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AUTOCLAVED AERATED CONCRETE BLOCKS (ACC

BLOCKS)
PROJECT REFERENCE NO.: 39S_BE_1714
COLLEGE : K L S GOGTE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, BELGAVI.
BRANCH : DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING
GUIDE : PROF. KANCHAN KANAGALI
PROF. NAMRATA ANGADI
STUDENTS : MS. MINI G. NAYAK.
MS. ARUNA GORJANAL.
MS. KIRAN PATIL.
MR. SHASHANK GAONKAR.

INTRODUCTION:
Autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC),also known as autoclaved cellular
concrete (AAC), autoclaved lightweight concrete (ALC), autoclaved concrete, cellular
concrete, porous concrete, is a lightweight, precast, Foam concrete building material invented
in the mid-1920s that simultaneously provides structure, insulation, and fire- and mould-
resistance. AAC products include blocks, wall panels, floor and roof panels and lintels.
AAC was perfected in the mid-1920s by the Swedish architect and inventor Dr. Johan
Axel Eriksson, working with Professor Henrik Kreuger at the Royal Institute of
Technology. It went into production in Sweden in 1929 in a factory in Hallabrottet and
quickly became very popular.
AAC is a highly thermally insulating concrete-based material used for both internal
and external construction. Besides AAC's insulating capability, one of its advantages in
construction is its quick and easy installation, because the material can be routed or cut to size
on site using standard carbon steel power tools.
AAC is well suited for urban areas with high rise buildings and those with high
temperature variations. Due to its lower density, high rise buildings constructed using AAC
require less steel and concrete for structural members. The requirement of mortar for laying of
AAC blocks is reduced due to the lower number of joints. Similarly, the material required for
rendering is also lower due to the dimensional accuracy of AAC. The increased thermal
efficiency of AAC makes it suitable for use in areas with extreme temperatures, as it
eliminates the need for separate materials for construction and insulation, leading to faster
construction and cost savings.

OBJECTIVE:
1. To construct economical buildings (cost comparision) by replacing clay bricks by
AAC blocks.
2. To make productive use of recycled industrial waste (fly ash).
3. To cast standard ACC blocks in the laboratory and conduct various tests to check the
strength and capacity of blocks.
4. To conduct experimentation on modified AAC blocks by adding materials such as
paddy husk, quarry dust, M-sand and super plastisizer to increase the efficiency of
AAC blocks.
METHODOLOGY:

Materials required:
1. Portland cement
2. Lime
3. Aluminum powder
4. Sand
5. Fly ash
6. M-sand
7. Super plastizer.
8. Casting molds and equipment.

Preparation of AAC blocks or panels:


AAC blocks are made from portland cement, silica rich material like fly ash or sand,
lime, water and aluminum powder as an air entraining agent. The materials are first mixed
into slurry and then poured into large molds where the air entraining agent reacts with the
alkalis in the cement and lime to produce millions of small hydrogen gas bubbles. The mix
expands and rises considerably more than its initial volume under suitable conditions. The
hydrogen evaporates and the 'cake' sets up and hardens into a stable closed cell matrix which
can then be precisely wire-cut into blocks or panels. The green aerated concrete is then steam
cured in a pressurized autoclave for about 12-14 hours where upon it undergoes a second
chemical reaction and transforms into the mineral Tobermorite or calcium silicate.
After casting and required curing various tests are performed on the blocks and the
result is noted.
Apart from casting and testing of blocks, comparative studies of estimation of cost of
construction is also carried out successfully results are discussed on the basis of quality of the
blocks and their economic feasibility.

CONCLUSION:
SL.
NO BLOCKS COMPOSITION PROPORTION
cement, fly ash, lime ,
1) SET 'A' alumina, gypsum 1:16.66 0.833:0.15: 0.0133
cement, fly ash, lime ,
2) SET 'B' alumina, gypsum 1:4.66:0.67:0.1
cement, fly ash, lime ,
alumina, gypsum, super
3) SET 'C' plasticizer 1:2.57:0.142:0.0025:0.00274
cement, fly ash, lime ,
4) SET 'D' alumina, gypsum 1:2.375:0.125:0.0025
cement, fly ash, lime ,
alumina, gypsum, M-sand,
5) SET 'E' rice husk 1:0.777:0.142:0.771:0.194:0.00274
Wt. Per
comp- Water Block unit
strength Absorption Density Area
Material Batch N/mm² (%) (kg/m³) (kg/m²) WARPAGE (mm)
Convex Concave
SET [A] A1 1.2 42.69 712.5 142.5 0 1
A2 1.49 39.766 712.5 142.5 0 0
A3 1.52 43.636 687.5 137.5 1 1
SET [B] B1 2.43 51 597.22 143.33 0 0
B2 2.46 50.46 597.2 142.26 0 0
B3 2.55 48.871 597.1 143.3 0 0
SET [C] C1 2.37 35 952.5 190.5 1 1.5
C2 2.43 36.32 955 191 0 1
C3 2.2 37.2 753.7 150.74 1.3 1.2
SET [D] D1 2.9 40.851 631.72 151.612 0 0
D2 2.8 43.3 692.204 166.129 0 0
D3 2.75 42.571 658.602 158.064 0 0
SET [E] E1 0.359 60.2 450.2 120.21 1.5 1.6
E2 0.4 62.7 432.75 115.3 1.8 1
E3 0.37 59.3 425.22 125.5 1 1.5

Considering various parameters like quality of blocks, cost of manufacturing and


scope for further improvement, SET[C] blocks are the most efficient ones.

FUTURE WORK:
1. Ratio of the contents can be varied and tested to further reduce the weight and cost of
the AAC blocks.
2. Introduction of reinforcement can be done in AAC blocks to increase its strength.
3. Implementation of AAC in pre-casted beams and other components of the structure.
4. To improve the quality of the blocks by reducing the percentage of the water
absorption .