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M.Sc. Degree (with course work)/ Postgrad.

Diploma in Physics Education Program (2016)


Revised Course Structure (December 2015)
Course No. Course Name C Hrs.

L P

PART I (26 credits)

1 MPE 5501 Foundations of Science Education 3 30 30

2 MPE 5502 Assessment and Evaluation Methods 3 30 30

3 MPE 5503 Laboratory in Information Communication Technology for Teaching 1 0 30

4 MPE 5504 Instructional Design Methods 2 15 30

5 MPE 5505 Methods in Physics Education Research 2 0 60

6 MPE 5506 Mathematical Methods in Physics 1 15 0

7 MPE 5507 Perspectives in Classical Mechanics & Thermal Physics 3 30 30

8 MPE 5508 Perspectives in Electromagnetic Theory & Optics 3 30 30

9 MPE 5509 Perspectives in Electronics & Semiconductor Physics 3 30 30

10 MPE 5510 Perspectives in Modern Physics 3 30 30

11 MPE 5511 Special Topics in Physics 2 30 0

PART II (5 credits)

12 MPE 5512 Physics Education Project 5

C.A – Continuous assessment, F.E. – Final Exam (written), V.R. – Viva-voce & Report

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Course Title: FOUNDATIONS OF SCIENCE EDUCATION
Credits: 3 (30L 30P)
Course Code: MPE 5501
Pre-requisites: none
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):

By the end of this course the students will be able to,


 describe theoretical aspects of learning and teaching.
 recognize new trends in education.
 explain the nature of science.
 evaluate aspects of science curriculum in Sri Lankan education system.
 compare Sri Lankan science curriculum practices with respect to international norms.

Course Contents:
Psychological aspects of learning and teaching: Intellectual development, Concept development, Learning theories.
Sociological and philosophical aspects of teaching and learning: Education and society, Socio-economic and cultural
determinants of education, Education and human development, Education and development, New trends in education.
Nature of science: Science as an organized body of knowledge, Science as a process of acquiring knowledge,
Scientific method, Science as an influence to human spirit, Philosophy of science; Educational value of science.
Development of Science and contemporary trends: Development of science education in the UK and USA. UNESCO
effort for science for all, Science education in Sri Lanka, New trends in science education.

Science curriculum: Aims and objectives of Learning science, Curriculum theory, Curriculum development models and
curriculum patterns, Curriculum evaluation, Science curriculum in Sri Lanka, Aims and objectives of Learning science,
Three domains (cognitive, Psychomotor and affective) bloom’s and other classifications, Science process skills, Scientific
and science related attitudes.

Method of Evaluation: Continuous assessments (40%); Final Exam (60%)

References:
1. Smolicz, J. J., & Nunan, E. E. (1975). The philosophical and sociological foundations of science education: The
demythologizing of school science.
2. Mintzes, J. J., Wandersee, J. H., & Novak, J. D. (Eds.). (2005). Teaching science for understanding: A human
constructivist view. Academic Press.
3. Hodson, D. (1985). Philosophy of science, science and science education.
4. Dembo, M. H. (1994). Applying educational psychology . Longman/Addison Wesley Longman.
5. Slavin, R. E., & Davis, N. (2006). Educational psychology: Theory and practice.

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Course Title: ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION METHODS
Credits: 3 (30L 30P)
Course Code: MPE 5502
Pre-requisites: none
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):

By the end of this course the students will be able to,


 explain the basis of assessment in education.
 identify and apply a variety of assessment tools for assessing different student skills.
 analyze the constructive alignment of assessment with course intended learning outcomes.
 analyze outcomes of assessment to improve teaching and learning.

Course Contents:
Assessment in Education; Conceptual Classifications of Assessment; What is to be Assessed: Learning Objectives and
Assessment Objectives, Content Standards and Performance Standards, Learning Outcomes, Skills and Competencies,
Different Categories of Learning Objectives, Cognitive / Affective / Psycho-motor /Knowledge / Attitudes / Skills,
Assessment Taxonomies (Bloom’s, Solo etc...) ;. Different Types of Assessment, Written Tests as a tool of Assessment,
Questions and Question Types, Multiple Choice Questions, Writing Structured / Essay Type Questions, Item Analysis,
Preparation of Question Papers, Test Validity and Reliability, References, Assessment of the Module.

Method of Evaluation: Continuous assessments (40%); Final Exam (60%)

References:
1. Nitko, A. J. (2001). Educational assessment of students. Prentice-Hall, Inc., PO Box 11071, Des Moines, IA
50336-1071.
2. Stiggins, R. J. (1994). Student-centered classroom assessment. New York: Merrill.

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Course Title: LABORATORY IN INFORMATION COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR TEACHING
Credits: 1 (30 P)
Course Code: MPE 5503
Pre-requisites: none
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):

By the end of this course the students will be able to,


 identify a variety of emergent technologies in IT for education
 use web based software for effective communication
 apply a variety of software tools to develop educational contents
 apply database management software to organize/retrieve information
 evaluate pros/cons of software tools used under varying educational contexts

Course contents
Human-Computer interaction & emergent technologies for education, Use of mathematical software, Word processing
and spreadsheet applications for educational content development, Use of graphics designing software, Web-based tools
for educational applications, Web page authoring and design software, Building web animations, Mobile technology in
education, Information systems and database management for education content management

Method of Evaluation: Lab based assessments (100%).

References:
1. Leask, Marilyn, and Norbert Pachler. Learning to teach using ICT in the secondary school: A companion to school
experience. Routledge, 2013.
2. Finger, Glenn, et al. Transforming learning with ICT: making IT happen!. Pearson Education Australia, 2007.

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Course Title: INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN METHODS
Credits: 3 (15L 60P)
Course Code: MPE 5504
Pre-requisites: none
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):

By the end of this course the students will be able to,


 recite different instructional design models.
 apply instructional design models for lesson planning.
 apply software tools for designing developing learning & teaching material.
 compare different strategies for effective teaching and learning instructions.
 demonstrate ability present selected topic in physics with effective use of multimedia.

Course Contents:
Instructional design principles: (15 L)
Instructional design models, Meaningful learning, discovery learning, Advance organization of learning, Process- based
teaching, Beyond process science teaching methods, Unit and lesson planning, Motivational models in instruction,
Information technology in education, Theories and principles in multimedia learning.

Practical aspects of instructional material development: (30 P)


Design and development of lecture slides, Course instructions using multimedia (graphics, video, animation, and audio),
Taking learning outside classroom using web based tools, Design and development of interactive tutorials, Usage of
learning management systems, IT tools for assessment, IT tools for student profiling and performance monitoring.

Method of Evaluation: Lab based assessments (100%).

References:
1. Gagne, Robert M., et al. "Principles of instructional design." (2005): Wiley & Sons Publishers.
2. Kidd, Terry T., ed. Online Education and Adult Learning: New Frontiers for Teaching Practices: New Frontiers for
Teaching Practices. IGI Global, 2009.

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Course Title: METHODS IN PHYSICS EDUCATION RESEARCH
Credits: 2 (60 P)
Course Code: MPE 5505
Pre-requisites: none
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):

By the end of this course the students will be able to,


 describe different approaches to Physics Education Research (PER).
 describe different epistemologies in Physics Education.
 identify different tools used in PER.
 apply different tools used in PER in their own classroom.
 synthesize research questions related to their own classroom.
 analyze data using PER tools and derive conclusions about student learning patterns.

Course Contents:
Synthesis of research questions/ hypothesis, Methods in Physics education research Identification of research projects,
Scientific method, Literature survey, Planning methodologies: Selection of Instrumentation and acquisition of data,
Statistical analysis of data and making conclusions, Interpretation and further development/improvements, Reporting
scientific findings.

Method of Evaluation: Case study type assessments (100%).

References:
1. McDermott, Lillian C. "Physics by Inquiry, Volume 1 & 2. ISBN 0-471-14440-1. Wiley-VCH, (1995).
2. Wittmann, Michael J., Richard N. Steinberg, and Edward F. Redish. Activity-based Tutorials. Volume 1 & 2. John
Wiley & Sons, 2005.
3. Louis, C., Lawrence, M., & Keith, M. (2007). Research methods in education. New York: Routledge.

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Course Title: MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN PHYSICS
Credits: 1 (15 L)
Course Code: MPE 5506
Pre-requisites: none
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):

By the end of this course the students will be able to,


 prove/ explain the underlying basis of a physical laws using the mathematical tools
 apply a variety of mathematical methods to solve problems in physics
 analyze quantitatively the processes, relationships and techniques relevant physical processes

Course Contents:
Introductory differentiation and integration, Series and Limits, Vector Calculus, Matrices and Vector Spaces, Eigen value
Problems in Physics, Differential equations and applications to Physics, Complex numbers, Fourier series.

Method of Evaluation: Final Exam (100%)

References:
1. Boas, Mary L. Mathematical methods in the physical sciences. Wiley, 2006.
2. Bence, S. J., K. F. Riley, and M. P. Hobson. "Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering: A
Comprehensive Guide." (2006).

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Course Title: PERSPECTIVES IN CLASSICAL MECHANICS & THERMAL PHYSICS
Credits: 3 (30L 30P)
Course Code: MPE 5507
Pre-requisites: none

PART I - Classical Mechanics: (15L 15P)


Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):
By the end of this course the students will be able to,
 analytically solve physical problems using Newtonian mechanics and Lagrangian formalism.
 perform set laboratory based experiments to demonstrate principles in classical mechanics.
 design laboratory based experiments for introductory physics students.
 design inquiry based tutorials for introductory physics students.
 demonstrate pedagogical ability on a selected topic.
Course Contents:
Waves & Oscillations: damped harmonic oscillator, forced vibrations, resonance, wave equation, interference, phase and group
velocities, reflection and transmission, Fourier analysis of pulses, Doppler effect; Central-Force Motion, Dynamics of a System of
Particles, Motion in a Non-inertial Reference Frame, Dynamics of Rigid Bodies, concepts in special relativity.

Lab based teaching, learning and assessment (15 P)


These sessions involve activity based learning where students are expected to perform set laboratory experiments or to design simple
experiments that could be used in school classroom teaching on selected topics specified under the above listed course contents.

References:
1. Marion, Jerry B. Classical dynamics of particles and systems. Academic Press, 2013.

PART II - Thermal Physics: (15L 15P)


Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):
By the end of this course the students will be able to,
 analytically solve physical problems related to selected topics in Thermodynamics.
 perform set laboratory based experiments to demonstrate principles in Thermodynamics.
 design laboratory based experiments for introductory physics students.
 design inquiry based tutorials for introductory physics students.
 demonstrate pedagogical ability on a selected topic.

Course Contents:
Thermodynamic systems and related measurements, Zeroth law of thermodynamics and implications, First law of thermodynamics,
thermal processes using the ideal gas law, Specific heat capacities, Second Law of thermodynamics, Carnot principle, Heat Engines,
Refrigeration, Entropy, Third law of Thermodynamics.

Lab based teaching, learning and assessment (15 P)


These sessions involve activity based learning where students are expected to perform set laboratory experiments or to design simple
experiments that could be used in school classroom teaching on selected topics specified under the above listed course contents.

References:

1. Kittel, Charles, and Herbert Kroemer. Thermal physics. Macmillan, 1980.

Method of Evaluation: Continuous assessments (40%); Final Exam (60%)

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Course Title: PERSPECTIVES IN ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY & OPTICS
Credits: 3 (30 L 30 P)
Course Code: MPE 5508
Pre-requisites: none

PART I - Electromagnetic Theory: (15L 15P)


Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):
By the end of this course the students will be able to,
 describe and analyze quantitatively processes, relationships and techniques relevant to the topics.
 perform set laboratory based experiments to demonstrate principles in Electromagnetic Theory.
 design laboratory based experiments for introductory physics students.
 design inquiry based tutorials for introductory physics students.
 demonstrate pedagogical ability on a selected topic.

Course Contents:
Coulomb’s law, Electric field intensity and potential, Electric dipole and dipole moment, Gauss’ law for electrostatics, Capacitors,
Theory of dielectrics and polarization field, Laplace and Poisson’s equations and Boundary value problems, Current density and
equation of continuity, Biot-Savart law, Magnetic flux density, Gauss’ law for magneto-statics, magnetic moment, Ampere’s law,
Magnetic properties of matter, magnetization field, Magnetic field intensity, Faraday’s law, Self and mutual inductance, Maxwell’s
equations.
Lab based teaching, learning and assessment (15 P)
These sessions involve activity based learning where students are expected to perform set laboratory experiments or to design simple
experiments that could be used in school classroom teaching on selected topics specified under the above listed course contents.
References:
1. Griffiths, DJ. Introduction to electrodynamics. Vol. 3. Prentice Hall, 1999.

PART II - Optics: (15L 15P)


Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):
By the end of this course the students will be able to,
 describe and analyze quantitatively processes, relationships and techniques relevant to the topics.
 perform set laboratory based experiments to demonstrate principles in Optics.
 design laboratory based experiments for introductory physics students.
 design inquiry based tutorials for introductory physics students.
 demonstrate pedagogical ability on a selected topic.

Course Contents:
Huygens Principle, Reflection, Refraction, Ray tracing, lenses, Ray matrix method in Geometrical Optics: reflection, refraction,
transmission, lenses, surfaces, optical systems, linear polarization, Malus's Law, circular & elliptical polarization, polarizers, Matrix
formulation of polarized light and elements; Jones' vectors and Jones' matrices, coherence, divisions of wave front and amplitude:
Young’s double slit experiment, Lloyd’s mirror, Fresnel’s Biprism, Fresnel’s double mirror, fringes of equal inclination and fringes of
equal thickness; Fraunhofer diffraction; Rectangular and circular apertures, resolving power, single slit, double slit and diffraction
grating, Fresnel diffraction; Fresnel half period zones, circular division of the wave front, vibration curve, circular aperture, zone plates,
strip division of the wave front, Cornu's spiral, straight edge and single slit.
Lab based teaching, learning and assessment (15 P)
These sessions involve activity based learning where students are expected to perform set laboratory experiments or to design simple
experiments that could be used in school classroom teaching on selected topics specified under the above listed course contents.
References:
1. Hecht, Eugene. "Optics, 4th." International edition, Addison-Wesley, San Francisco (2002):

Method of Evaluation: Continuous assessments (40%); Final Exam (60%)

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Course Title: PERSPECTIVES IN ELECTRONICS & SEMICONDUCTOR PHYSICS
Credits: 3 (30 L 30 P)
Course Code: MPE 5509
Pre-requisites: none

PART I - Electronics: (15L 30P)


Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):
By the end of this course the students will be able to,
 describe and analyze quantitatively the processes, relationships and techniques relevant to the topics.
 perform set laboratory based experiments in Electronics.
 design a simple laboratory experiment in Electronics.
 demonstrate pedagogical ability on a selected topic.

Course Contents:
Diode as a circuit element, Diode models, Rectifier circuits, Zener diodes, Voltage regulation and low voltage power supply, Limiting
and clamping circuits, Special diode types, Seven segment and other displays and their applications. Bipolar transistors, Operation of
an npn transistor in the active mode, Transistor biasing and transistor as an amplifier, Designing of a common emitter amplifier, Voltage
gain, Transistor as a switch-Cutoff and saturation, Small signal equivalent circuit models, Frequency characteristics of an amplifier,
Feedback, Four-basic feedback topologies, Voltage and current feedback, Negative feedback amplifiers, Effect of feedback on the
amplifier characteristics, Positive feedback, Oscillators, Operational amplifiers, Inverting and non-inverting amplifiers, Op-amp based
electronic ammeters and voltmeters, Analogue differentiators and integrators, Digital electronics, Voltage levels, Basic logic gates,
Introduction to logic families, Designing of combinational logic circuits, Minimization of logic expressions using algebraic and Karnaugh
map methods, Construction of a full adder, Addition and Subtraction, Flip-Flop as a memory element, Sequential logic circuits,
registers, Asynchronous counters.
Lab based teaching, learning and assessment (30 P)
These sessions involve activity based learning where students are expected to perform set laboratory experiments or to design simple
experiments that could be used in school classroom teaching on selected topics specified under the above listed course contents.

References:
1. Nagrath, I. J. Electronics: Analog and Digital. PHI Learning Pvt. Ltd., 2013.

PART II - Semiconductor Physics: (15L)


Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):
By the end of this course the students will be able to,
 describe and analyze quantitatively processes, relationships and techniques relevant to the topics.
 design inquiry based tutorials for introductory physics students.
 demonstrate pedagogical ability on a selected topic.

Course Contents:
Semiconductor materials and their properties, Intrinsic semiconductors, Electron-hole pair formation, Doped (extrinsic) semiconductors
(n and p type), Relationship between electron and hole concentrations in semiconductors, p-n junction, Drift and diffusion currents, p-n
junction under open circuit condition, Depletion region Built in voltage width of the depletion region, p-n junction under forward-bias and
reverse-bias conditions, Current-voltage relationship, Diffusion capacitance, Bipolar transistors, Physical structure and mode of
operation, Operation of pnp and npn transistor in the active mode, Current flow through the transistor, Introduction to field effect
transistors and MOSFETS, IC technology, Semiconductor device applications.

References:
1. Neamen, Donald A. Semiconductor physics and devices. McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2003.

Method of Evaluation: Laboratory practicals (40%); Final Exam (60%)

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Course Title: PERSPECTIVES IN MODERN PHYSICS
Credits: 3 (30 L 30 P)
Course Code: MPE 5510
Pre-requisites: none
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):

By the end of this course the students will be able to,


 describe and analyze quantitatively processes, relationships and techniques relevant to the topics.
 perform set lecture demonstrations related to principles in Modern Physics.
 design inquiry based tutorials for introductory physics students.
 demonstrate pedagogical ability on a selected topic.

Course Contents:
Historical background, failures in classical Physics, properties of thermal radiation, blackbodies, cavity radiation,
Stefan's and Wien's law, classical theory of cavity radiation, Planck's theory of cavity radiation, Interaction of radiation
with matter; Photoelectric effect, Compton effect, X-rays, Pair production and Pair annihilation, Matter waves, de
Broglie's hypothesis, Wave-particle duality, Atomic spectra, Thomson's and Rutherford's model of the atom, Bohr model
of the atom, Frank and Hertz experiment, Energy quantization, Rydberg constant, Correspondence principle, Particles
and wave packets; Heisenberg uncertainty principle and its consequences; Wave function and its interpretation, position
probability density, superposition principle; Time-dependent Schrodinger equation; Conservation of probability,
probability current density; Time-independent Schrodinger equation, stationary states; Energy quantization; Particle
moving in a region of step potential, infinite square well potential, Quantum theory of the atom.

Lab based teaching, learning and assessment (30 P)


These sessions involve activity based learning where students are expected to perform set laboratory experiments or to
design simple experiments that could be used in school classroom teaching on selected topics specified under the
above listed course contents.

References:
1. Krane, Kenneth S. "Modern physics." Modern Physics, 2nd Edition, by Kenneth S. Krane, pp. 608. ISBN 0-471-
82872-6. Wiley-VCH, August 1995. 1 (1995).
2. Eisberg, Robert, and Robert Resnick. Quantum physics. John Wiley & Sons, 1985.

Method of Evaluation: Continuous assessments (40%); Final Exam (60%)

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Course Title: SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICS*
Credits: 2 (30 L)
Course Code: MPE 5511
*Students will be offered 2 courses worth 15 L each from the suite of courses given below.
.Pre-requisites: none
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILO):
By the end of this course the students will be able to,
 describe and analyze quantitatively processes, relationships and techniques relevant to the topics.
 perform laboratory experiments/ lecture demonstrations to related to principles of a selected course.
 demonstrate pedagogical ability on a selected topic.

Course Contents:
Astronomy (15 L): Luminosity and magnitude of a star, the structure of stars, Hertz-Russel diagram, Evolution of stars: White
dwarfs, Neutron stars, red giants, supernovae, black holes, pulsars, variable stars, Cepheid variables, X-ray and Gamma ray
sources; Binary stars; Galaxies: classification of galaxies.
References: Comins, Neil F., and William J. Kaufmann. Discovering the universe. Macmillan, 2011.

Earth Sciences (15 L): The Earth’s atmosphere, temperature profile solar radiation and insolation; motions of the atmosphere
cyclones tornadoes, Weather and climate: Greenhouse effect, El niño effect, global warming and sea level rise, Earth and its interior:
Gravity, earth's magnetic field geological structure seismic waves, plate tectonics, earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes, landslides.
Earth’s electrical environment and lightning.
References: Tarbuck, Edward J., and Frederick K. Lutgens. Earth science. Prentice Hall, 2000.

Cosmology (15 L): Historical origins and the development of Cosmology; the evolution of the universe; structure and composition of
the universe; types of galaxies; quasars and radio galaxies; density of the universe; principles of modern cosmology; Hubble’s
observations and Hubble’s Law; extragalactic distances; cosmic background radiation; the big bang and the other models of the
universe; the cosmological constant; Mach’s principle; basic concepts of general relativity, the metric tensor, geodesics, the energy
momentum tensor; Einstein’s field equations, Friedman solutions; the Friedman- Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker metric; modern
observational instruments, black holes, dark matter, dark energy and neutrino cosmology; gravitational lensing; inflation theory;
perturbations from inflation; basic concepts of plasma physics; basic string theory, cosmic strings, areas for further research.
References: Narlikar, Jayant Vishnu. An introduction to cosmology. Cambridge University Press, 2002.

Physics in Biology (15 L): Linear and Angular motion; Biomechanics; Centrifugation; Diffusion; Blood flow, Pressure transducers,
Physics of respiration, Physics of the Eye: Resolution power and Quantum efficiency of the eye. Electrocardiography; Nerve
conduction, Quality of sound. Physics of the Ear: Ear canal as a resonance tube.
References: Franklin, Kirsten, et al. Introduction to biological physics for the health and life sciences. John Wiley & Sons, 2010.

Radiation Physics: (15 L): Radioactivity, Interaction of charged particles and EM radiation with matter, Radiation detectors:
Gaseous, Liquid and Solid detectors. Radiation measurements: Activity, Exposure, Absorbed dose, Kerma, LET and Dose
equivalent. Health effects of radiation: Deterministic effects and stochastic effects. Radiation in the environment: Natural background
radiation, Manmade sources; Radiation safety; Applications of radiation.
References: Lilley, John. Nuclear physics: principles and applications. John Wiley & Sons, 2013.

Nanotechnology (15 L): Historical development of the subject, how structure control properties;interdisciplinary nature of the
subject; nanotechnology fabrication and characterization methods; Current and potential future applications in energy, medicinal
engineering, physics, chemistry, biology, electronics and computing, potential nanotech applications relevant to Sri Lanka.
Ref:
References: Nanotechnology: The Whole Story; by Ben Rogers, Jesse Adams, Sumita Pennathur; ISBN 9781439897805.

Method of Evaluation: Continuous assessments (40%); Final Exam (60%)

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Course Title: PHYSICS EDUCATION PROJECT

Credits: 5 (150 P)

Course Code: MPE 5512

Course content
Guided independent study to identify student learning difficulties in selected topics in Physics and then to implement an
efficient method/s of teaching to improve student understanding. (Could be based on designing activity based tutorials or
multimedia based teaching material) or to design and develop a laboratory experiment to further enhance student
understanding in Physics concepts. The student is expected to use standard methods in Physics Education
Research/Education research.

Method of Evaluation: Research report & Viva-voce examination.

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