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Mechanical Analysis and Design

ME 2104

Lecture 4

Mechanical Analysis
Gear trains
Prof Ahmed Kovacevic
School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences
Room C130, Phone: 8780, E-Mail: a.kovacevic@city.ac.uk
www.staff.city.ac.uk/~ra600/intro.htm
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Plan for the analysis of
mechanical elements
Objective:
Procedures for design and selection of
mechanical elements
 Week 1 – Shafts and keyways
 Week 2 – Bearings and screws
 Week 3 – Belt and chain drives
 Week 4 – Gears and gear trains
 Week 5 – Design Project Review
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Plan for this week

 Gears
 Gear trains
 Examples

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Gear types

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How gears work
Law of Gearing:
A common normal to the tooth profiles at
their point of contact must, in all positions
of the contacting teeth, pass through a fixed
point on the line-of-centres called the pitch
point.
Any two curves or profiles engaging each
other and satisfying the law of gearing are
conjugate curves
Pitch point

Pitch Pressure
circle angle

Basic Pressure
circle line

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Module and Pitch
NG N P
Diametral P  in 1 
pitch DG DP
 D
p    m    mm 
Circular
pitch P N
D 25.4
Module m  [mm]; m 
N P

m=6.35

m=2.11

m=0.97
6 Standard modules are 0.5, Ahmed
0.8, 1,Kovacevic,
1.25, 1.5,City2,University
2.5, 3, London
4, 5, 6
Relations between gear parameters
Centre distance: DP  DG
C
o
2 o
Pressure angle: 20 (14.5 )

Addendum: a = module
Dedendum: b = 1.25 module
Clearance: c = 0.25 module

Backlash: clearance measured on the


pitch circle of a driving gear

Backlash is function
of module
and centre distance

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Relations between gear parameters


Pow  T  GTG  PTP 

DG DP  DG N G nP TG
v  G  P  GR    
2 2  D P N P nG TP
   Gear ratio
G  nG ; P  nP
30 30 

rb  r cos  Radius of the base circle

D Pitch of the
pb  p cos    cos  base circle
N
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Contact ratio and interference
Contact ratio: Lab Lab
cr  
pb p cos 
Lab  rop2  rbp2  rog2  rbg2  Cd sin 

Interference (the smallest number of teeth for contact without interference):

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Helical gears

N Number of teeth for helical


Normal circular pitch pcn  pc cos Nn 
cos 
3
gear
Normal diametral pitch pdn  pd cos
tan n
pcn tan   Normal pressure angle
Axial Pitch pa  pc cot  cos
sin
D p  Dg N p  N g bw – gear width
cd  
Axial load Fa  Ft tan 2 cos 2 cos
Radial load Fr  Ft tan  Crt  Cr  Cra Contact ratio for helical gear
Ft b tan
Normal load F  Cra  w Axial contact ratio
cos  cos pc
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Example 11 –helical gear
An involute gear drives a high-speed centrifuge. The speed of the centrifuge is
18000 rpm. It is driven by a 3000 rpm electric motor through 6:1 speedup
gearbox. The pinion has 21 teeth and the gear has 126 teeth with a diametral
pitch of 14 per inch. The width of gears is 45.72 mm and the pressure angle is
20o. Power of the electric motor is 10kW.

Determine :
a) A contract ratio of a spur gear a) Cr=1.712
b) A contact ratio of a helical gear with helix angle of 30o. b) Cr1=6.343
c) A helix angle if the contact ratio is 3 c) 9.122o
d) Axial, radial and contact (normal) force for both helix angles.
d) Fa1=160.8 N
Fa2=44.7 N

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Examples of gear trains
Two stage compound
Gear train

Planetary gear train

Compound reverted
gear train

Planetary gear train


on the arm

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Example 12 – Compound gear train

A gearbox is needed to provide an exact 30:1 increase in speed, while


minimizing the overall gearbox size. The input and output shafts should be in-
line.
Governing equations are:
N2/N3 = 6
N4/N5 = 5
N2 + N3 = N4 + N5

Specify appropriate teeth numbers.

N2 = 108; N3 = 18; N4 = 105; N5 = 21

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Example 13 – Planetary gear train

The sun gear in the figure is the input, and it is driven clockwise at 100 rpm. The
ring gear is held stationary by being fastened to the frame.

Find the rev/min and direction of rotation


of the arm and gear 4.

n3 = - 20 rpm, n4 = 33.3 rpm,

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Gear Force Calculation
 Stress based on the Force acting
 The force is caused by the
Fr F transmitted torque. That force
a
Ft always acts along the pressure line.

30 P
T  P  Ft R  Ft  [N ]
 nR
R Ft 30 P
F  F
cos a  n R cos a

 The force induces stress


concentration on gear.
We need to answer:
How much power a pair of gears in
question can transfer?
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Basic gear stress calculation
 Basic analysis of gear-tooth is
based on Lewis Equation which has
following assumptions:
» The full load is applied on the tip of a
single tooth (the worse case)
» Radial component is negligible
» The load is distributed uniformly
along the teeth width
» Friction forces are negligible
» Stress concentration is negligible.
Ft
Basic stress in B 
teeth mbY
Sy
P  n D m bY
Power transmitted B fs

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Correction
factors
Basic stress must be corrected for:
- Shocks,
- Size effects,
- Uneven load distribution,
- Dynamic effects.

Ka Ks Km
 B
Kv
Ka Ks Km
P  PB
Kv
Ka – Application factor
Ks – Size factor
Km – Load distribution factor
Kv - Dynamic factor

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Gear
materials

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Example 14 – Gear stress calculation
Pinion A and gear B are shown in figure. Pinion A rotates
at 1750 rpm, driven directly by an electric motor. The
driven machine is an industrial saw consuming 20 kW.
The following conditions are given:
NP=20 m=3 mm Qv=6
NG=70 b=38 mm fs=1.5
np=1750 rpm Pow=20 kW
What is the centre distance? Compute the stress due to
bending in the pinion and gear and find required Brinell
hardness for this application.

SOLUTION:
( DP  DG ) ( N P  NG )
Centre distance: c m  3 90  135  mm
2 2 2
The pitch diameter of the pinion is: DP  mN P  3  20  60[mm]  0.06  m
n P DP 1750  0.06
The pitch velocity is: vP    5.5[m / s]  1090 ft / min 
60 60
60 Pow 60  20000
Transferred load (Tangential force): Ft    3638  N 
 nP DP  1750  0.060
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Example 14 – cont.
From the diagram: YP=0.34 and YG=0.42

Ft 3638
Basic bending stress is: pinion –  BP    94 106  Pa 
mbYP 0.003  0.038  0.34
Ft 3638
gear -  BG    76 106  Pa 
mbYG 0.003  0.038  0.42
Correction factors are: Application factor Ka=1.5
(from diagrams and tables) Size factor Ks=1.0
Load distribution Km=1.2
Dynamic factor Kv=0.68

Ka Ks Km
Corrected pinion bending stress:  P   BP  2.64  94 106  248  MPa 
Kv

Allowable stress required for


this application: S  f s P  248 1.5  372  MPa 

From the diagram, any material with Brinel hardness higher than HB=400 will satisfy application
requirements.
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Coursework
Example 15 – Industrial mixer
A gear train is made up of helical gears with their shafts in a single plane, such as the
arrangement in the vertical mixer shown. The gears have a normal pressure angle of 20°
and a 30° helix angle. The middle shaft is an idler. Gears AB and CD are engaged, the
others in the illustration are not in contact. The module of all gears is 2 mm. The table
gives the number of teeth per gear. Gear A exerts a load of 1200 N onto gear B. The
shaft containing gear A is driven by the motor at a speed of 200 rpm. All gears are Grade
2 and have been Gear Number of Teeth
hardened to A 20
HB 350 and have
B 50
50 mm face widths.
C 12
D 75
Find:
The normal load exerted by gear C on gear D
and the speed of gear D and the safety factor
for gear D based on bending and contact
stresses.
F=4066 N; nD=12.8 rpm; fsb=2.76; fsc=1
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