4.1 litres/m2/minute over the full surface area of
the tank (pourers should be fitted to the shell of the tank not the roof). Subsurface injection systems
(not to be used for internal floating roofs) should be sized for 4.1 litres/m2/minute minimum, but may
be at a greater rate due to degradation of the foam as it travels up through the oil.

Shell cooling water deluges


Should be sized for a minimum of 2.1 litres/m2/minute to protect against radiant heat (not direct flame
impingement).

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 96 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT

Key Question Y N NS N/A


8.2.4 Are the fire and foam mains acceptable in the tankfarm?

Guidance Questions
8.2.4.1 Are the mains fitted with the appropriate number of
block/isolation valves to allow for isolation of any one section
and still allow effective response? (as determined by the
hydraulic calculation)
8.2.4.2 Are fire hydrants spaced and located in the tankfarm in
accordance with good industry practice and the scenario-based
requirements and onsite resources?
8.2.4.3 Are the number & location of fixed and semi-fixed foam and
water systems adequate in the tankfarm?
8.2.4.4 Where fixed, mobile or portable monitors are part of the pre-
planned fire response, are they correctly sized, with adequate
water, and foam supplies and logistics?
8.2.4.5 Can the foam monitors reach all tanks, pumps and pigging
systems etc if used for primary protection according to the
scenarios?
8.2.4.6 Where firewater is supplied from tanks, have worst case
scenario calculations confirmed that there is a sufficient supply
at maximum demand for the duration of the tankfarm incident?
Is this necessary or do we need to move it into Section 4

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Guidance
Foam Type
If foam destructive chemicals are handled at the jetties (eg pure ETBE, ETBE, methanol…), foam
quality should be AR (alcohol resistant).

Foam Storage
Bulk foam storage should be shielded from extremes of temperature. Foam production facilities should
be fully operable, with valves greased and instruments easily seen.

Location of foam equipment


The ability to access the foam generation facilities in a fire situation without putting people unduly at
risk should be assessed.

Inspection
Check that the volume of foam can be checked easily and fit the emergency plan / regulation
requirements.

Mixing
Being able to mix the foam is important to have an adequate sample for analysis. Note: plastic tube
level gauge should be avoided because of leak risk.

Extinguishers
Portable wheeled (typically 100kg) and hand held fire (9kg) extinguishers should be provided within tank
farms on a scale relative to the risks and in accordance with codes.

Dry chemical extinguishers are recognised as the most appropriate type of extinguisher for the quick
knockdown of small hydrocarbon fires. Halon and carbon dioxide extinguishers have little value in the
open. Halon extinguishers should now be phased out and replaced with dry powder in accordance with
Montreal protocol requirements.

Foam extinguishers in the order of 100L capacity pre-max. foam are suitable for use at berths. They
produce 1000L of foam and provide a typical jet length of about 12m. Small foam extinguishers with
capacities of about 10L are too limited to be effective in most cases in the event of a fire at a Facility.

Enclosed electrical sub-stations, switch rooms or diesel generators / pumps rooms should be provided
with an adequate fire detection system plus a number of carbon dioxide extinguishers (electric risk) or /
and dry powder (hydrocarbon risk). Fixed gaseous suppression systems are acceptable as long as
audible and visible alarms are installed and set up to give adequate time for all staff to evacuate before
activation. Preferred agents are inert gas or Novec systems having minimal ODP.

Portable and hand held fire extinguishers should be located so that in any area or hazard, a fire
extinguisher can be reached without travelling more than 15m. Wheeled extinguishers should normally
be located in accessible positions at pump stations, metering skids and other vulnerable facilities.

Portable and hand held extinguishers should be clearly marked with the last test date, be within the
current test period, and protected in appropriate manner from the elements (sunshades, heated
enclosures, protected from spray, etc)

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT

Key Question Y N NS N/A


8.2.5 Is the Facility’s foam supply and logistics adequate in the
tankfarm?

Guidance Questions
8.2.5.1 Are the mains fitted with the appropriate number of block /
isolation valves to allow for isolation of any one section without
affecting perfromance of the system (as determined by the
hydraulic calculations)?
8.2.5.2 Is the bulk foam storage and / or distribution system serving the
Facility adequate?
8.2.5.3 Are the number & location of fixed and semi-fixed foam and
water system adequate?

Key Question
8.2.6 Is the Facility’s management and provision of fire extinguishers
in the tankfarm acceptable?

Guidance Questions
8.2.6.1 Are there sufficient dry chemical and / or portable units?
8.2.6.2 Are hand held extinguishers properly located?
8.2.6.3 Are extinguishers checked regularly (at least annually depending
on the environment) for operability and charge?
8.2.6.4 Is all fire fighting equipment and systems in the tankfarm clear
of obstruction, accessible during an incident and clearly marked
and identified with operating instructions provided locally?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
8.3 Maintenance & Inspection Physical Checks
It is essential that Facility’s conduct maintenance & inspections as dictated in the maintenance &
inspection programme.

Guidance

The assessor should check whether or not the Facility’s written inspection and maintenance
procedures are effective against what is observed in the field.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
8.3 Maintenance & Inspection Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
8.3.1 Do general inspections appear to be effective?

Key Question
8.3.2 Do engineering inspections appear to be effective?

Key Question
8.3.3 Is the preventative maintenance programme effective?

Key Question
8.3.4 Are acceptable levels of housekeeping maintained (eg debris left
in tankfarm)?

Guidance Questions
8.3.4.1 Are tank water draw valves closed, blanked / capped (or double
valved) and chained closed?
8.3.4.2 Are the block valves around pressure / thermal relief valves sealed
open?
8.3.4.3 Are sample hatches and tank roofs free of product spillage?

Key Question
8.3.5 During a major TAR (turnaround), are the facilities used by the
TAR team (temporary buildings, laydown areas, workshops, car
parks, etc.) located in appropriate/safe areas?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
8.4 Procedures & Operations Physical Checks
It is essential that Facility’s carry out procedures & operations as dictated in the operations manual.

Guidance

The assessor should check whether or not the Facility’s written operating procedures are being
followed and are effective.

EFRT roof pontoons


This should be at least once per quarter and recorded.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 102 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
8.4 Procedures & Operations Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
8.4.1 Are operational checklists completed diligently (eg daily
walkarounds)?

Key Question
8.4.2 Are shift handovers performed in sufficient detail (eg log book,
operations status sheet etc, formal meeting)?

Key Question
8.4.3 Are control of work rules (eg permits) adhered to?

Key Question
8.4.4 Are EFRT roof pontoons subject to gas testing at regular
intervals?

Key Question
8.4.5 Are up-to-date hard copies of the Facility operating procedures /
manuals and emergency plans kept in the control room with
access to all?

Key Questions
8.4.6 Are there procedures covering tank receipt, tank to tank transfers
and tank monioring?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
8.5 Environmental Physical Checks
The Facility must maintain all environmental protection features in the Facility.

Guidance

Condition of rim seals


Studies are continuing within BP at present to evaluate the effect of rim seal condition on emission
levels. Depending on the type of seal involved, the condition of a primary seal may have an effect of
several hundred percent on the emission level ( all other factors being equal).

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
8.5 Environmental Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
8.5.1 Can the tank bunds / dikes be drained and if so is the water
suitably handled?

Guidance Question
8.5.1.1 Are the bund / dike valves locked closed except when draining
water?
8.5.1.2 Does the operating the valves avoid an operator entering in to
the bund / dike?
8.5.1.3 Is a log maintained of bund / dike drainings and confirmation
kept that the water was checked for absence of visible oil
sheen?

Key Question
8.5.2 Are the floating roof tanks’ seals and deck fittings in good
condition (eg no gaps between seal and wall, deck fittings seals
in place)?

Key Question
8.5.3 Are tank bund / dike floors sufficiently impervious?

Guidance Question
8.5.3.1 Does the Facility have documentation to confirm the
imperviousness of the bund / dike floor where it is not lined?

Key Question
8.5.4 Are oily water sewers and sumps sealed (eg no open channels
for oily water)?

Key Question
8.5.5 Are external floating roof tank roof drains left open and if so
what provision is made to ensure there are no product leaks (eg
operators daily walkarounds with records kept)?

Key Question
8.5.6 Where tanks are equipped with vapour recovery is the system
maintained and operated in good condition?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 105 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
9. WASTE WATER TREATMENT AREA

9.1 Safety & Fire Fighting Physical Checks


The Facility must ensure that waste water treatment areas are suitably equipped with the correct
safety and fire fighting equipment.

Guidance

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
9.1 Safety & Fire Fighting Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
9.1.1 Is the waste water treatment area adequate overall with respect
to safety & fire fighting?

Guidance Question
9.1.1.1 Are emergency evacuation routes clearly marked?
9.1.1.2 Are all ladders and walkways in good condition?
9.1.1.3 Are general safety signs adequate?
9.1.1.4 Is all fire fighting equipment and systems in the waste water
treatment area clear of obstruction, accessible during an incident
and clearly marked and identified with operating instructions
provided locally?
9.1.1.5 Is there sufficient life saving equipment available (eg life rings
around open water tanks/ basins/ reservoirs)?
9.1.1.6 If covers are installed are there adequate safety precautions in
place for fixed covers to prevent confined vapour build-up (ie
adequately vented)?
9.1.1.7 If hazardous chemicals are handled, are safety showers and
eyewash stations provided and toxic signs in place?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
9.2 Maintenance & Inspection Physical Checks
It is essential that the Facility conducts maintenance & inspections as dictated in the maintenance &
inspection programme.

Guidance

The assessor should check whether or not the written inspection & maintenance procedures covering
waste water treatment plant are effective.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 108 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT

9.2 Maintenance & Inspection Physical Checks


Key Question Y N NS N/A
9.2.1 Is the waste water treatment area well maintained?

Guidance Questions
9.2.1.1 Are acceptable levels of housekeeping maintained?
9.2.1.2 Does the waste water treatment equipment generally appear to
be in a good state of repair?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
9.3 Procedures & Operations Physical Checks
It is essential that Facility carries out procedures & operations as dictated in the operations manual.

Guidance

The assessor should check whether or not the Facility’s written operating procedures relating to waste
water treatment plant are being followed and are effective.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
9.3 Procedures & Operations Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
9.3.1 Are there written procedures for the waste water treatment
plant?

Guidance Questions
9.3.1.1 Is the waste water treatment system’s accumulated oil in the
separator basin in conformance with the Facility’s procedures?
9.3.1.2 Are Confined Spaces identified and controlled (ie for cleaning)?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
9.4 Environmental Physical Checks
The Facility must maintain all environmental protection features in the waste water treatment area.

Guidance

Emission Controls
Typically installed on open basins that are likely to contain free oil (eg API separators). These can be
fixed (ie with a space above the surface) or floating. Fixed covers usually have inspection hatches to
allow operators to observe the operation and condition, especially for skimming. Floating covers can
either be panels, balls or discs. The use of these can reduce the ability to skim the surface.

Sewers
It is preferrable to have closed sewers (ideally segregated - oily water, surface water runoff). For oily
water sewers these typically have vents to reduce the build-up of hydrocarbon gases. It is often seen
in tankfarms open channels running across bunds / dikes. Where this is used for bottom water drains
there is likely to be increased air emissions.

High Level Alarms


Where there is a surge of water to a waste water treatment plant (eg after heavy rains) it is important
that high level alarms are installed on the front-end of the plant. These can warn of the risk of overflow
or in some cases trigger the automatic diversion of flow to holding tanks or basins.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
9.4 Environmental Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
9.4.1 Are all suitable emission control measures in place and
functional?

Guidance Questions
9.4.1.1 Are covers installed on the equipment?
9.4.1.2 Are sewers closed / sealed for oily contact water?
9.4.1.3 Are sumps covered for oily contact water?
9.4.1.4 Are high level alarms fitted to holding vessels, sumps and
lagoons?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 113 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
10. ROAD (UN)LOADING FACILITIES

10.1 Layout & Equipment


The layout of road (un)loading facilities must be such that tanker loading can take place with minimal
risk of incident.

Guidance

Take into account the traffic volume.

Drive away prevention


Provide barriers across the tanker stance, brake interlocks on the vehicle or breakaway couplings on
the hose connections.

Hose condition
Look for:
o Product leakage.
o That they swivel / rise / fall easily.
o Damage to other equipment from movement of loading arms.
o ID tag and cross-reference with hose testing records.

Overfill protection
Eg Scully, QED. If no overspill protection fitted then are gantry flow meters fitted with pre-sets?
(controlled by electronic pre-authorisation system / automated stock control system.)
Look for:
o Mechanical damage.
o Operation lamps functioning.
o Any record of system being over-ridden or persistently breaking down.
o ‘Dead Man’s Handle’ on top fill loading arms

Communication
Should be fixed (ATEX rated telephone / intercom) and mobile (ATEX rated radio) means.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 114 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
10.1 Layout & Equipment
Key Question Y N NS N/A
10.1.1 Is the road tanker facility suitably arranged and equipped to
allow safe operation?

Guidance Questions
10.1.1.1 Is there safe and adequate access and exit for tankers without
the need to reverse or manoeuvre?
10.1.1.2 Is there adequate parking space (staging area) available for
tankers waiting / queuing to (un)load?
10.1.1.3 Are equipment or procedures in place to prevent tankers being
driven away with hoses / arms still connected?
10.1.1.4 Is there correct grade identification on all incoming pipe work,
pump switches, meter pre-sets and loading arms?
10.1.1.5 Are the loading arms and / or hoses in good condition?
10.1.1.6 Is there electronic overspill protection and is it regularly tested?
10.1.1.7 Is there a way of communicating with or alerting the supervisor
/ control room in the event of an incident?
10.1.1.8 Is adequate lighting provided at all gantries?
10.1.1.9 Is traffic controlled within the facility to separate trucks from
other vehicles, with a defined traffic pattern?
10.1.1.9.1 Is the traffic pattern (circulation route) marked?
10.1.1.10 Are pre-entry checks conducted for each truck and driver (eg
by access card, security guard or operator)?
10.1.1.11 Are other vehicles restricted from driving through the
(un)loading area?
10.1.1.12 Are changes in elevation of six inches (15 cm) or more painted
in yellow or another color that will draw attention to them?
10.1.1.13 Are there sufficient bays to allow efficient operation?
10.1.1.14 Are sufficient grades available in all bays?
10.1.1.15 Are the loading bays equipped with “Dead Man” switches or
handles on top loading arms?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 115 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
10.2 Operations & Procedures
All facilities must ensure that all road loading operations follow written procedures

Guidance

Operational Procedures
o Check that the operational procedures are the ones related with the trucks seen at the
gantries.
o Check if the drivers follow the procedures.
o Are drivers generally aware of emergency procedures, including location of muster points,
location of ESDs / fire alarm points and 1st Aid Spill Response, use of emergency
communication equipment and operational requirements?
o For gantries / racks where drivers are on an elevated platform or access the tanker
hatches are there good controls for working at height (drop platforms, railings, harnesses
if no railings).

Vehicle Checks
Vehicles should be randomly checked for:
o Safe Loading Pass Validity
o Seat belt fitting (if, like BP, company policy)
o Sources of ignition (spark arrestor fitted?)
o Hose condition & policy
o Fire Extinguishers
o Trecar & Hazchem signs
o Master switch use & operation

Driver Checks
There should be a system to check that drivers are qualified and certified. Likewise for vehicles.
Drivers should receive an induction to enter the site. Where they carry out loading operations they
should be trained in the procedure. Access cards are typically used, especially for unmanned facilities.
These should link to identify whether the checks are in order and still valid, and training has been
completed.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 116 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
10.2 Operations & Procedures
Key Question Y N NS N/A
10.2.1 Are the road (un)loading operations conducted safely?

Guidance Questions
10.2.1.1 Are (un)loading procedures displayed and visible to drivers?
10.2.1.2 If drivers carry out (un)loading operations do they receive a
safety induction and operational training?
10.2.1.2.1 Are new drivers required to take a knowledge test after the
training?
10.2.1.3 Are physical checks made on a sample of vehicles?
10.2.1.4 Does the facility require any specific vehicle tanker trailer
inspections in order to receive and maintain loading
permission?
10.2.1.5 Are driver’s pre-qualified before arriving on site?
10.2.1.6 Are the trucks linked into a GPS system for monitoring (LNG
trucks only)?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 117 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
10.3 Safety & Fire Fighting Physical Checks
All safety & fire fighting equipment must be designed, installed and maintained to international, national
and industry standards.

Guidance

Distance from boundary


At least 10m, 15m for Class 1 products.

Safety Showers
Safety showers and eyewash facilities should be clearly marked and operable, where a need has been
established, eg mogas leading stations. It is acceptable to provide sterile eye wash bottles where
eyewash only is required - confirm acceptable condition.

Top loading
For top loading of vehicles, access gantries with stairs or ladders and protective handrails are required.
Where necessary gantries should include means of access to the top of the tanker vehicles.

Hazard warning signs


Internationally recognised pictograms preferred. Look specifically for benzene (carcinogen), leaded
compound, hydraulic fluids, Nitrogen and other chemical substances used on the gantry.

Emergency Shutdown System


ESD should trip all loading pumps and close remotely operable ESVs. Should be clearly marked & easily
accessed. In addition to any automatic shut-off devices on the tanker or the tank, an emergency stop
button should be installed at the loading / unloading point which will activate a quick-action shut-off
valve or pump stop control.

Fire Fighting
A deluge system is the preferred arrangement, with fire detection. However, many locations still use
monitors around the loading area.
Monitor controls - Codes state, where practicable, monitor control points should be at least 15m from
the probable location of fire. In reality assessors should judge the location of remote control points in
relation to the exposure and whether access is not unduly putting people, suitably protected, at risk in a
fire situation.
Monitor design - The water monitors should be fitted with nozzles capable of discharge on spray or jet
as required. They should be located so as to be capable of cooling the gantry structure as well as the
adjacent vehicle(s).
Number of monitors - The number and capacity of foam monitors to be provided in a loading area will
depend upon circumstances including the capacity of the firewater system.
Bulk foam storage - Bulk foam storage should be shielded from extremes of temperature. Foam
production facilities should be fully operable, with valves greased and instruments easily seen.
Monitor operation - Operating instructions should be displayed in an appropriate manner - the use of
simple diagrams and instructions on a fixed board is good practice.
Safe access -The ability to access the foam generation facilities in a fire situation without putting people
unduly at risk should be assessed.
Fire Extinguishers - Minimum per gantry:
o 1 of 9kg Dry Powder at ground level.
o 1 of 9kg Dry Powder on platform (if applicable).
o 2 of 50kg Dry Powder at ground level.
PPE - Truck drivers, and others, directly involved with the loading process must wear appropriate PPE
such as Nomex suits (especially for LPG), hard hat and gloves.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 118 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
10.3 Safety & Fire Fighting Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
10.3.1 Is all the safety equipment and signage sufficient in the gantry
area (eg, safe loading procedures posted, no smoking, no cell
phone use, no engines running, proper PPE requirements
posted)?

Guidance Questions
10.3.1.1 Are there safety showers and eyewash stations in good
condition and identified with distinctive signs and markings in
the gantry area?
10.3.1.2 Are lines and valves colour coded to identify hazardous
products, firewater, potable water etc.?
10.3.1.3 Are emergency evacuation routes and muster points clearly
marked?
10.3.1.4 Are there at least two safety egress paths away from
hazardous areas?
10.3.1.4.1 Is emergency evacuation procedures part of driver training?
10.3.1.5 Are all ladders and walkways in good condition and are trip
hazards minimised?
10.3.1.6 Are toxic material signs in place including precautions?
10.3.1.7 Are fire alarm and emergency shutdown buttons clearly
marked with push-button actuators at key points in the gantry
area?
10.3.1.8 Is there an ESD system which is effective, accessible and
easily actuated?

Key Question
10.3.2 Is the loading gantry located the correct safe distance from any
occupied building site boundary and fixed source of ignition?

Key Question
10.3.3 Is the gantry & vehicle earthing intact & well maintained?

Key Question
10.3.4 Is the fire fighting systems adequate?

Guidance Questions
10.3.4.1 Is there adequate provision for rapid application of foam and
cooling water?
10.3.4.2 Is there sufficient foam and / or dry chemical portable fire
extinguishers properly located on the gantries?
10.3.4.3 Is all fire fighting equipment and systems in the gantry area
clear of obstruction, accessible during an incident and clearly
marked and identified with operating instructions provided
locally?

Key Question
10.3.5 Is suitable PPE worn by driver and any others who are in the
vicinity of road vehicles during the (un)loading process?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 119 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
10.4 Maintenance & Inspection Physical Checks
It is essential that facilities conduct maintenance & inspections as dictated in the maintenance &
inspection programme.

Guidance

The assessor should check whether or not the Facility’s written inspection & maintenance procedures
are effective.

Gantries
o Is the gantry structure and paintwork in good condition?
o Are the drop platform fenders intact?

Expansion joints
Are the concrete and its expansion joints in good condition?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 120 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
10.4 Maintenance & Inspection Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
10.4.1 Do general inspections appear to be effective?

Key Question
10.4.2 Do engineering inspections appear to be effective?

Key Question
10.4.3 Is the preventative maintenance programme effective?

Key Question
10.4.4 Are acceptable levels of housekeeping maintained?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 121 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
10.5 Environmental Physical Checks
The facility must maintain all environmental protection features.

Guidance

Containment of fire water run off


The facility should produce evidence of studies, which confirm that foreseen quantities of firewater run
off can be handled (based on calculations performed o support a pre-fire plan, for example). Is the
gradient sufficient to ensure run-off from the gantry area?

Containment of Spills
Any spills should be contained by gradient and / or gullies which are routed via drains to separators.
First Aid oil spill materials should be available (absorbent chippings etc).

Air Emissions
Best practice is for bottom loading with a vapour collection and recovery or destruction system. In
Europe and US this is legislated for light products. Where this is not required it is good practice to
route emissions from loading to a vent away from the loading area.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 122 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
10.5 Environmental Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
10.5.1 Are all practical measures taken to prevent spillage?

Guidance Questions
10.5.1.1 Are all (un)loading connections securely capped or blank flanged
when not in use?
10.5.1.2 Are sumps fitted with high-level alarms?
10.5.1.3 Is there means to prevent the bypass of the loading rack overfill
system to load or finish loading a tanker?

Key Question
10.5.2 If a spill was to occur are there sufficient measures in place to
minimise the impact of the spill?

Guidance Questions
10.5.2.1 Would any spillage at the (un)loading / unloading areas be
contained or channelled to the interceptor?
10.5.2.2 Are surface water drains capable of handling firewater run-off
with containment if required?

Key Question
10.5.3 Are sufficient measures in place to minimise atmospheric
emissions?

Guidance Questions
10.5.3.1 Are air / gas mixtures displaced during loading operations
routinely directed appropriately to VRU's or other collection /
destruction systems?
10.5.3.2 Are sumps properly vented and covered?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 123 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
10.6 Road Tanker Facilities Loading Liquefied Gas

Guidance

For the road tanker loading of liquefied gas, including LNG, the majority of the Guidance and Questions
in Sections 10.1 to 10.5 are applicable. Due to the issues / risks associated with the road loading of
liquefied gas, additional Guidance Notes and Questions that relate to the loading of liquefied gas, and
to LNG in particular, are presented in this Section 10.6.

Although facilities for road loading LNG are not common (compared to liquid products stored under
ambient conditions, such as gasoline, diesel etc), there are likely to be more LNG road facilities built,
as the market for LNG increases, particularly in parts of the world where the local gas pipeline
infrastructure is limited or non-existent.
o A Road Loading facility should be designed and built to recognised industry standards. For LNG
a suitable standard for the facility itself is BS EN 1473 - Installation and Equipment for Liquefied
Natural Gas – Design of Onshore Installations. For LNG trucks a suitable standard is BS
EN 13530-2 Large transportable vacuum insulated cryogenic vessels - design, fabrication,
inspection and testing.
o LNG truck loading stations should be equipped with strict site entry control requirements to
ensure only approved LNG trucks and drivers enter the site.
o An LNG truck pre-inspection should be conducted prior to the truck entering the site. This
inspection should review the physical condition of the truck and the LNG tank.
o Loading bays must be clearly marked so drivers know where to load.
o LNG truck loading facilities should not be used as a parking area. Separate parking facilities
outside the truck loading station should be maintained.
o The LNG loading facilities, including truck weighing stations, should be clean and the roads
should be clear.
o There must be separate emergency exits for trucks and people.
o Truck loading bay spill trenches should be clear of water in case of an LNG spill.
o The gas and fire detection system are the first line of defence for an LNG leak or fire and they
must be functioning and clear of obstructions.
o Maintenance activities in the truck loading area must be strictly controlled by work permit.
o LNG customer facilities should undergo and HSSE and Operational audit for approval.
o LNG Truck companies should be vetted to ensure they are safe and reliable.
o A comprehensive road safety program should in place eg BP driving standard. This standard
should be used as a basis for LNG driver qualifications.
o A system should be in place to monitor the LNG truck fleet eg GPS, Vehicle Data Recorders,
etc.
o An LNG truck driver behaviour monitoring program should be used. For example, a road ranger
program.
o Emergency response plans should be place for providing qualified LNG emergency reponse
expertise to public response agencies, customers and the truck companies.

An example of a typical LNG road tanker loading facility:

o 60 LNG trucks per day operate out of the facility to customers sites. LNG truck capacity is about
20 tonnes.
o The LNG trucks are contracted by the customers, not by the facility.
o Journey risk assessments have been conducted for major routes
o Defensive driving training and driver fatigue training provided to LNG truck drivers
o All LNG trucks are monitored by GPS system and there are vehicle data recorders to record
speed and driving time, etc
o Road ranger service to monitor LNG truck driver behaviour

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 124 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
10.6 Roading Loading of Liquefied Gas
Key Question Y N NS N/A
10.6.1 Are appropriate procedures/standards/facilities in place for the
safe road loading of liquefied gas, such as LNG?

Guidance Questions
10.6.1.1 Does the facility have a separate entrance for liquefied gas
trucks?
10.6.1.2 Are the LNG truck companies vetted?
10.6.1.3 Is there a list of approved truck companies?
10.6.1.4 Are the customer facilities audited to assess whether they are
of good design, acceptable operating standard and well
maintained?
10.6.1.5 Is each truck pre-qualified prior to arriving on site?
10.6.1.6 Is there a list of pre-qualified trucks?
10.6.1.7 Is there a truck driver qualification standard?
10.6.1.8 Are Vehicle Data Recorders used to record driving hours,
speed, etc?
10.6.1.9 Does the loading operator conduct a pre-loading inspection of
the truck prior to hooking up and loading?
10.6.1.10 Are road loading facilities handling LNG, and all trucks handling
LNG, designed to suitable industry standards?
10.6.1.11 For road loading stations handling LNG, are drainage systems in
the loading bays kept clear of water in case of an LNG spill?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 125 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
11. RAIL (UN)LOADING FACILITIES

11.1 Layout & Equipment


The layout of rail loading facilities must be such that tanker loading can take place with minimal risk of
incident.

Guidance

Take into account the traffic volume.

Roll Away Prevention.


Provide barriers across the tanker stance, breakaway couplings on the hose connections. Simple
chocks placed on the leading rail tank car can prevent accidental movements.

Hose / Arm Condition


Look for:
o Product leakage.
o That they swivel / rise / fall easily.
o Damage to other equipment from movement of loading arms.
o ID tag and cross-reference with hose testing records.

Splitting of Trains
Acceptable for long trains to be split.

Railcar evacuation
Russian Standard: 50m escape track to remove trains from incident. There should be readily available
locomotives to assist. Winches are also used at the end of sidings.

Overfill protection
Electronic sensors typically installed on top loading arms. Look for:
o Mechanical damage.
o Operation lamps functioning.
o Any record of system being over-ridden or persistently breaking down.

Communication
Should be fixed (ATEX rated telephone) and mobile (ATEX rated radio) means.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 126 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
11.1 Layout & Equipment
Key Question Y N NS N/A
11.1.1 Is the rail (un)loading facilities suitably arranged and equipped to
allow safe operation?

Guidance Questions
11.1.1.1 Is layout designed to allow minimal shunting and / or separation
of trains?
11.1.1.2 Is there adequate space available for trains waiting / queuing to
load?
11.1.1.3 Are equipment or procedures in place to prevent rail cars being
towed away with hoses / arms still connected?
11.1.1.4 Is there correct grade identification on all incoming pipe work,
pump switches, meter pre-sets and loading arms?
11.1.1.5 Are the loading arms and / or hoses in good condition?
11.1.1.6 Is there electronic overspill protection and is it regularly tested?
11.1.1.7 Is there a way of communicating with or alerting the supervisor /
control room in the event of an incident?
11.1.1.8 Is adequate lighting provided at all gantries?
11.1.1.9 Is the track level within the Facility?
11.1.1.10 Is the condition of the track in the Facility acceptable?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 127 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
11.2 Operations & Procedures
All facilities must ensure that all rail loading operations follow written procedures

Guidance

Operational Procedures
o Check that the operational procedures are the ones related with the rail tank cars seen at the
gantries.
o Check if the train crew follow the procedures.
o Are train crew generally aware of emergency procedures, including location of muster
points, location of ESDs / fire alarm points and 1st Aid Spill Response, use of emergency
communication equipment and operational requirements?
o For gantries / racks where drivers are on an elevated platform or access the tanker hatches
are there good controls for working at height (drop platforms, railings, harnesses if no
railings).

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 128 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
11.2 Operations & Procedures
Key Question Y N NS N/A
11.2.1 Are the rail (un)loading operations conducted safely?

Guidance Questions
11.2.1.1 If train crew carry out (un)loading operations are procedures
displayed and visible at the gantry / rack?
11.2.1.1.1 If Facility operators carry out (un)loading operations is there an
operating procedure describing this activity?
11.2.1.2 If train crew carry out (un)loading operations do they receive a
safety induction and operational training?
11.2.1.2.1 Are new crew required to take a knowledge test after the
training?
11.2.1.3 Are physical checks made on rail tank cars prior to (un)loading?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 129 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
11.3 Safety & Fire Fighting Physical Checks
All safety & fire fighting equipment must be designed, installed and maintained to international, national
and industry standards.

Guidance

Distance from boundary


At least 10m, 15m for Class 1 products.

Safety Showers
Safety showers and eyewash facilities should be clearly marked and operable, where a need has been
established, e.g. mogas leading stations. It is acceptable to provide sterile eye wash bottles where
eyewash only is required - confirm acceptable condition.

Top loading
For top loading of tankers, access gantries with stairs or ladders and protective handrails are required.
Where necessary gantries should include means of access to the top of the tanker vehicles..

Hazard warning signs.


Internationally recognised pictograms preferred. Look specifically for benzene (carcinogen), leaded
compound, hydraulic fluids, Nitrogen and other chemical substances used on the gantry.

Emergency Shutdown system


o ESD should trip all loading pumps and close remotely operable ESVs.
o Should be clearly marked & easily accessed.
o An emergency stop button should be installed at the loading / unloading point which will
activate a quick-action shut-off valve or pump stop control.

Fire fighting
Monitor controls - Codes state, where practicable, monitor control points should be at least 15m from
the probable location of fire. In reality assessors should judge the location of remote control points in
relation to the exposure and whether access is not unduly putting people, suitably protected, at risk in a
fire situation.
Monitor design - The water monitors should be fitted with nozzles capable of discharge on spray or jet
as required. They should be located so as to be capable of cooling the gantry structure as well as the
adjacent vehicle(s).
Number of monitors - The number and capacity of foam monitors to be provided in a loading area will
depend upon circumstances including the capacity of the firewater system.
Bulk foam storage - Bulk foam storage should be shielded from extremes of temperature. Foam
production facilities should be fully operable, with valves greased and instruments easily seen.
Monitor operation - Operating instructions should be displayed in an appropriate manner - the use of
simple diagrams and instructions on a fixed board is good practice.
Safe access - The ability to access the foam generation facilities in a fire situation without putting
people unduly at risk should be assessed.
Fire Extinguishers - Minimum per gantry:
o 1 of 9kg Dry Powder at ground level per 15m.
o 1 of 9kg Dry Powder on platform (if applicable) per 15m.
o 2 of 50kg Dry Powder at ground level per 45m.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 130 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
11.3 Safety & Fire Fighting Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
11.3.1 Is all the safety equipment and signage sufficient in the rail
gantry / rack area?

Guidance Questions
11.3.1.1 Are there safety showers and eyewash stations at the gantry /
rack areas in good condition and identified with distinctive signs
and markings?
11.3.1.2 Are lines and valves colour coded to identify hazardous products,
firewater, potable water etc.?
11.3.1.3 Are emergency evacuation routes and muster points clearly
marked?
11.3.1.4 Are there at least two safety egress paths away from hazardous
areas?
11.3.1.5 Are all ladders and walkways in good condition and are trip
hazards minimised?
11.3.1.6 Are toxic material signs in place including precautions?
11.3.1.7 Are fire alarm and emergency shutdown buttons clearly marked
with push-button actuators at key points in the gantry area?
11.3.1.8 Is there an ESD system which is effective and easily actuated?

Key Question
11.3.2 Is the (un)loading gantry / rack located the correct safe distance
from any occupied building site boundary and fixed source of
ignition?

Key Question
11.3.3 Is the gantry, rails, pipework and rail tank car bonding intact &
well maintained?

Key Question
11.3.4 Is the fire fighting systems adequate?

Guidance Questions
11.3.4.1 Is there adequate provision for rapid application of foam and
cooling water where appropriate?
11.3.4.2 Are there sufficient foam and / or dry chemical portable fire
extinguishers properly located on the gantries?
11.3.4.3 Is all fire fighting equipment and systems in the rail gantry area
clear of obstruction, accessible during an incident and clearly
marked and identified with operating instructions provided
locally?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 131 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
11.4 Maintenance & Inspection Physical Checks
It is essential that facilities conduct maintenance & inspections as dictated in the maintenance &
inspection programme.

Guidance

The assessor should check whether or not the Facility’s written inspection & maintenance procedures
are effective.

Gantries
o Is the gantry structure and paintwork in good condition?
o Are the drop platform fenders intact?

Expansion joints
Are the concrete and its expansion joints in good condition?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 132 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
11.4 Maintenance & Inspection Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
11.4.1 Do general inspections appear to be effective?

Key Question
11.4.2 Do engineering inspections appear to be effective?

Key Question
11.4.3 Is the preventative maintenance programme effective?

Key Question
11.4.4 Are acceptable levels of housekeeping maintained?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 133 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
11.5 Environmental Physical Checks
The facility must maintain all environmental protection features.

Guidance

Containment of fire water run off.


The facility should produce evidence of studies, which confirm that foreseen quantities of firewater run
off can be handled (based on calculations performed to support a pre-fire plan, for example). Is the
gradient sufficient to ensure run-off from the gantry area?

Containment of Spills.
Any spills should be contained by gradient and / or gullies which are routed via drains to separators.
First Aid oil spill materials should be available (absorbent chippings etc).

Air Emissions.
Best practice is for bottom loading with a vapour collection and recovery system. In Europe this is
legislated for light products.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 134 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
11.5 Environmental Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
11.5.1 Are all practical measures taken to prevent spillage?

Guidance Questions
11.5.1.1 Are all (un)loading connections securely capped or blank
flanged when not in use?
11.5.1.2 Are sumps fitted with high-level alarms?

Key Question
11.5.2 If a spill was to occur are there sufficient measures in place to
minimise the impact of the spill?

Guidance Questions
11.5.2.1 Would any spillage at the (un)loading areas be contained or
channelled to the interceptor?
11.5.2.2 Are surface water drains capable of handling firewater run-off
with containment if required?

Key Question
11.5.3 Are sufficient measures in place to minimise atmospheric
emissions?

Guidance Questions
11.5.3.1 Are air / gas mixtures displaced during loading operations
routinely directed appropriately to VRU's or other collection /
destruction systems?
11.5.3.2 Are sumps properly vented and covered?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 135 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12. MARINE OPERATIONS

12.1 Management and Organisation


12.1.1 Compliance
Every facility should comply with applicable International, National and Local regulations, and with
company policy and procedures.

Guidance

Facilities should comply with applicable International, National and Local regulations, and with company
policy and procedures. Where a self-regulatory regime exists, facilities should meet the spirit and intent
of the applicable code and the guidelines for its implementation.

The facility management should provide a healthy and safe working environment and ensure that all
operations are conducted with minimum impact on the environment whilst complying with the
regulatory system in force and recognised industry codes of practice.

Facilities should maintain current copies of regulations and guidelines applicable to their operations.
(See also 12.1.10 Documentation)

Facilities should seek assurance that vessels visiting their berths comply with applicable International,
National and Local marine regulations. (See also 12.1.8 Vessel Vetting Verification)

Facilities should have a management system in place, which is able to demonstrate and document
proof of compliance with regulatory requirements and company policy and procedures. Facility
management should designate a person to be responsible for ensuring compliance with the regulations
and company policy and procedures.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 136 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.1 Compliance
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.1.1.1 Does the Facility comply with applicable International, National
and Local regulations?

Guidance Questions
12.1.1.1.1 Does the Facility have a management system in place, which is
able to demonstrate and document proof of compliance with
regulatory requirements?
12.1.1.1.2 Does the Facility have a designated person responsible for
ensuring compliance with applicable legislation and regulations?
12.1.1.1.3 Where a self-regulatory regime is required, does the Facility meet
the spirit and intent of the applicable code and the guidelines for
its implementation?

Key Question
12.1.1.2. Does the Facility comply with company policy and procedures?

Guidance Questions
12.1.1.2.1 Does the Facility have a management system in place, which is
able to demonstrate and document proof of compliance with
company policy and procedures?
12.1.1.2.2 Does the Facility have a designated person responsible for
ensuring compliance with company policy and procedures?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 137 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.2 Risk Management
Every facility should have formalised Risk Management processes in place, which demonstrate how
hazards are identified and quantified, and how the associated risk is managed.

Guidance

Facilities should have formalised risk management processes in place, which demonstrate how hazards
are identified and quantified, and how the associated risk is assessed and managed.

The risk management process should include formal risk assessments, which address any changes in
design, manning or operation, and should follow on from the design case risk assessment for the
facility. They should be structured in order to identify hazard events, assess the probability of
occurrence, and determine the potential consequences of the event. The output of the risk assessment
should provide recommendations on prevention, mitigation and recovery. Risk assessments should be
undertaken as part of the process when modifications are made to the equipment and facilities. They
should also be carried out as part of the safety management processes to allow the conduct of
operations whose scope is not covered in the current operational procedures.

Facilities should conduct reviews (typically annually) of their facilities and operations to identify potential
hazards and the associated risks, which may demonstrate the need for additional or revised risk
assessments. Reviews should also be carried out when there are changes to the facilities or
operations, for example: changes in equipment organisation, the product being handled, or the type of
vessels visiting the berths.

Facility operating procedures should provide documentation and processes for ensuring the effective
management and control of identified risks.

Records of all reviews and assessments should be kept for inspection

As a guide, the risk assessment process should consider the following areas:

Process and Facilities Ship Handling


o Ship Vetting o Pilotage
o Technical Integrity: o Towage
 mooring and fendering systems o Line Handling
 loading arms, pipelines and tanks
 valves Vessel systems
o Processes associated with the above and o Inert Gas System
cargo control and emergency shutdown o Mooring System
o Containment systems o Cargo Control and Emergency Shutdown
o Notification and response systems
o Training associated with the above Security
o Access/Personnel Control
Safety and Health o Threat Assessment Methodologies
o Warning systems o Communications
o Training  Ship to Shore
o Personal Protective Equipment  Law Enforcement agencies
o Hazard awareness
Contingency Planning
Environmental Conditions o Fire Fighting
o Pollution Control
o Emergency Towage

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 138 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.2 Risk Management
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.1.2.1 Does the Facility have formalised risk management processes in
place, which demonstrates how hazards are identified and
quantified, and how the associated risk is managed?

Guidance Questions
12.1.2.1.1 Does the risk management process include formal risk
assessments, which address any changes in design, manning or
operation?
12.1.2.1.2 Do the formal risk assessments follow on from the design case
risk assessment for the facility?
12.1.2.1.3 Are the risk assessments structured in order to identify hazard
events, assess the probability of occurrence, and determine the
potential consequences of the event, in accordance with the
Guidance?
12.1.2.1.4 Does the Facility conduct periodic reviews of its facilities and
operations to identify potential hazards and the associated risks,
which may demonstrate the need for additional or revised risk
assessments?
12.1.2.1.5 Are records of all reviews and assessments kept for inspection?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 139 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.3 Operating Manual
Every facility should have a written, comprehensive, and up-to-date Marine Terminal Operating Manual.

Guidance

Facilities should have a written, comprehensive, and up-to-date Marine Terminal Operating Manual.

The facility Operating Manual is a working document and should include procedures, practices, and
drawings relevant to the specific facility. The Manuel should be available to all appropriate personnel in
the accepted working language.

The facility Operating Manual should include the roles and responsibilities of the berth operating
personnel and procedures associated with emergencies such as fire, product spillage or medical
emergency. However, a separate emergency response manual should be provided to cover such
topics as emergency call-out procedures and interaction with local authorities, municipal emergency
response organizations, or other outside agencies and organizations.

The facility Operating Manual should include but not be limited to the following:

o Loading and Discharge Procedure o Exposure to Toxic Vapours (e.g., H2S)


o Gassing up and Cool Down Procedures o Vessel Acceptance Criteria (Berth Limits)
for LNG/LPG Carriers o Operating Environmental Limits
o Cargo Transfer Equipment Procedures o Mooring Guidelines
o Control and Shutdown Procedures o Facility Plan Layout Drawings
o Fire & Emergency Procedures o Plans of Fire Fighting Systems
o Gauging and Sampling Procedures
o Static Electricity Precautions
o Environmental Protection Procedures

The facility should also have a documented management of change process for handling temporary
deviations and when making permanent changes to the procedures in the operating manual including
defining the level of approval required for such deviations and changes to a prescribed procedure.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 140 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.3 Operating Manual
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.1.3.1 Does the Facility have a written, comprehensive, and up-to-date
Marine Terminal Operating Manual?

Guidance Questions
12.1.3.1.1 Is the operating manual available to all appropriate personnel in
the accepted working language?
12.1.3.1.2 Are the roles and responsibilities of the berth operating
personnel defined in the operating manual?
12.1.3.1.3 Is there a documented management of change process for
handling temporary deviations and permanent changes to the
operating manual including defining the level of approval
required?
12.1.3.1.4 Does the operating manual cover the topics in accordance with
the Guidance?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 141 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.4 Terminal Information and Port Regulations
Every facility should provide ships visiting its berths, with information on all pertinent local regulations
and facility safety requirements applicable to the safe management of the ship/shore interface.

Guidance

Facilities should provide ships visiting their berths with information on all pertinent local regulations and
facility safety requirements applicable to the safe management of the ship/shore interface. The
information should be provided in English, or in the facility’s working language provided that operational
personnel on the vessel understand this language.

The process of passing the information to the ship and exchanging information with the ship should be
formalised. The facility and the ship should acknowledge the exchange of this information with signed
receipts.

Information provided should include, but not be limited to, the following:

Facility and Pre-Arrival Information o Mooring arrangements and requirements,


o Pre-Arrival information required for the with diagrams
Port and facility o Tugs and tug requirements, including any
o Depths and maximum vessel drafts and special towing arrangements
dimensions o Facility and berth plans including escape
o Vessel displacement and dimensional routes and safety equipment locations
limitations for each berth

Operational Information o SSL - Ship to Shore Link (Comms, ESD link)


o Safe operations requirements, e.g., o Ship/Shore access arrangements and
environmental limitations, personnel requirements
requirements on shore and on board. o Facility smoking regulations
o Communications: primary, secondary and o Health and Environmental hazards
any emergency means of associated with the cargoes handled
communication, VHF channels, o Cargo transfer equipment connection details,
installation telephone extension including diagrams where applicable (e.g.,
numbers, local emergency contact SPM hose arrangements, PERC’s, QCDC)
numbers o Vapour return connection details
o Organisation and management of marine o Cargo transfer procedures
terminal ship/shore interface o Ballast procedures
o Pre-transfer procedures, including o Tank cleaning, tank entry and Crude Oil
Ship/Shore Safety Checklist and Safety Washing (COW) operational requirements
Letter

Safety and Security Information o Meteorological information, tide heights and


o Emergency procedures, including alarm times, weather forecasts
signals o Port / terminal facility security requirements
o Emergency Shut Down (ESD) procedure o Equipment usage, intrinsic safety

Environmental Information o Garbage disposal including any charges


o Port / facility pollution prevention levied
regulations o Vapour emissions
o Ballast water discharge controls
Miscellaneous Information and Requirements o Ship stability
o Facility / Local Drug and Alcohol Policy o Ships stores handling and bunkering
o Repairs alongside arrangements for each berth

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 142 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.4 Terminal Information and Port Regulations
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.1.4.1 Does the Facility provide ships visiting its berths, with
information on all pertinent local regulations and facility safety
requirements applicable to the safe management of the
ship/shore interface?

Guidance Questions
12.1.4.1.1 Is the information in English or in the Facility’s working language
provided that operational personnel on the vessel understand
this language?
12.1.4.1.2 Is the exchange of information formalised?
12.1.4.1.3 Does the information cover the topics as detailed in the
Guidance notes?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 143 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.5 Security
Every facility should have a security plan with procedures to address all security aspects identified
from a security assessment of the facility.

Guidance

Facilities should have a security plan with procedures to address all security aspects identified from a
security assessment of the facility. Port complexes, and facilities therein, serving ships engaged on
international voyages will require to be in compliance with the measures to enhance maritime security
detailed in the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) 1974 (as amended) and
the provisions of the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code Parts A & B. Facilities
not required to comply with the SOLAS and ISPS Code requirements are encouraged to consider the
provisions of SOLAS and the ISPS Code in developing their security plans.

The security assessment should include a risk analysis of all aspects of the facility operations in order
to determine which parts of it are more susceptible and/or more likely to be the subject of a security
incident. The risk is a function of the threat of a security incident coupled with the vulnerability of the
target and the consequences the incident. The security assessment should as a minimum encompass
the following items;

o Identification and evaluation of important assets and infrastructure it is important to protect.


o Perceived threat-(s) to the installation and their likely occurrence
o Potential vulnerabilities and consequences of potential incidents to the facility, berths and
vessels at the berths
o Identification of any weaknesses (including human factors) in the infrastructure, policies and
procedures.

Responsibility for the plan rests with the facility management and may, depending upon the
circumstances at the facility, require a trained and designated security officer who has the necessary
skills and training to ensure full implementation of the required measures to be in place at the facility.
The security plan will vary from facility to facility depending on the particular circumstances identified
by the security assessment and local and national security considerations. The documented plan
should include but is not limited to the following:

o The security organisation at the facility and port complex.


o Basic security measures for normal operation and additional measures that will allow the
facility to progress, without delay, to increased security levels as the threat changes.
o Procedures with scope for interfacing with ships and their security activities, local port
authorities, other facilities and dock facilities in the region and other local authorities and
agencies (e.g., police and Coast Guard). These procedures should contain links to ensure the
necessary communications systems allow for effective continuous operation of the
organisation and its links with others, including ships at the facility.
o Provisions for regular reviews of the plan and for amendments based upon experience or
changing circumstances.
o Measures designed to prevent unauthorised access to the facility, in particular restricted areas
and ships moored at the facility.
o Measures to prevent weapons or dangerous substances that could harm people or endanger
ships from being introduced.
o Procedures for responding to security threats or breaches of security including evacuation.

To ensure it remains continuously effective, the security plan must also allow for periodic review,
update and amendment based upon ongoing experience.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 144 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.5 Security
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.1.5.1 Does the Facility have a security plan with procedures to
address all security aspects identified from a security
assessment?

Guidance Questions
12.1.5.1.1 Has a security assessment been undertaken that has evaluated
the minimum requirements of the Guidance?
12.1.5.1.2 Is a documented security plan addressing all the issues arising
from the assessment available to facility personnel responsible
for implementation of the plan?
12.1.5.1.3 Is the security plan implemented?
12.1.5.1.4 Are management responsibilities for implementation of the
security plan clearly assigned?
12.1.5.1.5 Has the plan been periodically reviewed, updated or amended to
ensure its continued effectiveness?
12.1.5.1.6 Is the Facility required by the Contracting Government to
comply with the measures to enhance maritime security
provisions of SOLAS and the ISPS Code?
12.1.5.1.7 Has the Contracting Government or its Recognised Security
Organisation approved the facility security plan and a Statement
of Compliance of Port Facility (SoCPF) issued?
12.1.5.1.8 Has the Facility confirmed that, where necessary, the
Contracting Government has advised the IMO that it has an
approved security plan?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 145 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.6 Manning Levels
Every facility should establish manning levels to ensure that all operations related to the ship/shore
interface can be conducted safely and that emergency situations can be managed

Guidance

The manning of a facility should ensure that all operations and activities related to the ship/shore
interface can be conducted safely and that emergency situations can be managed.

Personnel should be trained in the operations undertaken and have site specific knowledge of all
safety procedures and emergency duties.

Facilities should provide sufficient manpower to ensure that all operational and emergency conditions
and be conducted in a safe manner, taking into account:

o Effective monitoring of operations


o The size of the facility
o Volume and type of products handled
o The number and size of berths
o Number, type and size of ships visiting the facility
o The degree of mechanisation employed
o The amount of automation employed
o Tankfarm duties for personnel
o Fire fighting duties
o Liaison with port authorities and adjacent/neighbouring marine facility operators
o Personnel requirements for port operations, including pilotage, mooring boats, line handling,
hose handling.
o Fluctuations in manpower availability due to holidays, illness and training.
o Personnel involvement in emergency and facility pollution response
o Facility involvement in port response plans, including mutual aid
o Security

In establishing manning levels, due account should be taken of any local or national legal
requirements. Consideration should be given to the avoidance of fatigue that may result from
extended hours of work or insufficient rest periods of time off between shifts.

De-manning of Berths
Facility operators may wish to reduce manning levels by de-manning berths during cargo transfer
operations. Where this is undertaken, facilities should continue to ensure that all operational and
emergency conditions can be conducted in a safe manner.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 146 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.6 Manning Levels
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.1.6.1 Does the level of Facility manning ensure that all operations
related to the ship/shore interface are conducted safely and
that emergency situations can be managed?

Guidance Questions
12.1.6.1.1 Are personnel trained in the operations undertaken, including
site-specific knowledge of all safety procedures and
emergency duties?
12.1.6.1.2 Does the available manpower meet all operational and
emergency conditions, in accordance with the Guidance?
12.1.6.1.3 Are manpower levels adequate to prevent or avoid fatigue?
12.1.6.1.4 Do any de-manning initiatives ensure that all operational and
emergency conditions can be conducted in a safe manner?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 147 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.7 Qualification and Training of Personnel
Facility management should ensure that personnel engaged in activities relating to the ship/shore
interface are trained and competent in the duties they are assigned to perform.

Guidance

Facility management should ensure that the personnel engaged in activities relating to the ship/shore
interface are trained and competent in the duties they are assigned to perform. The following
processes should be in place:

o Identification of skills required for all positions.


o A system to assess individual competence and identify training needs to provide staff with the
knowledge to undertake their allotted duties.
o Formal training provided by industry, the company or developed locally. Vocational (“on the job")
training should be formalised to ensure that consistent levels of training are achieved.
o A system of ongoing re-assessment of an individual competence to perform their assigned
duties.
o Maintenance of personnel training records

All Facility s may wish to consider adoption of the OCIMF Marine Terminal Training and Competence
Assessment Guidelines (MTT & CAG) in a manner appropriate to their operations. This document may
assist in determining the scope of training needed.

All personnel engaged in activities relating to the ship/shore interface should be thoroughly familiar with
industry standards and guidelines, including but not limited to "International Safety Guide for Oil
Tankers and Terminals"(ISGOTT) and relevant section of SIGTTO/OCIMF publications such as
“Principles of Handling Liquefied Gases’. All personnel as a minimum, should attend the following
formal training (including refresher courses):

o Site-specific safety / training (inductions)


o Jetty operations training
o Appropriate level pollution response training
o Appropriate level fire fighting training
o Appropriate level security training

Personnel should be aware of national and local rules and port authority requirements, which affect the
facility operations and the manner in which they are implemented locally.

All personnel, including contractors undertaking maintenance work within the facility and jetty areas
should receive safety training appropriate to the task and the workplace (e.g., permit to work systems,
system isolations).

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 148 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.7 Qualification and Training of Personnel
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.1.7.1 Are personnel engaged in activities relating to the ship/shore
interface trained and competent in the duties they are assigned
to perform?

Guidance Questions
12.1.7.1.1 Are the processes related to the qualification and training of
personnel in place in accordance with the Guidance?
12.1.7.1.2 Are all personnel engaged in activities relating to the ship/shore
interface thoroughly familiar with those sections of the
“International Safety Guide for Oil Tankers and Terminals”
(ISGOTT) or equivalent SIGTTO publication that are appropriate
to the local site?
12.1.7.1.3 Do all personnel, including contractors, engaged in activities
relating to the ship/shore interface attend formal training
(including refresher courses) as appropriate?
12.1.7.1.4 Are personnel aware of national and local rules and port
authority requirements that affect the facility operations and the
manner in which they are implemented locally?
12.1.7.1.5 Do all personnel, including contractors, who undertake
maintenance work within the facility and jetty areas, receive
safety training appropriate to the task and the workplace?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 149 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.8 Vessel Vetting Verification
Every facility should have a procedure in place to ensure that vessels accepted to call at the berths
meet minimum standards of safe operation as established by the facility or the company's vetting
system.

Guidance

Facilities should have a procedure in place to ensure that vessels accepted to call at the facility meet
minimum standards of safe operation as established by the facility or the company vetting system.

Vessel acceptability may be determined by a company vetting system. In the absence of data, vessel
acceptability could be based on the evaluation of industry programmes such as the Oil Companies
International Marine Forum (OCIMF) Ship Inspection Report Programme (SIRE) or the Chemical
Distribution Institute (CDI) system, with approvals based on recent vessel inspections.

Where facilities have specific requirements or limitations, procedures should be in place to ensure that
only acceptable vessels are allowed. A documented procedure should be in place to address the
facilities response if a vessel is found to be sub-standard on arrival.

Irrespective of the vetting result, the facility should retain the right to reject nominated vessels,
provided it has justifiable grounds to do so.

Facilities should provide feedback information on the vessel performance or deficiencies to the vetting
system focal point.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 150 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.8 Vessel Vetting Verification
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.1.8.1 Does the Facility have a procedure in place to ensure that
vessels accepted to call at the berths meet minimum standards
of safe operation as established by the facility or the company's
ship vetting system?

Guidance Questions
12.1.8.1.1 In the absence of company vetting system, is vessel
acceptability based on evaluation of data of industry
programmes such as the OCIMF SIRE or the CDI system, or
established local or regional systems?
12.1.8.1.2 Does the Facility provide feedback information on the vessels
performance or deficiencies?
12.1.8.1.3 In the event that a vessel is found to be substandard on arrival,
is there a documented procedure in place to deal with the
situation?
12.1.8.1.4 Is the Facility aware of its right to reject nominated vessels?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 151 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.9 Vessel Berth Compatibility Criteria
Every facility should have a definitive and comprehensive list of vessel dimensional criteria for each
berth.

Guidance

Facilities should have a definitive comprehensive list of vessel dimensional criteria for each berth. This
information, which should be made available to both internal and external contacts, should include the
following criteria:

Maximum Draft (See also 12.2.2 Water Depth Surveys)


o Maximum draft should preferably be determined in consultation with authorities and should be
based upon the restricting depth at the berth or in the approaches, related to a specific datum
(e.g., Chart Datum, Lowest Astronomical Tide).
o A minimum under keel clearance (UKC) should be defined taking into account speed, squat, ship
motion (e.g., due to wave action), and the nature of the seabed.
o Maximum draft should be defined for the usual water density at the berth.
o When defining maximum draft, due regard should be given to unusual tidal or environmental
conditions which may affect water depth.

Maximum Displacement
o The full load displacement figure should be quoted to define the maximum size of the vessel
allowed on the berth.
o A maximum displacement figure may also be quoted for the berthing operation where the
loadings on berth fendering may be limited.

Length Overall (LOA)


o This is the maximum length of the vessel

In addition, facilities may specify further dimensional limitations, for example:


o Minimum Length Overall (LOA)
o Bow to Centre Manifold (BCM)
o Minimum Parallel Body Length required forward and aft of the manifold. (To ensure that the
vessel will rest against the fenders when in position with the cargo connection made.)

Maximum Beam
o May be limited where the width of the waterway is limited such as a lock, a dock or a river.

Maximum Allowable Manifold Height above the Water


o To ensure that the vessel can keep the cargo arms connected to discharge all the cargo
o In tidal locations it may be necessary to disconnect the loading arms during the high water
period

Minimum Allowable Manifold Height above the Water


o To ensure that a loaded vessel can be connected to the discharge arms.
o In tidal locations it may be necessary to disconnect the cargo arms during the low water period.

Maximum Air Draft


o The distance between the waterline and the highest point on the vessel.
o This may be needed to ensure that vessels can pass beneath bridges and overhead
obstructions.
o A safe clearance distance may be defined by the local harbour authority.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 152 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
For LNG vessels the formal compatibility confirmation based on GTE procedures (or similar) should
apply, and consideration should be given to applying similar standards for confirmation of LPG tanker
compatibility

In defining these criteria, care should be taken in establishing the baseline data from which they are
derived and ensuring that they are correctly reconciled. facilities should clearly identify the units of
measurement used.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 153 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 154 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.9 Vessel Berth Compatibility Criteria
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.1.9.1 Does the Facility have available a list of vessel acceptance
criteria for each berth?

Guidance Questions
12.1.9.1.1 Is the list of vessel acceptance criteria for each berth in
accordance with the Guidance?
12.1.9.1.2 If additional dimensional limitations are required, are these
specified as described in the Guidance?
12.1.9.1.3 Do restrictions consider all aspects of the port including berth
sizes, water depths, channel width, weather conditions and
environmental effects?
12.1.9.1.4 Is this information made available both internally and externally
using for example OCIMF MTPQ and SIGTTO questionnaire?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 155 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.10 Documentation
Every facility should maintain a set of up-to-date documents to ensure compliance with regulations,
procedures and good practice, and for providing information on the regulations, facilities and equipment
associated with the management of the ship/shore interface.

Guidance

Facilities should maintain a set of up-to-date documents to ensure compliance with regulations,
procedures and good practice, and for providing information on facilities and equipment associated with
the management of the ship/shore interface.

Documentation should provide current information on topics that include the following:

o Legislation, including national and local requirements and HSE legislation.


o Industry guidelines, company policies, HSE Policy
o Operating manuals, maintenance and inspection procedures, site plans and drawings
o Records, e.g., internal and external audits; inspections; meetings; HSE records; permits, local
procedures
o Certificates issued for equipment and processes.

Documentation available on site should include a comprehensive set of “as-built " construction
drawings and specifications of the berth and associated facilities, including any and all modifications
made since it was first commissioned. This documentation should form the basis of any structural,
water depth, or other surveys carried out to inspect the fabric of the facilities. (See also 9.1 Structural
Surveys).

A record of the major equipment items should be kept, eg, specifications, purchase orders, inspection
and maintenance data. Major equipment could include transfer arms, access towers, large valves,
pumps, meters, fenders, and mooring hooks.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 156 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.1.10 Documentation
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.1.10.1 Does the Facility maintain a set of up-to-date documents to
ensure compliance with regulations, procedures and good
practice, and for providing information on the regulations,
facilities and equipment associated with the management of
the ship/shore interface?

Guidance Questions
12.1.10.1.1 Are the latest editions of ISGOTT and, if required, Liquefied
Gas Handling Principles on Ships and in Terminals available?
12.1.10.1.2 Does the documentation include current information as
described in the Guidance?
12.1.10.1.3 Does the documentation available at the Facility include
comprehensive "as-built" construction drawings and
specifications of the berth and associated facilities, including
any modifications since commissioning?
12.1.10.1.4 Are records of the major equipment items kept as described in
the Guidance?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 157 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.2 Port Operations
12.2.1 Pre-arrival Communications
Every facility should have procedures in place to manage the exchange of information between the
vessel and the facility, before the vessel berths, to ensure the safe and timely arrival of the vessel at
the berth, with both parties ready to commence operations.

Guidance

Facilities should have procedures in place to manage the exchange of information between the vessel
and the facility, before the vessel berths, to ensure the safe and timely arrival of the vessel at the berth,
with both parties ready to commence operations.

Prior to the vessel arrival, the facility will receive details of the vessel Estimated Time of Arrival (ETA) in
accordance with voyage instructions.

Prior to arrival at the port, the facility and vessel should exchange information which, as a minimum,
should include that detailed within ISGOTT.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 158 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.2.1 Pre-arrival Communications
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.2.1.1 Does the Facility have procedures in place to manage the
exchange of information between the vessel and the Facility,
before the vessel berths, to ensure the safe and timely arrival of
the vessel at the berth, with both parties ready to commence
operations?

Guidance Questions
12.2.1.1.1 Are there effective pre-arrival communications conducted
between the Facility and Vessel in line with the guidance given
in ISGOTT?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 159 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.2.2 Water Depth Surveys
Every facility should maintain up-to-date records of the water depths at their berths and in the
immediate vicinity of their berths. They should also obtain up-to-date information on the water depths
in the port and the approaches to the port, which may limit the operation of the facility.

Guidance

Facilities situated where access may be limited by water depth should maintain up-to-date records of
the water depths at their berths and in the immediate vicinity of their berths. They should also obtain
up to date information on the water depths in the port and the approaches to the port, which may limit
the operation of the facility.

When a new berth is built or where a company assumes the operation of a berth or facility, an initial
depth survey should be undertaken or recent existing survey reports referenced to establish baseline
data.

At all locations, water depth surveys should be conducted at intervals not exceeding five (5) years. At a
new facility or where there is a history of siltation or scouring, or where siltation or scouring may be
expected due to structural changes to facilities in the vicinity, more frequent surveys should be
undertaken. This will allow any trends to be identified.

All surveys should be carried out by competent personnel and the results should conform to the
established datum for the port.

The berth area should be inspected regularly for debris and/or underwater obstructions. If the berth
area does not dry to enable visible inspection, inspections should be conducted by diver or other
means.

The facility should ensure that all internal and external interested parties, such as the Port Authority,
Agents, and Pilot Associations are aware of any changes to the water depth. Likewise, any inability to
maintain a specific advertised minimum depth in the vicinity or alongside a specific berth should be
reported.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 160 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.2.2 Water Depth Surveys
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.2.2.1 Does the Facility maintain up-to-date records of the water
depths at their berths and in the immediate vicinity of their
berths?

Guidance Questions
12.2.2.1.1 Does the Facility have up-to-date depth surveys of the berths?
12.2.2.1.2 Do depth surveys take account of any potential siltation
scouring or structural changes in vicinity, which may require
more frequent surveys?
12.2.2.1.3 Is the berth inspected regularly for debris and/or underwater
obstructions?

Key Question
12.2.2.2 Does the Facility obtain up-to-date information on the water
depths in the port and the approaches, which may limit the
operation of the Facility?
12.2.2.3 Does the Facility ensure that all internal and external interested
parties (eg Port Authority, agents, pilot associations) are ware of
changes to the water depths?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 161 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.2.3 Navigation Aids and Pilotage
Every facility should have processes in place to ensure that, where required, pilotage services are
available for the operations undertaken and that necessary navigation and berthing aids are in place and
are operational.

Guidance

Facilities should have processes in place to ensure that, where required, pilotage services are available
for the operations undertaken and that necessary navigation and berthing aids are in place and are
operational.

Pilotage
Facilities should seek assurance from the Port Authority or Pilotage Service that trained and competent
pilots are available to handle vessels nominated to call at their berths and are available for emergency
incidents. In some cases, a company-managed pilotage/berthing master service may be provided by
the facility, in which case processes should be in place to ensure competence.

Navigational Aids
Facilities should maintain a close liaison with the Port and other regulatory authorities regarding
changes to navigational aids within the port and approaches that could impact on the safe operation of
ships destined for the facility.

Facilities should be kept informed of any changes to the navigational aids and any notices advising of
any operational failures. If unsure of the impact of any change or failure, they should seek professional
advice in order to assess the risk.

Where navigational aids are maintained by the facility, records of maintenance and operability should be
kept. Authorities should be advised of any changes in the status of navigational aids affecting facility
operations.

Where navigational aids are sited in the facility but maintained by another party, safe access to the
equipment should be provided and the activities of the workers involved should be controlled by facility
safety processes.

Berthing Aids
Facilities should carefully consider the use of berthing aids such as, speed of approach monitors, to
minimise the risk of damage to their facilities, the visiting vessels and the consequential risks of fire
and pollution.

Traffic Management
Facility management should assure itself that ship movements within the port are effectively
controlled.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 162 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.2.3 Navigation Aids and Pilotage
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.2.3.1 Does the Facility have processes in place to ensure that, where
required, pilotage services are available for the operations
undertaken?

Guidance Questions
12.2.3.1.1 Is the Facility assured that trained and competent pilots are
available to handle vessels nominated to call at its berths?
12.2.3.1.2 If Pilots are required for emergency incidents, are they
available?
12.2.3.1.3 Has the Facility management assured itself that ship
movements within the port are effectively controlled to meet
the circumstances of the port and Facility?

Key Question
12.2.3.2 Does the Facility have processes in place to ensure that,
necessary navigation and berthing aids are in place and are
operational?

Guidance Questions
12.2.3.2.1 Is the Facility kept informed of any operational failures or
changes to the navigational aids that affect vessels visiting its
berths?
12.2.3.2.2 Is the Facility able to ascertain the impact and assess the risk of
any change or failure to navigation aids?
12.2.3.2.3 Where navigational aids are maintained by the Facility, are
records of maintenance and operability kept?
12.2.3.2.4 Are authorities advised of any changes in the status of
navigational aids affecting facility operations?
12.2.3.2.5 Where navigational aids are sited in the Facility but maintained
by another party, is safe access to the equipment provided and
the activities of the workers involved controlled by facility safety
processes?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 163 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.2.4 Tugs and Support Craft
Every facility that requires tugs and other support craft for berthing and un-berthing operations should
have a documented policy to determine, or formal process to confirm the adequacy of the design,
number and power of tugs and/or support craft to be used for operations at their berths.

Guidance

Facilities that require tugs or other support craft for berthing and un-berthing operations should have a
documented policy to determine, or formal process to confirm the adequacy of the design, number and
power of tugs and/or support craft to be used for operations at their berths. Tug and support craft
acceptability should take into account the following factors:

o The full range of vessel sizes and types to be handled (tugs and line boats).
o Loaded and ballasted vessels (assist tugs and escort vessels)
o Environmental conditions: wind; sea; swell; current (all support craft)
o Requirements for escort and assist tugs (assist tugs and escort vessels)
o Bollard pull certification (assist tugs, escort vessels and line boats)
o Suitability/ability to handle lines (line boats)
o Communications (all support craft)

Simulation studies may be undertaken to establish any operational constraints.

Minimum bollard pull requirements should be established for the sizes and types of vessels calling at
the facility.

Emergency and standby tug requirements should be established. The facility should consider the need
for tug or support craft capability related to emergency response, including pollution control,
emergency evacuation, fire fighting, availability and speed of response.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 164 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.2.4 Tugs and Support Craft
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.2.4.1 Does the Facility have a documented policy to determine, or
formal process to confirm, the adequacy of the design, number
and power of tugs and/or support craft to be used for operations
at their berths?

Guidance Questions
12.2.4.1.1 Has the Facility established the minimum requirements for tugs
and support craft taking into account the factors in accordance
with the Guidance?
12.2.4.1.2 Have tug and mooring boat emergency and standby
requirements been established to meet the needs of the
Facility?
12.2.4.1.3 Have minimum bollard pull requirements been established for
the sizes and types of vessels calling at the Facility?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 165 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.2.5 Double Banking
Double banking of vessels on a berth for cargo operations should not be conducted unless a formal
engineering study and risk assessment has been carried out and a formal operational procedure and
safety plan have been produced.

Guidance

Double banking (including multiple banking)of vessels on a berth for cargo transfer (i.e. alongside ship
to ship (STS) transfer) should not be conducted unless a formal engineering study (fendering and
mooring load analysis) and risk assessment has been carried out. Once it has been established that
double banking operations can be safely accomplished, a formal operational procedure manual and
safety plan should be produced and adopted by the facility management.

The results of the Engineering Study and Risk Assessment should be available for inspection at the
facility by charterers/owners/agents.

This guidance is relevant to all alongside berths, but is not intended to restrict transfers between
vessels on different berths.

The formal Engineering Study should address The Risk Assessment should address and consider
o Design of the berth: the fendering; o Environmental Impact Assessment.
displacement and impact limits; mooring o Engineering Study.
hooks and bollards, number and SWL; o All aspects of the berthing unberthing and
fire fighting equipment capacity and cargo transfer operation.
range of monitors. o Simulation studies to assess feasibility and
o Local environmental conditions. practicality of the proposed operations.
o Impact on adjacent channels and port o Limitations of vessels to be adopted on the
operations. basis of size, displacement and mooring
o Tug availability for mooring and equipment limitations.
emergency operations. o Equipment to be employed (emergency
o Mooring study of single ship operation. release couplings, mooring hooks, shore
o Mooring study of double-banked vessel moorings, cargo transfer equipment, etc.)
operation in all configurations of loaded o Cargo to be handled.
and ballasted ships. o Simultaneous operations.
o Fender loading study for all berthing and o o Personnel requirements on board vessels
un-berthing operations and for cargo and ashore
transfer operations for berth fenders and
Ship-to-Ship fenders.
o Ship structure assessment for shell plate
loadings on alongside vessel during STS
operation.
o STS Hose management.
o Pollution control equipment and
capability.
o Vapour emission management.
o o Alarm systems

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 166 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
The Operational Procedure Manual should The Safety Plan should include
address o Contingency plan to address emergency
o Management structure and events.
responsibilities. o Pollution procedures.
o Applicability of the procedures detailing o Emergency and anti-pollution management
cargoes which may be handled, ship size structure and responsibilities.
and displacement limitations. o Contact List.
o Environmental limitations. o Checklists
o Operational constraints.
o Pilotage requirements, speed and
berthing limits.
o Tug numbers and application.
o Mooring arrangement and restraint to be
achieved.
o Berthing and un-berthing procedures.
o Cargo transfer procedures.
o Insulation (electrical isolation).
o Vapour balancing or venting
arrangements and limitations.
o Manning levels.
o Training of facility staff.
o Inspection and watchkeeping.
o Checklists.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 167 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 168 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.2.5 Double Banking
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.2.5.1 Does the Facility conduct a formal engineering study and risk
assessment which is used to produce operational procedures
and safety plans for berths where vessels are engaged in
double banking cargo operations?

Guidance Questions
12.2.5.1.1 Has a formal engineering study with a fendering and mooring
analysis been conducted in accordance with the Guidance?
12.2.5.1.2 Has a risk assessment been conducted in accordance with the
Guidance?
12.2.5.1.3 Does the Facility have a formal operational procedure manual in
accordance with the Guidance?
12.2.5.1.4 Does the Facility have a safety plan in accordance with the
Guidance?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 169 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.2.6 Over-the-Tide Cargo Operations
Every facility that permits over-the-tide cargo operations should have procedures in place to control the
specific hazards associated with the operation.

Guidance

Facilities with draft limitations and significant tidal variations should have procedures in place where
discharging or loading over-the-tide operations are to be permitted. These procedures should be agreed
by all involved parties prior to the arrival of the vessel. All procedures produced to control these
operations should be developed from a full risk assessment process to ensure that the vessel remains
safely afloat, taking under keel clearance requirements and contingency measures into account. The
facility should seek assurance that the vessel equipment critical to the operation (e.g., cargo pumps,
main engines) are operational prior to berthing and kept available while the vessel is alongside.

Discharging Over - the - Tide


Where a vessel is nominated to carry a cargo to a berth where the nominated quantity will cause the
vessel to arrive at a draft which will exceed the maximum "always afloat" draft for the berth, it may be
possible for the vessel to berth and discharge sufficient cargo before the next low water to enable her
to remain afloat. This procedure may be adopted where all parties concerned accept the risk involved
and agree to adopt mitigating procedures to ensure that the vessel can be discharged in good time to
remain afloat or be removed from the berth to a position where she can remain afloat.

Where the interested parties agree to the vessel being nominated to a berth where the vessel will be
required to pump over the tide, the following criteria should be met:-

o The ship must be advised of the need to discharge cargo to meet the minimum water depth
limitation.
o The ship should provide a discharge plan which will achieve the draft reduction necessary
before the next low water after berthing, taking into account the tide cycle and tidal range on
the relevant dates. Consideration should be given to the effect of trim and list on under keel
clearance.
o The vessel pumping capacity and the facility capacity should be sufficient to achieve the
necessary under keel clearance in the time available with a contingency allowance (e.g., extra
vessel pumping capacity, spare facility capacity).
o Facility staff must also be prepared to expedite all necessary preparations to receive cargo and
ensure the facility is ready to receive cargo in accordance with the ship discharge plan,
commensurate with safe operations.
o The vessel passage in the pilotage area is to be planned and agreed to allow the vessel to berth,
as soon as possible after low water (on the rising tide) as the under keel clearance requirements
and tidal conditions allow.
o If necessary, shore authorities (Customs, Immigration, etc.) should be briefed on the operation
and their cooperation solicited to expedite cargo operations.
o To expedite the cargo operation, ullages and temperatures and other custodial measurements
may need to be taken before the vessel berths.
o Vessel pumps should be available for immediate use on completion of berthing.

Loading Over-The-Tide
This may be undertaken where a vessel cannot remain safely afloat during the final stages of loading
during the low water period. The vessel should stop loading at the draft at which she can remain
‘always afloat’ and recommence loading as the tide starts rising. Loading should not recommence
unless equipment critical for the departure of the vessel from the berth (eg main engines) is ready for
use. The loading rate should allow the vessel to complete loading, custodial measurements and
documentation, clearance formalities and un-berthing with sufficient under keel clearance.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 170 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT

12.2.6 Over-the-Tide Cargo Operations


Key Question Y N NS NA
12.2.6.1 If over-the-tide cargo operations are permitted, are procedures
in place to control the specific hazards associated with the
operation?

Guidance Questions
12.2.6.1.1 Are the procedures produced to control these operations
developed from a full risk assessment process, taking
contingency measures into account?
12.2.6.1.2 If discharging over-the-tide operations take place at the
Facility, are all the issues and criteria in the Guidance notes
addressed?
12.2.6.1.3 If loading over-the-tide operations take place at the Facility, are
all the issues and criteria in the Guidance notes addressed?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 171 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.3 Marine Facility Layout/Physical Considerations
12.3.1 Electrical Equipment
Every facility should ensure that any electrical equipment is provided in accordance with a site-specific
area electrical classification drawing which shows hazardous zones at the berths in plan and elevation.

ADDRESSED IN SECTION 1

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 172 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.3.2 Fendering
Fendering systems at each berth should be engineered to suit the sizes of vessels expected to use the
berth so as to ensure the safe berthing and mooring of vessels at marine facilities.

Guidance

Fendering systems at each berth should be engineered to suit the sizes of vessels expected to use the
berth so as to ensure the safe berthing and mooring of vessels at marine facilities. The focus of this
guidance is on operations at fixed berths, for example continuous quays, T-Head jetties, finger piers,
and island berths.

Fender Design
Fendering systems at each berth should be engineered to suit the sizes of vessels expected to use the
berth. For purposes of this Criteria, the term fendering system should include, the fender itself,
supporting apparatus (i.e., chains, wires, etc.) and related dock structure. The design of the fenders
must be compatible with the range of ship sizes and types, which use the berth. Any proposed
modifications to the size range of ships using the berth should take into account displacement, speed
of approach on berthing, and the position of fenders (dolphins) relative to the ship mid-point and the
available flatside. For berths handling small vessels, fendering systems could comprise of rubbing strips
or rubber tyres, which are adequately proportioned and supported.

Fender Operating Limits for Berthing


The maximum allowable displacement for berthing must be defined in the operating procedures. The
speed of the ship must be controlled as it approaches the berth so that its force on contact is within
defined limits. A function of this speed is related to ship displacement and is designed to avoid over-
stressing the fendering system and berthing dolphins. Berthing speeds in excess of the defined limits
could lead to damage of the fendering system, berth structures and/or the vessel.

The facility must advise the local pilots and facility operating personnel of the maximum permissible
berthing speed for each berth, recognising that this is often difficult to estimate, however If speed of
approach equipment is provided on the berth it is strongly recommended that allowable approach
speeds for each generic size of ship are included in the operating procedures.

Fender (Berthing Dolphin) Location


On initial berthing and while vessel is lying alongside, the fenders should lie within the parallel mid-body
of the ship. Ideally the fenders should be located symmetrically about the ship manifold. For dolphin-
type berths, the spacing between fenders should lie within the range 25% to 40% of the ship length
overall. This may vary, especially in multi-use berths or on berths designed for gas carriers where, the
manifold may be located forward of midships. In such cases the position of the fenders may be
designed in accordance with the range of vessels that may call at the facility. For continuous quays,
such as those used by small vessels, the spacing between fenders should be approximately 15% of
the ship length overall. Fender panels:-

Fender panels should be maintained in a vertical orientation by tensioning of the support chains so that
the weight of the panel is not carried by the elastomeric fender unit. The fender panels should have a
smooth rubbing face without obstructions, and proportioned such that:

o The area of the fender panel is such that the pressure on the ship hull does not exceed
20 tonnes/m2. For small vessels this pressure may be increased up to 40 tonnes/m2.
o The bottom edge of the panels is positioned to prevent low freeboard vessels from catching
underneath the panel.
o The upper edge of the panels is located to prevent any protrusions (eg rubbing strips) on the
ship’s hull from catching on the top of the panel.
REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 173 of 332
THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Damaged Fendering
When fendering system components become damaged, the use of temporary fendering may be
considered but only after an engineering analysis and risk assessment have been carried out and the
results have been implemented.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 174 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.3.2 Fendering
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.3.2.1 Is fendering at each berth engineered to suit the sizes of vessels
expected to use the berth?

Guidance Questions
12.3.2.1.1 Can the Facility demonstrate that the design of the fenders is
compatible with the range of ship sizes and types which use the
berth?
12.3.2.1.2 Do any proposed modifications to the size range of ships using
the berth take into account: Displacement, Speed of approach on
berthing, Position of fenders (dolphins) relative to the ship’s mid-
point and the available flat side.
12.3.2.1.3 Is the berthing maximum allowable displacement and speed of
approach recorded in the operating procedures and understood
by responsible facility personnel?
12.3.2.1.4 Has the Facility ensured that the Pilots have been formally
advised of the maximum fender operating limits for each berth?
12.3.2.1.5 Do fenders lie within the parallel mid body length of the vessels
expected to use the berth?
12.3.2.1.6 Is the fender system intact and in good condition?
12.3.2.1.7 Are fender panels maintained in a vertical orientation with faces
free of obstruction and protrusions?
12.3.2.1.8 Are procedures in place to deal with damaged fendering system
components?
12.3.2.1.9 Where the use of temporary fendering is considered, do the
procedures require an engineering analysis and risk assessment
prior to implementation?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 175 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.3.3 Lifting Equipment
Every facility should have a programme for examination and periodic load testing of lifting equipment
used that includes strops, chains and other ancillary equipment.

ADDRESSED IN SECTION 3

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 176 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 177 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.3.4 Lighting
Every facility should have a level of lighting for access to ensure that all ship/shore interface activities
can be safely conducted during periods of darkness.

Guidance

Facilities should have an appropriate level of lighting for access to ensure that all ship/shore interface
activities can be safely conducted during periods of darkness.

Lighting levels should at least meet national or international engineering standards, but consideration is
to be given to the following areas:-

o Jetty head working areas


o Access routes
o Jetty perimeters
o Boat landings
o Mooring dolphins and walkways
o Stairways to elevated gantries
o Emergency escape routes
o Lighting of water around dock to detect spillage
o Consideration of possibility of "unlit" vessels calling at jetty (e.g., barges)
o Facility perimeter fencing

The provision of emergency lighting from a secondary power source may be considered appropriate.

The lighting system should be included in the facility maintenance programme.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 178 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.3.4 Lighting
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.3.4.1 Does the Facility have an appropriate level of lighting for access
to ensure that all ship/shore interface activities can be safely
conducted during periods of darkness?

Guidance Questions
12.3.4.1.1 In the absence of appropriate national or international
engineering standards for lighting levels, is consideration given
to areas in accordance with the Guidance?
12.3.4.1.2 Is emergency lighting available from a secondary power source?
12.3.4.1.3 Is the lighting system included in the facility maintenance
programme?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 179 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.3.5 Ship/Shore Electrical Isolation
Every facility should have means of electrical isolation to ensure protection against electrical arcing at
the manifold during connection and disconnection of the shore hose or arm.

Guidance

Facilities should have adequate means of electrical isolation to ensure adequate protection against
electrical arcing at the manifold during connection and disconnection of the shore hose or arm.

An insulating flange installed in each cargo line is the recommended means for providing electrical
isolation. Alternatively, a single length of clearly identified non-electrically conductive hose should be
included within each hose string. The insulating flange or non-electrically conductive hose should be
positioned so that it clearly isolates the ship from the shore.

Bonding cables are not an effective means of dissipating potential differences between ship and shore
and should not be used, unless required by local regulation. If this is required, an isolating switch must
be fitted and local procedures for its operation should be provided. Even if local regulations require the
use of a bonding wire, an insulating flange or a single length of electrically discontinuous hose should
be fitted for each cargo line.

Maintenance procedures should include the regular testing of the effectiveness of electrical isolation.
Inspection procedures should require the inspector to check that insulating flanges have not been
painted or damaged.

Where electrically continuous hoses and an insulating flange are employed as the connection to the
ship manifold, procedures must be in place to ensure that connecting flanges in the hose string are
supported clear of the berth structure to prevent the insulating flange being rendered ineffective.

The requirements for the use of insulating flanges or an electrically discontinuous length of hose also
applies to the vapour recovery connection.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 180 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.3.5 Ship/Shore Electrical Isolation
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.3.5.1 Does the Facility have means of electrical isolation to ensure
protection against electrical arcing at the manifold during
connection and disconnection of the shore hose or arm?

Guidance Questions
12.3.5.1.1 Is each loading arm or hose string insulated in accordance with
the Guidance? Note: This also includes the vapour recovery
connection if fitted.
12.3.5.1.2 If a bonding wire is required, is it fitted with an isolating switch
with clear and understood procedures for its use? Note:
insulation of the arms or hoses is still required.
12.3.5.1.3 Do the inspections and maintenance procedures ensure that
insulating flanges are not painted or damaged?
12.3.5.1.4 Are procedures in place to ensure that connecting flanges in the
electrically continuous hose string are supported clear of the
berth structure to prevent the insulating flange being rendered
ineffective?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 181 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.3.6 Marine Asset Layout and Design
The layout of the facility and its facilities should address risks from external hazards and should
minimise internal hazards by good design practices.

Guidance

The layout of the marine facility should address risks from external hazards and should minimise
internal hazards by good design practices.

Facility Layout
The layout of the facility should take into consideration external risks due to the proximity of other
facilities and industrial sites.

The facility layout should provide a secure perimeter with access for emergency services. The siting of
sensitive or high-risk equipment should ensure that they do not present a risk to other facilities and
reduce their exposure to physical damage from external forces.

Vehicular access and internal roads should be designed to provide safe routes for traffic and protection
for pipelines, tanks and equipment. Kerbs and safety barriers should be provided where necessary,
including jetty areas. Traffic should be managed to ensure that bottlenecks do not occur in emergency
situations when emergency vehicles will need to have standing room adjacent to the emergency site.

The design of the facility should take into account the need for emergency escape routes from
potentially hazardous locations and the provision of safe muster points.

Jetties
Jetty design should take into account the proximity of other berths and the risks presented by ships
passing the berths in the navigable channel.

Jetty equipment and fittings and their arrangement, should be suitable for the size of ships to visit the
facility, and appropriate to the type of cargo to be handled and will meet published industry guidelines.

Walkways, the inshore side of off-lying mooring dolphins and, where possible, berth edges, should be
protected by guardrails. Chains may be used in lieu of metal rails where there is an operational need for
guarding to be removable. Emergency ladders should be provided from the dock level to the water
level.

The design should address the following requirements in a consistent manner throughout the facility:

o Fire fighting system o Pipeline drainage


o Fire and gas alarm system o Pipeline inspection and corrosion
o Gas detection management
o Environmental protection o Stray current protection
o Personnel access to jetty and equipment o Jetty drainage system including water
o Reception facilities for slops and oily separation and disposal
water mixtures and garbage o Security of facility and vessel
o Garbage Management o o Jetty head maintenance requirements,
o The provision of fixed life saving including hard arms
equipment

In addition, due attention should be given to the provision of clear signs and notices to reinforce the
design intent.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 182 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.3.6 Marine Asset Layout and Design
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.3.6.1 Does the layout of the Facility’s marine assets address risks
from external hazards and minimise internal hazards by good
design practices?

Guidance Questions
12.3.6.1.1 Has a study been undertaken to determine the impact of
passing traffic on vessels moored alongside?
12.3.6.1.2 Have all opportunities to un-man hazardous areas (by use of
appropriate systems/technology, avoid occupied buildings in
blast zones) been implemented?
12.3.6.1.3 Have there been any major modifications or change of use since
the last issue/review of the permitting?
12.3.6.1.4 Does the design include adequate provision for access (eg for
personnel, vehicles, emergency services)?
12.3.6.1.5 Is speed of approach equipment installed?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 183 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.4 Ship/Shore Interface
12.4.1 Moorings
Every facility should provide mooring equipment on their berths appropriate for the sizes of vessels
using the berths. The facility should also provide mooring arrangements for all berths and for all sizes of
vessels, which can be moored at those berths.

Guidance

Facilities should provide mooring equipment on their berths appropriate, in both size and number, for
the sizes of vessels using the berths. The facility should also provide mooring arrangements for all
berths and for all sizes of vessels, which can be moored at those berths.

The facility should provide mooring bollards, mooring bitts, mooring hooks or rollers/pulleys positioned
and sized for the vessels visiting the berth.

The Safe Working Load (SWL) of each mooring point or lead should be known to the berth operating
personnel or marked on each mooring point.

Mooring hooks and rollers are to be maintained and functionally tested.

It is recommended that the mooring patterns for all vessel sizes be determined by the use of an
engineering (mooring and fendering) analysis. For vessels greater than16 KDWT, the mooring
arrangement should be sufficient to satisfy the criteria contained in the OCIMF Mooring Equipment
Guidelines, and for Gas Tankers any additional SIGTTO recommendations should be satisfied. If used
shore moorings should be in good condition and well maintained.

Facilities should establish operating limits for each berth that prescribe the thresholds for stopping
cargo transfer, disconnecting cargo (and bunker) connections and removing the vessel from the berth
taking account of the Safe Working Load (SWL) of the mooring system components. (See also 5.3
Environmental Limits)

The Facility should have operational procedures in place to:

o Check adequacy of moorings for each vessel, recognising issues such as mixed moorings
o Monitor the vessel moorings and take corrective action
o Ensure that the vessel remains securely moored in the correct position on the berth
o At an SPM, the facility should ensure that the hawser tension and hawser angle is monitored
o Measure wind speeds

Preferably, the marine facility should have its own locally installed anemometer for measuring wind
speeds. Alternatively, other means may be used, such as reliance on wind reports from a reliable local
source (e.g., nearby airport or use of ship anemometer). Provisions should also be in place to correct
the available wind speed to the basis used in the mooring guidelines (i.e. wind elevation and gust
factor). Equipment for measurement of other environmental factors may also be considered, as
necessary. (See also 5.3 Environmental Limits)

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.4.1 Moorings
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.4.1.1 Does the Facility provide mooring equipment on their berths
appropriate for the sizes of vessels using the berths?

Guidance Questions
12.4.1.1.1 Are mooring bollards, mooring bitts, mooring hooks or
rollers/pulleys positioned and sized for the vessels visiting
each berth?
12.4.1.1.2 Is the safe working load (SWL) of each mooring point or lead
known to the berth operating personnel or marked on each
mooring point?
12.4.1.1.3 Is the Facility’s mooring equipment, mooring hooks and rollers
maintained and functionally tested?
12.4.1.1.4 Do arrangements exist for the release of moorings using quick
release hooks?
12.4.1.1.5 Do arrangements exist for the remote release of individual
moorings?
12.4.1.1.6 Has the Facility undertaken a study to assess the use of
berthing and mooring aids such as speed of approach
monitors, pilot positioning units, tension monitors etc?
12.4.1.1.7 Are mooring line tension monitors installed?

Key Question
12.4.1.2. Does the Facility provide mooring arrangements for all berths,
and for all sizes of vessels which can be moored at those
berths?

Guidance Questions
12.4.1.2.1 Are diagrams of minimum recommended mooring
arrangements made available to visiting vessels?
12.4.1.2.2 For vessels greater than 16 KDWT, is the mooring
arrangement sufficient to satisfy the criteria contained in the
OCIMF Mooring Equipment Guidelines?
12.4.1.2.3 Has the Facility established operating limits for each berth that
prescribe the thresholds for stopping cargo transfer,
disconnecting cargo (and bunker) connections and removing
the vessel from the berth?
12.4.1.2.4 Does the Facility have mooring operational procedures in place
in accordance with the Guidance?
12.4.1.2.5 Are mooring operations subject to a formal risk assessment?
12.4.1.2.6 Are design calculations available for all mooring points?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 185 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.4.2 Ship/Shore Access
Every facility where vessels are berthed alongside the loading/unloading facilities, including barge-
handling facilities, should have provisions for safe ship/shore access.

Guidance

Facilities where vessels are berthed alongside the loading/unloading facilities, including barge-handling
facilities, should have provisions for safe ship/shore access.

Access Equipment
Shore Gangway - A gangway provided by the shore facility to allow safe access between the shore and
the vessel. This may be similar to a Ship Gangway. On berths for large vessels, an automatic gangway
consisting of a stairway tower with an adjustable bridge, which spans from the tower to the ship deck,
may be provided. The bridge section is adjusted for height depending on the vessel freeboard. At some
berths it may be necessary to provide access to small vessels from an internal stairway below the
working level of the berth.

Ship Gangway - A straight, lightweight bridging structure with side stanchions and handrails. The
walking surface has a non- slip surface or transverse bars to provide foot grips for when it is inclined. It
is rigged perpendicular to the ship side and spans between the ship rail and the working deck of the
berth.

Accommodation Ladder - A straight lightweight bridging structure fitted with side stanchions and
handrails. The steps are self-levelling or large radius non-slip treads. It is rigged parallel to the ship side
on a retractable platform fixed to the ship deck. The ladder is limited in its use as an access to the
shore as it is fixed in its location and cannot be used if the ship deck is below the level of the berth
working deck.

Criteria
The responsibility for provision of safe ship/shore access is jointly shared between the vessel and the
facility. The preferred means for access between ship and shore is a gangway provided by the facility.
At locations that commonly handle vessels (including barges) that are unable to provide a gangway due
to the physical limitations of the berth or the nature of the vessel trade, the facility should provide a
shore based gangway or alternative arrangements to ensure safe ship/shore access. Where the facility
does not provide a shore gangway, it must provide space on the berth for the vessel to land its
gangway, allowing for changes in tide and vessel freeboard. Irrespective of whether the facility or
vessel provides the gangway, it should be subject to inspection as part of the continuing Ship/Shore
Safety Checks throughout the vessel stay at the berth.

All ship and shore gangways should meet the All shore gangways should also meet the following
following criteria: additional criteria, as appropriate:

o Clear Walkway o Remain within deflected fender face when in


o Continuous handrail on both sides the stored Position
o Electrically insulated to eliminate continuity o Provide for locking against motion in the stored
between ship and shore Position
o Adequate lighting o Permit "free wheeling" after positioning on
o A maximum safe operating inclination should vessel
be established for gangways without self- o Provide back-up power or manual operation in
levelling treads/steps. event of primary power failure
o Lifebuoys available with light and line. o o Be designed for a specified operating
envelope

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Routine Maintenance Safety Nets
o All gangways are to be inspected and tested. o Safety nets are not required if the gangway is
Mechanically deployed gangways should be fixed to the shore and provided with a
function tested. Self-adjusting gangways permanent system of handrails made of
should be fitted with alarms, which should structural members. For other types of
be tested. gangways (rope or chain handrails or removable
posts), safety nets should be provided.

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REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 188 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.4.2 Ship/Shore Access
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.4.2.1 Does every vessel berthed at the Facility have safe ship/shore
access?

Guidance Questions
12.4.2.1.1 Does the ship/shore access meet the criteria in the Guidance?
12.4.2.1.2 If a shore gangway is provided, does it meet the additional
criteria in the Guidance?
12.4.2.1.3 Is inspection and testing of shore gangways included in the
Facility’s routine maintenance programme?
12.4.2.1.4 Is a gangway safety net provided when required?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 189 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.4.3 Ship/Shore Pre-Cargo Transfer Information Exchange
Every facility should have a procedure in place to ensure that a pre-cargo transfer conference is
undertaken, a Ship/Shore Safety Check List is completed, and that cargo transfers are conducted in
accordance with agreed procedures.

Guidance

Facilities should have a procedure in place to ensure that a pre-cargo transfer conference is undertaken,
a Ship/Shore Safety Check List (SSSCL) is completed, and that cargo transfers are conducted in
accordance with agreed procedures. In some countries a pre-cargo transfer conference is mandated
with specific requirements including documentation. This Guidance should supplement such
requirements.

As a minimum, the pre-cargo transfer conference should cover the following topics:

o Completion of ship/shore safety check list o Loading or discharge plan, including product
o Methods of communication safety data, quantities, and handling
o emergency procedures requirements
o Safety and security matters o Hose handling or loading arm operations
o Limits of operation (e.g., maximum draft, o Inert gas and Crude Oil Washing
freeboard, trim; wind speeds, etc.) o Bunkering operations (see below)
o Gangway access and emergency escape o Slops and ballast (if appropriate)
o Towing wires o Sealing of sea suction valves
o Secondary containment / drip pans o Deck drainage And scuppers
o - Current weather report and forecast o Mooring arrangements

The pre-cargo transfer conference should be held between the "person-in-charge" of the berth and the
vessel officer responsible for cargo transfer. The information exchanged should be formalised and
documents endorsed by both parties. The facility may provide notices it may require the vessel to
display to convey important information to the ship personnel. Operational procedures agreed during
the pre-cargo transfer conference should include the following (See also 1.4 Terminal Information and
Port Regulations):

o Assure sea valves are checked o Completion by trained and knowledgeable facility
o Cargo operations commenced at a slow personnel of the IMO Check List prior to
rate, and checks made of ship and shore commencing COW operations
lines for leakage prior to full rate. o Confirmation by trained and knowledgeable
o Hourly vessel/shore comparisons of cargo facility personnel of the cargo tanks oxygen
transfer rates and quantities. content prior to permitting COW to take place.
o Forewarning to vessels before change of o For bunkering operations, a safety pollution
shore tank taking place prevention check list to be used and a pre-
o An exchange of information between jetty bunkering conference held with agreed details
personnel during shift changes. recorded. The following should be considered as
o Verification by the facility that IGS is fully a minimum in the check list:
operational, with tanks inerted, prior to o Oil Spill preparedness and containment at the
commencement of cargo operations bunkering points - facility, ship, barge, and truck.
o Facility requirement that cargo operations o Gas leak preparedness
be stopped in event of IGS failure o Communications and procedures for emergency
o Procedures in place where tanks do not stop, topping off, etc., agreed and understood.
meet IGS requirements. o Ullaging, dipping and sampling follows ISGOTT
o Personnel understand and agree the procedures

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT

o The SSSCL should be based on the version contained in the current edition of ISGOTT. The
facility may adopt certain checks relevant to its own operations, and may add extra questions to
the ISGOTT check list to meet these requirements. Completed SSSCLs should be retained for
future examination.
o It is important that the SSSCL is completed during a joint inspection of the vessel by trained and
competent ship and shore representatives to confirm the necessary level of compliance. It
should not be conducted as a desktop activity or considered merely as a paperwork exercise. In
carrying out their full responsibilities, both representatives, by questioning the other, by sighting
records and, where felt appropriate, by joint visual inspection, should assure themselves that
the standards of safety on both sides of the operation are acceptable. Where facility staff are
physically involved with checks onboard, they should be aware of hazards and associated safety
procedures and dangers, what to check and the different types of isolation. Repeat checks
should be carried out and recorded as required in the SSSCL.

o Transfer operations should be delayed until unsatisfactory items identified on the SSSCL are
corrected, and should not start unless all parties understand their responsibility, including the
authority to stop operations when there is a safety or pollution concern.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
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REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 192 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.4.3 Ship/Shore Cargo Transfer Procedures
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.4.3.1 Does the Facility have a procedure in place to ensure that a
pre-cargo transfer conference is undertaken, including
completion of a Ship/Shore Safety Checklist?

Guidance Questions
12.4.3.1.1 Does the Facility conduct a pre cargo conference with the
ship’s responsible officer prior to the start of operations?
12.4.3.1.2 Is the information exchange formalised and are documents
endorsed by both vessel and shore representatives?
12.4.3.1.3 Does the Ship/Shore Safety Checklist comply with ISGOTT
recommendations?
12.4.3.1.4 Is the Ship/Shore Safety Checklist completed following a joint
inspection?
12.4.3.1.5 Are follow-up checks made and recorded at appropriate
defined intervals?
12.4.3.1.6 Are operations delayed until unsatisfactory items identified on
the Checklist are corrected?
12.4.3.1.7 Do jetty operators understand their responsibility, and have the
authority to stop operations when there is a safety or pollution
concern?
12.4.3.1.8 Where Facility staff are physically involved with the checks
onboard, are they aware of hazards and associated safety
procedures?
12.4.3.1.9 Do procedures require the formal exchange of information on
cargo properties?
12.4.3.1.10 Are the results of the Facility’s pre-arrival equipment checks
shared with the vessel prior to arrival?

Key Question
12.4.3.2 Are transfer operations conducted in accordance with the
procedures agreed during the Pre-Cargo Transfer Information
Exchange?

Guidance Questions
12.4.3.2.1 Are records available to demonstrate that the operational
procedures within the guidance are adhered to?
12.4.3.2.2 Are separate pre transfer checklists used for bunkering
operations?
12.4.3.2.3 Do procedures require regular cross checks of quantities
transferred between the vessel and shore tanks?
12.4.3.2.4 When handling inerted vessels, does the Facility undertake
random checks of the oxygen content of vessel tanks?
12.4.3.2.5 Does the Facility formally monitor the efficiency of transfer
operations?
12.4.3.2.6 Is a meeting held with the vessel’s personnel, on completion
of transfer operations, to discuss overall performance?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 193 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.4.4 Operational Communications (Alongside Berth)
Every facility should have a primary and secondary means of communication with vessels at their
berth(s)

Guidance

Facilities should have a primary and secondary means of communication with vessels at their berth(s).
Telephone, portable VHF/UHF and radiotelephone systems should comply with the appropriate safety
requirements (See also Section 1.2). The facility should ensure provision of means of a
communication, including a back-up system between ship and shore. The ship radios can be used
provided that their use is covered at the pre-cargo transfer conference.

Communication between the responsible officer on duty and the responsible person ashore should be
maintained in the most efficient way. The communications system used should be dedicated to the
cargo transfer operations and not subject to outside interference from other communication activity
within the facility. Verbal communication between the vessel and a jetty may be an acceptable primary
means of communication at some facilities, but only in cases where both the vessel manifold area and
jetty head are permanently manned and a common language is used.

Where telephones are used, the telephones should not be used for communications beyond those
necessary for cargo transfer, e.g., other facility / ship business or personal calls. Ideally the ship/shore
telephone line should be set up as a dedicated ‘hotline’ with dedicated telephones, such that this
communication channel is always available for use, and can never be ‘engaged’. If the system is not
dedicated, it should be possible for the supervisor to override all calls.

When VHF/ UHF or radiotelephone systems are used, units should preferably be portable and carried
by the responsible officer on duty and the responsible person ashore, or by persons who can contact
their respective supervisor immediately. To ensure immediate access, radiotelephone channels should
be restricted to a minimum number of users with minimal traffic. Where fixed systems are used the
above guidelines for telephones should be followed.

The selected system of communication together with the necessary information on telephone numbers
and/or channels to be used should be recorded on a form signed by both ship and shore
representatives.

Should mobile telephones be used for ship/shore communications, they should be intrinsically safe and
be appropriately certified (see also 6.6 Portable Electrical and Electronic Equipment).

Should all the agreed means of communication fail, cargo transfer should be suspended until the
problem is resolved

Where there are difficulties in verbal communications, these should be overcome by appointing a
person with technical and operational knowledge and a command of a language understood by both
ship and shore personnel.

Where the national language is used by both facility and ship it is acceptable for communications to be
conducted in that language. Where the national language is not being used, the common language to
be used should be English. The IMO Standard Marine Vocabulary can be used to convey all necessary
basic communications.

Should language difficulties be experienced that threaten to impact the safety of operations, cargo
transfer should be suspended until the problem is resolved.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.4.4 Operational Communications (Alongside Berth)
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.4.4.1 Does the Facility have a primary and secondary means of
communication with vessels at their berth(s)?

Guidance Questions
12.4.4.1.1 Do the telephone, portable VHF/UHF and radiotelephone
systems, where used, comply with the safety requirements?
12.4.4.1.2 Do personnel who need to communicate between ship and
shore speak and understand a common working language?
12.4.4.1.3 Do procedures require the suspension of operations in the
event of communication failure
12.4.4.1.4 Is the communication between ship and shore dedicated to
cargo transfer operations?
12.4.4.1.5 Is the primary communication between ship and shore
continuously manned?
12.4.4.1.6 If verbal communication is the primary means of communication
between the vessel and the jetty, are both manifold and jetty
permanently manned?
12.4.4.1.7 Is the selected system of communication, together with the
necessary information on telephone numbers and/or channels
used, recorded on a form?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 195 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.5 Cargo Transfer
12.5.1 Emergency Shutdown
Every facility should have a procedure in place under which cargo operations must be stopped
immediately.

Guidance

Facilities should have a procedure in place which designates circumstances under which cargo
operations must be stopped immediately and describes the means of doing so.

The procedure should identify the location of the emergency shut down button or the communication
method to be employed and any back up system.

The arrangements for emergency shut down procedures and equipment to be used must be discussed
and agreed at the pre-cargo transfer conference.

Due regard should be given to the possible dangers associated with any emergency shutdown
procedure (e.g., pressure surges, valve closure times, marine loading arm disconnection).

An emergency shutdown (known as ‘ESD 1’) can be initiated manually eg by a push-button, or


automatically either on-board or in the facility by a number of initiators eg fire detection, control air
failure etc.

Certain sectors of the liquefied gas industry use a powered emergency release coupling (PERCs) on
each loading arm. The PERC is designed to protect the loading arm against damage caused by over-
extension. PERC operation is commonly referred to as ‘ESD 2’. Where PERC’s on loading arms are in
operation fitted, shore and ship staff need to be aware of the operating parameters and monitor the
position of the ship’s manifolds relative to the position of the loading arms for the duration of the port
call.

ESD systems for LNG facilities should be designed and installed in accordance with Section 12.3 of
NFPA 59A Standard for the Production, Storage and Handling of LNG.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 196 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.5.1 Emergency Shutdown
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.5.1.1 Does the Facility have a procedure in place, which designates
circumstances under which cargo operations must be stopped
immediately?

Guidance Questions
12.5.1.1.1 Do Facility operators know the location of the emergency shut
down button or the communication method to be employed
and any back up system?
12.5.1.1.2 Has the design case included an assessment for the need to
have linked emergency shut down (ESD) systems (eg
umbilicals or telemetry)?
12.5.1.1.3 Is due regard given to the possible dangers associated with
any emergency shutdown procedure (eg pressure surges,
valve closure times, marine loading arm disconnection)?
12.5.1.1.4 Are the arrangements for emergency shut down procedures
and equipment to be used discussed and agreed at the pre-
cargo transfer conference?
12.5.1.1.5 For each ship/cargo, is the Facility aware of what could cause
an ESD to be initiated on the ship?
12.5.1.1.6 For each ship/cargo, does the Facility make sure that the ship
is aware of what could cause an ESD to be initiated onshore?
12.5.1.1.7 Where PERCs system is in operation, is there a procedure in
place to prevent an inadvertent operation of ESD 2.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.5.2 Emergency Isolation
Every facility should have a means of isolating cargo lines in an emergency.

Guidance

Facilities should have a means of isolating cargo lines in an emergency.

Isolation valves should be fitted at the berth manifold area for each loading or unloading line, and where
berth extend from the shore; an additional isolation valve should be fitted at the shore end of each line.

In addition, a non-return valve or other means to prevent back-flow should be fitted to cargo lines that
are dedicated to unloading service.

If the berth is not continuously manned during the cargo transfer, isolation valves should be motorised
and remotely operated.

To avoid surge pressures, closure times of isolation valves should be in the order of 30 seconds.

The need for additional remotely operated isolation valves within the facility cargo line system may be
determined by a risk assessment addressing scenarios such as fire, explosion, or damage from impact.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.5.2 Emergency Isolation
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.5.2.1 Does the Facility have a means of isolating cargo lines in an
emergency?

Guidance Questions
12.5.2.1.1 Are isolation valves fitted at the berth manifold area for each
loading or unloading line?
12.5.2.1.2 Where the berth extends from the shore, is an additional
isolation valve fitted at the shore end of each line?
12.5.2.1.3 Are non-return valves or other means to prevent back-flow fitted
to cargo lines that are dedicated to unloading?
12.5.2.1.4 If the berth is not continuously manned during the cargo
transfer, are isolation valves motorised and remotely operated?
12.5.2.1.5 Are isolation valve closure times set to avoid surge pressures?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 199 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.5.3 Environmental Limits
Every facility should have clearly defined environmental operating limits for all the types and sizes of
vessels visiting the berths.

Guidance

Facilities should have clearly defined environmental operating limits for all the types and sizes of
vessels visiting the berths.

These limits should be documented in the facility operating procedures and the Port Regulations and
Terminal Information Booklet.

The defined limits should cover all operations associated with the arrival and departure of vessels and
the safe loading or discharge of product at the facility.

Limits will normally be based on ambient environmental conditions, such as:

o Wind speed and direction,


o Wave height and period
o Current speed and direction
o Swell conditions that may affect operations at the berth.
o Electrical storms
o Environmental phenomena such as river bores and ice movement
o Temperature which might affect loading or unloading

The environmental limits should define the thresholds for:

o Manoeuvring for arrival and berthing


o Stopping loading or discharging
o Disconnecting cargo hoses or hard arms
o Summoning tug assistance
o Removing the vessel from the berth
o Manoeuvring for un-berthing and departure

Information on environmental limits should be passed to the vessel at the pre-cargo operations transfer
conference and, where applicable, be formally recorded in the Ship/Shore Safety Checklist. Routine
weather forecasts received by the facility should be passed to the vessels.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.5.3 Environmental Limits
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.5.3.1 Does the Facility have clearly defined and documented
environmental operating limits for all the types and sizes of
vessels visiting the berths?

Guidance Questions
12.5.3.1.1 Do the applicable defined limits cover all operations associated
with the arrival and departure of vessels and the safe loading
or discharge of product at the Facility?
12.5.3.1.2 Is information on environmental limits passed to the vessel at
the pre-cargo operations transfer conference and, where
applicable, formally recorded in the Ship/Shore Safety
Checklist?
12.5.3.1.3 Does the Facility receive frequent weather forecasts and pass
them to the vessels?
12.5.3.1.4 Are tidal gauges and current meters installed?
12.5.3.1.4.1 Can data from these be obtained remotely?
12.5.3.1.5 Is there a documented procedure to ensure that unexpected
changes in environmental conditions are detected and
promptly acted on?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 201 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.5.4 Cargo Transfer Equipment
Every facility should have cargo transfer equipment that is designed, constructed, operated, and
maintained in accordance with national regulatory requirements, industry standards and recognised
codes of practices.

Guidance
Facilities should have cargo transfer equipment that is designed, constructed, operated, and maintained
in accordance with national regulatory requirements, industry standards and recognised codes of
practices. The integrity of the cargo transfer equipment is critical to ensure safe and pollution-free
loading and discharge operations. To provide this assurance, marine facilities need to maintain records
on design basis, operating conditions, and maintenance of cargo transfer equipment. All operational
aspects on the proper use of cargo transfer equipment should be contained in the facility operating
manual. Following are recommended requirements for cargo transfer equipment. Existing facilities that
have equipment in service not meeting the equipment original design basis or the minimum
requirements noted below should base the continued use of such equipment on a formal risk
assessment.

Minimum Requirements
o All equipment used should be certified and o Marine Loading Arms should be designed and
should be fit for purpose fabricated by a recognised manufacturer in
o Insulating flanges or a section of non- accordance with the Oil Companies International
conducting hose should be installed in all Marine Forum (OCIMF) "Design Specification for
cargo transfer systems in accordance with Marine Loading Arms"
ISGOTT. o Cargo transfer piping systems should be
o Dock hoses should be manufactured in designed in accordance with the applicable
accordance with industry guidelines or national code for its duty.
international standards
o SIGTTO guidelines should govern all
equipment used for the transfer of liquefied
gases

Inspection and Maintenance Requirements


o Insulating flanges should have a documented o Cargo transfer pipelines should have a
inspection at least annually to confirm they documented testing and inspection programme,
provide adequate electrical resistance which includes a formal annual visual inspection
o Cargo hoses in service should have a to check on the condition of the pipelines,
documented inspection at least annually to protective coatings and, if fitted, insulation
confirm their suitability for continued use, materials. The programme should also include
which includes visual check for internal inspection, wall thickness measurement,
deterioration/damage, pressure test to 1.5 and pressure testing. The interval between tests
times Rated Working Pressure (RWP), and inspections should be determined by
electrical continuity and with a retirement reference to pipeline material, duty, location, and
against defined criteria. This guidance should experience. In the absence of a documented
also apply to ship cargo hoses used for programme, the following minimums should
ship/shore connections. apply: internal inspection every 5 years; wall
o Marine loading arms should have a thickness measurement every 10 years and
documented inspection programme, which pressure testing after component replacement.
includes: annual visual inspection and o A visiting vessel should attest hoses provided by
manoeuvring through their full envelope; wall the vessel are certified, fit for purpose, in good
thickness measurements (not to exceed a 6 physical condition and have been pressure
year interval), and pressure testing after seal tested within the past year.
change-outs or at an interval not exceeding 6 o o Range monitoring and alarms on marine
years. loading arms are to be regularly tested

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 202 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Operating Requirements
Safe operating procedures for marine loading arms and hose systems should be documented in the
facility operating manual. The manual should contain procedures and guidance on all aspects of the
equipment fitted at the berths such as:

o Hose storage, handling and support o Use of reducers


o Arm support o Use of ship hoses
o Securing of blank hose, hard arm and o Line venting and draining
manifold flanges when not in use o Pressure regulating devices
o Marine Loading Arms - Safe working o Breakaway couplings
envelopes o PERC (Powered Emergency Release Coupling)
o Use of patented connections and fittings

Visual inspection of jetty and equipment, including cargo hoses and loading arms before and during
use.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.5.4 Cargo Transfer Equipment
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.5.4.1 Does the Facility have cargo transfer equipment that is
designed, constructed, operated, and maintained in
accordance with national regulatory requirements, industry
standards and recognised codes of practice?

Guidance Questions
12.5.4.1.1 Are recommended requirements for cargo transfer equipment
provided in the guidance being followed? Minimum
requirements, Maintenance requirements, Operating
requirements
12.5.4.1.2 For existing assets, is the continued use of cargo transfer
equipment, which does not meet the equipment's original
design basis or the minimum recommended requirements,
based on a formal risk assessment?
12.5.4.1.3 Is there a systematic inspection of the jetty and equipment
prior to the arrival of a vessel with a formal system for
reporting defects?
12.5.4.1.4 Does the Facility ensure that any ship hoses used for cargo
transfer are certified, fit for purpose, in good physical condition
and have been pressure tested within past year?
12.5.4.1.5 Has an assessment been made in the design case for the
need to have PERCs or ERS?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 205 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.6 Safety, Health and Fire Protection
12.6.1 Safety Programme
Every facility should have an active and comprehensive Safety Programme designed to deliver a high
level of safety performance.

ADDRESSED IN SECTION 1

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 206 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.6.2 Fire Protection
Every facility should have a fire-fighting capability suited to the size of vessels and the type and volume
of cargo being handled.

Guidance
Fire Pumps
Separation of fire pumps from hazardous areas should ideally be determined using a risk-based
approach. Some plant layout codes may prescribe a distance, e.g. 100 metres. Fire pumps should in
any case be protected from the effects of blast and / or thermal radiation from a fire.
It is common to have multiple pump arrangements divided between two well-separated pump houses
to protect against a common mode situation.

The fire pumps should be housed in an enclosure appropriate to the environment. The pumps and
associated equipment should be clean, without oil leaks, and well maintained. Batteries should be
covered to prevent tools falling onto terminals.
Fire pumps should be properly lined up for remote start, where appropriate, with the start switches set
at “Remote”.
In cold climates, diesel tanks and fuel supply systems should be traced and lagged.

Fire Main
Fire mains within a facility should be designed as a grid with isolating valves to allow maintenance
without reducing cover to major exposures. Where the fire main is extended from a shore-side
installation, isolation should be provided at the shore-side end of the jetty. Additional hydrants should
be provided upstream of this valve.

Hydrants should be spaced at intervals of not more than 45m in the berth or loading arm areas
(although it is recognised this may be difficult to achieve) and not more than 90m along the approach or
access routes. Hydrants should be readily accessible from roadways or approach routes and located or
protected in such a way that they will not be prone to physical damage.

International Shore Fire Connection


All marine facilities and berths with a fire water system should have at least one international shore fire
connection (ISC) complete with fittings through which water could be supplied to a tanker’s fire main if
required for shipboard fire fighting. One 63mm hose connection should be provided for every 57 m3/h
(250 US GPM) required pumping capacity.

Foam Systems & Mobile Extinguishers


The provision of fixed foam / water monitors should be considered for tanker berths handling vessels in
excess of 20,000 tonnes dead weight. The scale of provision should be related to the size, location and
frequency of use of each individual berth.

Monitors may be situated at pier or wharf deck level (small facilities) or may be mounted on fixed
towers, remotely controlled from either the tower base or at a distance. Codes state, where
practicable, monitor control points should be at least 15m from the probable location of fire. In reality
assessors should judge the location of remote control points in relation to the exposure and whether
access is not unduly putting people, suitably protected, at risk in a fire situation.
The water monitors should be fitted with nozzles capable of discharge on spray or jet as required. They
should be located so as to be capable of cooling the berth structure as well as the adjacent hull of a
tanker. In some cases it may be necessary to provide elevated water monitors in place of, or additional
to, deck mounted monitors to ensure water discharge above maximum freeboard height.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 207 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
The number and capacity of foam monitors to be provided on a berth will depend upon circumstances
including the capacity of the firewater system. Where a single elevated foam monitor is provided for
berth and shipboard fire fighting duty, the discharge capacity of the monitor in foam / water solution
should be at least 115 m3/h (500 US GPM) but could be as high as 350 m3/h (1500 US GPM). See
Section 4.3 of this document for requirements for oil / chemicals ships.

Bulk foam storage should be shielded from extremes of temperature. Foam production facilities should
be fully operable, with valves greased and instruments easily seen. Operating instructions should be
displayed in an appropriate manner - the use of simple diagrams and instructions on a fixed board is
good practice. The ability to access the foam generation facilities in a fire situation without putting
people unduly at risk should be assessed.

As a minimum, two trolley extinguishers (2 x 50 kg Dry Powder) should be provided on each jetty.
Portable wheeled (typically 100 kg) and hand held fire (9 kg) extinguishers should be provided within
the marine facility on a scale relative to the risks and in accordance with codes.

Dry chemical extinguishers are recognised as the most appropriate type of extinguisher for the quick
knockdown of small hydrocarbon fires. Halon and carbon dioxide extinguishers have little value in the
open. Halon extinguishers should now be phased out and replaced with dry powder in accordance with
Montreal protocol requirements.

Foam extinguishers in the order of 100 L capacity pre-max. foam are suitable for use at berths. They
produce 1000 L of foam and provide a typical jet length of about 12m. Small foam extinguishers with
capacities of about 10 L are too limited to be effective in most cases in the event of a fire at a facility.

Enclosed electrical sub-stations, switch rooms or diesel generators / pumps rooms should be provided
with an adequate fire detection system plus a number of carbon dioxide extinguishers (electric risk) or /
and dry powder (hydrocarbon risk). Carbon dioxide systems are acceptable as long as operators’
evacuation is ensured. Other halon alternatives gases are not recommended by BP.

Portable and hand held fire extinguishers should be located so that in any area or hazard, a fire
extinguisher can be reached without travelling more than 15m. Wheeled extinguishers should normally
be located in accessible positions at pump stations, metering skids and other vulnerable facilities.

Portable and hand held extinguishers should be clearly marked with the last test date, be within the
current test period, and protected in appropriate manner from the elements (sunshades, heated
enclosures, protected from spray, etc.).

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 208 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.6.2 Fire Protection
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.6.2.1 Is vehicular access to the jetty during cargo transfer operations
restricted?

Key Question
12.6.2.3 Are fire alarm and emergency shutdown buttons on the jetty
clearly marked?

Key Question
12.6.2.4 Are firewater pumps serving the jetties located in a suitable
place with good separation from hazardous areas?

Key Question
12.6.2.5 Is the physical condition of the fire pumps satisfactory?

Key Question
12.6.2.6 Are the mains fitted with the appropriate number of block /
isolation valves to allow for isolation of any one section and still
allow effective response (as determined by the hydraulic
calculation)?

Key Question
12.6.2.7 Are fire hydrants spaced and located in accordance with OCIMF
guidelines?

Key Question
12.6.2.8 Are the number and location of shore-side fixed and portable
foam and water monitors adequate taking into account different
wind directions and strength?

Key Question
12.6.2.9 Is the bulk foam storage and / or distribution system serving the
jetty adequate?

Key Question
12.6.2.10 Are there sufficient foam and / or dry chemical portable fire
extinguishers properly located on the jetty and are they checked
monthly for operability and charge?

Key Question
12.6.2.11 Are international shore fire connections properly located and
easily identified at each berth?

Key Question
12.6.2.12 Are all fire fighting equipment and systems in the jetty area
clear of obstruction, accessible during an incident and clearly
marked and identified with operating instructions provided
locally?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 209 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Guidance
Fire and Gas Protection Systems Specific for Marine Facilities Handling Gas Tankers
Gas tanker facilities should have gas detectors and fire detectors installed in areas that can have the
presence of a flammable gas. Fire detectors and flammable gas detectors (or low-temperature
sensors) should sound an alarm at the facility or at a constantly attended location if the facility is not
attended continuously. Flammable gas detectors should activate an audible and visual alarm at not
more than 25% of the low flammable limit of the gas being monitored.

With reference to Section 12.2.1 of NFPA 59A Standard for the Production, Storage and Handling of
LNG, the extent of the fire and gas protection for a facility should be determined by an evaluation based
on fire protection principles, analysis of local conditions, hazards within the facility and exposure to or
from other property.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 210 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Y N NS NA
Key Question
12.6.2.13 Do berths handling liquefied gas have an effective fire and gas
detection systems?

Guidance Questions
12.6.2.13.1 Are fire detectors and gas detectors installed in the vicinity of
berths handling liquefied gases?
12.6.2.13.2 Do the detectors alarm locally and remotely?
12.6.2.13.3 Are the alarms both audible and visual?
12.6.2.13.4 Since the original design, have there been any changes to local
conditions, to the hazards within the facility or to and exposure
to/from other property that could lead to a re-assessment of
the fire and gas protection requirements?
12.6.2.13.5 Where appropriate, has passive fire protection been applied to
structures?

Key Question
12.6.2.14 Does the Facility have a life jacket policy for personnel working
on the jetty?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 212 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.6.3 Access to the Marine Facility
Every facility should have procedures in place to control access to the site, the berths and vessels at
the berths.

ADDRESSED IN SECTION 5

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 213 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.6.4 Notices (Warning/Safety/Pollution/Security)
Every facility should display notices to alert personnel to critical information.

Guidance

Facilities should display notices to alert personnel to critical information. Notices should be used to
convey important information only. The following topics are usually covered by Notices:

Safety Instructions
o No Smoking
o No-Entry
o Permit to Work
o Use of portable electrical equipment
o Anti-pollution procedures
o Use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Advice
o Facility layout
o Roadways
o Parking Areas
o Pedestrian ways
o Main access point
o Emergency access points or emergency rendezvous points
o Emergency escape routes
o Location of fire-fighting equipment, including the International Shore Fire Connection
o Location of life-saving and safety equipment
o Muster Points
o Low head room or obstruction
o Emergency communication and equipment
o Location of emergency stops and alarms
o Security
o Statutory information
o Equipment locations
o Pipeline markings

Information contained on notices should be contemporary and where it is authorised by management,


it should be signed by the current Manager.

Whenever possible, notices should be of a pictorial nature rather than written to more effectively
communicate the message, especially with those who do not read the language of the respective
facility. Where facilities are handling international trading vessels, any text should also be displayed in
English where the working language of the facility is different.

Locations for notices should be carefully considered to make them visible from all key locations,
including vessels alongside the facility entrances. Consideration should be given to the need to re-
emphasise guidance in specific locations.

Emergency, safety, and security notices should be illuminated or highlighted by the adoption of
luminous or retro-reflective materials.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 214 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.6.4 Notices (Warning/Safety/Pollution/Security)
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.6.4.1 Does the Facility display notices to alert personnel to critical
information?

Guidance Questions
12.6.4.1.1 Are there adequate, easily understood and up-to-date notices to
cover the topics contained in the guidance?
12.6.4.1.2 Where handling international trading vessels, is the text in
English as well as the working language of the Facility?
12.6.4.1.3 Where necessary are emergency, safety, and security notices
illuminated or highlighted by the adoption of luminous or retro-
reflective materials.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 215 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.6.5 Life Saving and First Aid
Every facility should provide lifesaving and first aid equipment suitable for the activities and manning of
the facility.

Guidance

Facilities should provide lifesaving and first aid equipment suitable for the activities and manning of the
facility.

Suitable equipment to address the consequences of probable hazards could include:

o Emergency Escape Breathing Devices (EEBD)


o Respiratory protective equipment
o Personal gas monitors
o Lifeboats and rescue boats
o Life rafts
o Floatation aids, including life rings and life vests
o First Aid kits
o Showers and eyebaths
o Stretchers
o Resuscitation equipment
o Torches/flash lamps
o Portable radios

Equipment should be accessible, maintained and in good condition, with responsibilities for the
equipment clearly identified.

Personnel should be trained in the correct use of any equipment provided at the facility.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 216 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.6.5 Life Saving and First Aid
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.6.5.1 Does the Facility provide lifesaving and first aid equipment
suitable for the activities and manning of the facility?

Guidance Questions
12.6.5.1.1 Does the lifesaving and first aid equipment available address the
consequences of probable hazards.
12.6.5.1.2 Is the equipment accessible, maintained and in good condition,
with responsibilities for the equipment clearly identified?
12.6.5.1.3 Are personnel trained in the correct use of all equipment
provided at the facility?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 217 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.6.6 Portable Electrical And Electronic Equipment
Every facility should have procedures to manage the use of portable electrical and electronic equipment
within the hazardous areas of the facility.

ADDRESSED IN SECTION 1

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 218 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.6.7 Occupational Health
All facilities should have procedures in place to protect personnel against risks to their health.

ADDRESSED IN SECTION 6

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 219 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.7 Environmental Protection
12.7.1 Protection Of The Environment From Pollution And Emissions
Every facility should have procedures in place for the treatment or control of waste and harmful
emissions generated as a result of its operations.

ADDRESSED IN SECTION 7

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 220 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 221 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.7.2 Cargo Drainage And Containment
Every facility berth should have provisions for safely draining the cargo transfer system, including hard
arms and hoses, and for containing any operational spillages.

Guidance

Guidance applicable to all Marine Facilities

Facility berths, whether they are dedicated to oils/chemicals or to liquefied gas, should have provision
for safely draining the cargo transfer system, including hard arms and hoses, and for containing any
operational spillages.

Surface drainage
Surface drainage control on the berth is an important aspect in preventing pollution and isolating
possible spill fires. There should be provision for:

o Containment on the jetty head and at cargo manifold areas.


o Procedures for the collection of residues, draining, and disposal (as appropriate).
o Draining of pipelines, hard arms and hoses for routine maintenance and testing.

Cargo Transfer System Drainage Requirements


The facility must have a closed system for clearing the cargo transfer lines. Acceptable systems are:

o Pump back system into cargo line


o Drain line from arm/hose directly to a sump
o Clearing with water to shore tank
o Displacement with nitrogen/air (as applicable to cargo)
o Gravity draining back into shore cargo line or ship tank.

There must be written operating procedures for the type of system used.

Unused hoses, hard arms, manifold connections, drains, vents, gauge connections must be suitably
blanked or capped. Blank flanges must be fully bolted and of the same rating as the system to which
they are attached.

Guidance specific to Marine Facilities for Oil / Chemical Tankers

Cargo Containment
Each facility must have a continuous bunded area for the containment of spills emanating from
manifolds, sample points, valves and other connections, which could leak directly into the marine
environment. The deck within bunded areas must be sloped to a dedicated catch basin, which drains
to a sump, or be provided with other means of preventing accumulation of product and avoiding
overflow. Consideration must be given to storm/rain water management.

Exceptions to this would be wharves that are not dedicated to the transfer of oils/chemicals. In this
case adequately sized drip trays should be placed under each connection to retain any leakage.

Sump
The sump should be fitted with a level gauge or a high level alarm. Enclosed sumps should be fitted
with venting arrangements.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 222 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Disposal
The facility should have documented procedures covering the emptying of sumps, the draining of
bunds and disposal of the contents. This should address the properties of products being handled at
the berth (e.g., chemicals with inhibitors, bitumen, volatile liquids). Disposal to reception facilities
should be recorded.

Guidance Specific to Marine Facilities for Gas Tankers

Site Provisions for spill and leak control are given in Section 5.3 of NFPA 59A, Standard for the
Production, Storage and Handling of LNG. This NFPA states that ‘site preparation (of an LNG Marine
facility) should include provisions for retention of spilled LNG within the limits of plant property’.

NFPA 59A is not prescriptive on the design of the system to retain any spilled LNG, and there are
alternative configurations/designs for a retention system which are equally effective. But a typical
system for retaining spilt LNG at a marine facility comprises the following:

o an impounding wall at the berth surrounding loading arms, valves and other equipment handling
LNG
o a graded surface with the impounded area to direct any liquid into a channel covered with
grating
o channel designed for gravity flow to an impounding basin
o impounding basin designed to retain the liquid and allow LNG to flash off
o facilities to monitor the liquid level in the impounding basin, and remove any water
o a low temperature alarm in the basin, to provide an alarm of an LNG spill incident
o a high expansion foam system and foam pourers above the channel and impoundment basin

The design intent of the LNG impounding system is that in the event of a loss of LNG containment at /
close to an LNG berth, the system:

o reduces the risk of operations/emergency response team coming into direct contact with LNG
o reduces the rate at which spilt LNG vaporises, thereby helping to ensure that gas
concentrations at the site boundary do not rise above 50% LFL (lower flammability limit).
o Reduces the risk to important process equipment and structures
o Reduces the risk of LNG reaching the waterway

NFPA 50A states that drainage pumps and piping should be provided in order to remove water that
would otherwise accumulate in the impounding basin.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 223 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 224 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.7.2 Cargo Drainage and Containment
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.7.2.1 Does the Facility have provisions for safely draining the cargo
transfer system, including hard arms and hoses, and for
containing any operational spillages?

Guidance Questions for Facilities for Oil/Chemical Tankers


12.7.2.1.1 Does the Facility have an acceptable closed system for clearing
the cargo transfer lines with written operating procedures for
the type of system used?
12.7.2.1.2 Does the Facility have an adequate bunded area for the
containment of spills emanating from manifolds, sample points,
valves and other connections, which could leak directly into the
marine environment?
12.7.2.1.3 Does the deck within bunded area slope to a dedicated catch
basin, which drains to a sump, or are there other means of
preventing accumulation of product in the bunded area?
12.7.2.1.4 At wharves that are not dedicated to the transfer of
oils/chemicals, are adequately sized drip trays placed under each
connection to retain leakage?
12.7.2.1.5 Is consideration given to storm/rain water management?
12.7.2.1.6 Are sumps fitted with a level gauge or a high level alarm?
12.7.2.1.7 Are unused hoses, hard arms, manifold connections, drains,
vents and gauge connections suitably blanked or capped, and
are blank flanges fully bolted and of the same rating as the
system to which they are attached?
12.7.2.1.8 Does the Facility have documented procedures covering the
emptying of sumps, the draining of bunds and disposal of the
contents?
12.7.2.1.9 Do procedures address the properties of products being
handled at the berth (e.g., chemicals with inhibitors, bitumen,
volatile liquids)?
12.7.2.1.1 Is disposal to reception facilities recorded?
0
12.7.2.1.1 Has an assessment been made of the potential for releases
1 from individual items of equipment?

Key Question
12.7.2.2 Does the Facility have systems for impounding LNG in the
event of a spill at/close to the berth?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 225 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Guidance Questions Marine Facilities for LNG Tankers
12.7.2.2.1 Are the systems for impounding LNG designed in accordance
with NFPA 59A?
12.7.2.2.2 Is the impounding basin clear of debris and rainwater, and ready
to receive LNG?
12.7.2.2.3 If sump pumps are designed for automatic operation, are there
redundant automatic shutdown controls to prevent operation
when LNG is present in the impounding basin?
12.7.2.2.4 Does the location of the impounding basin take into account the
maximum allowable radiant heat flux at the property line, in the
event of a fire?
12.7.2.2.5 Are there foam pourers installed above the channel and
impoundment basin?
12.7.2.2.6 Is high expansion foam used?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 226 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.7.3 Oil and Chemical Spill Response
Every facility should be equipped and prepared to effectively respond to a Tier 1 spill, and should have a
comprehensive, up-to-date, Oil/Chemical Spill Response Plan.

ADDRESSED IN SECTION 7

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 227 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.8 Emergency Preparedness
12.8.1 Emergency Response Plan
Every facility should have a written, comprehensive, and up-to-date Emergency Response Plan.

Guidance

Facilities should have a written, comprehensive, and up-to-date Emergency Response Plan.

The Emergency Response plan should address the following emergency scenarios, if applicable:

 Fire and explosion at the facility and, on or around a berthed vessel


 Major escape of flammable and/or toxic vapours, gases oil or chemicals
 Grounding, collisions and unintended contacts
 Drifting and breaking away from berths and anchorages
 Major port accidents with ships, tugs, mooring boats ferries or other craft.
 Meteorological hazards such as threat of flooding, high winds, electrical storms.
 Security breaches including criminal and terrorist activities, sabotage and threats against the facility
or ships.
 Earthquakes and tidal waves
 Breakout (eg mooring hook failure, mooring line failure due to passing ship interaction)

The Emergency Response Plan need not include specific information on how to physically combat an
emergency, but should be focused on people, equipment, organisation and communications.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 228 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.8.1 Emergency Response Plan
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.8.1.1 Does the Facility have a written, comprehensive, and up-to-date
Emergency Response Plan which covers marine emergency
scenarios?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 229 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.8.2 Emergency Evacuation
Every facility berth should have a means of emergency evacuation to ensure personnel have a safe and
secure means of exiting from normal work areas.

Guidance

Facility berths should have a means of emergency evacuation to ensure personnel have a safe and
secure means of exiting from normal work areas on the berth in the event of a fire, explosion, or other
emergency.

General
It is necessary to provide facilities and a plan which will ensure the efficient evacuation of all personnel
in the event of a serious emergency. There should be two escape routes, which should not be
simultaneously affected in the event of a fire. Escape routes should be located such that in event of a
fire, at least one route provides a safe evacuation path sufficiently far from the source of probable fire
to afford personnel protection during evacuation. If such spacing cannot be provided, the escape routes
should be protected (where practicable) by fire walls/barriers or heat shields.

Unless otherwise defined, the primary emergency escape route is the day-to-day access way from
normal work areas to shore. The secondary emergency escape route is defined as a separate access
way, preferably located at a maximum practical distance from the primary escape route, which leads
from the normal work areas to shore or to a safe evacuation point such as a mooring dolphin equipped
with emergency ladders to the waterline at all stages of the tide.

Normal work areas are those where a berth operator would be expected to be in during cargo transfer
operations. Other areas a berth operator might visit during mooring and unmooring operations, such as
mooring dolphins, are not considered part of the normal work area.

Evacuation routes should be located as far away as practicable from high fire risk areas. Where boats
are designated as providing the secondary means of evacuation, they should be alerted at a very early
stage of the emergency and be kept as close as possible to the evacuation point, such that they can be
on scene rapidly, certainly no later than 15 minutes from initial advice. If this cannot be achieved, a
permanent escape craft should be provided.

Evacuation Plan
The Evacuation Plan should take into account the number of personnel to be evacuated including ship
personnel, jetty operators and maintenance personnel. There should always be a reciprocal
arrangement between ship and shore in the evacuation plan and it is important that there is a means of
conveying information on the evacuation arrangements to the Masters of ships visiting the facility. The
evacuation arrangement for ship personnel may be to remove the ship from the berth.

The critical elements of the emergency Evacuation Plan include organisation, control, communications
and the resources needed to put the plan into operation. The availability of resources is particularly
important where the secondary escape route requires the use of support craft.

Drills
Emergency drills should include the testing of the Evacuation Plan.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 230 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.8.2.1 Does the Facility have means of emergency evacuation from
normal work areas to ensure personnel have a safe and secure
means of exiting?

Guidance Questions
12.8.2.1.1 Are there sufficient evacuation routes to meet the requirements
such that an alternative route is available if one is affected by
fire?
12.8.2.1.2 Are evacuation routes located as far away as practicable from
high fire risk areas or protected?
12.8.2.1.3 Where boats are designated as providing the secondary means
of evacuation, are they able to reach any evacuation point within
15 minutes of an emergency being declared?
12.8.2.1.4 Is there an Evacuation Plan, which takes into account the number
of personnel to be evacuated including ship's personnel, jetty
operators and maintenance personnel?
12.8.2.1.5 Does the evacuation plan include reciprocal arrangements
between ship and shore?
12.8.2.1.6 Are the evacuation arrangements discussed and agreed with the
Masters of ships visiting the Facility?
12.8.2.1.7 Do the emergency drills include the testing of the Evacuation
Plan?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 231 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.9 Maintenance
12.9.1 Structural Surveys
Every facility berth (primarily fixed berths) should be structurally surveyed as part of an integrated
inspection and maintenance programme.

ADDRESSED IN SECTION 3

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 232 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.9.2 Maintenance, Inspection and Testing Programme
Every facility should have a planned general maintenance, inspection and testing programme to ensure
the integrity of systems.

ADDRESSED IN SECTION 3

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 233 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.10 Operations at Buoy Moorings
12.10.1 Single Point Mooring (SPM) Operations
Every facility operating a Single Point Mooring (SPM) should have procedures in place to ensure
compliance with established standards for operations and maintenance

Guidance

Facilities operating a Single Point Mooring (SPM) should have procedures in place to ensure compliance
with established standards for operations and maintenance.

The Minimum Standard detailed elsewhere in this document should apply to facilities operating an SPM
where they are appropriate.

Additional Considerations And Requirements


Facilities operating SPMs have additional considerations and requirements to address which are
primarily covered by the OCIMF publications listed below.

Hose Arrangement And Design


For buoy hose arrangements reference should be made to:

o OCIMF SPM Hose System Design Commentary


o OCIMF SPM Hose Ancillary Equipment Guide
o OCIMF Guide to Purchasing, Manufacturing and Testing of Loading and Discharge Hoses for
Offshore Moorings

Hawsers and Mooring Equipment

o OCIMF Guidelines for the Purchasing and Testing of SPM Hawsers


o OCIMF Recommendations for Equipment Employed in the Mooring of Ships at Single Point
Moorings

Operations and Maintenance


o OCIMF Single Point Mooring Maintenance and Operations Guide
o OCIMF Guidelines for the Handling, Storage, Inspection and Testing of Hoses in the Field.

Facilities are expected to comply with the above industry guidelines, including the provision of
equipment for mooring tankers. Records should show that the recommended procedures, tests and
inspections are carried out.

Operating procedures will define the complete operation from the time the berthing master joins prior
to mooring until he leaves when the vessel departs on completion of cargo operations. Any tankers
calling at the facility must be provided with the procedure covering the mooring operation before the
operation commences.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 234 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.10.1 Single Point Mooring (SPM) Operations
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.10.1.1 Does the Facility operating the SPM have procedures in
place to ensure compliance with established standards for
operations and maintenance?

Guidance Questions
12.10.1.1.1 Do the operating procedures define the complete operation
from the time the berthing master joins until he leaves?
12.10.1.1.2 Is there adequate manoeuvring area and water depth at the
location of the CBM to allow safe operation of vessels at all
stages of the tide?
12.10.1.1.3 Are procedures in place to prevent a tanker overrunning the
buoy or hose string?
12.10.1.1.4 Are the maximum weather conditions for berthing approach
and cargo operations identified and understood?
12.10.1.1.5 Are all tankers calling at the Facility provided with the
procedure covering the mooring operation before the
operation commences?
12.10.1.1.6 Is the SPM in good condition?
12.10.1.1.7 Does equipment provided for mooring tankers conform to
the Guidelines?
12.10.1.1.8 Is the mooring hawser(s) and chafe chain(s) in good
condition?
12.10.1.1.8.1 Are hawser tension and angle visually monitored through
the transfer operations?
12.10.1.1.8.2 Is hawser tension monitored by the use of remote reading
tension monitors?
12.10.1.1.8.3 Has the exposure of personnel to potential hazards when
handling mooring lines on buoys been formally risk
assessed?
12.10.1.1.9 Is a procedure in place for determining hawser and chafe
chain change-out intervals?
12.10.1.1.10 Is the hose string(s) in good condition?
12.10.1.1.11 Are hose testing procedures documented?
12.10.1.1.12 Is a procedure in place for determining hose retirement?
12.10.1.1.13 If a Marine Breakaway Coupling (MBC) is installed in the
hose string, is it located in accordance with the
manufacturer’s recommendations?
12.10.1.1.14 Are all parts of the hose lifting equipment certified as being
suitable for the weights involved?
12.10.1.1.15 Are all critical items of mooring and hose handling
equipment inspected during each operation with the results
documented?
12.10.1.1.15.1 Has consideration been given to the use of cargo transfer
equipment that may provide improved environmental
protection (eg double carcass hoses and marine breakaway
couplings)?
12.10.1.1.16 Is there effective communication between the Facility
control room, workboats, tank farm and tanker?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
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REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 236 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.10.1.1.17 Are emergency stop procedures identified and tested? Y N NS NA
12.10.1.1.18 Do maintenance records show that the recommended
procedures, tests and inspections are carried out correctly?
12.10.1.1.19 Are support craft and tugs (if required) of sufficient size and
number available?
12.10.1.1.20 Are mooring craft and tugs manned, maintained and
operated safely?
12.10.1.1.21 Are procedures established for non-routine activities
involving visiting vessels prior to vessel nomination (eg
clearing hoses with water for maintenance purposes)?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 237 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.10.2 Conventional Buoy Mooring (CBM) Operations
Every Facility operating a Conventional Buoy Mooring (CBM) should have procedures in place for the
safe operation and maintenance of the facility.

Guidance

Facilities operating a Conventional Buoy Mooring (CBM) should have procedures in place for the safe
operation and maintenance of the facility.

The Minimum Standards detailed elsewhere in this document should apply to facilities operating a
CBM where they are appropriate.

Additional Considerations And Requirements


Facilities operating CBMs have additional considerations and requirements to address which will
include the following:

The design parameters of the CBM should be known to operating personnel and procedures should be
in place to ensure that only vessels of a size suitable for the facility are received.

Prior to each vessel arrival, an inspection should be undertaken of equipment within the berth. This will
include verification of the condition of the mooring buoys and hooks, marker buoys and hose pick-up
buoys. Where marker buoys are used to indicate the position in which vessels are required to drop their
anchors, the position of these markers should be verified.

Operating procedures will define the complete operation from the time the berthing master joins until
he leaves when the vessel departs on completion of cargo operations. Any tankers calling at the facility
must be provided with the procedure covering the mooring operation before the operation
commences.

Environmental criteria for safe operations must be established and should take into account the hazards
associated with personnel access to the mooring buoys for handling mooring lines. For similar reasons,
an assessment should be made of the need to restrict berthing operations to daylight only.

The facility should be serviced by support craft that are of a design and capability suited to the needs of
the facility.

Effective means of communication must be in place between the facility, support craft and the tanker.
Procedures must include arrangements for stopping cargo in an emergency.

On every occasion that a vessel berths, a general inspection should be made of all mooring and hose
lifting equipment and the results should be documented. The hose should also be examined for any
signs of damage or deformation, particularly in the section that undergoes maximum bending at the
tanker rail.

Inspection and maintenance routines for the mooring buoys, hoses, sub-sea lines and ancillary
equipment should be included within the facility planned maintenance system. Intervals should be
defined for the regular overhaul of the mooring buoys, diver inspection of ground tackle and the
inspection and testing of sub-sea hoses and lines. Maintenance records should confirm that procedures
are being followed.

The facility should maintain a minimum stock of spare equipment and hoses in accordance with the
berth manufacturer recommendations or as defined on the basis of operational experience

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 238 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
12.10.2 Conventional Buoy Mooring (CBM) Operations
Key Question Y N NS NA
12.10.2.1 Does the Facility operating the CBM have procedures in
place to ensure the safe operation and maintenance of the
facility?

Guidance Questions
12.10.2.1.1 Do the operating procedures define the complete operation
from the time the berthing master joins until he leaves?
12.10.2.1.2 Are procedures in place to ensure that the design parameters
of the berth are complied with?
12.10.2.1.3 Are pre-arrival checks undertaken of the equipment within
the berth?
12.10.2.1.3.1 Is there adequate manoeuvring area and water depth at the
location of the CBM to allow safe operation of vessels at all
stages of the tide?
12.10.2.1.3.2 Are procedures in place to prevent a tanker overrunning the
buoy or hose string?
12.10.2.1.4 Are environmental criteria established for the safe operation
of the berth, which take into account the hazards, associated
with personnel access to the mooring buoys?
12.10.2.1.4.1 Has the exposure of personnel to potential hazards when
handling mooring lines on buoys been formally risk
assessed?
12.10.2.1.5 Are all tankers calling at the Facility provided with the
procedure covering the mooring operation before the
operation commences?
12.10.2.1.6 Are support craft and tugs (if required) of sufficient size and
number available?
12.10.2.1.7 Is there effective communication between the Facility control
room, workboats, tankfarm and tanker?
12.10.2.1.8 Are emergency stop procedures identified and tested?
12.10.2.1.9 Are all parts of the hose lifting equipment certified as being
suitable for the weights involved?
12.10.2.1.10 Are hawser tension and angle visually monitored through the
transfer operations?
12.10.2.1.10. Is hawser tension monitored by the use of remote reading
1 tension monitors?
12.10.2.1.11 Are maintenance, inspection and test routines included
within the Facility’s planned maintenance system?
12.10.2.1.12 Do maintenance records show that the recommended
procedures, tests and inspections are carried out correctly?
12.10.2.1.13 Does the Facility maintain a minimum stock of spare
equipment and hoses?
12.10.2.1.14 Has consideration been given to the use of cargo transfer
equipment that may provide improved environmental
protection (eg double carcass hoses and marine breakaway
couplings)?
Y N NS NA
12.10.2.1.15 Are procedures established for non-routine activities involving
visiting vessels prior to vessel nomination (eg clearing hoses
with water for maintenance purposes)?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 239 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
13. CROSS-COUNTRY & OFFSITE PIPELINES

Guidance

This Section of the Third Party Facilities HSSE document covers cross-country and offsite pipelines.
The intent is that this document covers pipeline systems carrying liquid hydrocarbons (crude oil, diesel,
LPG etc.) and gaseous hydrocarbons (natural gas etc.).
This document is applicable where a pipeline is used to transport hydrocarbon to which BP has title and
where the pipeline is owned / operated either by a JV in which BP has a minority shareholding or by a
3rd party.
A cross-country pipeline connects one facility to another facility, where the facilities include, but are not
limited to, the following:
 Process Units
 Refineries
 Storage Facilities (atmospheric, pressurised, refrigerated, underground)
 Marine facilities
 Road Loading facilities
 Rail Loading facilities
A cross-country pipeline could, as the description suggests, be a long pipeline with many compressor /
pump stations, or it could be a short offsite pipeline linking facilities that are local to each other.

Pipelines can cross a number of sites and / or geopolitical boundaries with different ownership and
operational constraints on either side of these boundaries.

Pipeline limits extend from the source of fluid and pressure (well heads; process facilities such as
compressors and pumps; third party pipelines; tanks, vessels, or other storage) to the point of
discharge (process facilities; tanks, vessels, or other storage; third party pipelines).

Pipelines include the equipment for facilitating flow through the pipeline, including fluid treatment,
valves, associated equipment and power supplies, control and measurement systems and data
transfer, inspection provision, cathodic protection, and support structures. For the purposes of this
document, the compression / pumping facilities and any compressor / pump stations associated with a
cross-country pipeline, plus any pigging facilities and metering systems, are considered to be part of
the pipeline facility.

Many pipelines have functions reporting back to different organisations, and as aconsequence, sight is
lost of the overall condition of the pipeline or the impact that can be caused if one component fails or is
not available. For this reason, the pipeline should be reviewed / assessed as a whole.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 240 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
13.1 Cross-country and Offsite Pipeline Layout & Design
The design and layout of a cross-country / offsite pipeline must be in accordance with internationally
recognised guidelines and regulations so as to make operations efficient and safe.

Guidance

Pipeline Description / Extent


The extent of each cross-country pipeline should be clearly defined, including the pipeline itself, its
boundaries and the interfaces with other facilities (eg upstream and downstream interactions with
processing facilities and storage systems). The routing plan for a cross-country pipeline should show
the entire route of the pipeline including all crossings of roads, railways, waterways and the locations of
all pump/compressor/compressor/pump stations.

Design Intent / Critical Design Features


The design intent and critical design features are often lost in volumes of project documentation, and
as a consequence, pipeline integrity can often be compromised through poor communication.

Pipeline Records
Up-to-date records should be maintained of the pipeline technical design, operating limits, and pertinent
commercial requirements, including all restrictions or limitations. The records should include:

o Pipeline description
o Current operating service, as well as future use or intent
o Legal or permit requirements
o Operational history (eg operating pressures, water cuts, CO2, and H2S levels)
o Alignment drawings, process flow diagrams, and P&IDs
o Materials of construction and as built records
o Hydrotest records
o Engineering design drawings - P&IDs, process description, and operating
parameters/assumptions
o Equipment details and performance data
o Environmental and soil data
o Corrosion management strategy
o Pipeline hydraulics
o Operating and maintenance philosophy
o Basis of Design (BOD)
o Inspection assessment and repairs strategy

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 242 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
13.1 Cross-country and Offsite Pipeline Layout & Design
Key Question Y N NS N/A
13.1.1 Are the pipeline description / extent / routing plan up-to-date and
complete showing all boundaries, interfaces and relevant
facilities/features?

Guidance Questions
13.1.1.1 Is the pipeline invulnerable to a vehicle collision along its route?
13.1.1.2 Is the system designed to take into account ESDs (emergency
shutdowns) of the pipeline, including ESDs of 3rd party systems
that may impact the pipeline?

Key Question
13.1.2 Are pipeline design records complete and in good order and
available on the shelf?

Guidance Questions
13.1.2.1 Is the pipeline constructed to a recognised standard?
13.1.2.2 Is the design intent for the pipeline documented (eg in an up-to-
date Statement of Requirements)?
13.1.2.3 Does the pipeline have any any critical design features, and if so
are they documented?
13.1.2.4 Are up-to-date P&IDs available?

Key Question
13.1.3 Are the layout, design and condition of pigging systems
acceptable?

Guidance Questions
13.1.3.1 Are pigging systems well designed and maintained?
13.1.3.2 Do pigging systems have sufficient hazard warning signs?

Key Question
13.1.4 For pipelines designed to carry liquids, are the surge protection
systems adequate?

Guidance Questions
13.1.4.1 Was a surge study carried out as part of the pipeline
construction, assessing maximum surge pressures in the
pipeline under all credible scenarios?
13.1.4.2 Is there an up-to-date surge study taking into account current
operation of the pipeline including maximum flowrate, fluid
properties and valve closure times?

Key Question
13.1.5 Are the corrosion protection systems for the pipeline adequately
specified and designed?

Key Question
13.1.6 Under the wayleave for the pipeline, is there a pipeline corridor
where no new construction by a 3rd party is permitted?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 243 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
13.2 Procedures & Operations Physical Checks

It is essential that procedures & operations for the cross-country pipline are carried out as specified in
the operations manual.

Guidance

Single Point of Accountability (SPA)


For each pipeline, there should be an SPA, or equivalent, who ensures that clear roles and
responsibilities are established for each section and each activity on the pipeline, covering both
technical integrity and operations. Assessor should ask for the name and job title of the SPA.

Operating Procedures
There should be formal operating procedures in place, which:

o are effective
o are followed
o focus on operating within safe limits
o cover the operating response in the event of an anomoly or incident.
o are up-to-date

Operating requirements and procedures should be established for pigging, corrosion inhibitor dosing,
line patrols, etc. The assessor should check that the key documents and procedures required to
operate the pipeline are clear and concise, reflecting key risks and processes to manage them to
ensure that pipeline integrity is not compromised during the design life.

Formalised Review of Pipeline Condition


A formalised review of the pipeline system condition and fitness assessment for continued operation
should be performed on a regular basis – annually or at max intervals of 2 years for low risk pipelines.
The review should be led by the SPA, with support from managers / specialists covering Enginering,
Technical, Inspection Operations, as required. The review should cover the whole length of the
pipeline, including interfaces across sites, external influences, and changes in regulatory requirements,
external environment, and conditions of the pipeline. Recommendations and actions from review
should be clearly recorded and implemented. As part of the review process, incidents affecting
pipeline safety, integrity, or operation (changes to the external environment such as increased
population density or the construction of new buildings adjacent to the pipeline) should be investigated
and recorded.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 244 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
13.2 Procedures & Operations Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
13.2.1 Is there a Single Point of Accountability (SPA) or equivalent for
each pipeline?

Guidance Questions
13.2.1.1 Does the Management of Change (MoC) process cover the
control and management of all changes (staff, operating
conditions, etc) associated with the pipeline?

Key Question
13.2.2 Are there effective operating procedures for the pipeline in
place?

Guidance Questions
13.2.2.1 Are the operting procedures available on the shelf?
13.2.2.2 Are the operating procedures being followed?
13.2.2.3 Do the operating procedures focus on operation within safe
limits?
13.2.2.4 Do operators know what the safe operating envelope of the
pipeline is?
13.2.2.5 Do the operating procedures cover all regular activities -
pigging, corrosion inhibitor dosing, line patrols, etc?
13.2.2.6 Do the operating procedures cover the response in the event
of an anomoly or incident?
13.2.2.7 Are the operating procedures up-to-date?
13.2.2.8 Are shift handovers performed in sufficient detail?

Key Question
13.2.3 Are formalised reviews of pipeline condition carried out?

Guidance Questions
13.2.3.1 What is the frequency of formalised reviews?
13.2.3.2 Do the attendees at the formalised reviews include managers /
specialists covering Enginering, Technical, Inspection
Operations, as required?
13.2.3.3 Are all relevant incidents reviewed and recorded at the
formalised reviews?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 245 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
13.3 Maintenance & Inspection Physical Checks
It is essential that maintenance & inspections of the cross-country pipeline are carried out as specified
in the maintenance & inspection programme.

Guidance

Inspection and Maintenance Procedures


The assessor should check that the written inspection and maintenance procedures for the cross-
country pipeline are effective, and that records of inspections and maintenance are well maintained.

Periodic Revalidation
The single point of accountability (SPA) for the pipeline should ensure that the pipeline is periodically
revalidated to demonstrate that system is fit for continued operation. In-line Inspection (ILI) is the
preferred method to demonstrate the integrity and fitness for continued operation of a pipeline system,
and each new pipeline system should be designed to allow for periodic ILI. The frequency of the
revalidation should comply with regulatory (and industry guidance) requirements and should be
subjected to a formal peer review, with recommendations / actions from the review clearly recorded
and implemented.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 246 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
13.3 Maintenance & Inspection Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
13.3.1 Do general inspections / line patrols appear to be effective?

Guidance Questions
13.3.1.1 Are they undertaken on foot?
13.3.1.2 Are they undertaken by vehicle?
13.3.1.3 Are they undertaken by helicopter?

Key Question
13.3.2 Does preventative maintenance appear to be effective?

Guidance Questions
13.3.2.1 Does preventative maintenance of the pipeline itself appear to
be effective?
13.3.2.2 Does preventative maintenance at each pump / compressor
station appear to be effective?
13.3.2.3 Does preventative maintenance at each road / rail /
watercourse / other crossing point along the pipeline appear to
be effective?

Key Question
13.3.3 Are the inspection and maintenance procedures documented,
followed and effective?

Key Question
13.3.3.1 Are inspection and maintenance records available for each
item, but specifically for critical items such as pressure
protection systems, ESD valves and systems?
13.3.3.2 Are all statutory reporting requirements complied with?

Key Question
13.3.4 Is there a revalidation of the pipeline that is carried out
periodically, to demonstrate that the system is fit for continued
operation?

Guidance Questions
13.3.4.1 Does the frequency of the revalidation comply with regulatory
requirements?
13.3.4.2 Is In-line Inspection (ILI) used to demonstrate the integrity and
fitness of the pipeline system for continued operation?
13.3.4.3 Does the revalidation process take into account the longer-
term trend in wall thickness i.e. current data and historic data
back to the original design?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 247 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
13.4 Safety & Security Physical Checks
All safety & Emergency Responseequipment must be designed, installed and maintained to
international, national and industry standards.

Guidance

Risk Assessment
A comprehensive risk assessment should be performed and kept up to date, to ensure that the full
range of threats faced by the pipeline has been identified, assessed, and appropriately mitigated. If a
comprehensive risk assessment is not performed, assessor should establish how risks are assessed
and managed, and follow through with the guidance questions in 13.4.1.

Pipeline Protective Systems


Pipeline protective systems should be identified, documented, inspected and tested to ensure that
they meet the design requirements and provide primary containment and protection to personnel and
the environment. Records of assessments, maintenance, and testing should be kept, and any change
to a protective system set points should be subjected to appropriate MoC and clearly recorded and
communicated across the pipeline.

Security
The security issues associated with a Cross-country Pipeline (and any compressor / pump stations
along that pipeline) are different to the security issues associated with other facilities (such as Gas
Processing Units and Terminals), and are generally more complex to deal with.

As a minimum, at unmanned compressor / pump stations there should be a secure perimeter fence
around the facility, lighting and a CCTV camera(s) relaying signals back to the pipeline control centre.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 248 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
13.4 Safety & Security Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
13.4.1 Is there a comprehensive risk assessment for operation of the
pipeline?

Guidance Questions
13.4.1.1 Is the risk assessment up-to-date, taking into account current
operation of the pipeline?
13.4.1.2 Is the risk assessment re-visited on a regular basis?
13.4.1.3 Does the current risk assessment consider the full range of
threats?
13.4.1.4 Does the risk assessment include mitigation measures with
actions assigned?
13.4.1.5 Are the mitigations working and are they adequate?
13.4.1.6 Have there been incidents or failures on the system?

Key Question
13.4.2 Does the pipeline have any protective systems?

Guidance Questions
13.4.2.1 Are the pipeline protective systems idetified, documented,
inspected and tested on a regular basis?
13.4.2.2 Are the records of protective systems up-to-date?

Key Question
13.4.3 Is the overall level of security associated with the Cross-
country Pipeline adequate?

Guidance Question
13.4.3.1 Is the security at each end of the pipeline adequate?
13.4.3.2 Is the security at pipeline compressor / pump stations, if
applicable, adequate?
13.4.3.3 Are there documented procedures in place covering the
management of any security incidents along the pipeline or at a
compressor / pump station?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 249 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
13.5 Environmental & Emergency Response Physical Checks
In operation of the cross-country pipeline, all environmental protection features must be maintained

Guidance

Emergency Response Plan


An emergency response plan should be in place, with procedures and equipment tested on a regular
basis. Under the emergancy response plan, the facility should be ready to deal with accidental loss of
fluid from the pipeline, discovery of a defect or damage to the pipeline, or other emergency affecting
the pipeline. These procedures should address major hazards identified in the risk assessment / review,
but they should also recognise potential for the unexpected.

The assessor should establish the frequency of testing and the time since the last testing, plus the
findings from the last test and the improvements to the emergancy procedures following the test..

Leak Detection
Irrespective of whether there is a leak detection system in place, there should be a contingency plan to
respond quickly to a leak from the pipeline, and resources / equipment should be available at short
notice to take appropriate action, such as installing a clamp on the pipeline. If there is a leak detection
system, it should be tested regularly.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 250 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
13.5 Emergency Response and Environmental Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
13.5.1 Is there an emergency response plan specifically for the pipeline
in place?

Guidance Questions
13.5.1.1 Are the emergency procedures and equipment appropriate and
available for an ‘offsite’ incident?
13.5.1.2 Are the Emergency procedures and equipment tested on a
regular basis?
13.5.1.3 Are findings from testing of the emergency procedures /
equipment recorded and improvements to the procedures /
equipment made, as appropriate?
13.5.1.4 Do the emergency procedures cover all credible scenarios,
including accidental loss of fluid from the pipeline, discovery of
damage / defect, etc?
13.5.1.5 Are there sufficient resources / equipment to execute
emergency procedures?
13.5.1.6 Do the emergency procedures cover management of the
communications / interfaces with 3rd parties such as media,
safety regulators, local officials, etc.

Key Question
13.5.2 Is there a pipeline leak detection system in operation?

Guidance Questions
13.5.2.1 Are there sufficient resources / equipment available at short
notice along the pipeline route (including remote locations and
including spares) to take appropriate action, such as installing a
clamp on the pipeline?
13.5.2.2 Is the pipeline leak detection system tested?
13.5.2.3 Is the pipeline leak detection system effective?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 251 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
14. PROCESS UNITS

Guidance

Gas Processing
Gas plant installations that come within the business operations of IST are designed to take a rich gas
from upstream facilities (BP or 3rd party) and process the gas into a leaner natural gas and NGLs -
propane, butane and condensate.

In supplying the market, a gas plant can be designed to produce propane and butane as separate
products or as mixed LPG stream.

A gas plant that is supplied by pipeline (from a remote production facility) and sends out natural gas by
pipeline is commonly referred to as a straddle plant.

A gas plant may requires storage facilities for the NGLs, typically comprising:

o Pressurised storage (spheres and bullets) for propane, butane and mixed LPG – see Section 16
o Conventional tanks for storage of condensate – see Section 8

Liquid Processing
Process units may handle liquid feedstocks varying from light hydrocarbons (eg NGL fractionators) to
heavy ends. Products produced again can vary from gases to heavy ends. Storage utilised can include:

o Pressurised storage (spheres and bullets) for propane, butane and mixed LPG – see Section 16
o Conventional tanks for storage of condensate – see Section 8

Product Dispatch from Process Units


Products can be dispatched in various ways:

o by cross country pipeline (see Section 13)


o by road (see Section 10)
o by rail (see Section 11)
o by ship (see Section 12)

Utility Supplies / Systems


A processing facility may require a wide range of utilities, including steam and power generation and
distribution, instrument air, nitrogen, water systems, cooling systems etc.

Catalysts and Chemicals


Process units may use catalysts and chemicals, for example in molecular sieves for gas treatment, acid
/ caustic / resins in water treatment systems, desiccants in instrument air systems.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 252 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
14.1 Process Units Layout & Design
A Processing Units must be set out following internationally recognised guidelines and regulations so
as to make operations efficient and safe.

Guidance

Processing Units Layout


The layout and design should be in accordance with a recognised industry standard. Irrespective of the
standard used for the layout, the plant layout should give good access by road, not only for operations
staff but also for a variety of activities such as cleaning, maintenance and repair as well as to enable
rapid response to emergency situations. Each process plant area should be separated from any
storage area by a road. Major roads should be a minimum width of 6 m and be not more than 400 m
apart.

Clearance of Overhead Piperuns


Clearance of overhead piperuns over roads should typically be 4.5 m or 5.5 m, to give good access for
heavy equipment.

Plot Plan
This should show location of all process areas, storage areas, roads, pump houses and fire fighting
equipment

Pump location
Pumps located in unventilated pump houses should not be given credit. In such cases check for
emergency escape and fire / smoke alarms. Pumps should be located:

o In the open air or in freely ventilated shelters away from overhead pipe tracks, fin-fans, cable
trays etc.
o Outside any bunded areas.
o If handling products above flash point, located at least 15m from the site boundary.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 254 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
14.1 Process Unit Layout & Design
Key Question Y N NS N/A
14.1.1 Are the design records for the facility complete / and in good
order and available on the shelf?

Guidance Questions
14.1.1.1 Is the Facility designed and built in accordance with recognised
industry standards?
14.1.1.2 Does the Facility have any critical design features, and if so,
are they documented?
14.1.1.3 Are up-to-date P&IDs available?

Key Question
14.1.2 Is the layout of the gas plant compliant with industry
regulations and guidance?

Guidance Questions
14.1.2.1 Is there an up to date and accurate plot plan of the Gas Plant?
14.1.2.2 Are the process areas and storage areas laid out in plots
separated by roads?
14.1.2.3 Are the process unit and storage facilities suitably located?
14.1.2.4 Do pipe racks over access routes provide sufficient height /
clearance (and are they marked with that height)?
14.1.2.5 Are equipment items and pipework invulnerable to vehicle
collisions?
14.1.2.6 Are pumps well located?

Key Question
14.1.3 Does the design and location of the plant control room comply
with industry regulations and guidance?

Guidance Questions
14.1.3.1 Is the control room located a suitable distance from the
process area and storage area(s)?
14.1.3.2 Is the control room designed to be blast proof?

Key Question
14.1.4 Were the plant relief / flare and vent / blowdown systems
designed and built in accordance with API 520 / 521 or other
industry standards?

Guidance Questions
14.1.4.1 Is there an up-to-date relief and blowdown review, covering
current operation/configuration of the relief and blowdown
systems?
14.1.4.2 Does the plant route all (major) vents into the flare header, not
to atmospheric vent systems?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 255 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
14.2 Procedures and Operations
It is essential that Gas Plant procedures & operations as dictated in the operations manual are being
followed and are effective.

Guidance

The Facility should have a written, comprehensive, and up-to-date Operating Manual. The assessor
should check that operating procedures are being followed and are effective.

The Operating Manual is a working document and should include procedures, practices, and drawings
relevant to the specific Facility. The Manual should be available to all appropriate personnel in the
accepted site working language.

The Facility Operating Manual should include the roles and responsibilities of the operating personnel
and procedures associated with emergencies such as fire, product spillage or medical emergency.

The assessor should check that the key documents and procedures required to operate the Facility are
clear and concise, reflecting key risks and processes to manage them. The Operating Manual should
include, but not be limited to, the following:

o Loading and Discharge Procedure


o Transfer Equipment Procedures
o Control and Shutdown Procedures
o Fire and Emergency Procedures
o Gauging and Sampling Procedures
o Catalysts and Chemicals Storage and Handling Procedures
o Static Electricity Precautions
o Environmental Protection Procedures
o Exposure to Toxic Vapours
o Operating Environmental Limits
o Operating Envelopes (including actions to take when parameters are exceeded)
o Start-up and Shutdown Procedures
o Facility Plan Layout Drawings
o Plans of Fire Fighting Systems

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 256 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
14.2 Procedures and Operations
Key Question Y N NS N/A
14.2.1 Are operational checklists and site visual inspections
completed diligently?

Key Question
14.2.2 Is there a shift handover procedure and are shift handovers
performed and recorded in sufficient detail?

Key Question
14.2.3 Are specialist procedures and instructions adhered to (eg a
permit-to-work system)?

Key Question
14.2.4 Does the Facility have a written, comprehensive, and up-to-
date Operating Manual?

Guidance Questions
14.2.4.1 Is the operating manual available to all appropriate personnel in
the accepted site working language?
14.2.4.2 Are the roles and responsibilities of the operating personnel
defined in the operating manual?
14.2.4.3 Does the operating manual cover the items listed in the
Guidance?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 257 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
14.3 Maintenance and Inspection Programmes and Checks
It is essential that a Gas Plant performs maintenance & carries out inspections as dictated in the
maintenance & inspection programme.

Guidance

The assessor should check whether the Facility’s written inspection and maintenance procedures are
effective, and check that records of inspections and maintenance are well maintained (Section 3).

The assessor should check to see if items of ‘Safety Critical Equipment’ (such as relief valves, high
integrity trip systems etc.) have been identified and how this equipment is managed for maintenance /
inspection / testing.

Some equipment (Pressure Vessels, Fire Protection and Gas Detection Systems, Lifting Equipment,
etc) may have to meet local mandatory inspection and testing requirements. The assessor should
verify that a program is in place for the related equipment and that the program is being implemented.

The general condition of the plant should be assessed visually during a ‘walkthrough’.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 258 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
14.3 Maintenance and Inspection Programmes and Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
14.3.1 Do general inspections appear to be effective?

Key Question
14.3.2 Do engineering inspections appear to be effective?

Key Question
14.3.3 Does the preventative maintenance programme appear
effective?

Key Question
14.3.5 Are the overall levels of housekeeping on the Facility
acceptable?

Key Question
14.3.6 During maintenance turnarounds of the Facility, are the
facilities used by the maintenance/turnaround team (temporary
buildings, laydown areas, workshops, car parks, etc) located in
appropriate safe areas?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 259 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
14.4 Safety, Emergency Response and Fire Fighting Provisions
All safety & fire fighting equipment must be designed, installed and maintained to international, national
and industry standards.

Guidance

Safety showers
Safety showers and eyewash facilities should be clearly marked and operable, where a need has been
established. It is acceptable to provide sterile eye wash bottles where eyewash only is required –
assessor to confirm that this is an acceptable condition.
Colour-coding of Pipework: Firewater pipework is normally painted red, and pipework containing a
significant concentration of hydrogen sulphide/other toxic gases should be painted yellow, or have
yellow-painted flanges.

Fire Pumps
Separation - Separation of fire pumps from hazardous areas should ideally be determined using a risk-
based approach. Some plant layout codes may prescribe a distance, e.g. 100 metres. Fire pumps
should in any case be protected from the effects of blast and / or thermal radiation from a fire in excess
of 3 kW/m2.

Pump Number/Capacity - Fire pumps to be generally in accordance with NFPA 20 with performance
and flow / pressure test facilities. A minimum of a 100% back-up driver unit and pump should be
provided for a single 100% duty pump, or back-ups using multiple pumps with split duty i.e. 3 x 50%
duty pumps. Pump drivers should be of alternative types and when electric driven be supplied from
alternate power including a stand-by generator option. Diesel engines should be supplied with twin
battery packs and be arranged for alternate charging. On large installations, pumps should be split
between two separate locations.

Housing - The fire pumps should be housed in an enclosure appropriate to the environment. The pumps
and associated equipment should be clean, without oil leaks, and well maintained. Batteries should be
covered to prevent tools falling onto the battery terminals.

Operation - Fire pumps should be properly lined up for automatic start, where appropriate, with the
start switches set to automatic, with a manual option.

Cold Climates - In cold climates, diesel tanks and fuel supply systems should be traced and lagged,
including the engine jacket, to a minimum of 5 degC.

Automatic / Remote Starts - Check that diesel fire pumps with automatic or remote start-up are
equipped with:

o Fire detection.
o Remote ESD.
o CO2 fire extinguisher.
o Physical separation between engine and diesel tank.
o Fireproof accessories on diesel (no plastic level gauge…)

Testing - Assessors should check to see if flow tests are carried out on a regular basis.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 260 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
14.4 Safety, Emergency Response and Fire Fighting Provisions

Key Question Y N NS N/A


14.4.1 Is all the safety equipment and signage sufficient in the process
area?

Guidance Questions
14.4.1.1 Are safety showers and eyewash stations in good condition and
identified with distinctive signs and markings in the process
area?
14.4.1.2 Are lines and valves colour-coded to identify firewater, H2S/toxic
gases, etc?
14.4.1.3 Are emergency evacuation routes clearly marked?
14.4.1.4 Are there at least two safety egress paths away from hazardous
areas?
14.4.1.5 Are all ladders and walkways in good condition?
14.4.1.6 Are toxic material signs in place including precautions?
14.4.1.7 Are fire alarm and emergency shutdown buttons clearly marked?
14.4.1.8 Are below ground pump pits designated by signs as confined
spaces with entry governed by permit to work?

Key Question
14.4.2 Do high-risk areas have gas or fire detection?

Guidance Questions
14.4.2.1 Does the control room have Heating, Ventilation and Air
conditioning (HVAC) with gas detectors in the air inlet which are
linked to an automatic HVAC shutdown system?
14.4.2.2 Do high-risk pumps rooms have gas detectors?
14.4.2.3 Are flammable and / or toxic gas detectors installed in high risk
areas as appropriate (eg in process unit areas handling fluids
with significant hydrogen sulphide concentrations)?

Key Question
14.4.3 Are the firewater pumps acceptable for the process area?

Guidance Questions
14.4.3.1 Is the physical condition of the fire pumps satisfactory?
14.4.3.2 Are firewater pumps located in a suitable place with good
separation from hazardous areas?
14.4.3.3 Is there an adequate provision of fire pumps with enough
redundancy, both in terms of pump location and energy supply?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 261 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Guidance
Water & foam main arrangement
The fire mains should be arranged in a grid pattern, with sufficient isolating valves so that with any one
section of fire main isolated (eg for maintenance), the distribution system can still supply water to any
point in the system at the required rate.

Where freezing can be a problem, fire mains should be buried. Fire mains are normally installed in steel
pipe, sometimes cement-lined, but more modern installations may be installed in GRE or HDPE
materials. Fire mains and hydrants should be protected against vehicle impact. Where fire mains pass
through potential blast areas they should be buried for security against damage.

Hydrant location & spacing


Hydrants should be NPS4 with 2 x 70 mm hose connections located at pre-determined risk sources, i.e.
in accordance with a pre-fire plan.

Cooling Water Deluges


Deluge systems should be provided to protect against radiant heat (not direct flame impingement) on
key process vessels and on the skirts supporting distillation columns. Credible scenario calculations
should be conducted following a risk assessment to determine potential leak sources. Thermal
modelling should be undertaken to determine potential flame impingement and thermal radiation levels
at vessels and other plant equipment items, using BP CIRRUS software or equivalent. Affected
equipment exposed to radiation levels in excess of 32 kW/m2 should be provided with immediate
cooling/deluge systems. Vessels and other equipment items exposed to thermal radiation in excess of
12 kW/m2 should be provided with cooling by manual or mobile means within 30 minutes. Surfaces
subjected to flame impingement require additional cooling. Cooling water deluge exposure protection
of 2 litres/min/m2 required on atmospheric storage tanks and insulated process vessels / skirts. Un-
insulated pressure vessels should be protected at 10 litres/min/m2, pumps and compressors at
20 litres/min/m2. Further guidance can be found in NFPA 15.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 262 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Key Question Y N NS N/A
14.4.4 Are the fire water and foam mains acceptable in the process
area?

Guidance Questions
14.4.4.1 Are the mains fitted with the appropriate number of block /
isolation valves to allow for isolation of any one section and still
permit effective response (as determined by the hydraulic
calculation)?
14.4.4.2 Are fire hydrants spaced and located in the process area in
accordance with good industry practice and the scenario-based
requirements and onsite resources?
14.4.4.3 Are the number and location of fixed and semi-fixed foam and
water system adequate?
14.4.4.4 Where fixed, mobile or portable monitors are part of the pre-
planned fire response, are they correctly sized, with adequate
water and foam supplies?
14.4.4.5 Can the foam or water monitors reach all process unit areas –
wherever they are used for primary protection according to the
scenarios, taking into account wind direction and strength?
14.4.4.6 Where fire water is supplied from tanks, have worst case
scenario calculations confirmed that there is a sufficient supply
at maximum demand for the duration of the process area
incident?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 263 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Guidance

Foam Storage
Bulk foam storage should be shielded from extremes of temperature eg by shading a tank under a
canopy. Foam production facilities should be fully operable, with valves greased and instruments easily
seen.

Location of foam equipment


The ability to access the foam generation facilities in a fire situation without putting people unduly at
risk should be assessed.

Inspection
Check that the volume of foam can be checked easily and that it meets the emergency plan / regulation
requirements.

Extinguishers
Portable wheeled (typically 100 kg) and hand held fire (9 kg) extinguishers should be provided within
plants in accordance with the risks and the relevant codes.

Dry chemical extinguishers are recognised as the most appropriate type of extinguisher for the quick
knockdown of small hydrocarbon fires. Halon and carbon dioxide extinguishers have little value in the
open. Halon extinguishers should now be phased out and replaced with dry powder in accordance with
Montreal protocol requirements.

Foam extinguishers in the order of 100 L capacity pre-mixed foam are suitable for use where liquid
hydrocarbons are present, producing 1000 L of foam and provide a typical jet length of about 12 m.
Small foam extinguishers with capacities of about 10 L are too limited to be effective in most cases in
the event of a fire at a processing facility.

Enclosed electrical sub-stations, switch rooms or diesel generators / pumps rooms should be provided
with an adequate fire detection system plus a number of carbon dioxide extinguishers (electric risk) and
/ or powder (hydrocarbon risk). Fixed gaseous suppression systems are acceptable as long as audible
and visible alarms are installed and set up to give adequate time for all staff to evacuate before
activation. Preferred agents are inert gas or Novec systems having minimal ODP.

Portable fire extinguishers should be located so that in any area where they are required, a fire
extinguisher can be reached without travelling more than 15 m. Wheeled extinguishers should normally
be located in accessible positions at pump stations, metering skids and other vulnerable facilities.
Portable extinguishers should be clearly marked with the last test date, be within the current test
period and be protected in an appropriate manner from the elements (sunshades, heated enclosures,
protected from spray, etc).

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 264 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT

Y N NS N/A
Key Question
14.4.5 Are the plant’s foam supply and foam logistics adequate?

Guidance Questions
14.4.5.1 Is the bulk foam storage and / or distribution system serving
the plant adequate?
14.4.5.2 Are the numbers & locations of fixed and semi-fixed foam and
water systems adequate?

Key Question
14.4.6 Is the plant’s management of fire extinguishers acceptable?

Guidance Questions
14.4.6.1 Are there sufficient extinguisher units?
14.4.6.2 Are extinguishers properly located?
14.4.6.4 Is all fire fighting equipment and systems in the process area
clear of obstruction, accessible during an incident and clearly
marked and identified with operating instructions provided
locally?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 265 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
14.5 Environmental Controls and Checks
The Gas Plant must maintain all environmental protection features in the Gas Plant.

Guidance

The flare systems within a plant should only be used in an emergency / de-pressuring situation, and
should not be used as a disposal route for excess gas or for off-spec gas.

All relief and blowdown streams should be routed into the flare system. The Facility should not have
any hydrocarbon blowdown stacks, in particular where the hydrocarbon may be denser than the air.

Where plants only process light (low molecular weight) hydrocarbons, there is still potential to generate
oily water and for this to require processing before release to a watercourse. For example surface
water can be contaminated with lube oil.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 266 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
14.5 Environmental Controls and Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
14.5.1 Are systems for managing water quality adequate?

Guidance Question
14.5.1.1 Is the quality of cooling water discharge to sea, if applicable,
monitored continuously (eg for chlorine)
14.5.1.2 Is the quality of effluent water discharged from the Process
Unit (eg to the site waste water treatment plant) monitored /
sampled (continuously, if applicable)?
14.5.1.3 Are water drainings from water seals and knock-out (KO) pots
in flare system etc appropriately handled, for systems handling
sour gases?
14.5.1.4 Are surface water streams from different areas (eg areas
where there could be lube oil contamination, roads) segregated
and given appropriate treatment according to the risk of
contamination and the nature of the likely contaminants?
14.5.1.5 Are surface water drains capable of handling fire water run-off
with containment if required?

Key Question
14.5.2 Are procedures for the storage and handling of catalysts,
chemicals and other process wastes appropriate and are they
followed?

Guidance Question
14.5.2.1 Are spent catalysts and chemicals stored on site in an
appropriate manner?
14.5.2.2 Are spent catalysts, chemicals and other solid wastes disposed
of to 3rd parties with the required licences / permits to do this
work, as applicable?

Key Question
14.5.3 Are emissions / releases to the atmosphere minimised /
appropriately managed?

Guidance Question
14.5.3.1 Are all relief, blowdown and vent streams routed to the flare
system (ie there are no blowdown stacks)?
14.5.3.2 Is the policy of no flaring other than in an emergency or for
scheduled depressuring followed?
14.5.3.3 Is it likely that sour gas sent to the flare will be sufficiently well
combusted to avoid odours?
14.5.3.4 Are flares and process vents fitted with continuous emission
monitoring?
14.5.3.5 Are relief valves (RVs) monitored regularly to check whether
they are passing?
14.5.3.6 Is there a leak detection and repair (LDAR) programme for
pipework, flanges and fittings?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 267 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
15. REFRIGERATED STORAGE

Guidance

This cection of the Third Party Facilities HSSE protocol covers facilities for the storage of hydrocarbons
under refrigerated conditions at (or close to) atmospheric pressure.

For conventional storage facilities (ie storage at or close to atmospheric pressure and ambient
temperature), refer to Atmospheric Aboveground Storage - Section 8 . For storage under pressure,
refer to Pressurised Storage - Section 16.

Refrigerated Storage Facilities are typically directly connected to marine facilities (see Section 12), and
are sometimes linked to road tanker loading facilities (see Section 10).

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) is stored in refrigerated storage facilities. The majority of refrigerated
storage facilities are in LNG service. In this Section, the terms ‘LNG tank’ and ‘refrigerated storage
tank’ are used interchangeably.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 268 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
15.1 Refrigerated Layout & Design
A Refrigerated Storage Facility must be designed and laid out in accordance with internationally
recognised guidelines and regulations.

Guidance

Relevant Design Standards


o BSI BSEN 14620-1: Design of Site-Built Vertical and Cylindrical Flat Bottom Steel Tanks for the
Storage of Refrigerated Liquified Gases Operating with Temperatures Between 0 Celcius and
- 165 Celcius
o BSI BSEN 1473: Installation and Equipment for Liquefied Natural Gas - Design of On- Shore
Installations (equivalent European standard is CEN EN 1473)
o BSI BSEN 1160: Installations and Equipment for Liquified Natural Gas - General Characteristics
of Liquified Natural Gas (equivalent European standard is CEN EN 1473).
o NFPA 58: Standard for the Production, Storage and Handling of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)

Types of Tank
There are four types of refrigerated storage tank:
o Single Containment Tanks
o Double Containment Tanks
o Full Containment Tanks
o Membrane Tanks

LNG Tank and Foundation Design


LNG storage containers should be installed on foundations designed by appropriately-qualified
engineers and constructed in accordance with recognized industrial structural engineering practices.
Prior to the start of design and construction of the foundation, a subsurface investigation should be
conducted by a qualified civil engineer to determine the stratigraphy and physical properties of the soils
underlying the site.

The base of the outer tank should be above the groundwater table or otherwise protected from contact
with groundwater at all times. The outer tank bottom material in contact with soil should be one of the
following:
o Selected to minimize corrosion
o Coated or otherwise protected to minimize corrosion
o Protected by a cathodic protection system

Where an outer tank is in contact with the soil, a heating system should be provided to prevent the
32°F (0°C) isotherm from penetrating the soil. The heating system should be designed to allow
functional and performance monitoring, which should be done, at a minimum, on a weekly basis.
Where there is a discontinuity in the foundation, such as for bottom piping, careful attention and
separate treatment should be given to the heating system in this zone.

Heating systems should be installed so that any heating element or temperature sensor used for
control can be replaced. Provisions should be incorporated to protect against the detrimental effects of
moisture accumulation in the conduit, which could result in galvanic corrosion or other forms of
deterioration within the conduit or heating element.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 269 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Guidance
If the foundation is installed to provide air circulation in lieu of a heating system, the bottom of the
outer tank should be of a material compatible with the temperatures to which it can be exposed.

A tank bottom temperature monitoring system should be installed, capable of measuring the
temperature on a predetermined pattern over the entire surface area in order to monitor the
performance of the bottom insulation and of the tank foundation heating system (if installed). This
system should be used to conduct a tank bottom temperature survey 6 months after the tank has been
placed in service and annually thereafter, after an operating basis earthquake and after any indication of
an abnormally cool area.

The LNG container foundation should be monitored periodically for settlement during the life of the
facility, including during construction, hydrostatic testing, commissioning, and operation. Any
settlement in excess of that anticipated in the design should be investigated and corrective action
taken as required.

Liquid Level Gauging in LNG Tanks


Each LNG tank should be equipped with two independent liquid level gauging devices. Density
variations should be considered in the selection of the gauging devices. These gauges should be
designed and installed so that it is possible to replace them without taking the tank out of operation.

Each LNG tank should be provided with two high-liquid-level alarms, which should be permitted to be
part of the liquid level gauging devices. They should be independent of each other. The alarm should be
set so that the operator has sufficient time to stop the flow without exceeding the maximum permitted
filling height and should be located so that it is audible to personnel controlling the filling.

Each LNG tank should be equipped with a high-liquid-level flow cutoff device, which should be separate
from all gauges. The high-liquid-level flow cutoff device should not be considered as a substitute for the
alarm. The LNG tank should also be equipped with a low-liquid-level flow cutoff device, which should
be separate from all gauges.

Tanks for Refrigerants or Flammable Process Fluids


Pressure Gauge - Each container should be equipped with a pressure gauge connected to the container
at a point above the maximum intended liquid level.

Vacuum Gauge (LNG Containers) - Vacuum-jacketed equipment should be equipped with instruments
or connections for checking the absolute pressure in the annular space.

Temperature Indicators
Temperature-monitoring devices should be provided in field-erected containers to assist in controlling
temperatures when placing the container into service or as a method of checking and calibrating liquid
level gauges.

Vaporizers (LNG Containers)


Vaporizers should be provided with indicators to monitor inlet and outlet temperatures of LNG,
vaporized gas, and heating-medium fluids to enable effectiveness of the heat transfer surface to be
monitored/checked.

Electrical Grounding and Bonding


Electrical grounding and bonding should be provided and meet local standards. Static protection is not
be required where tank cars, tank vehicles, or marine equipment are loaded or unloaded and where
both halves of metallic hose couplings or pipe are in contact. It should be checked that LNG marine
facilities are equipped with appropriate static protection.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 270 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Guidance
Stray or Impressed Currents
If stray currents can be present or if impressed currents are used on loading and unloading systems
(such as for cathodic protection), protective measures to prevent ignition should be taken.

Lightning Protection
Lightning protection is not be required on LNG storage containers, with the exception of tanks
supported on non-conductive foundations for personnel and foundation protection, where lightning
protection ground rods should be provided.

Piping System
Isolation valves should be installed so that each transfer system can be isolated at its extremities.
Where power-operated isolation valves are installed, an analysis should be made to determine that the
closure time will not produce a hydraulic shock capable of causing line or equipment failure. If
excessive stresses are indicated by the analysis, an increase of the valve closure time or other
methods should be used to reduce the stresses to a safe level.

Each piping system used for periodic transfer of cold fluid should be provided with a means for
precooling before use. For LNG systems, the piping is maintained in a cold state at all times.

Check valves should be provided as required in transfer systems to prevent backflow and should be
located as close as practical to the point of connection to any system from which backflow might
occur.

Pump and Compressor Control


In addition to a locally mounted device for shutdown of the pump or compressor drive, a readily
accessible, remotely located device should be provided a minimum of 25 ft (7.6 m) away from the
equipment to shut down the pump or compressor in an emergency.

Plot Plan
The plot plan for a Refrigerated Storage Facility should show the locations of all roads, tanks, process
facilities, bunds/containment areas and fire fighting equipment.

Road Layout / Access


Roads around Refrigerated Storage Facilities are required for a variety of activities such as cleaning,
maintenance and repair as well as to enable rapid response to emergency situations. The
recommended layout for tank farms has changed over time to highlight the need for better access.
Roads should separate tank plots. Major roads should be a minimum width of 6m and be not more than
400 m apart.

Pump location
Any pumps located in unventilated pump houses should not given credit. In such cases assessors
should check for the existence of an emergency escape and fire / gas / smoke alarms.

Surge.
During the design of a refrigerated storage facility, surge in liquid piping systems during transient
conditions (eg ESD) should be assessed, and measures taken as required to ensure that max surge
pressures can be handled.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 271 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 272 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
15.1 Refrigerated Facility Layout and Design
Key Question Y N NS N/A
15.1.1 Are the design records for the facility complete / in good order
and available on the shelf?

Guidance Questions
15.1.1.1 Is the Facility designed and built in accordance with recognised
industry standards?
15.1.1.2 Does the facility have any critical design features, and if so, are
they documented?
15.1.1.3 Are up-to-date P&IDs available?

Key Question
15.1.2 Are the LNG tanks designed and installed to recognised
structural engineering practices?

Guidance Questions
15.1.2.1 If the tank has a soil heating system, is the heating system
tested on a regular basis?
15.1.2.2 Are tank bottom temperature surveys carried out annually?
15.1.2.3 If the LNG tank is above the ground on piles, is there tank
settlement monitoring system?
15.1.2.4 If the LNG tank is above the ground on piles, is there a system
in place to prevent the ingress of natural gas under the elevated
tank base (to prevent it reaching a confined area and mitigate
the risk of an explosion)?

Key Question
15.1.3 Does each LNG tank have the appropriate amount of
instrumentation?

Guidance Questions
15.1.3.1 Does each LNG tank have two independent level gauging
devices, two high level liquid alarms and independent high level,
low level cut-off devices and density stratification
measurement?

Key Question
15.1.4 Does the layout of the Facility comply with industry regulations
and guidance?

Guidance Questions
15.1.4.1 Is there an up to date and accurate plot plan of the Facility?
15.1.4.2 Are the tanks suitably located?
15.1.4.3 Are the storage areas laid out in plots separated by roads?
15.1.4.4 Are piperacks over access routes arranged to provide sufficient
height (and are they marked with that height)?
15.1.4.5 Are equipment items and pipework invulnerable to vehicle
collision?
15.1.4.6 Are pumps well located?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 273 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 274 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Y N NS N/A
Key Question
15.1.5 For systems designed to carry liquids, are the surge protection
facilities adequate?

Guidance Questions
15.1.5.1 Was a surge study carried out when the facility was designed /
constructed, assessing maximum surge pressures under all
credible scenarios?
15.1.5.2 Is there an up-to-date surge study taking into account current
operation including maximum flowrate, fluid properties and valve
closure times?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 275 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
15.2 Procedures and Operations Physical Checks
It is essential that a Refrigerated Storage Facility carries out procedures & operations as dictated in the
operations manual.

Guidance

The Facility should have a written, comprehensive, and up-to-date Operating Manual. The assessor
should check that operating procedures are being followed and are effective.

The Operating Manual is a working document and should include procedures, practices, and drawings
relevant to the specific Facility. The Manual should be available to all appropriate personnel in the
accepted site working language.

The Operating Manual should include the roles and responsibilities of the operating personnel and
procedures associated with emergencies such as fire, product spillage or medical emergency.

The assessor should check that the key documents and procedures required to operate the Facility are
clear and concise, reflecting key risks and processes to manage them. The Operating Manual should
include, but not be limited to, the following:

o Loading and Discharge Procedure


o Transfer Equipment Procedures
o Control and Shutdown Procedures
o Fire & Emergency Procedures
o Gauging and Sampling Procedures
o Static Electricity Precautions
o Environmental Protection Procedures
o Exposure to Toxic Vapours
o Operating Environmental Limits
o Facility Plan Layout Drawings
o Plans of Fire Fighting Systems
o Tank Rollover Protection

Tank roll-over (when stratified layers within a tank mix / roll-over in the realtively short time) is a low
probability, high impact event that can result in significant business / reputation loss. LNG tanks
generally have LDT measurement sytems (ie level, density, temperature) to monitor stratification within
the tank.

A separate emergency response manual should be provided to cover such topics as emergency call-out
procedures and interaction with local authorities, municipal emergency response organisations, or other
outside agencies and organisations.

The Facility should also have a documented management of change process for handling temporary
deviations and for use when making a permanent change to the procedures in the operating manual.
The management of change documentation should also define the level of approval required for such
deviations and changes to a prescribed procedure.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 276 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
15.2 Procedures and Operations Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
15.2.1 Are operational checklists and site visual inspections
completed diligently?

Key Question
15.2.2 Is there a shift handover procedure and handovers performed
in sufficient detail?

Key Question
15.2.3 Are specialist procedures and instructions adhered to (eg the
permit-to-work system)?

Key Question
15.2.4 Does the Facility have a written, comprehensive, and up-to-
date Operating Manual?

Guidance Questions
15.2.4.1 Is the operating manual available to all appropriate personnel in
the accepted site working language?
15.2.4.2 Are the roles and responsibilities of the operating personnel
defined in the operating manual?
15.2.4.3 Does the operating manual cover the items listed in the
guidance?

Key Question
15.2.5 Is there a procedure or system in place to monitor and predict
when there is an increasing risk of tank ‘roll-over’?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 277 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
15.3 Maintenance and Inspection Physical Checks
It is essential that as Refrigerated Storage Facility conducts maintenance & inspections as dictated in
the maintenance & inspection programme.

Guidance

The assessor should check whether the Facility’s written inspection and maintenance procedures are
effective, and check that records of inspections and maintenance are well maintained (See Section 3).

The assessor should check to see if items of ‘Safety Critical Equipment’ (such as relief valves, high
integrity trip systems etc.) have been identified and how this equipment is managed for maintenance /
inspection / testing.

Some equipment (Pressure Vessels, Fire Protection and Gas Detection Systems, Lifting Equipment,
etc) may have to meet local inspection / testing requirements. The assessor should verify that a
program is in place for the related equipment and that the program is being implemented.

Is refrigerated tankage and piping insulated adequately? Look for frost on pipes or tanks as this will
indicate poor insulation quality or break down of insulation.

The effectiveness of the programmes should be assessed following a ‘walkthrough’ of the facility.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 278 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
15.3 Maintenance and Inspection Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
15.3.1 Do the refigerated storage area inspection and maintenance
procedures appear effective overall?

Key Question
15.3.2 Do engineering inspections appear to be effective?

Key Question
15.3.3 Does the preventative maintenance programme appear
effective?

Key Question
15.3.5 Is the insulation on refrigerated equipment and piping
adequate?

Key Question
15.3.6 Are the overall levels of housekeeping on the Facility
acceptable?

Key Question
15.3.7 During maintenance turnarounds of the tanks, are the areas
used by the maintenance turnaround team (temporary
buildings, laydown areas, workshops, car parks, etc) located in
appropriate safe areas?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 279 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
15.4 Safety and Fire Fighting Physical Checks
All safety & fire fighting equipment must be designed, installed and maintained to international, national
and industry standards.

Guidance
NFPA 59A - Standard for the Production, Storage, and Handling of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)
Reference should be made to this standard which covers equipment and procedures designed to
minimize the consequences from released LNG, flammable refrigerants, flammable liquids, and
flammable gases in facilities constructed and arranged in accordance with this standard. These
provisions augment the leak and spill control provisions in Section 15.5.

Fire Protection
Fire protection should be provided for all LNG facilities. The extent of such protection should be
determined by an evaluation based on sound fire protection engineering principles, analysis of local
conditions, hazards within the facility, and exposure to or from other property. The evaluation should
determine the following, as a minimum:

o The type, quantity, and location of equipment necessary for the detection and control of fires,
leaks, and spills of LNG, flammable refrigerants, or flammable gases
o The type, quantity, and location of equipment necessary for the detection and control of
potential nonprocess and electrical fires
o The methods necessary for protection of the equipment and structures from the effects of fire
exposure
o Fire protection water systems
o Fire extinguishing and other fire control equipment
o The equipment and processes to be incorporated within the emergency shutdown (ESD)
system, including analysis of sub-systems, if any
o Need for depressurizing specific vessels or equipment during a fire emergency
o The type and location of sensors necessary to initiate automatic operation of the ESD system or
its sub-systems
o The availability and duties of individual plant personnel and the availability of external response
personnel during an emergency
o The protective equipment, special training, and qualification needed by individual plant
personnel as specified by NFPA 600, Standard on Industrial Fire Brigades, for his or her
respective emergency duties.

The wide range in size, design, and location of LNG facilities covered by this document precludes the
inclusion of detailed fire protection provisions that apply to all facilities comprehensively.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 280 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
15.4 Safety and Fire Fighting Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
15.4.1 Is all the safety equipment and signage sufficient in the
refrigerated storage area?

Guidance Questions
15.4.1.1 Are lines and valves colour-coded to identify firewater, etc?
15.4.1.2 Are emergency evacuation routed clearly marked?
15.4.1.3 Are there at least two safety egress paths away from
hazardous areas?
15.4.1.4 Are all ladders and walkways in good condition?
15.4.1.5 Are toxic material signs in place including precautions?
15.4.1.6 Are fire alarm and emergency shutdown buttons clearly
marked?
15.4.1.7 Are below ground pump pits designated by signs as confined
spaces with entry governed by permit to work?

Key Question
15.4.2 Has the refrigerated storage facility been design in
accordance with NFPA 58 or equivalent recognised standard?

Key Question
15.4.3 Do the Facility’s records include documents giving the basis
for the provision of fire and gas protection systems in the
refrigerated storage area?

Guidance Questions
15.4.3.1 Has the provision of fire and gas systems been re-assessed
since the facility first came into operation?
15.4.3.2 Are the records up-to-date taking into account current
operation, as well as analysis of local conditions, hazards
within the facility, and exposure to or from other property?
15.4.3.3 Do high-risk areas (control room, compressor / pump rooms)
have gas and / or fire detection systems?
15.4.3.4 Are detection systems for fire and gas designed, installed and
maintained in accordance with NFPA 72 National Fire and
Signaling Code or equivalent recognised standard?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 281 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Fire and Leak Control
Those areas, including enclosed buildings, which have a potential for flammable gas concentrations,
LNG or flammable refrigerant spills, and fire should be monitored as required by the evaluation.

Continuously monitored low-temperature sensors or flammable gas detection systems should sound
an alarm at the plant site and at a constantly attended location if the plant site is not attended
continuously. Flammable gas detection systems should activate an audible and visual alarm at not more
than 25 percent of the lower flammable limit of the gas or vapour being monitored.

Fire detectors should sound an alarm at the plant site and at a constantly attended location if the plant
site is not attended continuously. In addition, if so determined by an evaluation , fire detectors should
be permitted to activate portions of the ESD system.

The detection systems determined from the evaluation should be designed, installed, and maintained in
accordance with NFPA 72, National Fire and Signaling Code

Fire Water Systems

A water supply and a system for distributing and applying water should be provided for protection of
exposures; for cooling containers, equipment, and piping; and for controlling unignited leaks and spills.
An exception to this is where an evaluation in accordance with code indicates the use of water is
unnecessary or impractical.

The design of fire water supply and distribution systems should provide for the simultaneous supply of
those fixed fire protection systems, including monitors, at their design flow and pressure, involved in
the maximum single incident expected in the plant plus an allowance of 1000 USgpm (63 L/sec) for
hand hose streams for not less than 2 hours.

Fire Extinguishers and Other Fire Control Equipment


Portable or wheeled fire extinguishers recommended by their manufacturer for gas fires should be
available at strategic locations within an LNG facility and on tank vehicles. These extinguishers should
be provided and maintained in accordance with NFPA 10, Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers.

A specific requirement is on the LNG tank PSVs. Dedicated fixed dry powder systems should be
connected to the PSV outlets with the ability to be remotely activated.
If provided, automotive and trailer-mounted fire apparatus should not be used for any other purpose.
Fire trucks should conform to the applicable portions of NFPA 1901, Standard for Automotive Fire
Apparatus.

Automotive vehicles assigned to the plant should be provided with a minimum of one portable dry
chemical extinguisher having a capacity of not less than 115 lb (15.2 kg).

Maintenance of Fire Protection Equipment

Facility operators should prepare and implement a maintenance program for all plant fire protection
equipment. Fire water system isolation valves must be maintained in the open position to ensure
firewater supply. There must be a local procedure in place to manage the opening and closing of
isolation valves for maintenance of the system.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 282 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Key Question Y N NS N/A
15.4.4 Are the firewater pumps acceptable?

Guidance Questions
15.4.4.1 Is the physical condition of the fire pumps satisfactory?
15.4.4.2 Are firewater pumps located in a suitable place with good
separation from hazardous areas?
15.4.4.3 Is there an adequate provision of fire pumps with enough
redundancy, both in terms of pump location and energy
supply?
15.4.4.4 Are the mains fitted with the appropriate number of block /
isolation valves to allow for isolation of any one section and
still allow effective response (as determined by the hydraulic
calculation)?
15.4.4.5 Are fire hydrants spaced and located in the tankfarm in
accordance with good industry practice and the scenario-
based requirements and onsite resources?

Key Question
15.4.5 Are portable and wheeled fire extinguishers provided at
strategic locations within the refrigerated storage area?

Guidance Question
15.4.5.1 Are dedicated fixed dry powder systems installed at PSV
outlets on LNG tanks, with the ability to remotely activate
these systems?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 283 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Emergency Shutdown (ESD) Systems
Each facility should incorporate an ESD system(s) that, when operated, isolates or shuts off a source of
flammable liquids or flammable gases, and shuts down equipment whose continued operation could
add to or sustain an emergency.

Instrumentation for liquefaction, storage, and vaporization facilities should be designed so that, in the
event that power or instrument air failure occurs, the system will proceed to a failsafe condition that is
maintained until the operators can take appropriate action either to reactivate or to secure the system.

If equipment shutdown will introduce an additional hazard or result in substantial mechanical damage to
equipment, the shutdown of such equipment or its auxiliaries should be permitted to be omitted from
the ESD system, provided that the effects of the continued release of flammable or combustible fluids
are controlled.
The ESD system(s) should be of a failsafe design or should be otherwise installed, located, or protected
to minimize the possibility that it becomes inoperative in the event of an emergency or failure at the
normal control system. ESD systems that are not of a failsafe design should have all components that
are located within 50 ft (15 m) of the equipment to be controlled in either of the following ways:

o Installed or located where they cannot be exposed to a fire


o Protected against failure due to a fire exposure of at least 10 minutes duration

Operating instructions identifying the location and operation of emergency controls should be posted
conspicuously in the facility area.

Initiation of the ESD system(s) should be manual and/or automatic. Manual actuators should be located
in an area accessible in an emergency, should be at least 50 ft (15 m) from the equipment they serve,
and should be marked distinctly and conspicuously with their designated function.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 284 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Key Question Y N NS N/A
15.4.6 Does the Facility have procedures in place which designate
circumstances and emergency situation under which various
process operations must be stopped immediately such as
those recommended by SIGTTO?

Guidance Questions
15.4.6.1 Do the operators know the location of the emergency shut
down buttons or the communication method to be employed
and any back up system?
15.4.6.2 For a Facility importing / exporting via a marine terminal, are
the arrangements for emergency shut down procedures and
equipment to be used discussed and agreed at the pre-cargo
transfer conference?
15.4.6.3 Is due regard given to the possible dangers associated with
any emergency shutdown procedure (eg pressure surges,
valve closure times, marine loading arm disconnection)?
15.4.6.4 For each tanker / cargo, are the operators aware of what
could cause an ESD to be initiated on the ship?
15.4.6.5 For each tanker / cargo, does the facility make sure that the
ship is aware of what could cause an ESD to be initiated
onshore?
15.4.6.6 Is there a procedure in place to prevent an inadvertent
operation of the PERCs system (ESD2) on the marine loading
arms?
15.4.6.7 Is there a training programme in place to ensure operators
are aware of the special associated with handling LNG (eg
cryogenic risks, roll-over, rapid phase transition)?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 285 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
15.5 Environmental Physical Checks
The Refrigerated Storage Facility must maintain all appropriate environmental protection features.

Guidance

If an LNG leak occurs, some portion vaporises immediately, and the rest remains as liquid. The
flammable vapour cloud or plume, which is generated, is cryogenic vapour having almost the same
density as air. It is possible for this vapour to travel far from the leakage point due to wind effects,
potentially resulting in escalation due to the potential for delayed flash fires. It is thus important to
control the spread of LNG liquid spills.

For this reason, the facility should have an LNG spill containment system, such as a spill trench leading
to spill sump.

NFPA 59A is not prescriptive on the design of the system to retain any spilled LNG, and there are
alternative configurations/designs for a retention system which are equally effective. But a typical
system for containing spilt LNG comprises the following:

o Spill trench designed for gravity flow to a spill sump


o Spill sump designed to retain the liquid and allow LNG to flash off
o Facilities to monitor the liquid level in the impounding basin, and remove any water
o A low temperature alarm in the basin, to provide an alarm of an LNG spill incident
o A high expansion foam system and foam pourers above the trench and sump

The design intent of the LNG spill containment system is that in the event of a spill, the system:

o Reduces the risk of operations / emergency response team coming into direct contact with LNG
o Reduces the rate at which spilt LNG vaporises, thereby helping to ensure that gas
concentrations at the site boundary do not rise above 50% LFL (lower flammability limit).
o Reduces the risk to important process equipment and structures
o Reduces the risk of LNG reaching the waterway

When LNG contacts water, there is a violent reaction referred to as ‘rapid phase transtion’. The spill
containment sump should be designed to ensure that the LNG is directed into the spill containment
sump and not into the rainwater drain system.

It should be noted that an LNG spill containment system will only be of use / effective if the liquid
release pressure is low enough to prevent the majority of the liquid coming out as a spray, which is
likely to miss the containment system.

Where a high pressure jet spray leak can occus and most of the liquid is likely to miss the collection
system, impingement plates or fire walls should be provided, where practical, near possible leak
sources to control the extent of liquid spray.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 286 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
15.5 Environmental Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
15.5.1 Is there an LNG spill containment system in place?

Guidance Questions
15.5.1.1 Are the systems for impounding LNG designed in accordance
with NFPA 59A?
15.5.1.2 Is the spill containment system clear of debris and rainwater,
and ready to receive LNG (NFPA 58 states that drainage
pumps and piping should be provided in order to remove water
that would otherwise accumulate in the sump)?
15.5.1.3 If sump pumps are designed for automatic operation, are there
redundant automatic shutdown controls to prevent operation
when LNG is present?
15.5.1.4 Does the location of the spill sump take into account the
maximum allowable radiant heat flux at the property line, in the
event of a fire?
15.5.1.5 Are there foam pourers installed above the trench and spill
sump?
15.5.1.6 Is high expansion foam used?

Key Question
15.5.3 Are emissions to the atmosphere minimised and appropriately
managed?

Guidance Questions
15.5.3.1 Are all relief, blowdown and vent streams routed to the flare
system (ie there are no blowdown stacks)?
15.5.3.2 Is the policy of no flaring other than in an emergency or for
scheduled depressuring followed?
15.5.3.3 Are the hydrocarbon pumps glandless (eg canned pumps or
magnetic drives), thereby minimising pump seal losses?
15.5.3.4 Are flares and process vents fitted with continuous emission
monitoring?
15.5.3.5 Are relief valves (RVs) monitored regularly to check whether
they are passing?
15.5.3.6 Is there a leak detection and repair (LDAR) programme for
pipework, flanges and fittings?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 287 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
16. PRESSURISED STORAGE

16.1 Pressurised Storage Layout and Design


A Pressurised Storage Facility must be set out following internationally recognised guidelines and
regulations so as to make operations efficient and safe.

Guidance

This Section of the Third Party Facilities HSSE protocol covers facilities for the storage of hydrocarbon
material under pressure. For conventional storage facilities (ie storage at or close to atmospheric
pressure and ambient temperature), refer to Section 8.

Pressurised storage facilities typically directly connected to process areas (see Section 14) and are
commonly linked to road loading facilities (see Section 10), rail loading facilities (see Section 11), marine
facilities (see Section 12) and cross-country pipelines (see Section 13).

Spheres vs Bullets
Pressurised storage tanks are either spheres or cylindrical vessels (known as bullets).

A large sphere could be 25 m in diameter, giving a capacity of approx 8,000 m3. Spheres are generally
elevated 2 to 3 m (6 to 10 ft) above grade.

A large horizontal bullet could be 5 m in diameter and 25 m in length, giving a capacity of approximately
500 m3. A very large horizontal bullet could be 7.5 m in diameter and 80 m in length, giving a capacity of
approx 3,500 m3.

Bullets are normally installed horizontally (but small bullets can be installed vertically where plot space
is at a premium). Horizontal bullets are installed either at grade, buried below grade or mounded (ie
covered with earth above grade). Mounded bullets are either fully mounded or partially mounded, as
shown below.

The selection of spheres or bullets depends on many factors, including capital cost, local codes, client
preference and safety considerations. Historically, spheres were generally used for volumes per vessel
in excess of 2,000 to 3,000 m3. However, there is a trend towards installing mounded bullets rather
than spheres. There are several reasons for this trend. Firstly, mounded bullets are considerably less
vulnerable to mechanical damage / loss due to, for example, a nearby explosion. Secondly, by covering
the bullets with earth, fire impingement and the consequent fire water demand and relief requirements
are also greatly reduced, which can be a major benefit.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 288 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Guidelines and Standards
The Energy Institute has published a document entitled ‘Model Code of Safe Practice Part 9: Liquefied
Petroleum Gas, Volume 1 Bulk Pressure Storage’ which covers the layout and design of the
pressurised storage facility and covers issues such as the specifiation and design of fire fighting deluge
systems and relief systems. This is a standard that is commonly used in the design of pressurised
storage facilities, but there are many other relevant standards such as API 2510 ‘Design and
Construction of LPG Terminals’ and API Pulication 2510A ‘Fire-Protection considerations for the Design
and Operation of LPG Storage Facilities’.

High Level Alarms


Protection against overfill of spheres and bullets is normally provided by independent high level
switches, which initiate an alarm in a manned control room. The setting of this alarm should give
sufficient time for the filling operation to be terminated.

Vessel Connections Below Maximum Liquid Level


In order to maximise the integrity of a sphere or bullet it is good practice to minimise the number of
connections onto the vessel below the maximum liquid level. In general, there is only one such
connection per vessel, that being the outlet to the pumping facilities.

Dewatering / Sampling of Spheres and Bullets


It is good practice for each sphere or bullet to have dedicated facilities for removing water and taking
samples from the vessel. The sampling or dewatering point should be downstream of the sphere or
bullet ESD valve, well away from the vessel. The sampling or dewatering point pipework should have a
minimum of two valves, each with fixed handles, spaced at least 0.6 m apart which can be operated
by one person. The second valve should be a quick-acting, spring-loaded type, closing on release.

However such a system is not 100% secure, since it is possible for hydrocarbon gas to be released to
atmosphere due to the spring-loaded valve freezing or malfunctioning in some other way.

A more secure system incorporates a dewatering pot installed downstream of the two valves
described above. Water is drained into the pot until the interface appears. The valves on the inlet to
the dewatering pot are then closed and a similar pair of valves used to drain the water from the pot
until the interface is low. The drain valves are then closed and the pot top connection is opened, routing
the gas to flare. Steam tracing the base of the dewatering pot assists the evaporation of the gas.

Road Layout / Access.


Roads around pressurised storage facilities are required for a variety of activities such as cleaning,
maintenance and repair as well as to enable rapid response to emergency situations. The
recommended layout for tankfarms has changed over time to highlight the need for better access.
Roads should separate tank plots. Major roads should be a minimum width of 6 m and be not more
than 400m apart.

Plot Plan.
The plot plan for a Pressurised Storage Facility should show the locations of all roads, spheres, bullets,
tanks, bunds, pumps and fire fighting equipment.

Pump location
Pumps located in unventilated pump houses should not be given credit. Look for emergency escape,
fire / gas / smoke alarms in such cases. Pumps handling hydrocarbons stored in spheres or bullets
should be:

o In the open air or in freely ventilated shelters away from overhead pipe tracks, fans, cables etc.
o At least 15m from the site boundary.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 290 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
16.1 Pressurised Storage Facility Layout and Design
Key Question Y N NS N/A
16.1.1 Is the layout of the pressurised storage facility compliant with
industry regulations & guidance?

Guidance Questions
16.1.1.1 Is there an up to date & accurate plot plan of the pressurised
storage facility?
16.1.1.2 Are the storage areas laid out in plots separated by roads?
16.1.1.3 Are the tanks suitably located?
16.1.1.4 Are pipe tracks over access routes arranged to provide sufficient
height (and are they marked with that height)?
16.1.1.5 Are pipelines invulnerable to vehicle collisions?
16.1.1.6 Are pumps well located?
16.1.1.7 Are the layout and design of the Pressurised Storage Facility in
accordance with a recognised industry standard such as the
‘Model Code of Safe Practice – Part 9 Liquefied Petroleum Gas
Vol.1 Bulk Pressure Storage’ published by the Energy Institute
or 'Design and Construction of LPG Installations' API 2510?

Key Question
16.1.2 Are the connections to the spheres and bullets designed in
accordance with industry guidance?

Guidance Questions
16.1.2.1 Is each connection onto a sphere or bullet, other than the vessel
main outlet to the pump suction, above the maximum liquid
level?
16.1.2.2 Is there an emergency shutdown (ESD) valve in the main outlet
from each sphere and bullet?
16.1.2.3 Is the pipework between each sphere or bullet and the ESD
valve all-welded ie no flanges ?
16.1.2.4 If there is no emergency shutdown (ESD) valve in the outlet
from each sphere and bullet, is there an ESD valve installed
inside each sphere or bullet?
16.1.2.5 Are all connections onto each sphere or bullet fitted with
remotely-operated shut-off valves (ROVs) and / or excess flow
valves (EFVs) - also known as pipe rupture safety valves (PRSVs)
- to reduce the risk of a major release following, for example,
downstream pipework failure?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 292 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
Key Question Y N NS N/A
16.1.3 Are the layout, design and condition of the pressurised storage
facilities acceptable?

Guidance Questions
16.1.3.1 Are the spheres / bullets sufficiently spaced?
16.1.3.2 Are the spheres / bullets constructed to a recognised standard
(such as BS 5500 Unfired Fusion Welded Pressure Vessels)?
16.1.3.3 Are the spheres / bullets well maintained?
16.1.3.4 Are the sphere / bullet foundations sound (ie no signs of
settlement)?
16.1.3.5 Are the sphere / bullets protected against overfill by
independent high level switches, which initiate alarms in a
manned control room, with sufficient time for the filling
operation to be terminated, or with shut-off valves that close
automatically on high high level?
16.1.3.6 Are the spheres / bullets and their fittings bonded and earthed
so as to dissipate static electricity?

Key Question
16.1.4 Have the pressure relief systems associated with the presurised
storage Facility been specified, designed and installed in
accordance with industry standards, such as API RP 520 and API
RP 521?

Guidance Questions
16.1.4.1 In assessing the number and capacity of relief valves required,
have all the apprpriate relief cases beens considered, such as
fire exposure, overfilling, excessive rundown temperature,
vapour breakthrough from a process unit (eg due to instrument
failure)?
16.1.4.2 Are all relief valves spared?
16.1.4.3 If the relief valves discharge to atmosphere rather than to a flare
system , is there good reason for this (eg it may be necessary
to maintain storage inventory at all times, even during flare
system turnarounds/maintenance)?

Key Question
16.1.5 Are the facilities for dewatering spheres / bullets in accordance
with industry practice?

Guidance Questions
16.1.5.1 Do the facilities for draining water from the spheres / bullets
include a dewatering pot, from which water and hydrocarbon
can be manually routed to drain and flare respectively?
16.1.5.2 If there is no drain pot, is dewatering carried out using two
valves located approx 1 m apart, the downstream valve being a
quick-acting spring-loaded type?
16.1.5.3 Are the dewatering facilities (valves, dewatering pot) located
sufficient distance away from all the spheres / bullets?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 293 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
16.2 Procedures and Operations Physical Checks

It is essential that a Pressurised Storage Facility carries out procedures & operations as dictated in the
operations manual.

Guidance
The assessor should check whether or not the Pressurised Storage Facility’s written operating
procedures are being followed and are effective.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 294 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
16.2 Procedures and Operations Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
16.2.1 Are operational checklists and site visual inspections
completed diligently?

Key Question
16.2.2 Are shift handovers performed in sufficient detail?

Key Question
16.2.3 Are specialist procedures/ and instructions adhered to (eg
permit-to-work system)?

Key Question
16.2.4 Is an up-to-date copy of the presurised storage Facility
operating procedures and manuals kept in the control room
with access to all?

Guidance Questions
16.2.4.1 Is there a written procedure to cover the water removal /,
draining and sampling from spheres and bullets, which
includes the required sequence of valve movements?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 295 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
16.3 Maintenance and Inspection Physical Checks
It is essential that Pressurised Storage Facility’s conduct maintenance & inspections as dictated in the
maintenance & inspection programme.

Guidance

The assessor should check whether or not the Pressurised Storage Facility’s written inspection and
maintenance procedures are effective.

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 296 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
16.3 Maintenance and Inspection Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
16.3.1 Do general inspections appear to be effective in the pressurised
storage area?

Key Question
16.3.2 Do engineering inspections appear to be effective in the
pressurised storage area?

Key Question
16.3.3 Is the preventative maintenance programme effective?

Key Question
16.3.4 Are acceptable levels of housekeeping maintained?

Key Question
16.3.5 During a major TAR (turnaround) of the Pressurised Storage
facility, are the areas used by the TAR team (temporary
buildings, laydown areas, workshops, car parks, etc) located in
appropriate/safe areas?

REVISION NUMBER: 10.1 Page 297 of 332


THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
16.4 Safety and Fire Fighting Physical Checks
All safety & fire fighting equipment must be designed, installed and maintained to international, national
and industry standards.

Guidance

Fire Pumps
Separation - Separation of fire pumps from hazardous areas should ideally be determined using a risk-
based approach. Some plant layout codes may prescribe a distance, e.g. 100 metres. Fire pumps
should in any case be protected from the effects of blast and / or thermal radiation from a fire in excess
of 3 kW/m2.

Pump Number / Capacity - Firepumps to be generally in accordance with NFPA20 with performance
and flow/pressure test facilities. A minimum of a 100% back-up driver unit and pump should be
provided for a single 100% duty pump, or back-ups using multiple pumps with split duty i.e. 3 x 50%
duty pumps. Pump drivers should be of alternative types and when electric driven be supplied from
alternate power including a stand-by generator option. Diesel engines should be supplied with twin
battery packs and be arranged for alternate charging. On large installations, pumps should be split
between two separate locations.

Housing - The fire pumps should be housed in an enclosure appropriate to the environment. The pumps
and associated equipment should be clean, without oil leaks, and well maintained. Batteries should be
covered to prevent tools falling onto the battery terminals.

Operation - Fire pumps should be properly lined up for automatic start, where appropriate, with the
start switches set to automatic, with a manual option.

Cold Climates - In cold climates, diesel tanks and fuel supply systems should be traced and lagged,
including the engine jacket, to a minimum of 5 degC.

Automatic / Remote Starts - Check that diesel fire pumps with automatic or remote start up are
equipped with:

o Fire detection.
o Remote ESD.
o CO2 fire extinguisher.
o Physical separation between engine and diesel tank.
o Fireproof accessories on diesel (no plastic level gauge…).

Testing - Assessors should check to see if flow tests are carried out on a regular basis.

Water Main Arrangement.


The fire mains should be arranged in a grid pattern, with sufficient isolating valves so that with any one
section of fire main isolated (e.g. for maintenance), the distribution system can still supply water to any
point in the system at the required rate.

Where freezing can be a problem, fire mains should be buried. Fire mains are normally installed in steel
pipe, sometimes cement-lined, but more modern installations may be installed in GRE or HDPE
materials. Fire mains and hydrants should be protected against vehicle impact. Where firemains pass
through potential blast areas they should be buried for security against damage.

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16.4 Safety and Fire Fighting Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
16.4.1 Is all the safety equipment and signage sufficient in the
pressurised storage area?

Guidance Questions
16.4.1.1 Are lines and valves colour-coded to identify firewater, H2S and
other toxic gases etc?
16.4.1.2 Are emergency evacuation routed clearly marked?
16.4.1.3 Are there at least two safety egress paths away from hazardous
areas?
16.4.1.4 Are all ladders and walkways in good condition?
16.4.1.5 Are toxic material signs in place including precautions?
16.4.1.6 Are fire alarm and emergency shutdown buttons clearly marked?
16.4.1.7 Are below ground pump pits designated by signs as confined
spaces with entry governed by permit to work?

Key Question
16.4.2 Do high-risk areas have gas or fire detection?

Guidance Questions
16.4.2.1 Does the control room have Heating ventilation and air
conditioning (HVAC) with gas detectors in the air inlet which are
linked to an automatic (HVAC) shutdown system?
16.4.2.2 Do high-risk pumps rooms have gas detectors?

Key Question
16.4.3 Are the firewater pumps acceptable in the pressurised storage
area?

Guidance Questions
16.4.3.1 Is the physical condition of the fire pumps satisfactory?
16.4.3.2 Are firewater pumps located in a suitable place with good
separation from hazardous areas?
16.4.3.3 Is there an adequate provision of fire pumps with enough
redundancy, both in terms of pump location and energy supply?

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Guidance
Hydrant location & spacing
Hydrants should be NPS4 with 2 x 70mm hose connections located at pre-determined risk sources, i.e.
in accordance with a pre-fire plan.

Cooling Water Deluges


Deluge systems should be provided to protect against radiant heat (not direct flame impingement) on
key process vessels and on the skirts supporting distillation columns. Credible scenario calculations
should be conducted following a risk assessment to determine potential leak sources. Thermal
modelling should be undertaken to determine potential flame impingement and thermal radiation levels
at vessels and other plant equipment items, using BP CIRRUS software or equivalent. Affected
equipment exposed to radiation levels in excess of 32 kW/m2 should be provided with immediate
cooling / deluge systems. Vessels and other equipment items exposed to thermal radiation in excess
of 12 kW/m2 should be provided with cooling by manual or mobile means within 30 minutes. Surfaces
subjected to flame impingement require additional cooling. Cooling water deluge exposure protection
of 2 litres/min/m2 is required on atmospheric storage tanks and insulated process vessels / skirts.
Uninsulated pressure vessels should be protected at 10 litres/min/m2, pumps and compressors at
20 litres/min/m2. Further guidance can be found in NFPA 15.

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Key Question Y N NS N/A
16.4.4 Are the fire mains acceptable in the pressurised storage area?

Guidance Questions
16.4.4.1 Are the mains fitted with the appropriate number of block /
isolation valves to allow for isolation of any one section and still
allow effective response (as determined by the hydraulic
calculation)?
16.4.4.2 Are fire hydrants spaced and located in the tankfarm in
accordance with good industry practice and the scenario-based
requirements and onsite resources?
16.4.4.3 Are the number and location of fixed water systems adequate?
16.4.4.4 Where fixed, mobile or portable monitors are part of the pre-
planned fire response, are they correctly sized, with adequate
water supplies?
16.4.4.5 Can the monitors reach all spheres, bullets and pumps –
wherever they are used for primary protection according to the
scenarios taking in to account different wind directions and
strength?
16.4.4.6 Where fire water is supplied from tanks, have worst case
scenario calculations confirmed that there is a sufficient supply
at maximum demand for the duration of the pressurised
storage incident?

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Guidance
Extinguishers.
Portable wheeled (typically 100 kg) and hand held (9 kg) fire extinguishers should be provided within
pressurised storage areas in accordance with the risks and the relevant codes.

Dry chemical extinguishers are recognised as the most appropriate type of extinguisher for the quick
knockdown of small hydrocarbon fires. Halon and carbon dioxide extinguishers have little value in the
open. Halon extinguishers should now be phased out and replaced with dry powder in accordance with
Montreal protocol requirements.

Foam extinguishers in the order of 100 L capacity pre-mixed foam are suitable for use where liquid
hydrocarbons are present, producing 1000 L of foam and provide a typical jet length of about 12 m.
Small foam extinguishers with capacities of about 10 L are too limited to be effective in most cases in
the event of a fire at a pressurised storage facility.

Enclosed electrical sub-stations, switch rooms or diesel generators / pumps rooms should be provided
with an adequate fire detection system plus a number of carbon dioxide extinguishers (electric risk)
and/or powder (hydrocarbon risk). Fixed gaseous suppression systems are acceptable as long as
audible and visible alarms are installed and set up to give adequate time for all staff to evacuate before
activation. Preferred agents are inert gas or Novec systems having minimal ODP.

Portable and hand held fire extinguishers should be located so that in any area where they are required,
a fire extinguisher can be reached without travelling more than 15 m. Wheeled extinguishers should
normally be located in accessible positions at pump stations, metering skids and other vulnerable
facilities.

Portable and hand held extinguishers should be clearly marked with the last test date, be within the
current test period, be protected in an appropriate manner from the elements (sunshades, heated
enclosures, protected from spray, etc).

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Key Question Y N NS N/A
16.4.6 Is the pressurised storage facility’s management of fire
extinguishers acceptable?

Guidance Questions
16.4.6.1 Are there sufficient extinguisher units?
16.4.6.2 Are extinguishers properly located?
16.4.6.4 Are all fire fighting equipment and systems in the pressurised
storage area clear of obstruction, accessible during an incident
and clearly marked and identified with operating instructions
provided locally?

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Guidance
Spray / Deluge Systems
In the event of a fire, the affected vessel and adjacent bullets or spheres are protected against radiation
by cooling using fixed water spray systems. Each water spray system consists of headers with spray
nozzles at regular intervals. Crown ring weir type deluge systems should be avoided as they are less
effective.

When not in service, the spray water headers on spheres / bullets are maintained dry ie they are
designed to be self-draining.

For a horizontal bullet which is installed aboveground, the spray water system consists of several
horizontal headers equally spaced around the vessel. For a bullet which is installed below ground or is
mounded, only the exposed areas need to protected by a spray water cooling system.

For a sphere, the spray water system consists of a cage of spray headers spaced at 2 to 3 metre (6 to
10 ft) intervals. The spray headers should preferably run vertically, to aid self-draining.

In addition to spray water systems being required on vessels, spray water is generally applied to the
ESD valve on the bottom outlet of each sphere / bullet.

For a spray water system on a sphere, it is important to ensure that the nozzles at the top of the sphere
are supplied with water at the required pressure to suit the nozzle specification and are not starved of
water due to the static head differential.

Spray water systems are normally supplied with water from the fire main. If an alternative water
supply is considered (for example cooling water), the reliability of the supply, relative to the fire water
system, must be considered very carefully. A control system may be required to switchover to the fire
water system automatically in the event of failure of the alternative water supply.

To calculate the radiation levels from fires on liquefied gas storage vessels, methods detailed in
Appendix 2 of Energy Institute Model Code of Safe Practice, Part 9 (or equivalent standard) should be
used.

In order to estimate the spray water rate required for cooling liquefied gas storage vessels, either
NFPA 15 or Appendix 5 of IP Model Code of Safe Practice, Part 9 should be used. NFPA quotes a rate
of 10.2 litres/min/m2 (0.2 USgall/min/ft2) of vessel surface.

In order to provide some protection against radiation from fires and against solar heating, bullets and
spheres may be insulated. A fire and hose spray resistant coating should be specified if credit is taken
for insulation to give a reduction in the fire relief load.

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Guidance
UVCEs and BLEVEs
LPG fires are not readily extinguished using water. A jet fire is often left to burn, with the appropriate
local spray water cooling of adjacent equipment, buildings and structures until the source of the fuel
can be isolated. Putting the fire out can leave a potential for a gas cloud to form, leading to a UVCE
(Unconfined Vapour Cloud Explosion). Damage caused by a UVCE could then lead to a BLEVE (Boiling
Liquid Expanding Vapour Explosion), when a vessel ruptures catastrophically.

If a jet fire needs to be extinguished, it should be tackled with powder. Spill fires may be tackled with
foam or powder. If powder is used the resultant pool should be secured with high expansion foam to
seal in the vapour, where possible.

Drainage in Pressurised Storage Areas


A significant potential danger in pressurised storage areas is the accumulation of heavier than air
flammable or explosive mixtures in drainage areas under spheres / bullets. Flammable vapours may
travel significant distances to sources of ignition and the flash back can then ignite the hydrocarbon that
has accumulated under spheres / bullets causing an explosion or at the least the ignition the original
source of the leak. Another requirement of drainage design is to ensure that leaking liquid drains from
under the vessel to safe / controlled areas generally away from equipment, structures boundaries and
emergency fire fighting access ways.

It is important to provide for rapid drainage of any spill away from the underside of liquefied gas storage
vessels. Drainage systems serving pressure storage areas must be designed to handle the relatively
large flows of firewater which occur as a result of fire fighting.

The slope should be to one side of the line of vessels and in the opposite direction from any pump
slabs. The areas under individual vessels are generally segregated by low deflection walls. Walled
sections, channels and sumps must not be deeper than 0.61 metres (2 ft) to avoid creating flammable
gas traps.

The drainage system normally includes open channels leading to a collection pit or interceptor, located
away from the storage area.

If the drainage system includes closed drains, traps or separators must be provided to prevent
flammable vapours travelling along the closed system.

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Intentionally Blank – For Assessor’s Notes

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Key Question Y N NS N/A
16.4.7 Are the fire protection, spray / deluge systems and surface
drainage systems in the pressurised storage facility designed in
accordance with recognised industry guidance such as ‘Fire-
Protection Considerations for the Design and Operation of
Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) Storage Facilities’ API 2510A?

Guidance Questions
16.4.7.1 Is there passive protection and / or a spray / deluge system
protecting each sphere / bullet, supports and other critical items
including any exposed surface of each mounded bullet?
16.4.7.2 Does the water supply system to the spray / deluge systems –
normally firewater – have adequate capacity / availability to meet
the maximum demand?
16.4.7.3 Is there a drainage system underneath all spheres and
(unmounded) bullets, designed to take water / hydrocarbon
away from the spheres / bullets to a remote collection pit?

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16.5 Environmental Physical Checks
The Pressurised Storage Facility must maintain all environmental protection features in the Facility.

Guidance

Although it is only light (low molecular weight) hydrocarbons that are stored in pressurised storage
facilities, there is still potential for to generate oily water and for this to require processing before
release to a water course. For example surface water can become contaminated with lube oil.

The flare system associated with a pressurised storage facility should only be used in an emergency /
depressuring situation, and should not be used as a disposal route for excess gas or for off-spec gas.

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16.5 Environmental Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
16.5.1 Are there systems for managing surface water contamination?

Guidance Question
16.5.1.1 Are surface water streams from different areas (eg areas where
there could be lube oil contamination, roads) segregated and given
appropriate treatment according to the risk of contamination and
the nature of the likely contaminants?

Key Question
16.5.3 Is the policy of no flaring other than in an emergency or for
scheduled depressuring followed?

Guidance Questions
16.5.3.1 Are the hydrocarbon pumps glandless (eg canned pumps or
magnetic drives), thereby minimising pump seal losses?
16.5.3.2 Are relief valves (RVs) monitored regularly to check whether they
are passing?
16.5.3.3 Is there a leak detection and repair (LDAR) programme for
pipework, flanges and fittings?

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17. UNDERGROUND STORAGE

Guidance

Background to Underground Storage


Underground facilities for storing hydrocarbons such as crude oil and natural gas have been in use for
more than 50 years. Compared to conventional aboveground storage facilities, a major advantage of
underground storage is economy of scale – very large volumes of hydrocarbon can be stored in a single
facility. Hence underground storage is most frequently used where large storage capacity is required, for
example crude oil at terminals, or natural gas for seasonal storage. But there are examples of
underground storage facilities with lower capacities, such as SABIC’s hydrogen and ethylene salt
caverns on Teesside in UK.

Low visual impact is another advantage of underground storage. For many on-shore underground storage
facilities, it is only the well heads and the aboveground facilities (AGF) that are visible. A further potential
benefit of underground storage is that there is the potential to locate the storage offshore, such as
Centrica’s Rough facility which makes use of a depleted gas field in Southern North Sea, UK.

The different types of underground storage facility covered in this document are:

o solution-mined salt caverns (referred to as ‘salt caverns’)


o rock caverns
o depleted oil and gas fields (referred to as ‘depleted fields’)
o aquifers
o former military installations (such as concrete cylindrical tanks)

It should be noted that some facilities consist of conventional tanks that are belowgound or
buried. Typically these have access tunnels or shafts that allow them to be operated and
maintained in th same manner as aboveground facilities. In these cases it is better suited to
assess them against section 8 of this protocol.

Underground storage facilities (other than former military installations) are described in European
Standard EN 1918 ‘Gas Supply Systems – Underground Gas Storage’ which covers the development,
design, construction, commissioning and operation of each type of facility (Part 1 - Aquifers, Part 2 - Oil
and Gas Fields, Part 3 - Solution-mined Salt Cavities, Part 4 - Rock Caverns, Part 5 - Surface Facilities).
Although the title of this EN standard implies that it is applies only to gas storage, it does cover the
storage of LPG in salt cavities and rock caverns. Hence it is also relevant to the use of salt cavities and
rock caverns for the storage of liquid hydrocarbons.

For all underground storage facilities storing gas (in the gaseous phase), the storage inventory / pressure
can be cycled between the maximum and minimum operating pressures. This inventory is the working
gas capacity. Below the minimum pressure it is inevitable that a significant quantity of gas remains in
the reservoir. This gas, called cushion gas, usually equates to about half of the maximum volume of gas
in place.

Brief descriptions of the type of storage are as follows:

Salt Caverns
The underground storage of compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) in solution-
mined salt cavities is a proven technology for adjusting gas supply systems to short-term and seasonal
changes in gas demand.

It is known that suitable salt layers and salt domes are impermeable to gas at normal pressures. In
addition, cracks and faults in the salt are healed by the viscoplastic behaviour of the salt under the

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geostatic pressure. Hence salt caverns are good for gas storage.

A cavity is constructed by drilling a well into the salt dome or salt layer deposit with adequate protection
for the underlying and overlying stratas. Cavities are leached by the controlled circulation of water down
the wellbore into the salt zone and back to the surface as brine.

There are two distinct types of salt deposit that are used for underground storage – domal salt and
bedded salt. Bedded salts are normally shouldower and thinner formations than salt domes, and have
higher concentrations of insolubles (mudstone, anhydrite). Hence cavern creation in bedded salt
deposits tends to be more challenging.

For caverns that store compressed natural gas, the brine is displaced from the cavity by the controlled
injection of gas. The pressure in the cavity is cycled between the maximum and minimum operating
pressures of the cavity, which are calculated based on the depth of the last cemented casing.

LPG is also stored in salt caverns. For these caverns, the brine displaced from the cavity by the injection
of the LPG on the first fill is generally collected in a pond, sized according to the volume of the cavity. To
withdraw LPG from the cavity, the brine is re-injected into the cavity, thereby displacing the LPG out of
the cavity. In this case, the system does not require any downhole pumping equipment. Hence a brine
compensation system has the advantage of operation at a more or less constant pressure in the cavity.

There are more than 30 years of experience of storage of gas and LPG in solution-mined salt cavities,
and the technique is well known and highly developed.

To ensure a very high level of safety, sophisticated techniques are available for:

o The evaluation of the suitability of the geological salt formation for storage;
o The description of the salt behaviour under stress conditions;
o The description of the local stresses around the salt cavities and the demonstration of its
mechanical stability;
o Drilling, cementing and completion of wells to prevent external gas migration from the cavity
towards the surface or upper geological formations;
o Controlled leaching of the cavity to its design form and size;
o First gas filling under controlled conditions;
o Monitoring critical parameters of the cavities in operation.

Rock Cavern Storage


Rock caverns (including dis-used coal mines and dis-used salt mines) can be used for underground
storage, and are relatively common in Scandinavia. Although a rock cavern can be lined, it is generally
designed to allow groundwater ingress into the cavern, thereby mitigating stock leakage / loss. The main
prerequisites for unlined cavern storage are the presence of a sufficient natural water head above the
caverns to ensure the hydrodynamic containment of the product, and a rock mass quality sufficient to
ensure the long-term stability of the excavation.

Generally water accumulates in drainage sumps which are fitted with level (interface) control and
automatic pump out to above ground water treatment facilities. In some locations the groundwater level
in the vicinity of a cavern is artificially controlled in order to reduce / control groundwater ingress.

A rock cavern facility typically comprises several galleries, excavated from an access shaft or ramp, the
galleries being sited deep enough to ensure hydraulic containment of the material being stored. The
storage space is connected to the surface by a series of lines in operating shafts or operating wells
(cased and cemented). Submersible pump are installed underground for product delivery and for
removal of seepage water. Examples of these caverns are found at Gothenburg and Gavle in Sweden.

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Depleted Field Storage
Depleted fields can be used for storage of gas, an example being Cross Alta facility in Canada. In
developing a depleted field for gas storage, the knowledge about the reservoir behaviour and properties
is available from the exploration and production periods. In assessing the suitability of a depleted oil and
gas field for gas storage, two key factors are porosity and permeability. The porosity of the formation
determines the amount of fluid that the field can hold. The permeability determines the rate at which the
fluid can flow through the rock formation, which in turn is likely to limit the rate of injection and
withdrawal per well.

Aquifer Storage
Underground aquifer storage is the artificial creation of a natural gas deposit by displacing the water /
brine contained in the pores of a deep-laying aquifer with gas. The space forms a gas ‘bubble’ which can
be operated in alternate injection and withdrawal cycles. By their very nature, underground storage
facilities in aquifers are closely related to oil and gas fields. Indeed, the exploration, installation and
maintenance phases are based on oil and gas industry approved technology.

Former Military Installations


It is common for former military underground storage installations to be converted for commercial
storage. These installations range from conventional storage tanks which are buried or mounded to
special-shaped underground tanks, often constructed as concrete boxes / cylinders. Generally these
facilities have been designed / built to avoid detection and to withstand military attack, and some have
fire suppression facilities installed. Capacities vary over a wide range, the order of 5,000 to
1,000,000 m3. Examples of these are PetroSA Saldhana Bay in South Africa and Milstrand Terminal in
Estonia.

Above Ground Facilities (AGF)


Whatever the type of underground storage facility (salt cavern, rock cavern, depleted field, aquifer,
former military installation), the facility will generally require some aboveground facilities (AGF) for the
pumping / compressing, treating / purifying, heating / cooling and gauging or metering of the hydrocarbon
when it is injected and / or withdrawn.

For a facility storing gas, the AGF includes (but is not limited to) compression for gas withdrawal and / or
injection and gas treatment / dehydration. For brine compensated storage facilities, the AGF also
comprises brine storage and handling systems.

For gas storage in a depleted field, it is common for the injected gas (which would normally be pipeline
quality) to pick up some heavier hydrocarbons and / or moisture from the depleted field. Acid gases –
hydrogen sulphide and carbon dioxide – could also contaminate the gas in this way, although a depleted
gas field that is sour is less likely to be selected for conversion to gas storage service. Hence on
withdrawal of gas from a depleted field storage facility, it is common for the gas to have to be treated /
dehydrated in an AGF before it is injected into the gas pipeline system.

Depending on the design / specification of the AGF, some / all of the following items form part of the
facility:
 Utility systems (power, steam, instrument air, nitrogen, water treatment, cooling systems etc.)
 Catalysts and chemicals storage and handling (eg for dessicant, molecular sieve, acid / caustic)
 Lube oil storage & handling
 Firewater and fire fighting foam storage and distribution

This Section does not cover these facilities that are associated with the AGF. Subject to the complexity
of the AGF associated with the underground storage facility, reference should be made to Section 14,
Process Units and the guidance and questions in Section 14 should be used for the assessment of the
AGF.

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17.1 Underground Storage Layout and Design
The facility must be designed and laid out following internationally recognised guidelines and
regulations.

Guidance

Standard for Facility


The design and development of an underground storage facility should be in accordance with
recognised standards, such as EN 1918 ‘Gas Supply Systems – Underground Gas Storage’ referred to
in the Guidance above.

Well-head Layout
The layout of the wellheads / facilities at the surface should give good access by road, not only for
operations staff but also for a variety of activities such as maintenance and repair as well as to enable
rapid response to emergency situations.

Process plant areas should be separated from any storage / well-head area. Major roads should be a
minimum width of 6 m.

Clearance of Overhead Piperuns


Clearance of overhead piperuns over roads should typically be 4.5 m or 5.5 m, to give good access for
heavy equipment.

Plot Plan
This should show location of all wellheads, roads, pump houses, surface storage facilities (eg for brine)
and any process facilities.

Salt Cavern Stability / Integrity


The structural stability of solution-mined salt caverns depends upon many interrelated factors, including
local hydrology, geology and rock properties, cavern operating profile, cavern depth, cavern geometry
and location with respect to other caverns. Successful cavern design, construction, long term operation
and abandonment must provide conditions for long-term cavern stability in order to maintain the
integrity of the salt. The cavern geo-design and operating limits, including the spacing of caverns, their
optimum shape, as well as the operating envelope, are calculated based on careful simulation using in-
situ and laboratory tests of materials and long-term creep models.

In an effort to simplify matters, at the Public Enquiry in 2008 held as part of the development of the
Preesall Project, some guidelines for salt cavern stability were produced, known as the ‘Preesall Rules’,
as follows:

o Max radius of any cavern should not exceed 50 m


o Salt thickness between the cavern roof and the top of the salt above should not be less than the
maximum radius of the cavern
o Salt thickness between the cavern base and the bottom of the salt below should not be less
than 20% of the max radius of the cavern
o The salt ‘pillar’ between adjacent caverns should not be less than three times the maximum
radius of each cavern
o Maximum / minimum permissible internal pressure should not be greater / less than 83% / 30%
of the vertical component of the overburden pressure at the depth of the last cemented casing
shoe

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For gas storage in a salt cavern, the monitoring of operations is more complex than for a depleted
field or an aquifer. Due to the viscoplastic behaviour of the salt, it creeps with time. Every few
years, re-leaching of the cavern may be required, to restore its working capacity. Generally this
causes caverns to shrink, and to shrink at higher rates at lower pressures. Continuous operation at
low pressures can cause damage to the cavern wall, as can rapid changes in pressure over
extended periods. For this reason, the monitoring of salt cavern operation should include the
recording of not only the average daily pressure, but also the maximum change in pressure during
each day and cavern temperature. The rate at which salt creeps is relatively sensitive to
temperature. The output from the monitoring system should demonstrate that each cavern has
been operated in compliance with its constraints / limitations, as determined by the geo-
mechanical consultant by modelling during the design. These constraints / limitations may include
a maximum daily pressure change, and operation above a certain pressure (the ‘healing’ pressure)
for a minimum number of days per year.

All neighbouring subsurface activities, past or present, such as oil and gas reservoirs, fresh water
aquifers, mining activities and other underground storage facilities, should be taken into account,
not only during the design and construction of an underground storage facility, but also as part of
the monitoring of the facility in normal operation.

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17.1 Underground Storage Layout and Design
Key Question Y N NS N/A
17.1.1 Was the Facility specified and designed in accordance with a
recognised industry standard / guideline?

Guidance Questions
17.1.1.1 Is there an up to date and accurate plan of the Facility?
17.1.1.2 Are the well head areas suitably located / laid out?
17.1.1.4 Do pipe racks over access routes provide sufficient height /
clearance (and are they marked with that height)?
17.1.1.5 Are pipelines and wellheads suitably protected against vehicle
collisions?

Key Question
17.1.2 Does the design and location of the Facility control room
comply with industry regulations and guidance?

Guidance Questions
17.1.2.1 Is the control room located a suitable distance from well head
area(s) and process area(s)?
17.1.2.2 Is the control room designed to be blast proof where storing
higher risk products?

Key Question
17.1.3 For each salt caverns, is the design in accordance with a
recognised industry standard / guideline?

Guidance Questions
17.1.3.1 Were staff / consultants with an appropriate level of expertise
and experience in salt cavern design responsible for the design
and layout?
17.1.3.1 For each salt cavern, are the radius and height of each cavern
satisfactory in relation to the thickness of salt around the
cavern and the applicable standards / guidelines?
17.1.3.2 Are the gradients used to calculate cavern maximum and
minimum pressures appropriate?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
17.2 Procedures & Operations
It is essential that the Facility carries out procedures & operations as dictated in the operations manual.

Guidance

The facility should have a written, comprehensive, and up-to-date Operating Manual. The assessor
should check that operating procedures are being followed and are effective.

The Operating Manual is a working document and should include procedures, practices, and drawings
relevant to the specific facility. The Manual should be available to all appropriate personnel in the
accepted site working language.

The Operating Manual should include the roles and responsibilities of the operating personnel and
procedures associated with emergencies such as fire, product spillage or medical emergency.

The assessor should check that the key documents and procedures required to operate the facility are
clear and concise, reflecting key risks and processes to manage them. The Operating Manual should
include, but not be limited to, the following:

 Operation in different modes (injection, withdrawal and static), and the switching between
modes
 Control Systems and Shutdown Procedures
 Fire and Gas Systems
 Emergency Procedures
 Gauging and Sampling Procedures
 Static Electricity Precautions
 Environmental Protection Procedures
 Exposure to Toxic Vapours
 Operating Environmental Limits
 Facility Plan Layout Drawings

A separate Emergency Response manual should be provided to cover such topics as emergency call-
out procedures and interaction with local authorities, municipal emergency response organizations, or
other outside agencies and organisations.

In normal operation of a gas storage facility (salt cavern, depleted field or aquifer), the main activity is
the monitoring of the injected and withdrawn gas volumes and the storage pressure. A monitoring
system is commonly used to check for gas containment and storage reservoir / cavern containment,
and to calculate gas inventory. A monitoring system should also be used for facilities storing liquids.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
17.2 Procedures & Operations
Key Question Y N NS N/A
17.2.1 Are operational checklists and site visual inspections
completed diligently?

Key Question
17.2.2 Are shift handovers performed and recorded in sufficient
detail?

Key Question
17.2.3 Are specialist procedures and instructions adhered to (eg a
permit-to-work system)?

Key Question
17.2.4 Does the underground storage facility (and the associated
above ground facilities) have a written, comprehensive and up-
to-date Operating Manual?

Guidance Questions
17.2.4.1 Is the Operating Manual available to all appropriate personnel
in the accepted site working language?
17.2.4.2 Are the roles and responsibilities of the operating personnel
defined in the Operating Manual?
17.2.4.3 Does the Operating Manual cover the items listed in the
Guidance?

Key Question
17.2.5 Does the Emergency Response Plan cover scenarios specific
to underground storage risks (eg gas releases to the surface
leading to fire or explosion, releases from aboveground
facilities leading to fire and explosion, liquid releases to the
environment, seismic activity)?

Key Question
17.2.7 Does the underground storage facility have a suitable
monitoring system installed, to record key operational data,
track inventory and check for containment?

Key Question
17.2.8 For gas storage system, are operations aware of the maximum
and minimum pressures and the significance of these
pressures?

Key Question
17.2.9 For gas storage in a salt cavern, are the constraints on the
operation of the cavern documented and adequately
understood by Operations?

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Y N NS N/A
Key Question
17.2.10 Are neighbouring subsurface activities, past or present, such
as oil and gas reservoirs, fresh water aquifers, mining activities
and other underground storage facilities, monitored / tracked?

Key Question
17.2.11 For salt cavern operation, are staff / consultants available with
expertise / experience in salt cavern geo-mechanics and
modelling, and do these people provide operational support?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
17.3 Maintenance & Inspection Programmes and Checks
It is essential that a Facility performs maintenance & carries out inspections as dictated in the
maintenance & inspection programme.

Guidance

The assessor should check whether the Facility’s written inspection and maintenance procedures are
effective, and check that records of inspections and maintenance are well maintained.

The assessor should check to see if items of ‘Safety Critical Equipment’ (such as relief valves, high
integrity trip systems etc.) have been identified and how this equipment is managed for maintenance /
inspection / testing.

Some equipment (Pressure Vessels, Fire Protection and Gas Detection Systems, Lifting Equipment,
etc) may have to meet local inspection / testing requirements. The assessor should verify that a
program is in place for the related equipment and that the program is being implemented.

The wells associated with an underground storage facility can cover a large area. It is important that
they are closely monitored. Periodic inspections should be carried out on all the wells, so as to detect
any anomaly and to carry out any necessary measurement. The annulus pressure should be monitored
to check for gas leakage, and the wellhead should be designed for the safe venting of any build-up of
pressure.

Each salt cavern should be periodically surveyed by suitably skilled personnel. If applicable given the
design of the cavity completion, the cavity shape should be monitored periodically by sonar or another
acceptable technique.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
17.3 Maintenance & Inspection Programmes and Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
17.3.1 Do the Facility’s inspection and maintenance procedures
appear effective?

Key Question
17.3.5 Are the overall levels of housekeeping on the Facility
acceptable?

Key Question
17.3.6 During maintenance turnarounds of the Facility, are the
facilities used by the maintenance and turnaround team
(temporary buildings, laydown areas, workshops, car parks,
etc) located in appropriate, safe areas?

Key Question
17.3.7 Are appropriate inspections carried out on each well?

Key Question
17.3.8 For underground storage facilities with casings and productions
strings, is the annulus pressure monitored to check for gas
leakage, and is any build-up of gas vented safely?

Key Question
17.3.9 For salt cavern storage, is each cavity periodically surveyed by
suitably skilled personnel?

Key Question
17.3.10 For salt cavern storage, is each cavity shape monitored
periodically by sonar or another acceptable technique?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
17.4 Safety and Fire & Gas Physical Checks
All safety & fire fighting equipment must be designed, installed and maintained to international, national
and industry standards.

Guidance

This Section covers Safety and Fire & Gas issues for Underground Storage facilities. For Emergency
Response relating to Underground Storage, see Section 4 and 17.2.

In addition to the usual safety rules and recommendations applicable to all comparable installations,
appropriate measures should be taken to minimise the risk and consequences of a blow-out and of any
leakage.

Specifically in addition to applying industry standards to the design / construction of the well, wellhead,
well casing, liner, cementing programme and tubing, underground gas storage facilities should have a
sub-surface safety valve (SSSV) installed as part of the production completion in each well. The SSSV
is operated by a control signal from the surface, or by subsurface pressure, or by flow rate conditions.

For underground storage facilities using salt caverns, aquifers and depleted fields, there is no (or
negligible) air / oxygen present in the underground section of the storage facility. The same fire
protection and gas detection rules / guidelines should be applied to the aboveground pipework and
valves as are applied to the balance of the aboveground facilities (AGF) - see Section 14. For other
storage facilities where air / oxygen can be present (rock caverns and former military installations), all
underground equipment and instrumentation should be specified / designed accordingly.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
17.4 Safety and Fire & Gas Physical Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
17.4.1 For salt caverns, is each well designed, installed and operated in
accordance with industry standards to minimise the risk of
blowout?

Key Question
17.4.2 For gas storage systems, does each well have a sub-surface
safety valve installed?

Key Question
17.4.3 For rock cavern storage, is all subsurface equipment and
instrumentation rated for the appropriate zone classification?

Key Question
17.4.4 Do high-risk areas have fire and / or gas detection?

Guidance Question
17.4.4.1 Does the control room have heating ventilation and air
conditioning (HVAC) with gas detectors in the air inlet which are
linked to an automatic HVAC shutdown system?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
17.5 Environmental Controls & Checks
The Facility must maintain all environmental protection features in the Facility.

Guidance

In normal operation, underground storage can result in the production of a waste water stream that
requires treatment before discharge. For example groundwater that ingresses into a rock cavern
storage facility and are then pumped out, contaminated brine used in a salt cavern storing LPG).

The capacity of many salt caverns decreases over the years due to salt creep. The amount of creep
depends on the cavern operating profile. After several years it is common for a salt cavern to be taken
out of service and re-leached, in order to restore its working volume. The re-leaching process requires
a significant amount of water and a disposal route for the brine.

Gas withdrawn from an underground gas storage can be contaminated with heavier hydrocarbons (for a
depleted field) and / or with water (for a depleted field, aquifer or salt cavern). Before the gas leaves
the facility, treatment may be required for the gas to meet the pipeline / export supply specification.
Hydrocarbon and water removal would be carried out within the aboveground facilities (AGF) – refer to
Section 14.

With good design and operation, the risk of the operation of an aquifer storage system leading to
contamination to / from a neighbouring aquifer or depleted field is very low. But if there are such
neighbouring facilities it is good practice to liaise with these 3rd parties as required and set up a
monitoring/tracking system.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
17.5 Environmental Controls & Checks
Key Question Y N NS N/A
17.5.1 Are there appropriate systems for handling and treating any
water removed from the underground storage Facility?

Key Question
17.5.2 For salt caverns, has appropriate provision been made for the
disposal of brine arising from future re-leaching operations?

Key Question
17.5.3 For gas that is withdrawn from storage that may be
contaminated with heavier hydrocarbons and / or water, are the
facilities for removing and disposing of these contaminants
appropriate and fit for purpose?

Key Question
17.5.4 If there are any neighbouring aquifers or depleted field storage
facilities, is there a system set up with the 3rd parties for
monitoring any contamination?

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
APPENDIX A

HSE PROGRAMME

Example: Accident Investigation Element of the HSSE Programme:

What Who When Where How


Reporting of All employees By the end of In control Using form
accidents and and a the shift during room XYZ-123
near misses contractors which the
incident occurs
Reporting of Shift Nurse By end of the First Aid Room Using form
injuries shift during XYZ-123, Part
which the “B”
injury occurs
Posting of Site Manager Within 24 Personal Using form
information to or Deputy hours of the message XYZ-124
all employees incident displayed on
on major occurring main notice
incidents boards.
Approval of Supervisor of Within 24 Completing
recommendati person hours of section 3 of
ons reporting the receiving the form XYZ-123
accident / near report form
miss
Allocation of Departmental Within 7 days Completing
actions arising Manager of receiving Section 4 of
from the report form XYZ-123
recommendati form
ons
Completion of Actionee Within period Completing
actions stated on form Section 5 of
XYZ-123 form XYZ-123
Compilation HSSE Quarterly, by Posted on Recording of
and Manager the end of the main notice the progress
communicatio first week boards and e- of activities
n of accident after the end mailed to associated
and near miss of each quarter HSSE with each form
statistics Committee XYZ-123.
members.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
APPENDIX B

APPLICATION RATES ON HYDROCARBONS (UP TO 15% MTBE / ETBE) FOR TANK TOP POURERS

Type of system Solution rate NFPA Minimum duration


(L/min/m2) (Minutes)
Rim seal pourer (with foam dam) 12.2 20
Rim seal pourer (without foam dam) 20.4 10
Top foam pourer (flash point>38°C) 4.1 20 *30 **
Top foam pourer (flash point<38°C) 4.1 30 *55 **
Top foam pourer (crude oil) 4.1 30 *55 **
Notes:

* A discharge outlet that will conduct and deliver foam gently onto the liquid surface without
submergence of the foam or agitation of the surface.

** A discharge outlet that does not deliver foam gently onto the liquid surface but is designed to lessen
submergence of the foam or agitation of the surface.

APPLICATION RATES FOR SUBSURFACE INJECTION ON TANKS

Type of system Solution rate NFPA Minimum duration


(L/min/m2) (Minutes)
Subsurface (flash point>38°C) 4.1 30
Subsurface (flash point<38°C) 4.1 55
Subsurface (crude oil) 4.1 55

BP preference is for top pourers rather than subsurface system as the latter are more difficult to maintain,
cannot be really tested and don’t allow change of product in the tank (from non-foam-destructive to foam
destructive) or upgrading of the tank (from simple fixed roof to fixed roof with internal cover float). Those
systems also represent a potential liquid leak source.

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THIRD PARTY FACILITY ASSESSMENT
APPENDIX C

FOAM APPLICATION USING PORTABLE EQUIPMENT

The recommended foam application rates using a 3% foam concentrate for use with portable / mobile
foam equipment is as follows:

Liquid Hydrocarbons:

Application rate NFPA Application Rate BP (NFPA + 60%) :


6.5 L/min/m2 10.4 L/min/m2

This includes gas oils and motor spirits containing no more than 15% alcohol by volume. Once this
percentage is exceeded the concentrate should be increased to 6%.

Flammable liquids having a boiling point of less than 100°F (37.8°C) may require higher rates of
application. Flammable liquids with a wide boiling range may develop a heat layer after prolonged burning
and can require application rates of 8.1 L/min/m2 or more. [BP rate 12.9 L/min/m2]. [See Appendix Five -
Boil-overs]

Other flammable / combustible liquids:

Water soluble and certain flammable and combustible liquids and polar solvents are destructive to regular
foams and require the use of alcohol resistant foams. In most instances a 6% foam solution will be
necessary; however individual suppliers should be consulted.

Liquid Application rate NFPA Application rate BP


(L/min/m2) (NFPA +60%) (L/min/m2)
Methyl alcohol 6.5 10.4
Ethyl alcohol 6.5 10.4
Acrylonitrile 6.5 10.4
Ethyl acetate 6.5 10.4
Methyl ethyl ketone 6.5 10.4
Acetone 9.8 15.7
Butyl alcohol 9.8 15.7
Isopropyl ether 9.8 15.7

Discharge duration:

Products with a flash point between 100°F (38°C) and 200°F (90°C) [kerosene] 50 min.
Products with a flash point below 100°F (38°C) [gasoline]. 65 min.
Crude oil 65 min

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