Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 214

THE

DEFENSE
GAME

by

PAFU
Copyright © 2002 by Pafu.

All rights to ‘The Defense Game’ are reserved by the author. No person is
authorized to copy, store electronically, or distribute by any means, any portion of
this publication without prior written permission by the author.

The author is the sole inventor, writer, editor, and publisher of the complete
contents of ‘The Defense Game’. All rights to original concepts and terminology in
this publication are reserved by the author. Any reference to these concepts should
make reference to this publication.

First draft edition printed in Italy by LiRiCo in Yr.2 (AD. 2002)


All inquiries should be directed to web site www.beginnersgame.com

ISBN 88-900519-4-9
Preface to The Defense Game
Read this book carefully and you will master the game of chess. Even if you are a complete
beginner, you will soon master the system described in this book, called the Defense Game.
Using it, you will play the chess opening quickly and accurately. With a little experience, you will
be able to play well enough to challenge any opponent and offer him a tough game. This new
system is the easiest and best way ever found for beginners to play chess, even better than the
systems described previously by the author in 'The Beginner's Game,' and 'The Center Game.'

Like the Beginner's Game and the Center Game, the Defense Game is a new approach to
playing chess. Like them, it is based on a standard opening, and a large number of related
variants defined by a simple set of rules. These systems bear little resemblance to conventional
chess in their style of play, but all of them are valid and very strong. Their strength combined
with ease of play makes them the easiest way to improve for players of all levels.

The Defense Game challenges everything practiced until the present in chess, confronting
any conceivable adversary response with a standard opening system. The Defense Game cannot
be forced to enter any of the conventional lines played until the present in the opening. You do
not need to know anything about what has been played in the past - it's a new game of chess!

In extensive experimentation at master level the Defense Game has proved its worth,
compiling consistently positive results against every imaginable style of adversary play. Try the
Defense Game and you too will be convinced of both its validity and its strength. On defense it is
almost invulnerable; on offense it is highly aggressive, capable of generating dangerous attacks.

The Defense Game is for everyone, from beginners to experts. Beginners will learn to play
good chess more rapidly with this system than with any other method known. Those who already
play will quickly master a brand new system that will complement and enrich their opening play.
All those who love chess will find in the Defense Game a vast new universe of fascination.

Like the Beginner's Game and the Center Game before it, the Defense Game is one of the
perfect jewels of chess, something of great and everlasting beauty. It was there all along, passed
over by everyone, but never found before. Now it is here, and it will change forever the way the
game is played. It is surely the easiest, but also one of the best, ways ever found to play chess.

enjoy your chess!


Pafu
When I is important
Then one is ignorant
When I is Servant
Then One is Present
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
2. The Defense Game. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
3. Continuing Play After the Opening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
4. The Defense Game in Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
5. Early Attacks on the Defense Game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
6. Playing Against the Defense Game. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
7. The D-system Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
8. D-system Variants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
9. Playing the D-system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
10. Why Wasn’t It Found Before? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
11. How It Was Found . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
12. Can it be Refuted? Is It Optimal?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
13. What Happens Now to Chess? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
14. Games Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Defense Games . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Close Variants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Distance 3 Variants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Distance 4 Variants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Borderline Variants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
15. Concluding Remarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
Appendix: Move Notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Introduction 7

1. Introduction: The Easiest Way Ever Found to Play Chess!

An amazing discovery has been made: a new system of playing chess that is the simplest
imaginable! Even those who have never played can master the basic opening in a few minutes. In
a few hours anyone can learn the complete system, including a large number of strong variants,
and play fluently and correctly during and after the opening, at least thru the first 12-15 moves. It
is the easiest system ever found for those learning to play chess, even simpler than the systems
previously described by the author in 'The Beginner's Game,' and 'The Center Game.'

At the same time, this system is definitely very strong for competitive chess. In hundreds
of games played at master level this system has proved its worth, compiling a positive record of
wins and draws against every imaginable style of opponent play. Given the ease with which it can
be learned, It is therefore the quickest way to improve for anyone who already plays chess.

This system is completely new, never presented or described before this publication.
Research by the author has not revealed anyone who has played it before. It is not based on any
existing method, and bears little resemblance to conventional chess opening practice.

This new system has a number of remarkable properties rarely seen before in chess, that
make it truly unique. The most important of these is that, playing with either white or black, in
most games the opening can be carried out in standard form regardless of how the opponent
plays. This makes it easy for everyone, even beginners, to learn it quickly and play it correctly.

The basic opening is called the Defense Game, and the set of related variants on the
opening is called the D-system. All D-system openings respect a simple set of rules for opening
play, that distinguish them from previous chess practice. The Defense Game and the D-system
challenge all of chess opening theory and, in the hands of competent players, emerge victorious.

Suitable for Beginners, Intermediate, and Advanced Players Alike

If you never learned to play chess before, consider yourself fortunate: you have been
spared the arduous task of studying the thick encyclopedias on the chess opening. Instead you
can learn in minutes to play the Defense Game, which guarantees you a successful opening. This
system is absolutely foolproof: even complete beginners can use it to play the opening
accurately and rapidly, choosing from a large number of strong lines. Any beginner playing this
system will be able play well not only during the opening, but also deep into the middle game,
even against players of expert level. Never before in chess has this been possible!

For intermediate players, this system is salvation. From the occasional to the serious club
player, all have difficulty with the openings. It is there that better players take most advantage of
them, wrecking their plans, and putting them at a disadvantage after only a few moves. Using
their knowledge of the openings, better players push their adversaries away from more familiar
lines, present difficult tactical situations and traps, force disadvantageous exchanges, and in
general, disorient and discourage their adversaries. Most occasional players do not have the time
or interest to study the openings, so condemning themselves to mediocrity. Do they really have
to digest the entire body of opening theory in order to play well? It's just a game, right?

The chess opening can be immensely complicated and unbelievably difficult. Until now it
has generally been assumed that the only way to succeed in this phase of the game is by
laborious study and meticulous imitation. This system frees you from that drudgery, allowing you
to master the chess opening in the least time imaginable. It is enough to follow a few simple
rules, keep in mind a few useful examples, and develop your own experience. With these, you will
pass intact thru this difficult and dangerous phase of the game; and you will do it by deploying
according to plan, and without allowing your adversary to develop any advantage.

Advanced players, including professional chess players, will be amazed by this system of
openings. It is truly exceptional, having properties that distinguish it from anything known
previously in chess. These unique properties give a player of the system a real advantage over
any rival of comparable strength. You play your game, not your adversary's. You control the
nature of the game, closed or open, quiet or full of risks, where and how attacks are made, all the
characteristics of play. You will also be able to anticipate the middle game well past the usual
limits, extending your preparation deep into the game. In addition, you are sure to find among the
great diversity of variants in this opening system many that suit your preferred style of play.

Chess analysts will find a wealth to explore in the Defense Game and its related system of
variants. The Defense Game is like a resonance point in chess, with many fascinating properties
to discover and understand. There is so much to explore, so much to experiment. Analysts will
find a great deal to research in the tuning of the system, such as selection of suitable variants to
counter sharper adversary play. Finding best defenses to the Defense Game and its related
system is a fascinating quest, not just for analysts, but for players of all levels.

Here then, is something for everyone, from beginners thru all grades of intermediate
players, up to the top contenders for championship tournaments. By adopting this new system
you are guaranteed to enrich and improve your game, in the least time imaginable.

A Completely New Practice of Chess

The Defense Game and D-system openings are not a complement to existing chess
practice. They are a new framework for playing chess, that did not exist in any form until the
present. Rules defining sound opening play have been difficult to formulate in the past; with this
simple and powerful system they are now made clear and understandable for all.

The Defense Game is completely new: it has not been presented or described before by
anyone. Research in games databases has not revealed anyone who has played this system
before. Only very few players have experimented with a similar approach to opening play. This
simple but powerful system of playing chess appears to be completely new, a pristine discovery.
Introduction 9

In conventional chess the opening is a race to control the center of the chessboard, and
quickly develops into skirmishes to fight for that ‘high ground.' The Defense Game is a tactical
redeployment of one’s own forces, in order to arrive at a solid position for the ensuing conflict. It
does not contest the center, avoids engagement, and shows little or no reaction to the opponent’s
play. In this respect the Defense Game, like the Beginner's Game and the Center Game before it,
is not just a new chess opening: it is a new concept of what the opening in chess is all about.

As the Defense Game is occupied with its development only, the opponent is free to pursue
any development he desires. Adversary responses are typically perfect classical deployments of
the pieces and pawns. They are not only the strongest conventional openings ever seen in chess,
they are the strongest openings that can be imagined! All of them are quite impossible to achieve
in conventional play, where their aggressive deployments would be challenged and restricted.

The Defense Game therefore typically faces an opponent who has deployed more
powerfully than is normally possible in the chess opening. In no sense can its superiority be
attributed to any deficiency on the part of the adversary! But the Defense Game confronts without
difficulty any classical opening, even more enlarged and aggressive versions of them. In fact it
confronts any conceivable opening on the part of the adversary - and it has proved to be as
strong as any of them! All this defies the imagination, but appears to be undeniably true.
The Defense Game is not a rote opening: it has an great variety of ways of playing it. So
have the openings in its related system of variants, which introduce different moves into the
standard opening, using the system rules. This system constitutes a subspace of the possible
openings that has been largely unexplored until the present. Almost all of the openings in this
system are completely new, and most are also generally playable and surprisingly strong.
All D-system variants respect the same simple and easy to learn rules for opening play. All
system variants, like the Defense Game itself, strive to produce predetermined positions after the
opening. To achieve this, they must resist adversary play, either as attacks during the opening, or
as preparations for attacks following their deployment. Amazingly, the rules of the system result
generally in deployments with this strong independence to adversary play.

As the Defense Game goes about its business of building a solid defense, it reveals as little
as possible to the adversary, concerning either its final defensive position, or its possible lines of
attack. The Defense Game gives the opponent nothing to attack, nothing to engage, no basis for
orienting a counter strategy. At the same time, it develops and maintains full options for its own
defense and offense, as always to a large degree irrespective of the opponent's play.

On defense the Defense Game is certainly one of the best openings in chess. It is like a
fortress that resists all attacks. It rarely needs to modify its opening moves; attacks on it bring
the adversary no tangible gains. The Defense Game really has no weak points: however it is
attacked, it will resist. This has been proved in extensive experimentation, against every
conceivable style of opposing play. So the Defense Game and its related system should appeal to
all players who like to build a strong defense and keep the game under control.
The Defense Game concentrates in the first moves on building a solid defense; only when
this is complete does it pass to the offensive. This seems to be a sensible way of playing the
opening, to complete one’s own development before confronting the adversary. But in no sense
does it lose its attacking potential for subsequent play; on the contrary, it is highly aggressive.
The compact defensive formation of the Defense Game moves rapidly and naturally into powerful
attacks on a broad front, which the adversary can neither predict nor prevent.

On offense the Defense Game is an excellent opening. It can develop dangerous attacks,
from a large selection of possible lines. A player of the Defense Game is rarely at a loss finding
ways to attack. Once an attack starts, it is almost always effective in gaining space. These
advances quickly produce favorable positions from which any experienced player can apply his
skills to obtain a decisive advantage. So, the Defense Game and its related system should also
appeal to all players who like to pressure their adversaries with an aggressive attack.

These are all startling claims, but the evidence accumulated to date firmly supports them:
The Defense Game and the D-system is one of the best ever found for playing chess, on defense,
on offense, and in every other sense! And at the same time it is absolutely the simplest!

Beginners and lesser intermediate players can use the Defense Game with great success as
a drawing system. Better players can exploit the offensive strengths of the Defense Game,
especially with black, to play for a win. This new system is sure to amaze everyone interested in
chess, it is perhaps the simplest and most effective way ever found to play the game.

Characteristics of Play

The same characteristics of play are almost always evident with this system: the defense is
solid, and there are plenty of opportunities for attacking. These openings are therefore suitable for
attacking and defending players alike. On the defense, they offer little weakness, and a great
flexibility of options for the consolidation of solid positions. On offence they are very strong;
regardless of how the adversary plays, good attacking lines are always present.

In games using the system, there is never a rout of a defensive position, nor are there
games in which attacking lines after the opening are not present. Losses recorded usually do not
result from any demonstrable weakness following the opening. Losses occur mostly when the
system player overexploits the natural strengths of the opening much later on, taking excessive
risks in an attempt to win. Good players should be quite familiar with this phenomenon: trying for
the win also increases your chances of losing - it's just part of the game.

The basic aim of these openings, almost always achievable in practice, is to carry out
essentially preconceived developments, with minimal adaptations. This gives a player of the
system real advantages. He knows how to play within the familiar lines of his well-practiced
opening, and he is better prepared to respond to anything his opponent might do.
Introduction 11

In playing an opening that goes according to plan, you are at the same time forcing your
opponent to play your game, and that is the basic strategy in any encounter. When your opponent
plays your game, your confidence improves and so does your quality of play. You know your own
game, with its risks and opportunities, so your decisions are better founded in experience.

A surprising, almost miraculous, aspect of the Defense Game and most of the D-system
openings is that they can be carried out in near complete tranquility. There is practically nothing
that the opponent can do to disrupt these openings. At best he can force exchanges of pawns or
pieces, or cause other minor damage which has minimal effect on the balance of the game.

Challenges All of Classical Chess Theory and Practice

The Defense Game and the D-system can confront any of the conventional openings. In
this sense they challenge all of classical chess, that is, everything practiced in the game until the
present. They also challenge, and in large part refute, much of what has been expounded until
now as sound guidelines for opening play. You could say that the entire system is radically
opposed to conventional chess opening theory and practice.

In hundreds of games the author has played this system, against a computer opponent of
professional strength, the Defense Game and the D-system openings have proved exceptionally
strong. Playing this system, there has been a consistently positive balance of wins. No adversary
response has yet been found which could defeat the standard opening in a series of games, and
most of the strongest adversary defenses and early attacks have been tried. There is already a
considerable amount of experimental evidence confirming the validity of this system.

How Important is this Discovery?

The Beginner's Game and The Center Game were claimed by the author as is the greatest
discoveries ever made in chess. But the Defense Game may eventually surpass both of them,
because it is even more resistant and easier to play, not only during the opening but during the
entire game! The Defense Game and the D-system confront all of conventional chess. They have
the potential to change dramatically the entire practice of the game. In fact, a completely new
game of chess results from playing them, bearing little resemblance to all that has gone before!

Chess has been a principal intellectual pastime for hundreds of years, and in this sense the
Defense Game, like its predecessors the Beginner's Game and the Center Game, must be
considered as a monumental discovery. This is not a self judgment, but a simple logical
statement, whose truth is established once the system has proved its strength in competition.

The validity of this system must be tested by extensive play, but the probable result is
already evident. It is the easiest and one of the best ways ever found to play chess. It is also
quite possibly an optimal way of playing the game. Optimal in the strong sense means it is
always capable of winning or drawing when played correctly. It would take a tremendous amount
of research to test the hypothesis, but it could be done, and the result might well be that it is true.
It is too soon to say if the Defense Game and its related system will never meet its equal.
Perhaps millions of games must be played before we can feel sure of that. But it is an exciting
theory, and in the meantime we can wonder whether the game of chess was really just a puzzle,
waiting to be solved. The Defense Game could well be that solution.

Entering a New Era of Chess

Share the enthusiasm of the author as you discover for yourself this amazingly strong, yet
simple system of playing chess. Use it, and you will be playing good chess right away. Even if
you are a beginner, you can confront even the strongest players and give them a tough match.

The game of chess is no longer too difficult for most people; it is now a truly universal
game that anyone can learn to play well in weeks. This correction was sorely needed in the sport,
to make it more accessible and more balanced between players of different levels of expertise.

The openings books must be revised, but that is not all: the entire practice of chess is
about to undergo a dramatic revolution, experience a complete transformation, and enter a totally
new era. Be part of it - it's the most interesting thing that ever happened to the dull old game!
The Defense Game 13

2. The Defense Game

(Note - if you are completely new to chess, you will learn by playing all the moves in the text
on your own chess set. Read the appendix on move notation, or ask someone who plays to
explain the basic rules and move notation, and then come right back: you will learn to play well
more quickly with this system than with any other method that teaches chess for beginners.)

The Defense Game is a standard configuration reached after 8 moves. With Its symmetric
aspect, it can be memorized at a glance. The Defense Game for white and black is shown below:

 §¯³¨
•‘’– ”“”ž¹“”“
‘’‘›’‘’ ˜”“—
¦ª²¤ 
Defense Game With White Defense Game with Black

In the standard Defense Game the queen and king pawns are advanced to the third rank,
and first the knights, then the bishops, are developed to the squares in front of the king and
queen. Although in most games we will not reach this standard position, it nevertheless serves
as a reference configuration for playing the Defense Game. All of the openings in the D-system
are based on this scheme, including at least four, but usually more, of its eight moves. The
standard opening itself is playable in many games, and is also an solid basis for continuing play.

The Defense Game has proved very strong in competitive play at master level, resulting in
an large positive balance of wins and draws. But perhaps the most interesting thing about the
Defense Game is that, with either white or black, this opening position or something very close to
it can be reached in most games, regardless of how the adversary plays. This makes it easy for
everyone, even beginners, to learn the opening quickly and play it correctly.

Before concerning ourselves with what order of moves is used in opening, or what our
opponent might be doing in the meantime, let’s take a good look at this standard position.

The standard Defense Game is a compact defensive position resilient to attack. All
approaches to it are heavily protected. The pawns in the center of the position are in short chains,
that cannot be attacked by pieces. From their recessed central placements, the bishops sweep the
flanks of the board, supporting flank pawn advances, and can also repair damage to the center.
The knights have been developed using the characteristic two move sequence via King 2 / Queen
2 to their respective Knight 3 squares on the third rank, a relocation very unusual in conventional
chess, but which proves to provide a very active placement for the ensuing game. The queen and
king are safe behind the strong pawn wall and the active pieces.
All pawns and pieces are well placed to co-operate in the defense. The deployment
executed in the first eight moves has placed all pawns and pieces in a compact position, that
nevertheless covers the entire of our side of the board. The position is so compact that the
adversary has to spend additional moves to bring his forces into range to attack; and the position
is so resistant, that there is practically nothing for him to attack once he is in range.

The center of our position is extremely solid. It may be attacked with pawns, but such
center pawn attacks at best succeed in exchanging. These exchanges can also be avoided in
most cases, and there are many other effective ways of responding to any attack on our center.

The knights in their characteristic placements are vulnerable to attacks by rook pawns or
by centrally placed bishops, but we can respond to either of these attacks with moves that fit into
the scheme of tactical play in D-system, and present us no real difficulties in defending.

Despite appearances, there are no weak points in this position. Our defense can respond
to any enemy threat, and also force an adversary piece placed on our side of the board to retreat.
Moreover, moves used to repel adversary pieces fit well into our game. As we shall see, forward
piece placements are rarely attempted by our opponent, confirming their low value.

In the first eight moves of the standard opening we have not yet performed castling, but it
is normally done immediately afterwards, with a conventional king side castle. The Defense Game
also allows for castling on the queen side, but as in conventional chess practice, the king side
castle is the easiest and safest for consolidation of a strong defensive position, and usually fits in
better with the general offensive orientation of the D-system openings.

We can always play at least six or seven of the of the standard moves of the Defense Game,
regardless of how the adversary plays. After we have done so we have an excellent basis for
completing and consolidating our defense. Regardless of which moves of the standard opening
that we have performed, and regardless of what opening our adversary has used, our position will
resist and repel any attack, and also provide a good basis for our subsequent play.

The compact position with pieces and pawns concentrated on the defense of the center
allows us to respond effectively to any attempts to attack there. Our adversary usually does not
attempt to attack our center, because of our concentration of defensive forces. As its name
suggests, the Defense Game is oriented to a defensive strategy. Even so the opening also allows
plenty of scope for offensive play, as we shall see in example games.

Our position is symmetric, which means that any co-ordinated pawn and piece actions
playable on one side can be played on the other. This mirror aspect benefits the system player,
allowing him to transfer experience in play between sides. Considering also that the Defense
Game is used for both white and black, and can be carried out in most games without little
modification, the result of all these factors is a reduction of the difficulty of the chess game for all
players of this opening, with a corresponding increase in the chance of playing it well.
The Defense Game 15

Move Sequences

What sequence of moves should be used to produce the standard position of the Defense
Game? Actually, subject to the limitation that center pawns must be moved prior to placement of
the pieces behind them, any of the possible orderings of pawn and piece moves are playable. This
results in a fairly large number of ways of playing the same opening (exactly: 70) all resulting in
this same position after eight moves. Here are a few examples of move sequences to produce the
Defense Game. (The move notation is given for white and black alternately.)

§ž¯³¹¨ Sequence 2N: §˜ž¯³¹¨ Sequence KN:


knights first,eg. K knight first,
”“”—˜“”“ 1. e3
”“”“”“ 1. e6
”“ 2. d3 ”“— 2. Ne7
 3. Ne2  3. d6
4. Nd2 4. Ng6
 then bishops  then the rest,
5. Ng3 5. Be7
‘’ 6. Nb3
‘’– 6. Nd7
‘’‘–•’‘’ 7. Bd2 ‘’‘’‘’ 7. Nb6
¦ª²›¤ 8. Be2 ¦•ª²›¤ 8. Bd7
(24 ways) (17 ways)

§¯³¹—¨ Sequence Q: §¯³¨ All Sequences


Q-side first, eg. have the same
”“”ž”“”“ 1. d6
”“”ž¹“”“ eight moves, in
˜” 2. Nd7 ˜”“— different order.
 3. Nb6 
4. Bd7 There are 70
 then K-side,  ways of playing
5. e6 the standard 8
•‘ 6. Ne7
•‘’– move opening!
‘’‘‘’‘’ 7. Ng6 ‘’‘›’‘’
¦ª²›–¤ 8. Be7 ¦ª²¤
(1 way)
Sequences of type 2N have a fairly large variety of move orderings. So do those of type KN
and of type QN (developing the queen knight first). Sequence Q and sequence K (developing the
king side first) have only a single ordering. In the interest of retaining flexibility in choosing from
a larger number of possible move orders, we usually prefer to play one of the 2N, KN, or QN
sequences. The Q and K sequences are also playable, but they constrain our choice of moves.

Different move sequences can result in different games, but not necessarily. All the
possible move sequences are generally playable regardless of what the adversary does. Players
may prefer some sequences to others, because they encourage certain adversary responses; but
in general, move sequence is just a matter of personal preference - there is no ‘best’ sequence.
Those who already play chess may be uncomfortable with this variety of move ordering.
Conventional chess openings have rigid move sequences, and even slight modifications can
change dramatically the games that result. In the Defense Game, the order of the first moves
hardly matters at all. Anyone can and should try many different sequences. Here the system
player has an advantage: he can vary his move sequences while playing his standard opening,
whereas his opponent often tries to invent different responses, changing his game each time.

Those who already play chess will definitely be uncomfortable with the idea of playing the
same opening all the time, and will already be thinking of modifying the opening, so that the
opponent will not know in advance what they are going to play. Many strong variants of the
standard opening exist, and will be discussed later. But even if your opponent knows that you are
playing the standard opening he can do little to stop you, and whatever opening he plays, you will
be able to confront it successfully. You can even announce at the start that you will play the
Defense Game, it changes practically nothing. It is a singular aspect that the Defense Game
shares with the newly Beginner's Game and Center Game, something rarely seen before in chess.

What if your adversary's play prevents you from carrying out your standard opening? As it
turns out, there is practically nothing that he can do disrupt this opening. Only slight
modifications to the standard opening are needed to respond to these attacks, so your game
doesn’t change very much. Each of these early attacks also has a number of valid possible
responses from which you can choose, so your play will never be forced by your adversary.

Two of the possible early attacks are shown in the following diagrams.
Rook Pawn Early Attack Example: §˜ž¯³¹¨
Your opponent advances a rook pawn, 1. e4 e6
threatening to displace your knight. You 2. d4 d6
”“”“”“
usually continue your bishop move. If the 3. Ng3 Ne7 ”“—
rook pawn advances, you can retire your 4. Nc3 Ng6 
knight to the back rank, or move it to the 5. h4 ’‘’
rook file, challenging the adversary's –•
knight. You can also block the advance of
the rook pawn with your own rook pawn.
‘’‘’‘
¦ª²›¤
Bishop Early Attack Example: §˜ž¯³¹¨
Your opponent attacks your queen (or 1. e4 e6
king) directly or indirectly. You can usually 2. d4 d6
”“”“”“
proceed with your standard bishop move, 3. Nf3 Ne7 ”“—
after which a bishop exchange often 4. Nc3 Ng6 
follows. You can also block the attack by 5. Bg5 ’‘
advancing your bishop pawn or prevent it –•
by advancing your rook pawn early.
‘’‘’‘’
¦ª²›¤
The Defense Game 17

These and other early attacks and some of the best ways of handling them will be dealt with
in detail later on. What you should know now is that none of the early attacks are particularly
effective. None of them can win material, threaten your king or queen, or gain any real advantage.
In most cases they result in delayed development and loss of initiative for your opponent.

In hundreds of games the author has played the standard opening against a computer
opponent of master level, the only early attacks that were used frequently against the Defense
Game were the rook pawn and bishop early attacks. For this reason we will dedicate a fair amount
of discussion to these responses, and treat them in a number of example games. In general
however, early attacking lines do not appear to be as effective as other lines which build in the
opening and avoid early contact. In other words, your opponent does better to pursue his own
development rather than trying to disrupt yours; so you can usually complete most of your
Defense Game without modifications. After doing so, you will have a solid defensive position and
many good lines for attacking, no matter what your opponent has played in the meantime.

Adversary Openings
Now we take a look at some typical responses of the adversary. These are the positions
playing D-system opening after eight moves each side. We'll see the complete games later on.

§¯³¨ §¯³¨ §¯³¹¨


”“”ž¹“”“ ”“”ž¹“”“ “”ž“”“
˜”“— ˜”“— ˜”“—
  ”
‘’‘ ’‘ ‘’‘
–›• –›• –›•
‘’’‘’ ‘’‘’‘’ ’‘’‘’
¦ª¤² ¦ª¤² ¦ª¤²
Game 22 Game 3 Game 28

§ž¯¨³ §ž¯³˜¨ §ž³¨


”“—¹“”“ ”“”—¹“”“ “”—¯“”“
“”“— ” “”“—
 ”‘ 
’‘ ‘’‘ ‘’‘
–• –• –•
‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’’‘ ‘’›’‘’
¦ª¤² ¦ª²›¤ ¦ª²¤
Game 69 Game 70 Game 71
Adversary Openings
(Black plays the Defense Game)
§ž¨³ §¯¨³ §¯³¹¨
”“”¹”“ ”“”“ ”““”
—¯˜ —¹ž˜ —ž˜
“”“ ”“”“ ”“”
  ‘”
•‘’– •‘’– ‘
‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘–›’‘’
¦ª²¤ ¦ª¤² ¦ª²•¤
Game 21 Game 27 Game 39

§ž¯¨³ §ž¯¨³ §¯¨³


”“”¹“”“ ”“¹“”“ ”““”“
— —˜ —¹˜
“” ”“” ”“”ž
’ ‘ 
’’ ’‘– •‘’•
‘’‘›’‘ ‘’–›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’
¦•ª¤² ¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤
Game 76 Game 73 Game 41

Adversary Openings
(White plays the Defense Game)

During the opening our opponent has been left to pursue his development in the absence
of threats from our side. The deployments that he makes, in his near complete freedom to
compose them, are usually perfect classical formations, typically with two or three advanced
center pawns, bishops and knights optimally placed, the king castled, and the queen relocated. In
all cases the adversary places an impressive mass of material in the center.

Our opponent usually does not attack during the opening, because there is little to attack.
He also has difficulty orienting his defensive strategy, because he does not know where we will
attack. Our early development has been calm and restrained, and our adversary's development
has been aggressive, but now that situation is about to be challenged. Playing with either white
or black, in most games the Defense Game will attack its opponent. This should surprise anyone
who thought that the aggressive openings in chess have already been well researched.
The Defense Game 19

In all games our opponent claims more space on the chessboard than does the compact
Defense Game. He appears to have absolute control of the center; he certainly occupies it, and
we don’t. He is also attacking far more on our side than we are on his: only our bishops are doing
this a bit. He seems poised to pour over the center of the chessboard with an overwhelming
attack. Classical chess would rate our opponent a solid favorite at this point. A classical player
would feel certain to have thoroughly crushed his timid opponent in the opening.

It was the dream of classical chess to dominate the center so thoroughly in the opening as
in any of these examples. Such successful deployments are virtually impossible to achieve in
conventional chess; against us they can be played with almost no resistance. The Defense Game
always plays against the strongest possible opposition, this much is obvious. Our opponent is
always doing the maximum that anyone can possibly achieve in the chess opening.

All of the adversary deployments shown in these examples above are evidently valid, and
obviously very strong. In fact, any of them are stronger than the openings that have normally
been playable in chess until the present! As we play our standard moves, our opponent builds
one of these impressive positions; but we need not be particularly concerned. Formidable as they
appear, none of them will prove to have any advantage whatsoever over the Defense Game!

Now we present two complete games using the Defense Game. In these games the player
of the Defense Game completes all or most of the standard opening, and has good play and
winning chances in the ensuing contest.
Game 1: Defense Game with White
§ž¯¨³ 1. e3 e5 Here is the first Defense Game ever played
2. d3 d5 by the author, resulting in a draw against a
“”“”“ 3. Ne2 Bd6 his strong computer adversary.
—¹˜ 4. Nd2 Nc6
“” 5. Nb3 Nf6 White completes the standard eight move
“ 6. Bd2 O-O opening, while black deploys the optimal 2
•‘’– 7. Ng3 a5 pawn standard classical defense. White's
8. Be2 a4 position offers little to attack other than
‘’‘›’‘’ the knights, so black now goes for a rook
¦ª²¤ pawn attack on the Q-side.

¨¨³ 9. Nc1 a3 White retreats with his knight, and avoids


10. b3 Qe7 pawn exchanges. He castles and moves
“”­“”“ 11. c3 Be6 forward with his pawns, setting up a zigzag
—¹ž˜ 12. O-O Rad8 central pawn formation. Black finds little to
“ 13. b4 e4 attack; he can exchange bishop for knight,
’’“ 14. d4 Qd7 but there's no immediate follow up to this
”’’– attack. White on the other hand has
defined a target - the isolated rook pawn!
‘›’‘’
¦–ª¤²

§³ 15. Nb3 b6 White piles up on the doomed pawn. All


16. Bc1 Ra8 this takes time, and would be dangerous if
¨”­˜“”“ 17. Nd2 Ra7 black could find anything to attack in the
”¹ž˜ 18. Nb1 Rfa8 meantime, but there's little to be found.
“ 19. Qb3 Ne7
’’“ Black makes an attempt at defending the
”ª’’– rook pawn, then moves his knight back,
preparing to attack on the flank.
‘›’‘’
¦•¤²
§³ 20. Nxa3 c5 White wins the pawn, then holds against
21. bxc5 bxc5 black's Q-side counter attack. Black then
§­˜“”“ 22. Nb5 Rb7 shifts into a K-side offensive, for which he
¹˜ 23. a4 c4 is well poised, with bishops, knights, and
•“ 24. Qb1 Bg4 queen. White must play carefully to avoid
‘“’“ž his castled position being overrun.
’’–
›’‘’
¦ª¤²
The Defense Game 21

Black attacks, but white is able to defend 25. f3 exf3 §—³


adequately, forcing the invading bishop to 26. gxf3 Bxg3
retreat. So far white has retained his pawn 27. hxg3 Bh5
§­“”“
advantage, but it doesn't last much longer; 28. g4 Bg6 ˜ž
black now piles up on the knight, and is 29. Qb2 Nc8 •“
ready to regain his lost pawn. ‘“’‘
’’‘
¬›
¦¤²
His lead about to vaporize, white now 30. g5 Qh3 §—³
invites a draw by perpetual check, by 31. gxf6 Qg3+
attacking white's knight and opening his 32. Kh1 Qh3+
§“”“
K-side to a queen invasion. The computer 33. Kg1 Qg3+ ’ž
calculates that this is a favorable line; a 34. Kh1 Qh3+ •“
human opponent would prefer to regain 35. Kg1 1/2-1/2 ‘“’
the pawn and play on. White gladly ’’‘­
accepts a draw: this is an amateur playing
against a master level opponent!
¬›
¦¤²

This is just the first of many games that we will see using this new system, but one game
should be already be sufficient to surprise those who thought that the openings in chess have
already been thoroughly researched, and that there is no interest in trying new lines. The Defense
Game is a not just a new opening, it's a completely new way of playing the game!

The first impression that this opening should make is that it is extremely solid. It cannot be
seriously attacked, and can almost always be played out in near standard form. It is also as
strong on offense as it is on defense: whenever an amateur of club level can challenge and draw
easily against the computer playing at master level, it's a sure indication that the opening he is
using stands up to the test. The Defense Game is completely new, totally valid, and very strong!

Perhaps the most interesting aspect of the Defense Game is that both in the opening and in
the game that follows it is extremely easy to play for beginners and lesser intermediate players.
Using this system with either white or black, even players with minimal skills have a good chance
of drawing against the computer, or against other players much stronger than themselves.

When played aggressively however, the D-system is very strong in master level play,
consistently demonstrating a high percentage of wins. The techniques of playing for a draw and
for a win are utterly different - but with this system, no matter what your skill level, you can offer a
tough match to your opponent, and that is what competitive sport is all about.
Game 2: Defense Game with White
§¯³¹¨ 1. e3 Nf6 Here is an fine victory emerging from the
2. Ne2 d5 analysis of the Defense Game. White's
”“”“” 3. Ng3 e5 opening is interrupted by a rook pawn
—ž˜ 4. Be2 h5 attack; white retires his knight and pushes
“” 5. d3 h4 his g-pawn to avoid opening the rook file:
 6. Nf1 h3 he's playing D-system close variant Dv7'G.
‘’’“ 7. g3 Nc6
8. Nbd2 Be6 White avoids Nxh5 - this dangerous gambit
‘’‘–›’’ is in fact white's best line, but you should
¦ª²•¤ take it only if you prepared for the sequel.

³¨¨ 9. Nb3 Qd7 White's position unfolds naturally on the


10. Nfd2 O-O-O Q-side, where he has plenty of space and
”“”¹“” 11. O-O Bd6 good play for his pieces.
ž˜ 12. d4 e4
— 13. c4 Be7 Black on the other hand is already reacting
’“ 14. cxd5 Bxd5 to white's game; he has no counter play
’•’’“ 15. Qc2 Nb4 for the moment, and must wait until the
16. Qc3 Qc6 white advance stalls - but it never does!
’–›’’ 17. Qxc6 Bxc6
¦¤² 18. a3 Nbd5

³¨ 19. Na5 Bd7 White continues to build, and black keeps
20. b3 Nc3 shifting pieces without any counter attack
”“”¨“¹ 21. Bc4 Be6 in sight. The black pieces have moved
ž˜“ 22. Bb2 Ncd5 away from the Q-side, leaving the king
—– 23. Rfc1 Bd6 exposed to a double rook barrage. White
’“ 24. Rc2 Rd7 already has a significant positional
’‘’’“ 25. Be2 Bf8 advantage, and is now ready to exploit it.
26. Rac1 g6
¤–›’’ 27. Nac4 Bg7
¦² 28. Ne5 Re7

³¨¨ 29. a4 Rd8 White invades, and trades a rook for piece
30. Ba3 Ree8 and pawn, but he can equalize by taking
“ 31. Bb5 Rh8 either of the undefended central pawns.
“““¹ 32. Be7 Nxe7
–— 33. Rxc7+ Kb8 Black is looking for counter play, but the
‘›’“ 34. Rxe7 Nd5 only thing he can find is the bishop attack.
‘’’“ 35. Nd7+ Ka8
36. Rxe6 fxe6
–’’ 37. Nc5 a6
¦² 38. Bc4 Bh6
The Defense Game 23

White finally cashes in his positional 39. Re1 e5 


advantage for a material one; he shuts 40. Ndxe4 exd4
down the bishop attack and pins the 41. Ne6 Nb4
“´§›
knight on the rook, allowing him to bring 42. Nxd8 Rxd8 ““¹
his knight and bishop into enemy territory. 43. Rd1 Nc6 
44. exd4 Nxd4 ‘˜•’
Black's 41..Nb4 is the only move which 45. Kh1 Kb8 ‘’“
doesn't lose rapidly. It's not an easy move 46. f4 Kc7
to find, or to accept for that matter, since it 47. Bf7 Rd7
’
results in loss of the exchange. ¤°
White has to give back a pawn of his two 48. Nf2 Rxf7 ¹
pawn lead, but he still commands the 49. Rxd4 Re7
chessboard, with his centrally placed 50. Nxh3 Re3
´
pieces. White's king advances to support 51. b4 b5 “
the forward movement of his pawns. 52. axb5 axb5 “–
53. Kg2 Re2+ ’¦’
Black can win the b-pawn, but he loses the 54. Nf2 Rb2 °’
g-pawn for it. Afterwards white's two 55. Kf3 Bf8
K-side pawns can go right in, but white 56. Nd3 Rxh2
¨
must also cover black's pawn promotion 57. Ne5 Rb2 
Black defends as best he can; he 58. Nxg6 Bxb4 
succeeds in splitting the white pawns, and 59. g4 Bc5
keeps pressure on, while defending his 60. Rd3 Bd6
´
own passed pawn. But it can't last for 61. Ke4 b4 
long - the g-pawn is now ready to advance, 62. Ne5 Re2+ ’°
and black can only stop it with his king. 63. Kf5 Bxe5 ”¨‘
64. fxe5 Rf2+ ¤
65. Kg6 Re2
66. Rb3 Re4

67. Kf5 Rd4 
White's pawns advance for promotion, and 68. g5 Kd7 
the black king is trapped on the back rank. 69. g6 Ke7
White offers his rook in exchange for the 70. Rh3 Rd1
°’´
pawn promotion, but black avoids it. The 71. Rh7+ Kf8 ‘
stage is set for white's pawn promotion; 72. e6 Rf1+ 
black loses his rook for it, and then it's all 73. Ke5 Re1+ 
over. Black resigns. 74. Kd6 b3 
75. e7+ Kg8
All black's moves were those which were 76. Rh1 Re2
”§
top ranked by the analysis program - it 77. Rd1 b2 ¤
was the best effort that he could make! 78. Kd7 Kg7
Play After the Opening 24

3. Continuing Play after the Opening


The Defense Game is a standard configuration with a number of related variants. Here we
present a general summary of how to play some lines of the D-game an additional 8 to 10 moves
after the opening. These examples are all excerpts taken from complete games in later sections.

The lines presented here represent only a small part of the entire D-system, but they are the
starting point for building a solid opening repertoire. These lines mostly develop the K-side first,
using moves from a restricted set that is easy to remember and to master in play. The standard
opening itself is generally playable, but is slightly less strong than most of its close variants.

A commonly used theme in continuing play with the Defense Game is the building of a
concentration of pieces to support a strong challenge in the center. Since the opponent usually
does not try to attack with his own center pawns, the player of the D-game typically has several
moves at his disposition in order to prepare this attack, which can start at any time.
Game 3: Black plays the standard opening against a 2 pawn classical opening. White later
tries a rook pawn attack, and a center pawn attack, and then trades off his bishops. Black is left
with some structural damage, but stays equal materially and later was able to draw easily.
§¯³¨ 1. Nf3 d6 9. a4 a5 §¯³
2. e4 Nd7 10. d5 exd5
”“”ž¹“”“ 3. d4 e6 11. exd5 O-O
“ž“”
˜”“— 4. Nc3 Ne7 12. Bxb6 cxb6 ””¹“
 5. Bd3 Nb6 13. Re1 Re8 ”‘
’‘ 6. Bf4 Bd7 14. Bxg6 hxg6 ‘
–›• 7. O-O Ng6 15. Qd3 Bf6 –ª•
8. Be3 Be7 16. Rxe8+ Qxe8
‘’‘’‘’ 17. Re1 Qd8
’‘’‘’
¦ª¤² ¦²

Game 18: Black's standard D-game faces white's 3 pawn standard classical opening. Black
has to react to white's attack, but is never in real difficulty. Black has some slight damage to his
position, but his pieces are active, and he has plenty of good continuations for later play.
§¯³¨ 1. d4 d6 9. c5 Nc8 §³¨
2. e4 e6 10. Qb3 b6
”“”ž¹“”“ 3. c4 Ne7 11. cxd6 Nxd6
”¯ž˜“”
˜”“— 4. Nc3 Ng6 12. e5 Nc8 ”““
 5. Nf3 Be7 13. d5 exd5 ’
‘’‘ 6. Be3 Nd7 14. Nxd5 c6 
–›• 7. Bd3 Nb6 15. Bxg6 hxg6 ª•
8. O-O Bd7 16. Nxe7 Nxe7
‘’’‘’ 17. Rad1 Qc7
‘’’‘’
¦ª¤² ¤¤²
Play After the Opening 25

Game 55: Black plays an early center pawn challenge against a K-side fianchetto opening
by white. Black then develops both knights in the D-game style. He responds to two rook pawn
attacks, and exchanges bishops. Black then goes for control of the open file, and is in good form.
§¯³¨ 1. g3 e6 9. h4 h5 §§³
2. Nf3 Ne7 10. exd5 exd5
”“”ž¹“”“ 3. d4 d5 11. a4 a5
““”
˜“— 4. Nc3 Nd7 12. Re1 O-O ˜“¯—
“ 5. Bg2 Nb6 13. b3 c6 ”“ž“
’‘ 6. O-O Bd7 14. Bg5 Bxg5 ‘’’
–ª•’ 7. Qd3 Ng6 15. Nxg5 Qf6 ‘–•’
8. e4 Be7 16. Nf3 Rfe8
‘’‘’›’ 17. Qd2 Bf5
‘¬’›
¦¤² ¦¦²
Game 31: White plays the D-game with an early castle, gaining time against black's 2 pawn
opening. White finds lively play after the opening, exchanging off 2 pieces, and pinning white's
queen. White is now in very good shape, and had no difficulties at all in the ensuing Game.

§¯¨³ 1. e3 e5 9. Bd2 a5 §§³


2. Ne2 d5 10. a4 Qd6
”“”“”“ 3. Ng3 Nf6 11. c3 Ne7
“”“”“
¹—ž˜ 4. Be2 Nc6 12. d4 Nf5 ¹
“” 5. O-O Bc5 13. Nxf5 Bxf5 ”“­
 6. d3 O-O 14. dxe5 Qxe5 ‘—
•‘’– 7. Nd2 Be6 15. Nd4 Ne4 ’’
8. Nb3 Bb6 16. Nxf5 Qxf5
‘’‘›’‘’ 17. Qc2 Rfe8
’ª›’‘’
¦ª¤² ¦¤²
Game 30: Black plays the standard opening with a response to a rook pawn early attack.
Afterwards black pushes on the center with e5, trades knights, and then challenges white's
centrally placed pieces. White now follows with 19.Bxg7, but black has an answer to everything.
§¯³¹¨ 1. d4 e6 9. Nd2 Be7 §¯¨³
2. e4 d6 10. f4 e5
“”ž“”“ 3. Nc3 Ne7 11. fxe5 dxe5
““”“
˜”“— 4. Nf3 Nd7 12. Nc4 Nxc4 –¹ž—
” 5. Bd3 Nb6 13. Bxc4 O-O ””
‘’‘ 6. O-O Bd7 14. Qf3 exd4 ‘›‘
–›• 7. a4 a5 15. Bxd4 Be6 ¬
8. Be3 Ng6 16. Nd5 Bd6
’‘’‘’ 17. Qc3 c6
’‘‘’
¦ª¤² 18. Nb6 c5 ¦¤²
Play After the Opening 26

Game 20: Black's D-game is countered by white's 3 pawn classical opening. Black's center
pawn exchange offer is not accepted initially by white. Instead both sides continue to build
before locking up the Q-side pawn structure. Note the interesting disposition of black's pieces.
§ž¯¨³ 1. e4 e6 9. Qc2 c6 §¨³
2. Nf3 d6 10. a3 Qc7
”“”—¹“”“ 3. d4 Ne7 11. b4 Nf6
¯ž¹“”“
”— 4. Be2 Nd7 12. h3 Bd7 ”˜—
” 5. c4 Ng6 13. Rfd1 Rfb8 ”‘””
‘’‘ 6. O-O Be7 14. Rab1 b6 ‘‘
–• 7. Nc3 O-O 15. Rb2 a5 ’–•‘
8. Be3 e5 16. b5 c5
‘’›’‘’ 17. dxe5 dxe5
¦ª›’‘
¦ª¤² ¤²
Game 46: Black's D-game confronts a 2 pawn classical opening. White exchanges knight
for bishop, and then pushes on the Q-side. Black plays in beginner's style, seeking to trade off
pieces quickly. White can now exchange for black's knight and queen, but black still stays even.
§ž¯¨³ 1. e4 d6 9. Nd5 Nf6 §ž¨³
2. Nf3 Nd7 10. Nxe7+ Qxe7
”“”—¹“”“ 3. d4 e6 11. d5 a6
”¯“”
”— 4. Nc3 Ne7 12. c4 Nd7 “””˜”
” 5. Bd3 Ng6 13. b4 b6 ‘”
’‘ 6. O-O Be7 14. Qc2 Nh4 ’‘‘
–›• 7. Be3 O-O 15. Qe2 Nxf3+ ›ª
8. Re1 e5 16. Qxf3 Nf6
‘’‘’‘’ 17. Bg5 h6
‘’‘’
¦ª¦² ¦¦²
Game 35: Black's D-game again confronts the 2 pawn standard classical opening. This
time white plays more cautiously, while black locks up the center and invades on the flanks. Black
compresses his adversary's position and prepares to press an across-the-board attack.
§ž¯¨³ 1. e4 e6 9. a4 Nf6 §¨³
2. d4 Ne7 10. h3 c5
”“”—¹“”“ 3. Nf3 d6 11. d5 Bd7
­ž¹“”“
”— 4. Nc3 Nd7 12. a5 Qc7 ”—
” 5. Bd3 Ng6 13. Qe2 Nh5 “”‘”
’‘ 6. O-O Be7 14. Bc4 Nhf4 ›‘˜
–›• 7. Be3 O-O 15. Qd1 b5 –•‘
8. Qd2 e5 16. axb6 axb6
‘’‘¬’‘’ 17. Qd2 Qb7
’‘¬’‘
¦¤² 18. Rfe1 b5 ¦¦²
Play After the Opening 27

Game 57: Black again faces a 2 pawn classical opening. White's avoidance of the center
pawn exchange allows black free play on the K-side. Black exchanges knight for bishop, then falls
back to cover a threatened knight sacrifice with Nxe5. Black is in good shape with no problems.
§ž¯¨³ 1. e4 e6 9. Qd2 a6 §¯¨´
2. d4 d6 10. a3 Nf6
”“”—¹“”“ 3. Nf3 Ne7 11. Qd3 Ng4
“”¹”“
”— 4. Nc3 Nd7 12. Bd2 Nf4 “”˜
‘” 5. Be2 Ng6 13. Qc4 Nxe2+ ‘”ž
‘ 6. d5 e5 14. Qxe2 f5 ª
–• 7. O-O Be7 15. Qc4 Nf6 ’–•
8. Be3 O-O 16. exf5 Bxf5
‘’‘›’‘’ 17. Rfc1 Kh8
’‘’‘’
¦ª¤² ¦¦²
Game 69: This time black develops a 3 pawn center, and then pushes on the Q-side. Black
exchanges pawns cleverly, sacrificing a pawn temporarily but regaining it quickly. Black gets
good play for all his pieces, and already has a definite positional advantage over his opponent.
§ž¯¨³ 1. e4 e6 9. Qd3 b5 §¨³
2. d4 Ne7 10. a3 Bb7
”“—¹“”“ 3. Nf3 d6 11. Rfd1 a6
ž¯¹“”“
“”“— 4. Nc3 Nd7 12. a4 Qc7 ”“—
 5. Bb5 c6 13. Qd2 b4 ”
’‘ 6. Be2 Ng6 14. Na2 c5 ‘—
–• 7. O-O Be7 15. dxc5 Nxc5 ¬•
8. Be3 O-O 16. Qxb4 a5
‘’‘›’‘’ 17. Qa3 Nxe4
•’‘›’‘’
¦ª¤² ¦¤²
Game 54: Here black strikes at the center with c5, brings the Q-side pawns forward, and
finds good placements for his queen and pieces. Both sides then concentrate on pure positional
play, and no exchanges are seen. Note white cannot free by 17.f4 without taking serious risks.
§ž¯¨³ 1. d4 d6 9. Be3 b6 ¨§³
2. e4 e6 10. Qc2 Bb7
”“—¹“”“ 3. Nf3 Ne7 11. d5 Re8
ž¯“”“
”“— 4. c4 Nd7 12. Rad1 a6 “””“˜—
” 5. Nc3 Ng6 13. Rfe1 Qc7 ”‘¹
‘’‘ 6. Bd3 Be7 14. Nd2 Bf6 ‘‘
–• 7. O-O c5 15. Ndb1 Be5 –‘
8. Be2 O-O 16. Qd2 Nf6
‘’›’‘’ 17. f3 Rab8
‘’¬›‘’
¦ª¤² •¤¦²
Play After the Opening 28

Another group of Defense Game main lines develop the c-pawn and queen, and postpone
the central pawn challenge. The c-pawn advance also prevents an adversary knight incursion.
Game 68: Black develops cautiously, repositioning his queen. He brings his knight to the
K-side, castles, and finally strikes at the center with e5. White tries a queen and bishop attack on
the black castle, but gets stung by a counter attack that wins black a piece for two pawns.
§ž³¨ 1. Nc3 d6 9. Bg5 Nf6 §ž¨³
2. d4 Nd7 10. Rae1 O-O
”“¯—¹“”“ 3. Nf3 e6 11. Bc4 e5
”¯¹“”
“”“— 4. e4 Ne7 12. a3 h6 “—˜
 5. Be2 c6 13. Bxh6 exd4 
’‘ 6. O-O Qc7 14. Nxd4 d5 ›–’
–• 7. Be3 Ng6 15. exd5 Ng4 ’–
8. Qd2 Be7 16. f4 Nxh6
‘’‘¬›’‘’ 17. dxc6 bxc6
’‘¬‘’
¦¤² ¦¤²
Game 61: Black again plays the queen developing move and afterwards has to respond to a
bishop exchange. Black recaptures with the king, exchanges center pawns, then brings his queen
out to probe white's K-side. Black is slightly behind in his development, but otherwise is fine.
§ž³¨ 1. d4 d6 9. Bxe7 Kxe7 §ž§³
2. e4 e6 10. Qd2 Re8
”“¯—¹“”“ 3. Nf3 Ne7 11. Rad1 Kf8
”““”“
“”“— 4. c4 Nd7 12. e5 dxe5 ““—
 5. Bg5 c6 13. dxe5 Ndxe5 ­
‘’‘ 6. Nc3 Qc7 14. Nxe5 Qxe5 ‘•
–• 7. Be2 Ng6 15. Rfe1 Qf4 ª
8. O-O Be7 16. Qd3 Kg8
‘’›’‘’ 17. Ne4 Qf5
‘’›’‘’
¦ª¤² ¤¦²
Game 59: Black develops a 3 pawn recessed center, but delays the queen move. He pushes
on the center, which then closes. Black then pulls up his Q-side pawns, and offers a knight trade.
Black is playing in pure beginner's style, but still has reasonable chances for the ensuing game.
§ž¯¨³ 1. Nf3 e6 9. Qc2 e5 ¨ž¯§³
2. d4 Ne7 10. Rad1 Re8
”“—¹“”“ 3. c4 d6 11. d5 c5
—“”
“”“— 4. e4 Nd7 12. a3 a6 “”””
 5. Nc3 c6 13. b4 b6 ”‘”
‘’‘ 6. Bd3 Ng6 14. Rb1 Rb8 ’‘‘¹
–›• 7. O-O Be7 15. Qd2 Nh4 ’–
‘’’‘’ 8. Be3 O-O 16. Nxh4 Bxh4
17. Bc2 h6
›¬’‘’
¦ª¤² ¤¤²
Play After the Opening 29

In the Defense Game the bishops are already well placed in their central positions, and do
not need to move right after the opening, unless they are used to recapture in central pawn
exchanges. Bishop replacements are quite playable however, and can be very strong.
Game 5: Black castles and brings his bishop out to support the e5 push. Black then
moves his knights about until white finally goes for a bishop exchange. Black is now in good
shape; his only weakness is the backward d-pawn, but this will not be too much of a problem.
§ž¯¨³ 1. Nf3 e6 9. Qd2 e5 §§˜³
2. d4 Ne7 10. d5 Nc5
”“”—“”“ 3. c4 d6 11. Bc2 a6
“­“”“
”“¹— 4. e4 Nd7 12. b4 Nd7 “”¹—
 5. Nc3 Ng6 13. Qd3 Re8 ‘”
‘’‘ 6. Be3 Be7 14. c5 Ndf8 ’‘
–›• 7. Bd3 O-O 15. Ba4 Bd7 –ª•
8. O-O Bf6 16. cxd6 cxd6
‘’’‘’ 17. Bxd7 Qxd7
‘’‘’
¦ª¤² ¦¤²
Game 14: Black castles and moves the rook onto the e-file. White challenges the center,
and black doesn't accept the pawn exchange. Later white tries to attack with bishop and knight,
but is not able to achieve anything. Black now begins to repulse the invading pieces.
§ž¯§³ 1. Nf3 e6 9. e5 b6 ¨­¨³
2. d4 Ne7 10. Be4 Rb8
”“”—¹“”“ 3. c4 d6 11. Nb5 a6
”—¹“”“
”“— 4. e4 Nd7 12. Na7 Bb7 “”›“—
 5. Nc3 Ng6 13. Nc6 Bxc6 
‘’‘ 6. Be3 Be7 14. Bxc6 Qc8 ‘’
–›• 7. Bd3 O-O 15. exd6 Bxd6 •
8. O-O Re8 16. Qe2 Rd8
‘’’‘’ 17. Bg5 Be7
‘’ª’‘’
¦ª¤² ¦¤²

Queen moves in the D-game are somewhat different from conventional chess. The queen
usually cannot relocate forward to the central squares, which are typically occupied by minor
pieces. Instead the queen often moves to the queen bishop 2 square after a c-pawn advance.
Rook placements on the other hand are similar to those used in conventional chess, with the
rooks moving to the center files, or to occupy and control any open or half-open files.
Castling is normally performed in the latter moves of the opening. As in classical chess,
the king side castle is always easier and safer, and in this system is the one used almost
exclusively. Castle is almost always performed, even if the pawn structure has been damaged, as
after an adversary bishop has exchanged for your king knight.
Play After the Opening 30

In Summary the main lines of the Defense Game usually include:

Primary Move Set: these six moves:


with black: d6, e6, Ne7, Nd7, Ng6, Be7
with white: d3, e3, Ne2, Nd2, Ng3, Be2

Secondary Move Set: the other moves that are frequently made are:
with black: O-O, e5, Re8, Nb6 (or Nf6), c6 (or c5), Qc7 (or Qb6), Bf6
with white: O-O, e4, Re1, Nb3 (or Nf3), c3 (or c4), Qc2 (or Qb3), Bf3

Even with an easy to learn system like the Defense Game, one cannot reduce play after the
opening to a simplistic sequence of habitual moves. But most of the typical moves listed above
can be played against most adversary deployments. Players of all levels should try improvising
continuations based on a selection of moves taken from this frequently used set. Below are two
more specific move sets, one suggested for beginners and another for better players.

Better players can learn quickly the most effective move sequences corresponding to
different general categories of adversary defenses, and so prepare anticipated lines up to 15
moves into the game. Beginners should concentrate on consolidating and maintaining a coherent
defense, with a more cautious approach to attacking, especially when facing better players.
Secondary Move Set for Beginners:
with black: O-O, Re8, c6, e5, Qc7
with white: O-O, Re1, c3, e4, Qc2
followed by slow advances of the Q-side pawns
Try to avoid pawn exchanges and trade off pieces

Secondary Move Set for Better Players:


with black: O-O, e5, Re8, Nf6, c6 (or c5), Qc7 (or Qb6)
with white: O-O, e4, Re1, Nf3, c3 (or c4), Qc2 (or Qb3)
Try to open the center with pawn exchanges
Play aggressively

Players of all levels should experiment with the many strong and valid continuations of the
Defense Game. There are dozens of interesting and playable lines - develop your repertoire!
The Defense Game in Action 31

4. The Defense Game in Action

Now we present, including the two already seen, twenty complete games with the Defense
Game, playing mostly with black. Most games use the standard opening and its close variants; a
few are distant variants. A variety of responses to the Defense Game are used in this collection.
In many cases the responses are early attacks.

These strong conventional responses are aggressive, but as we will see, the Defense Game
is able to contain their initial aggression, and defend adequately during and after the opening.
The adversary can attempt to disrupt our opening by attacking early, but more often he is content
to occupy the center heavily with pieces and pawns, and even allow the D-system player the
attack rather than trying to seize the initiative himself. This observation is also well supported by
analysis, which suggests that among the strongest adversary lines are many which do not
challenge the Defense Game either during or immediately after the opening.

Watch in these games how the D-system player is able to carry out his opening, while the
opponent usually concentrates on building a strong center. Notice the large variety of adversary
responses possible. Study carefully the moves made following the opening, to develop a general
idea of how to continue play with this system after the first moves.

Unless otherwise noted, all games were played by the computer, using adequate time (45
minutes per side) to produce a contest of master level quality. All games have been analyzed to
insure that they are free of serious errors, and that the moves chosen on both sides are
consistently from among the strongest and most promising. They are all good examples of chess
being played well from start to finish, and they can provide you with valuable ideas on how to
exploit the strengths of this opening system in the middle and end games.

In all these games the Defense Game wins or draws. Losses have not been included,
because we are just beginning to document the validity of the basic system. In the next chapters
we will address the topic of playing against the Defense Game. For the moment we are only
gaining familiarity with the basic opening system and play following it, but at the same time we
are beginning to develop an impression of the style of games that result from using this system.

Play thru these games before reading on in the book. For beginners it is essential to see
how games proceed from beginning to end. But players of all levels can benefit from reviewing
these games. By so doing you will become familiar with the Defense Game and its variants, the
range of responses used against it, and the type of games that result from playing this system.

Attack!
Game 3: Defense Game Dv0 with Black
§¯³¨ 1. Nf3 d6 Here is a a quick and easy draw produced
2. e4 Nd7 by the author, playing black against a two
”“”ž¹“”“ 3. d4 e6 pawn classical opening.
˜”“— 4. Nc3 Ne7
 5. Bd3 Nb6 Black's D-game standard opening is not
’‘ 6. Bf4 Bd7 challenged in the first moves; instead it is
–›• 7. O-O Ng6 white who has to react by retreating his
8. Be3 Be7 centrally placed bishop when black's king
‘’‘’‘’ knight shifts into position.
¦ª¤²
§¯§³ 9. a4 a5 White plays a typical continuation against
10. d5 exd5 the Defense Game, trying every kind of
“ž¹“” 11. exd5 O-O offensive action he can find: first a rook
””“ 12. Bxb6 cxb6 pawn attack, which is stopped cold, then a
”‘ 13. Re1 Re8 central pawn challenge and exchange, and
‘ 14. Bxg6 hxg6 then two bishop for knight exchanges.
–•
Black's pawn structure is slightly damaged
’‘’‘’ but white has a difficult task trying to
¦ª¦² capitalize on these positional weaknesses.

§³ 15. Qd3 Bf6 Black now encourages more trades, and
16. Rxe8+ Qxe8 white obliges - rooks and minor pieces are
“ž“” 17. Re1 Qd8 exchanged. The board is being cleared
””¯“ 18. b3 Bxc3 rapidly, and black is able to maintain
”‘ 19. Qxc3 Rc8 pressure on open lines, without risking to
‘ 20. Qd2 Qf6 incur a material disadvantage.
‘•
Black now targets exchanges of queens
‘¬’‘’ and rooks; if he succeeds in doing so, he
¦² is almost certain of obtaining a draw.

¯³ 21. c4 Re8 White is constantly being challenged on


22. Rxe8+ Bxe8 the open lines, and so has little time to
“ž” 23. h3 Qa1+ develop any coordinated offensive action.
”””“ 24. Kh2 Qf6
”‘ 25. Qe1 Qd8 The exchange of rooks signals the last
‘‘–’ 26. h4 f6 opportunity for white to develop any
‘ 27. Nd4 Bd7 attack; black is now set to block the knight
posting and challenge the open king file.
’‘²
¬
The Defense Game in Action 33

White's last attempt at attacking fizzles out 28. Qe3 Kf7 ´
as black jams the center, and now forces a 29. Ne6 Bxe6
queen exchange. Afterwards there will be 30. Qxe6+Kf8
“¯”
nothing but pawns on the board, and so 31. g4 Qe7 ””ª”“
many of them that there will be no room ”‘
for the kings to maneuver on any front. ‘‘‘’
‘
’²

Black's 'inferior' K-side pawn structure 32. Qxe7+Kxe7 
now shows to be as resistant as a normal 33. f4 Kf7
one - any advance by white allows black to 34. Kg3 Ke7
“³”
undouble his pawns and close the game 35. Kf3 f5 ””“
out. Black waits for a while, then locks the 36. g5 Kf7 ”‘“’
pawns himself with the f-pawn advance. ‘‘’’
‘°


Now it's all over - black's pawn structure 37. Ke3 Ke7 
doesn't allow any advance on any front, 38. Kd3 Kd7
and the white king can neither pass thru or 39. Kd2 Kd8
“³”
otherwise create a gap allowing him to 40. Kd1 Kc8 ””“
force the situation. After wandering about 41. Ke1 Kd8 ”‘“’
pointlessly with his king for a while, white 42. Kd2 Ke8 ‘‘’’
finally accepts the draw. 43. Kd1 Kd7 ‘

°
While this style of play will certainly not be to everybody's liking, experience to date
nevertheless indicates that it is the most effective system ever found for drawing. It permits all
players, even those with minimal skills, to maintain parity in games with the best chess playing
computers, and also to hold their own with other players who are much stronger than themselves.

When this system is played aggressively, and not passively as in this game, it is
exceptionally strong, and can drive for a win as well as the best classical openings. This is the
main strength and attraction of adopting the D-system: it allows beginners to survive against
opponents far stronger than themselves, and at the same time it offers an excellent basis for
better players to challenge strongly and play for a win. It's a system that you can use and grow
with as your chess playing skills evolve from scratch to master level.
Game 4: Close Variant Dv3'Dx with Black
§ž³¨ 1. e4 e6 Here is a fine victory playing the Defense
2. d4 d6 Game with black against a 3 pawn classical
”“—¯“”“ 3. Nf3 Ne7 deployment with a bishop early attack. It's
“”“— 4. c4 c6 a good example of how this system can be
 5. Nc3 Nd7 played effectively at master level.
‘’‘ 6. Be2 Ng6
–• 7. Bg5 Be7 White now follows his bishop attack with a
8. Bxe7 Qxe7 rook pawn attack: like most adversaries of
‘’›’‘’ the D-game, he is impatient to refute this
¦ª²¤ opening - a series of shocks await him!

§³¨ 9. h4 e5 White's attack is preempted by black's


10. g3 h5 counter in the center. Black then shuts
”“¯“” 11. Qd2 Nb6 down the rook pawn attack and brings out
“”— 12. O-O-OBg4 his bishop, preparing for a long castle.
’“ 13. dxe5 Nxc4
—‘ž’ White castles Q-side, and then exchanges
–•’ center pawns, no doubt feeling confidant
about his position. Black's Nxc4 again
‘’¬›’ preempts the attack; white's play is forced.
²¤¤

§´¨ 14. Bxc4 Bxf3 White's pawn moves downfield, giving


15. exd6 Qf6 check, and compensating for the bishop
”“‘¯“” 16. d7+ Kd8 fork of his rooks. But when this tactical
“ 17. Rhg1 Bxd1 episode is over, white has lost the
˜“ 18. Rxd1 Ne5 exchange, and so most likely the game.
‘’ 19. Bb3 Qe7
›–’ Combinations such as this one are not
easy to find at the chessboard; but if you
‘’¬’ have a repertoire of them prepared in
²¤ advance, you can beat the best players!

¨ 20. Qd4 Kc7 Black now follows with a fine series of
21. f4 Nxd7 moves, again virtually forcing white's play.
”“´¯› 22. Qxg7 Rag8 Black always seems to find the counter
“ 23. Qd4 Nc5 punch before white's blow can arrive.
“ 24. Bxf7 Rd8
—’’ 25. Qe3 Rxd1+ White's position continually deteriorates;
–¬’ 26. Kxd1 Rd8+ he has difficulty coordinating his pieces.
27. Kc2 Nxe4
‘’°

The Defense Game in Action 35

Queens and pieces are exchanged, and 28. Bb3 Re8 
black consolidates his lead by picking off 29. Qxe4 Qxe4+
one of the separated white pawns. 30. Nxe4 Rxe4
”“
31. Kd2 Re7 “´
At this point there is only the endgame 32. Bd1 Rg7 ‘
exercise left. With three pawns each still 33. Bxh5 Rxg3 ¨
on the board, black's exchange difference 34. Be2 Kd6 
is more than sufficient to win. 35. h5 Rh3
36. Ke1 Rh4
‘’›²
37. Kf2 Rxf4+ 
Black's play is razor sharp, again breaking 38. Kg3 Rf6 
up the remains of white's defenses as he 39. Bd3 Ke5
moves downfield, then creating a passed 40. b3 c5
”
pawn which moves towards promotion. 41. Bc2 b5 ¨
42. Bd3 c4 ‘
43. bxc4 Kd4 ‘´
44. Bb1 bxc4 ”²
45. a4 c3

›
White loses his bishop to stop the pawn 46. a5 Rf1 
promotion. Afterwards black's rook covers 47. Bc2 Rh1
easily as his king moves over to capture 48. Kg4 Rh2
”
white's rook pawn. It's time to resign. 49. Bh7 c2 °’
50. Bxc2 Rxc2 ’³
An impressive win with superior tactical 51. h6 Rh2 
play: that's what master level chess is all 52. Kg5 Kc5 
about; and the Defense Game is definitely
capable of winning at master level!
¨

Game 5: Defense Game DvEF with Black
§ž¯¨³ 1. Nf3 e6 Here the author with black triumphs in a
2. d4 Ne7 difficult game against the computer. Black
”“”—“”“ 3. c4 d6 plays DvEF, one of the better D-game lines,
”“¹— 4. e4 Nd7 preparing for a push of the e-pawn.
 5. Nc3 Ng6
‘’‘ 6. Be3 Be7 White plays the 3 pawn standard classical
–›• 7. Bd3 O-O opening, one of the most frequently seen
8. O-O Bf6 responses to the Defense Game, and also a
‘’’‘’ theoretically perfect development.
¦ª¤²

§¯§˜³ 9. Qd2 e5 White prefers to avoid an exchange of


10. d5 Nc5 center pawns, looking instead to open the
“”ž“”“ 11. Bc2 a6 Q-side. Black's play is concentrated on
“”¹— 12. b4 Nd7 maintaining the pawn structure intact, and
’‘” 13. Qd3 Re8 trading the pieces - the beginner's strategy
›’‘ 14. c5 Ndf8 in playing the Defense Game.
–ª• 15. Ba4 Bd7
‘’‘’
¦¤²

§˜³ 16. cxd6 cxd6 White exchanges bishops and pawns and
17. Bxd7 Qxd7 moves his rooks to the opened c-file, but
“¨­“”“ 18. Rac1 Rec8 black is able to keep step with him easily.
“”¹ 19. Rc2 Rc7
‘” 20. Rfc1 Rac8 Black's knight invades, inviting another
‘’‘˜ 21. a4 Nf4 piece exchange. White doesn't want to
–ª• lose time retreating with his queen, and so
he accepts the piece trade.
¤’‘’
¦²

˜³ 22. Bxf4 exf4 More pieces are traded, as black shores up
23. Ne2 Rxc2 his position with a queen relocation. Black
““” 24. Rxc2 Rxc2 can now respond to any piece invasion on
“”” 25. Qxc2 Be5 his side of the board.
’­‘¹ 26. a5 Qb5
’‘” 27. Qd2 h6 Note that no difficult moves were needed
• by black to maintain parity to this point;
the main strength of the Defense Game is
¬•’‘’ that it's easy for everyone to play!
²
The Defense Game in Action 37

Now there is a tactical phase, as black 28. Nfd4 Qd7 


repulses a knight invasion, and occupies 29. h3 Nh7
the 'hole' on g3 with his knight. 30. Nf5 Nf6
““³
31. f3 Nh5 “”“”
White's knights have little scope, and his 32. Kh1 Kh7 ’‘¹
queen is tied up in the defense of the 33. Kg1 Qa4 ­’–‘”
b-pawn, hardly a worthy task for such an 34. Qe1 g6 ‘˜‘
important piece. 35. Nfd4 Ng3
•‘
¬²
Black brings his queen in close to aid in 36. Qb1 Qa3 
the attack, and now his penetration bears 37. Kh2 Qe3
fruit. At move 39 white is effectively in 38. Qd1 g5
““³
'zugzwang', meaning 'obliged to move' - 39. b5 axb5 ””
but any moves he makes result in losing. 40. h4 gxh4 ’“‘¹
White offers both his rook pawns to –‘””
escape from the bind. ¯‘˜
•‘²
ª
Black will probably not be able to keep his 41. Kh3 Qf2 
2 pawn advantage, since his own doubled 42. Qc1 Nxe2
pawns are weak; what has been gained 43. Nxe2 Qxe2
“¬“´
however, is the passed b-pawn. 44. Qc7 Kg7 ””
’“‘¹
White then abandons his knight and ‘””
attacks with his solo queen in a desperate ‘°
attempt to find a perpetual check.
­‘

Black forces a queen exchange, and now 45. Qd7 Qf2 
his passed pawn goes straight in for 46. Qg4+ Kf6
promotion. White no longer has any 47. Qf5+ Ke7
“´“
chance, so he resigns. 48. Qg4 Qg3+ ””
49. Qxg3 hxg3 ’‘¹
If the author managed to beat the 50. Kh4 b4 ”‘”²
computer, then merit has to be given 0-1 ‘”
mainly to the opening system he's using!
‘

Game 6: Close Variant Dv3'D with Black
§ž³¨ 1. d4 d6 Here is a fine victory with black playing the
2. c4 Nd7 Defense Game. Black reacts to the bishop
”“¯—¹“”“ 3. Nf3 e6 pin by moving his queen away from the
“”“— 4. Nc3 Ne7 attack, then completing his normal knight
 5. Bg5 c6 maneuver and bishop development. Also
‘’‘ 6. e4 Qc7 good is running the bishop off with a rook
–• 7. Qd2 Ng6 or bishop pawn advance. The line shown
8. Be2 Be7 here is often played in the D-system even
‘’¬›’‘’ when there is no bishop early attack.
¦²¤

§ž§³ 9. Bxe7 Nxe7 Following the bishop exchange black


10. O-O O-O brings his knights over to the K-side; after
”“¯“”“ 11. Rfd1 Ng6 some preparation, he pushes the e-pawn.
”˜— 12. Rac1 Re8
”‘” 13. h3 Nf6 White avoids the pawn exchange, and
‘‘ 14. Bd3 e5 advances instead. Black is also content to
–›•‘ 15. d5 c5 close the center: he now has good play on
both flanks and will not be concerned
‘’¬’‘ about a white invasion on his side of the
¦¤² board - solid D-game elementary strategy.

¨ž§³ 16. Ne2 Nh5 Black advances and exchanges a Q-side


17. Rf1 b6 pawn, opening a file for queen and rooks.
”“”“ 18. Bc2 Rb8
¯”— 19. b3 Nhf4 White finds little that he can do to improve
”‘” 20. Ng3 b5 his position - he moves a knight over to
‘˜ 21. cxb5 Rxb5 the K-side, echoing black's earlier double
’‘•–‘ 22. Rfe1 Rb8 knight placement. Black's knight shifts
23. a3 Qb6 forward, occupying a good 'hole' on f4.
›¬’‘
¦¦²

¨§³ 24. Ra1 Ba6 Black advances and exchanges another


25. Rab1 Qc7 Q-side pawn. His pieces are slowly gaining
”¯“”“ 26. Rbc1 c4 in effectiveness, and he already has a
ž”— 27. bxc4 Rec8 slight positional advantage.
‘”
‘‘˜ Note now how black's constant shifting of
’•–‘ his queen will make it difficult for white to
assess his intentions - black's threats may
›¬’‘ be feinted or they may be real.
¦¦²
The Defense Game in Action 39

White is beginning to have trouble finding 28. Ba4 Bxc4 ¨³


decent moves. He sends his bishop to 29. Re3 Qb7
harass the black rooks, but it ends up 30. Rec3 Qa6
”›“”
being the object of attack itself. 31. Bd7 Rc5 ­”—
32. Ne1 h5 ¨‘”“
It doesn't appear much is happening in ž‘˜
this phase, but a seemingly pointless 33rd ’¦–‘
move by white signals that his game is
going down. Analysis shows that he has
¬’‘
effectively lost the game at this point! ¦–²
The knight invades and black wins the 33. Kh2 Rd8 ¨³
exchange. Now the situation turns clearly 34. Bc6 h4
desperate for white: black's pieces slice 35. Nf5 Ne2
”“”
thru his defense, and his own pieces are 36. Rxc4 Rxc4 ›”—
not capable of striking any targets of value 37. Bb7 Qa4 ‘”•
on the other side of the board. 38. Bc6 Qb3 ­‘”
39. Rxc4 Qxc4 ’‘
¬—’‘²
–
Now black sets up the mating net, with the 40. Qa5 Rf8 ¨³
queen and knight to provide the final blow. 41. Nxd6 Qc1
White no longer has any way of stopping it 42. Nf3 Nd4
”“”
and so he tries a diversionary attack. 43. Nd2 Qe1 –
44. Bb5 Nf4 ¬›‘”
˜‘˜”
’‘
–’‘²
¯
White's attack doesn't slow black from 45. Nb7 Qxf2 §
moving towards checkmate. Finally white 46. Bf1 Rc8
throws away his queen to prolong the 47. d6 Nfe2
”•“”³
game. Black is left with the easy task of 48. Qd8+ Kh7 ’
mating with advantage of a queen: 49. Qxh4+Qxh4 ”
50. Nc5 Qf4+ 54. gxf3 Nxf1 ˜‘¯
51. Kh1 Ng3+ 55. Kxf1 Qd2 ’‘
52. Kg1 Rxc5 56. a4 Rc1#
53. Nf3 Nxf3+
–—‘²
›
Game 7: Defense Game Dv0 with White
§¯¨³ 1. e3 Nf6 Here's another of the author's numerous
2. Ne2 d5 draws playing the Defense Game against a
“”“”“ 3. Ng3 e5 top strength computer rival. The D-game is
—¹ž˜ 4. d3 Bd6 probably the best system ever found for
”“” 5. Nd2 O-O drawing in chess, it's a real achievement!
 6. Nb3 Nc6
•‘’– 7. Be2 Be6 White completes his standard opening as
8. Bd2 a5 black plays the 2 pawn standard classical
‘’‘›’‘’ defense, ending with a rook pawn attack.
¦ª²¤

§¨³ 9. O-O a4 White plays a beginner's version of the


10. Nc1 a3 D-game: castling, retreating his knight in
“”“”“ 11. b3 Qe7 face of the rook pawn attack, avoiding
—¹ž¯ 12. Nh5 Nxh5 exchange with the rook pawn, and then
“”› 13. Bxh5 Qh4 inviting exchange of knights on the K-side.
 14. g3 Qf6 The computer rates the knight exchange to
”‘‘’’ be in his favor, and accepts. Black's queen
foray is then repelled easily. The computer
‘‘’’ judges all this as solid positional gain.
¦–ª¤²

¨¨³ 15. c3 Bh3 Black brings his bishop down to harass


16. Re1 e4 the rook, and tries to open the center.
“˜“”“ 17. d4 Rad8 White refuses center pawn exchanges, and
“¹ž 18. Be2 Be6 consolidates his defense. The computer
“¯ 19. Bf1 Qg5 still rates his position as far superior, but
’“ 20. Ne2 Ne7 white is not that easy to attack; unless the
”‘’’’ 21. Bg2 c6 computer is willing to sacrifice material, a
draw is already the most probable result.
‘•’›’
¦ª¦²

§¨³ 22. Rf1 Bg4 Black tries to press along the e1-h5 short
23. h3 Bh5 diagonal, but only succeeds in exchanging
˜“”“ 24. Qe1 Bf3 bishops. White tries to lock up the pawn
“¹ 25. Nf4 Bxg2 structure; the only way black can break
““¯ 26. Nxg2 b5 thru is with a sacrifice of material that
’’“ 27. b4 Ra8 cannot be recuperated easily, and his
”’’’‘ program logic won't accept this!
‘’•
¦¬¤²
The Defense Game in Action 41

White proposes more exchanges, and the 28. Qe2 Nf5 §³
computer accepts, reasoning that by so 29. Qg4 Qxg4
doing, he improves his positional strength 30. hxg4 Ne7
”“
- but he is only helping the weaker human 31. Nh4 f5 “¹
player achieve his aim of drawing. 32. gxf5 Nxf5 ““§
33. Nxf5 Rxf5 ’’“
With the queens and knights removed, and ”’’’
most of the pawns still present, there is
now almost no way that black can reopen
‘’
the game without risking to lose. ¦¤²
Now the pawn structure closes: white's 34. Kg2 Kf7 §
advancing f-pawn could be taken en- 35. f4 h5
passant, but the computer judges this 36. Rh1 Ke6

capture as less favorable than refusing it, 37. Rh3 g6 “¹¨“
and so misses his last opportunity to open 38. Rah1 Rf6 ““³“
the game. Note the characteristic zigzag 39. Bc1 Kf5 ’’“’
white pawn formation, with the bishop ”’’’¤
protecting the backward pawns - this
structure is totally resistant!
‘°
¤
The computer finally understands, but it's 40. Rh4 Re6 ¨
too late now to do anything about it. 41. R4h3 Ree8
White's position, which had been rated as 42. Rh4 Be7
¨
utterly inferior, is now judged by the 43. R4h3 Rf8 “¹“
computer evaluation to be perfectly equal. 44. Kf2 Kg4 “““
45. R1h2 Ra6 ’’“’³
Here's to thinking machines, and to the 46. Kg2 Bf6 ”’’’¤
humans that programmed them! You're 47. Rh1 Ra7
not as likely to find human adversaries as
‘°
willing to permit you to draw! ¤
Game 8: Defense Game DvEH with White
³¨¨ 1. e3 e5 Here is a typical master level Defense
2. Ne2 d5 Game, with a sharp tactical struggle thru
”“”¯“”“ 3. d3 Nf6 the entire contest. The Defense Game
—¹ž˜ 4. Nd2 Nc6 concedes little to the adversary, and gives
“” 5. Ng3 Be6 you equal chances in the middle game, but
 6. Be2 Bd6 in order to win, you have to work hard!
‘’– 7. O-O Qe7
8. Re1 O-O-O Black plays the strong 2 pawn classical
‘’‘–›’‘’ opening and opts for the Q-side castle. By
¦ª¦² classical standards his opening is perfect.

³¨¨ 9. e4 dxe4 Heavy trades follow: 3 pieces and a pawn


10. Ndxe4 Nxe4 each. Such exchanges are typical when
”“”“ 11. Nxe4 Qd7 playing the D-system - often most of the
—“ 12. Be3 f5 minor pieces are traded off, and queen and
­”ª 13. Nxd6+Qxd6 rook endgames result. These endgames
 14. Bf3 Bd5 are relatively easy to master, another very
‘“’ 15. Bxd5 Qxd5 favorable aspect for system players.
16. Qh5 f4 Following the trades white tries a queen
‘’‘’’ 17. Bd2 f3 sortie; black advances his K-side pawns.
¦¦² 18. g3 g6

´§¨ 19. Qg4+ Kb8 White piles up on the isolated king pawn;
20. Bc3 Rhf8 at first black tries to defend, but then he
”“”­ 21. Qe4 Qd7 abandons it. Black shifts his queen to
—“ 22. Qh4 Rde8 allow an invasion of white's back rank.
”“ 23. Re4 h5 Both sides have potential attacks - the
’¤¬ 24. Rae1 Qe6 tension is reaching a climax.
’‘“’ 25. a3 Qf5
26. b4 Qf7 Analysis shows that black did somewhat
‘’’ better with 26..g5, but white already has a
¦² definite advantage in any case.

§ 27. Bxe5 Rxe5 White attacks first, giving check, but black
28. Rxe5 Nxe5 is a move away from giving checkmate,
´” 29. Rxe5 Qa2 and at the end of this episode white must
”“ 30. Qe4 a5 yield: he has an adequate response - Rf1,
”“ 31. Re8+ Ka7 but he must return his pawn advantage.
’¬ 32. Qd4+ b6
’‘“’ 33. Re1 Re8 Black now has a choice of pawns to take -
which is the better one?
­‘’’
¦²
The Defense Game in Action 43

This is the critical phase of the game. 34. Rf1 Qxc2 
Black goes for the c-pawn, and then falls 35. bxa5 Qc6
back to defend his threatened king. White 36. h4 Re6
³¯
relieves tension on his castled position 37. Qf4 Qd6 ”§“
with h4, then gains time with checks and is 38. axb6+ cxb6 “
again able to win a pawn. 39. Qxf3 Qxa3 ’¬’
40. Rb1 Kb8 ’
41. Qf4+ Kb7
42. d4 Qe7
’
¤²
Now follows a tactical phase, in which 43. d5 Rd6 
white profits from the positional advantage 44. Rd1 Qc7
of a centrally placed queen and advanced 45. Qe3 Rd7
³
pawn. Black plays stubborn defense, 46. Rc1 Qd8 ¨“
blocking the pawn advance and preventing 47. Qe4 Rd6 “¯‘“
white from extending his margin. The 48. f3 Qf6 ª’
outcome is not yet clear - one pawn up in 49. Qc4 Qd8 ‘’
this type of endgame is often not enough. 50. Rd1 Qc7
51. Qe4 b5
²
52. Kf2 Qc5+ ¤
Now pawns and rooks are exchanged. 53. Ke2 b4 
Black avoids a queen exchange that would 54. Rd4 Ka7
give white a clear margin of victory. The 55. Rxb4 Rxd5
³
stage is set for a tough finale, and only 56. Ra4+ Kb7 ¯“
precisely calculated moves will allow white 57. Rc4 Qd6 “
to bring home the victory. 58. Kf2 Ka7 ’’
59. Rc2 Rd2+ ’
White's next move is the key to his victory: 60. Rxd2 Qxd2+
can you find it? 61. Qe2 Qd6
ª²
62. f4 Kb7 
White's f-pawn advance, seeming to lose a 63. f5 Qc5+ 
pawn outright, wins the game. It's a move 64. Kg2 Qxf5
non-expert players probably wouldn't find. 65. Qf3+ Kc7

66. Qxf5 gxf5 ³°
The endgame is where the best players 67. Kf3 Kd6 “
show their stuff - where accuracy is most 68. Kf4 Ke6 ’
critical, and where the slightest errors are 69. Kg5 Ke5 ’
severely punished. After trying his best, 70. Kxh5 Kf6
black resigns. A tough win with a tough 71. Kh6 Kf7

opening: the brand new Defense Game! 72. Kg5 Ke6 
73. Kg6 1-0
Game 9: Close Variant DvGG with Black:
§¯³¨ 1. Nf3 Nf6 Here is an interesting game in which black
2. d4 d6 trades down to a pawn endgame and wins
”“”ž¹“”“ 3. e4 e6 in fine style. It shows the powerful drawing
˜”“ 4. Bg5 Be7 capabilities of this opening, which become
›—’ 5. Nc3 Nbd7 winning capabilities when combined with
’ 6. Qd2 Nb6 good endgame technique.
–• 7. e5 Nfd5
8. Bb5+ Bd7 White tries playing aggressively, attacking
‘’‘¬’‘’ with both bishops and the center pawns as
¦²¤ well. His efforts will soon prove pointless.

¨§³ 9. Nxd5 exd5 After the opening, white finds little better
10. Bxd7+Qxd7 than to trade his bishops and knight, but
”“”¯“”“ 11. O-O O-O obtains no advantage from the exchanges.
˜” 12. Bxe7 Qxe7
“’ 13. Rfe1 Rfe8 Black has centralized both rooks, and is
’ 14. b3 Rad8 prepared to challenge for the center files:
‘• all solid chess technique, that works with
the D-system as well as with any other.
‘‘¬’‘’
¦¦²

­³ 15. Rac1 dxe5 White tries to press, but meets only solid
16. Rxe5 Qd7 resistance, offering no better course than
”“”“”“ 17. Rxe8+ Rxe8 to continue trading down: both rooks are
 18. Ne5 Qd6 exchanged, and now white must look for
“ 19. Re1 Nd7 some way to utilize his move advantage.
’ 20. Nxd7 Qxd7
‘ 21. Rxe8+ Qxe8 White's next move, though by no means a
mistake, nevertheless gives black a slight
‘‘¬’‘’ edge, and in this case that is decisive.
²

 22. Qe3 Qxe3 White offers a queen exchange. Moving


23. fxe3 f5 the king to f1, or almost any pawn move
““ 24. c4 c6 would have been better, giving equality.
³ 25. cxd5 cxd5
”““” 26. h3 a5 We're now in the endgame, and what an
’‘ 27. g4 Kf7 odd one it is: a pawn ending with 7 pawns
‘’²‘ 28. Kf2 g5 each side! Has anyone ever seen this
29. Kg3 Kg6 before? Black anchors the center and
‘ Q-side. He's targeting the backward pawn
 on e3: if he can win it, he wins the game
The Defense Game in Action 45

Black now takes control of the game. 30. a3 fxg4 


White cannot bring his king forward thru 31. hxg4 h5
the gap between black's pawns, but the 32. gxh5+ Kxh5
“
black king can advance there. Black can 33. b4 axb4 ³
also cover an attempt at promotion, eg. 34. axb4 Kg6 “”
had white played 31.e4 instead. ’’
’²


This is the way the position resolves: 35. b5 b6 
white must retreat with his king, giving 36. Kg4 Kf6
access to black. White now loses his 37. Kg3 Kf5

central pawns, and with them, the game. 38. Kf3 g4+ ”
39. Kg3 Ke4 ‘“
’³“
’²


For the beginners, here's the checkmate: 40. Kxg4 Kxe3 
note how black is able to win more quickly 41. Kg3 Kxd4
by delaying his promotion a move. 42. Kf4 Kc3

43. Ke5 d4 ²
44. Kd5 d3 ‘
45. Kc6 Kc4 ³
46. Kxb6 d2 
”

With his queen advantage, black gives 47. Kc7 d1=Q °­
checkmate in short order. 48. b6 Kc5
49. b7 Qd6+

Of course you can say white should have 50. Kc8 Qc6+ ´
played less aggressively and not traded 51. Kd8 Qxb7 
down as much - but this game shows you 52. Ke8 Qg7 
that with this system, you can trade down 53. Kd8 Kd6 
quickly, and benefit from simplifications. 54. Ke8 Qg8#
There's no easy way to beat the D-game!


Game 10: Defense Game Dv7G with Black
§ž¯³˜¨ 1. Nf3 e6 Black's Defense Game is challenged in the
2. d4 Ne7 opening moves by a rook pawn early
”“”—¹““ 3. c4 d6 attack. Black retreats with his knight and
”“’ 4. e4 Nd7 then counters with g5. This aggressive
” 5. Nc3 Ng6 response is recommended for better
‘’‘ 6. h4 Be7 players; less skilled players survive better
–• 7. h5 Ngf8 with the quieter g6. Black can now attack
8. h6 g5 on the K-side: he will be taking serious
‘’’‘ risks in doing so - but that's chess!
¦ª²›¤
§³¨ 9. Be3 Ng6 Black challenges and exchanges his king
10. Bd3 Nf4 knight, which leaves a pawn hanging, but
”“¯““ 11. Bxf4 gxf4 he has a response ready should white take
“”ž’ 12. Qd2 e5 it. Also good was 12..c5, sacrificing the
˜ 13. Nd5 c6 advanced pawn, but allowing black good
‘‘” 14. Nxe7 Qxe7 play later on.
›• 15. dxe5 Nxe5
16. O-O-OBe6 White goes for the long castle, with play
‘’¬’‘ on the d-file after further exchanges.
²¤¤

§ 17. Qxf4 Nxd3+ White leads off the attack, but black stays
18. Rxd3 Bxc4 even materially and tactically, and has not
”“´“–“ 19. Rxd6 Bxa2 yielded any advantage to his adversary.
“¦ž’ 20. Nd4 Rg8
¨ 21. Nf5 Qg5 The forced queen exchange helps black
‘ 22. Qxg5 Rxg5 avoid the complications of dangerous
’ 23. g3 Be6 attacking combinations. Afterwards black
24. Ng7+ Ke7 is able to hold effectively; even the open
’’ d-file does not present serious problems.
²¤

§ 25. Nxe6 fxe6 White's try to exploit the d-file only results
26. Rhd1 Rc5+ in a rook exchange. Black's clever 27..Rd5
”““ 27. Kb1 Rd5 should be in the repertoire of all system
´’ 28. exd5 Kxd6 players - a response opponents may not
” 29. dxc6+ Kxc6 see in their haste to attack. White now has
 30. Re1 Kd6 no more threats; like many attacking
’ 31. Kc2 e5 players, he becomes frustrated when his
schemes don't pan out, and now starts
’°’ playing for a draw. Black has other ideas!
¦
The Defense Game in Action 47

Black wins a pawn with the help of his 32. f4 exf4 
active king. By contrast, white's king is 33. gxf4 Rf8
completely out of the game, and his 34. Rd1+ Kc6
“³“
pawns are advanced and vulnerable. 35. Rf1 Rf6 “¨
Note that this is mainly due to the fact 36. f5 Kd6 ‘
that white castled, and black did not! 37. Rd1+ Ke7 
38. Re1+ Kf7 
With a pawn advantage, black now has 39. Ra1 a6
winning chances, but still it requires 40. Rf1 Rxh6
’°
completely accurate play on his part. ¤
Black plays to remove white's remaining 41. b4 Kf6 
pawns, and is able to extend his lead to 42. b5 a5
two pawns, virtually insuring his victory. 43. b6 a4
“
44. Rf4 Rh2+ ¨³”
Both pawns are ready to advance for 45. Kb1 a3 
promotion, and there's little black can 46. Rf3 Rb2+ 
do to prevent it. If black's lead was a 47. Kc1 Rxb6 
single pawn, there would be drawing 48. Rxa3 Kxf5
chances; as it stands white is cooked! 49. Rh3 h6

50. Rh1 Kg6 ²¤
Now follows a tactical phase of moving 51. Rg1+ Kf6 
forward with the king to prepare the 52. Rf1+ Kg7
advance of the pawns. Note how black's 53. Rg1+ Kh7
“
rook stays on the cross point, protecting 54. Rh1 Rb5 
both pawns. White can only harass the 55. Kc2 h5 §“
king, he can't stop both pawns at once. 56. Kd3 Kg6 
57. Rg1+ Kf5 °³
58. Rf1+ Kg4
59. Rg1+ Kf3

¦
With the approach to promotion, white 60. Rh1 Kg2 
can't capture either pawn, even with 61. Rh4 Kg3
help of his king - black would exchange 62. Re4 h4

rook and pawn for rook, and still win 63. Re3+ Kg4 ´
after promotion of his remaining pawn. 64. Re4+ Kg5 “¤
The game ended after: 65. Ke3 h3 
70. Kf4 b4 74. Rh3 Rc2 66. Kf2 Rb2+ ²
71. Rh6+ Kg7 75. Kg3 b2 67. Kg3 h2
72. Rh3 b3 76. Rh6+ Kg5 68. Re5+ Kf6
¨”
73. Rg3+ Kf6 77. Rh8 b1=Q 69. Rh5 b5 
Game 11: Defense Game DvBE with Black
§ž¯¨³ 1. Nf3 e6 Here's an action packed encounter with
2. d4 Ne7 black's defense game playing against the
”“”¹“”“ 3. c4 d6 three pawn standard opening by white.
”“˜— 4. e4 Nd7
 5. Nc3 Ng6 Black's line has shown to be very playable,
‘’‘ 6. Be3 Be7 although his life is not going to be without
–›• 7. Bd3 O-O problems! As in many continuations, white
8. O-O Nf6 will now exchange bishop for knight, in
‘’’‘’ order to damage the D-game castle.
¦ª¤²
§¯¨ 9. e5 Ng4 Although white obtains a slight positional
10. Bd2 dxe5 advantage with this exchange, it is not all
”“ž¹“”³ 11. Bxg6 exd4 that easy to capitalize on this weakness in
“ 12. Bxh7+Kxh7 subsequent play. Here white tries harder
•” 13. Nb5 c5 than most adversaries, going a pawn down
‘”— 14. Bf4 Bd7 temporarily in order to disrupt black's
• 15. Bc7 Qc8 castle and invade with knight and bishop.
16. Bd6 Qd8
‘’’‘’
¦ª¤²

§ 17. Ng5+ Bxg5 Heavy exchanges follow, with both sides
18. Bxf8 Bxb5 making the most of intermezzo moves to
”““´ 19. cxb5 Nxh2 try to destabilize the opponent. When the
“ 20. Qh5+ Kg8 dust clears, white emerges with a slight
‘”­¹ 21. Bxg7 Kxg7 material lead, but his position is not that
” 22. Qxh2 Qd5 good - neither of his rooks is in play yet,
 and his queen is away in the corner.
Moreover, black has a mass of pawns in
‘’’‘¬ the center ready to advance; white's rooks
¦¤² will have a tough time stopping them!

´ 23. Qg3 Kf6 White brings his rook into the assault,
24. f4 Bh6 doing his best to attack black's king, but
”““¹ 25. Qh4+ Kg7 black is able to repulse the attack and
“ 26. Rf3 Rh8 exchange rooks, which helps his cause.
‘”­¬ 27. Rg3+ Kf8
’ 28. Qf6 Rh7 At the end of the episode black launches
“‘ 29. Rh3 Bg7 his passed center pawn; white's in trouble!
30. Qg5 Rxh3
‘’ 31. gxh3 d3
¦²
The Defense Game in Action 49

White trades queens, and prepares to meet 32. Qxd5 exd5 ´
the advancing mass of black pawns. After 33. Rb1 Bd4+
assessing the situation white abandons 34. Kg2 c4
”
the defense of his b-pawn, and moves his 35. Kf3 f5 ”
rook over to support his h-pawn advance. 36. a4 b6 ‘“
37. Rh1 Bxb2 ‘¹“”’
Black's pawns move forward menacingly, 38. Ke3 d4+ “‘
well supported by the bishop. It definitely 39. Kd2 Bc3+
looks grim for white at this point! 40. Kd1 Bb4

°¤
Now white's game collapses completely. 41. h4 c3 
His rook is unable to do anything other 42. Rg1 Bd6
than pester the black king, which moves 43. Rf1 Kg7
”
down the board gobbling pawns. 44. Rg1+ Kh6 ¹
45. Rf1 Kh5 ”‘“
White starts throwing away material; there 46. Ke1 Kxh4 ”´
is really nothing left to do but resign. 47. a5 bxa5 ”“
48. Kf2 Kg4
49. Rg1+ Kxf4
²
¦
Here's the resolution and final checkmate. 50. Ra1 c2 
Another ferocious predator of the D-game 51. Rf1 Bb4
takes his place in the trophy case! 52. Kg2+ Ke3
’
53. Rxf5 d2 ¤
The author really likes this opening; are 54. Rf3+ Ke4 ”³¯
you beginning to appreciate it as well? 55. Rf6 c1=Q ¹”
56. Re6+ Kf5 °
57. b6 d1=Q
58. bxa7 Qg5+

59. Kh3 Qh1# ­
Game 12: Defense Game DvEF with White
³¨¨ 1. e3 e5 White plays strong continuation DvEF of
2. d3 d5 the Defense Game, relocating his bishop
”“”­“”“ 3. Ne2 Nf6 to support a center pawn advance.
—¹ž˜ 4. Nd2 Nc6
“” 5. Ng3 Be6 Black plays the 2 pawn standard classical
 6. Be2 Bd6 defense, opting for the long castle. By all
‘’›– 7. Bf3 Qd7 conventional standards, black has a better
8. O-O O-O-O position; but conventional standards may
‘’‘–’‘’ need revision in light of the D-system!
¦ª¤²
³¨¨ 9. c4 Bb4 Following the opening, both sides attack
10. cxd5 Nxd5 the adversary castle. Games such as this
”“”” 11. a3 Bxd2 where castling is performed opposite,
—ž”” 12. Bxd2 Nde7 often give rise to exciting sequels with
­”— 13. Be2 h6 both sides attacking.
’• 14. b4 Nf5
’‘’ 15. Ne4 Qd5 White is more successful getting started:
16. Rc1 f6 the open c-file and mobile Q-side pawns
›’‘’ allow him to seize and keep the initiative.
¦ª¤²

´ž¨­¨ 17. Rc5 Qd7 White configures his attack, but black is
18. b5 Nce7 able to defend adequately. Positions such
”“”” 19. Qa4 Kb8 as these require a great deal of insight,
˜˜”” 20. Rfc1 Nd5 preparation, and patience - inadequately
¬‘–” 21. R5c2 Qe8 planned assaults can't break down strong
 22. Nc5 Nb6 castle walls, bristling with defenders.
’‘’› 23. Qa5 Bc8
24. Bf3 Nd6
¤’‘’
¦²

´ž¨¨ 25. a4 g5 White has to reconfigure his attack, and


26. Qb4 g4 black then has an interval to launch his
”“­ 27. Be2 Nd5 own counter. White falls back a while
˜˜” 28. Qb3 Qf7 under the black advance, then launches
–”“ 29. a5 f5 the first wave of his attack, sacrificing his
“ 30. Bf1 Rhf8 pawns to open the black position.
ª‘’ 31. b6 cxb6
32. axb6 Nxb6 Even now it is uncertain white's attack can
¤’‘’ succeed: the first wave of his onslaught
¦›² has barely damaged black's castle.
The Defense Game in Action 51

Now the full attack is unleashed. White 33. Qb2 Qf6 ´ž§
piles up on the defending knight as black 34. Ba5 Nf7
defends the best he can. Major exchanges 35. Rb1 Rd6
“—
follow, resulting in a win of the exchange 36. Na4 g3 ¦”
and a pawn. Even when the defender plays 37. hxg3 f4 ”
well, heavy advantages can be gained in 38. Nxb6 axb6 
chess - but they can be wiped out in an 39. Bxb6 Rxb6 ‘’’
instant by reversals of fortune in the 40. Qxb6 Qxb6
skirmishes that follow! 41. Rxb6 fxg3
¤‘
42. fxg3 Rg8 ›²
White is able to retain his lead with sharp 43. Rf6 Nd8 
play in the ensuing open field battle. Black 44. Be2 Rxg3
now struggles as the material difference is 45. Bf3 Nc6
“ž¨
decisively against him. 46. Rc5 Bd7 ´—¦
47. Rxh6 Rg7 ¤
Black's last move e4, although seeming to 48. Rf6 Kc7 “‘
give away a pawn, is nevertheless well 49. Kf2 Re7 ‘’›
considered - white must recapture by 50. g4 Kb6
doubling his pawns, reducing his chances 51. Rd5 e4
²
of forcing a promotion. 
White is able to press the attack and push 52. dxe4 Kc7 §
for promotion, in spite of dogged defense 53. g5 Ne5
by black. White even offers the exchange 54. g6 Bc6
’
in order to expedite things, but black 55. Rd4 b5 ´ž˜
wisely refuses, and falls back to block the 56. Bh5 Kb6 “¦›
pawn's forward movement. Although white 57. Rf7 Re8 ¦‘
has the lead and is close to victory, black 58. Rf5 Nd7 ’
still keeps on the pressure, now with a 59. g7 Rg8
knight fork of king and rook. 60. Rg5 Nf6
²

Finally white crushes the last resistance, 61. Bf7 Nxe4+ ª
promoting his pawn, and winning. 62. Ke2 Nxg5
63. Bxg8 Bf3+
´
An excellent example of play with the new 64. Kd3 Bh5 ˜
Defense Game, and also a fine illustration 65. Rd6+ Kc7 “
of the difficulty of overcoming tenacious 66. Rh6 Bg4 ²
defensive play by the opponent. 67. Bb3 Bf5+ ›’
68. Kd4 Bh7
69. Rxh7 Nxh7

70. g8=Q Nf6 
Game 13: Distant Variant Dv138D with Black
§ž³¹—¨ 1. d4 d6 Here's a delightful game with black playing
2. e4 Nd7 a D-system distant variant. White uses an
“¯“” 3. Bg5 c6 anti- D-game strategy, anticipating black's
˜“”“” 4. Nf3 Qc7 e6 with a bishop pin on the pawn. Black
” 5. Bd3 Nb6 develops his queen instead, stops a
‘’‘ 6. a4 a5 subsequent rook pawn attack, and finally
›• 7. O-O h6 runs the bishop off. White's trying his best
8. Be3 e6 to attack the D-system opening, throwing
’‘’‘’ everything he can at his opponent.
¦•ª¤²

§ž¨³ 9. c4 d5 White now attacks with the center pawns,


10. cxd5 exd5 gives check, and then invades with his
“¯¹“” 11. exd5 Nxd5 knight. Black is under pressure, but his
“•” 12. Re1 Nxe3 counter attack keeps him out of serious
” 13. Rxe3+ Be7 trouble. Black could continue with the
‘›’— 14. Ne5 Nf6 obvious 16..Re8, but instead he goes for a
¦ 15. Bc4 O-O razor sharp continuation: Ng4, which loses
16. Ng6 Ng4 a piece immediately with white's knight
’’‘’ check, but black isn't giving anything
¦•ª² away: he's threatening check!

´ 17. Nxe7+ Kh8 White goes for the check, but has to cover
18. Rg3 Qxe7 with Rg3 or lose the exchange. White then
““” 19. Rxg4 Bxg4 grabs two pieces for his rook, but gets
“” 20. Qxg4 Qe1+ slammed with a queen check, and the
” 21. Bf1 Rfe8 black rooks move in position. White can't
‘¨§ 22. Qf4 Re4 exchange queens: the rook pair would
‘ 23. Qd2 Rd8 come to the back rank and win two pieces.
24. f3 Rdxd4 Things are not going the way white had
’¬‘’ planned: the attacker is being attacked!
¦•¯›²

´ 25. Qf2 Qxf2+ White trades queens and rooks, and gets
26. Kxf2 Rxa4 out of the frying pan, but now there's the
“” 27. Nc3 Rxa1 fire - black's Q-side pawns are close to the
” 28. fxe4 a4 last rank - only by sacrificing his knight
›’ 29. Be2 b5 can white stop their promotion.
“ 30. e5 Rc1
 31. Nxb5 cxb5 Somewhat better for white was to play
32. Bxb5 Ra1 27.Na3. When the ship starts sinking, it's
’²‘’ hard to stay cool and collected!
¨
The Defense Game in Action 53

Black now snaps up two of white's 33. Bc4 Rb1 ´


remaining pawns and develops his 34. Bxf7 Rxb2+
promotion threat, while covering white's. 35. Kf3 a3
”
Black can offer his rook to stop it, since 36. g4 Rxh2 ”
afterwards white's bishop can no longer 37. e6 Rh1 
stop his pawn advance. It's time to resign. 38. e7 Re1 ›²‘
39. Bc4 Rxe7 ”
40. Kf4 Re2
§

Playing on for the interest of beginners, 41. g5 Rf2+ 
black continues by forcing white's bishop 42. Ke3 Rc2
to exchange for his advanced pawn. 43. Bd5 h5
´
44. Kf3 Kh7 “
45. Be4+ g6 ’“
46. Bd5 Kg7 ²
47. Kf4 a2 
48. Bxa2 Rxa2
§

Black now gets his queen, and gives 49. Kg3 Kf7 
checkmate in the classic beginners style: 50. Kf4 Ke6
56. Kb3 Qh4 51. Ke4 h4

57. Kc3 Rg3+ 52. Kd3 h3 ³“
58. Kb2 Qh2+ 53. Kc4 Rg2 ’
59. Ka1 Rg1# 54. Kd3 h2 °
55. Kc4 h1=Q 
The author finds this game very amusing:
the essence of humor is surprise, and
§
white certainly had his fill in this game : ) ­
Game 14: Defense Game DvEH with Black
§ž¯§³ 1. Nf3 e6 Here's a neat little Defense Game with the
2. d4 Ne7 author playing black. It's an illustration of
”“”—¹“”“ 3. c4 d6 the impressive drawing capabilities of this
”“— 4. e4 Nd7 new system for playing chess.
 5. Nc3 Ng6
‘’‘ 6. Be3 Be7 Black plays a main line of the opening,
–›• 7. Bd3 O-O castling and developing the rook. White
8. O-O Re8 uses the optimal 3 pawn classical opening.
‘’’‘’
¦ª¤²

¨­§³ 9. e5 b6 White heads off with a center pawn attack.


10. Be4 Rb8 Black avoids initiating the exchange, which
”—¹“”“ 11. Nb5 a6 would open the center; instead he develops
“”›”“— 12. Na7 Bb7 the fianchetto, inviting white to invade with
’ 13. Nc6 Bxc6 his bishop and knight. This attack doesn't
‘’ 14. Bxc6 Qc8 really achieve anything however - white has
• to find something else.
‘’’‘’
¦ª¤²
¨­¨³ 15. exd6 Bxd6 Now white initiates exchange of pawns,
16. Qe2 Rd8 and brings his heavy pieces to the center.
”˜“”“ 17. Bg5 Be7 Black is still reacting in his play, trying to
“”›“˜ 18. Rfe1 Bxg5 free his side of the board of the invaders.
– 19. Nxg5 Nf6
‘’ 20. Rad1 Ne7

‘’ª’‘’
¤¦²

¨¨³ 21. Ba4 h6 Black finally succeeds in driving off all the
22. Nf3 b5 enemy pieces. Now follows his only clever
˜“” 23. cxb5 axb5 move of the game, offering a pawn only to
““˜” 24. Bxb5 Qb7 regain it a few moves later. Nothing really
 25. a4 c6 brilliant, but enough to stay even and have
‘›’ 26. Bc4 Qxb2 the satisfaction of attacking for a while.
•
White did his best to refute this opening
¯ª’‘’ but at this point he's on the defensive.
¤¦²
The Defense Game in Action 55

Now black invades with his knight and 27. Rd2 Qc3 ¨¨³
queen, threatening to win the d-pawn. 28. Rc2 Qb4
Black forces an exchange of pieces and 29. Ra1 Nf5
“”
then challenges the white queen. 30. Rd2 Ne4 ““”
31. Qxe4 Qxc4 ­—
Post-game analysis showed 30..Ra8 was 32. Rc2 Qd5 ‘’ª
better, offering black winning chances. •
¤’‘’
¦²
Queens and knights are exchanged, and 33. Qxd5 Rxd5 ¨³
it's still an even game. Black now forces a 34. Rxc6 Nxd4
rook exchange to simplify further. 35. Nxd4 Rxd4
“”
36. a5 Ra4 ¤“”
Black can already draw at this point: ’
36..Rb2, 37.h3 Rdd2, and then perpetual §
check following ..Rxf2 and ..Rxg2. 
’‘’
¦²
Black moves over to capture the isolated 37. Rcc1 Rxa1 §
rook pawn, as white moves in to clean up 38. Rxa1 Kf8
on the K-side. Even so white can no longer 39. a6 Ke7
“
win, because he's going to be left with 40. f4 Kd6 ‘´“”
only a rook pawn, and there's no way to 41. Kf2 Ra8 
force its promotion. 42. g4 Kc6 ’
43. g5 Kb6 
44. gxh6 gxh6
²’
¦
Black plays on till white accepts the draw. 45. Kg3 Rxa6 
The D-game can almost always draw; if its 46. Rxa6+ Kxa6
adversary makes a mistake, it can win! 47. Kg4 f6
³°
48. Kh5 e5 
The most important thing is that all of this 49. fxe5 fxe5 
is the kind of chess that even less skilled 50. Kg4 Kb6 ”
players can imitate and improvise - the 51. Kf5 Kc6 
strong point of the Defense Game is that 52. Kxe5 Kd7
everybody can understand and play it well! 53. Kf6 h5
’
54. Kf7 h4 
Game 15: Distant Variant Dv3'DGG with White
§¯³¨ 1. c3 d5 This game is a good illustration of one of
2. Qc2 e5 the main strength of the Defense Game, to
”“”“”“ 3. d3 Nf6 get quickly to the endgame, where good
—¹ž 4. Nd2 Nc6 results can be obtained with accurate play.
“” 5. Ngf3 Bd6
—– 6. Nb3 Bf5 White's Defense Game variant develops on
•’‘ 7. Nh4 Be6 the Q-side, and waits to see how black will
8. Bd2 Ne4 commit. White chases off the forward
‘’ª‘’‘’ bishop, but then black springs a disclosed
¦²›¤ attack on his knight.

§¯§³ 9. g3 Nxd2 Following the opening, white consolidates


10. Nxd2 O-O nicely with a K-side fianchettoed castle,
“”¹“”“ 11. Nhf3 Re8 and now has excellent play. Black, like
—ž 12. Bg2 a5 most adversaries, retires his bishop rather
” 13. O-O a4 than accept an exchange with the knight,
“• 14. e4 dxe4 allowing it a temporary forward posting.
’‘•’ 15. Nxe4 Be7
Black can't find any objective for attack -
‘’ª’›’ he tries advancing the rook pawn, but it's
¦¤² only a probe, there's nothing serious in it.

¨³ 16. b4 axb3 Now the heavy exchanges occur. As often


17. axb3 Qd5 happens, all the minor pieces are removed
””“ 18. b4 Red8 from the board, leaving the queens, rooks,
““ 19. Nfg5 Ra2 and lots of pawns - an ideal situation for a
” 20. Qc1 Rxa1 good endgame player.
’ 21. Qxa1 Bxg5
’­’ 22. Nxg5 Qxd3 White is temporarily down a pawn, but it's
23. Nxe6 fxe6 no problem to equalize: black's double
’’ 24. Bxc6 bxc6 doubled pawns cannot be defended.
¬¤²

¨³ 25. Qa7 Qd6 White equalizes easily, then maneuvers


26. Qe3 c5 about looking for a way to unbalance the
””“ 27. bxc5 Qc6 black position. Black missed a better line
“ 28. Rb1 Qd5 with 26..Rb8; he seems to be playing for a
’­” 29. Re1 Kf7 draw at this point, shuttling his queen and
‘ 30. h3 Qc6 king back and forth pointlessly. But even
’¬‘ 31. Rb1 Kg8 in drawish positions, skilled players can
32. g4 Qd5 find lines leading to a decisive advantage.
’
¤²
The Defense Game in Action 57

A few more feints and shifts, then white 33. Re1 Kf7 ª
strikes, giving check and gaining a pawn. 34. Qg5 Ra8
White's queen exploits the situation to the 35. Qh5+ Kg8
””³
maximum, moving on open lines, 36. Qxe5 Ra1 
37. Qe2 Rxe1+ ’
38. Qxe1 e5 ­“
39. Qe3 h5 ‘
40. c4 Qxc4
41. Qxe5 hxg4
’
42. Qe8+ Kh7 ²
White keeps the pressure on black, by 43. Qh5+ Kg8 
chasing the king. Black has no hope of 44. hxg4 Qe4
surviving unless he can get his king into 45. Qg5 Kf7
”
play, but he is so exposed that white trips 46. Kh2 Qf3 “
him on every occasion. Notice how white 47. Qh5+ g6 ’¬
refuses to exchange queens with 46.Qf5 48. Qh7+ Kf6 ´‘
and double his K-side pawns: this would 49. Qh4+ Ke5 ­
leave him little chance of winning. 50. Qg5+ Kd4
’²

White's king now becomes the object of 51. Qxg6 Qxf2+ 
attack; black is able to equalize at the end 52. Kh3 Qf3+
of the episode, but white is still a step 53. Kh4 Qh1+
°
ahead in the race for promotion. 54. Kg5 Qc1+ ª
55. Kf6 Qxc5 ”¯’
56. g5 Qe5+ ´
57. Kf7 c5 


White forces the queen exchange and 58. Qf6 Qxf6+ 
promotes first, after that it's a draw. 59. gxf6 c4
60. Ke6 c3
¬
The endgame is the only part of chess 61. f7 c2 °
which can be thoroughly analyzed; since 62. f8=Q c1=Q 
the Defense Game offers a quick route to 63. Qg7+ Kd3 
good endgames, it is a practical strategy 1/2-1/2 ³
for chess. If your opponent doesn't make
mistakes, you draw; if he slips, you win!

¯
Game 16: Close Variant Dv3'D with Black
§ž³¹¨ 1. d4 d6 In this contest black plays close variant
2. e4 e6 Dv3'D of the Defense Game, moving his
”“¯“”“ 3. Nf3 Ne7 queen away from a bishop pin early attack.
˜“”“— 4. Bg5 Nd7
 5. c4 Nb6 White plays a 3-pawn classical opening.
‘’‘ 6. Nc3 c6 Black can run the bishop off with an f-pawn
–• 7. Be2 Qc7 push, but he prefers not to weaken his
8. O-O Ng6 K-side; with this line he can challenge the
‘’›’‘’ bishop later with normal moves.
¦ª¤²

§ž¨³ 9. a4 Be7 White tries every way possible to attack


10. a5 Nd7 black's position, using rook and center
”“˜˜“”“ 11. Bxe7 Nxe7 pawn attacks, and a queen invasion.
““ 12. b4 O-O
’’ 13. c5 dxc5 Black holds well, but his position is now
’‘ 14. dxc5 Nf6 rather cramped. It will take him the next
–• 15. Qd6 Ne8 several moves to mobilize his pieces, as
16. Qxc7 Nxc7 white goes for control of the open d-file.
›’‘’
¦¤²

¨¨³ 17. Rfd1 Ng6 Black's knights and bishop move out, and
18. Rd6 Rb8 clear the back ranks. White has control of
”““”“ 19. Rad1 e5 the open file, but this no longer poses a
“˜ 20. R1d2 Bg4 threat for black; he now has equal chances
’’” 21. h3 Bxf3 for the ensuing game.
’‘˜ 22. Bxf3 Ne8
–¤›‘ 23. Rd7 Nf6
24. R7d3 Nf4
¦’‘
²

—³ 25. Rd6 Ne8 White tries to press by attacking the


26. Rd8 Rxd8 Q-side pawns, but black stays even with a
¦“”“ 27. Rxd8 Nf6 rook sortie. The game is beginning to
““ 28. Rd6 Rb8 assume a drawish look, although white
’” 29. a6 Ne8 keeps trying to press the attack with his
§‘˜› 30. Rd7 bxa6 last move; better was a quick 32.Rxa6.
–‘ 31. Rxa7 Rxb4
32. Bg4 Rc4
’‘
²
The Defense Game in Action 59

White again presses with an attack on the 33. Ra8 Kf8 
king and then the pinned knight, but black 34. Bd7 Ke7
stays even by capturing white's poorly 35. Bxe8 Rxc3
´“”“
defended Q-side knight and pawns. 36. Bxc6 Rxc5 ¤›
37. Rxa6 Rc1+ ”
At the end of the episode black gains a 38. Kh2 Rc2 ˜‘
tempo with a king check, and now has a 39. Kg3 Ne2+ ‘
chance to go up a pawn temporarily. 40. Kh2 Nd4
§’‘²

An interesting tactical endgame follows, 41. Ra7+ Kd6 
with white again threatening, and black 42. Bd5 Rxf2
saving himself by trading down. The 43. Rxf7 Rxf7
”›
bishop is superior to the knight in the 44. Bxf7 Ne2 
endgame, but when the bishop can't cover 45. Bg8 Kc5 ˜”’
the promotion squares, this advantage 46. Bxh7 Kd4 ’
vanishes. Black now has a passed pawn, 47. h4 Nc3 ´°
and his backward pawn is a serious 48. g4 Nxe4
impediment on white's path to promotion. 49. g5 Ke3

50. Kh3 Nc5 
Here's how the situation resolves - white 51. Kg4 e4 
has to offer his bishop to stop black's 52. h5 Kd2
pawn from advancing. White then tries to 53. Bxe4 Nxe4
—
accompany his pawn to the last rank, 54. h6 gxh6 ’
where only the black knight can defend. 55. gxh6 Nf6+ ²
56. Kg5 Nh7+ 

´

But king and pawn cannot get past the 57. Kg6 Nf8+ °
knight, even on the edge of the board. 58. Kg7 Ne6+
White tries all the possibilities, then 59. Kf6 Nf8
—
accepts the draw. 60. Kf7 Nh7 
61. Kg7 Ng5 
Even when faced by the most aggressive 62. Kg6 Ne6 
attackers, the Defense Game is capable of 63. Kf7 Ng5+ ´
resisting to the end; but it also offers you 64. Kg8 Ke3
good chances of winning whenever your 65. h7 Nxh7

opponent leaves you any opportunity! 1/2-1/2 
Game 17: Defense Game DvDxE with White
§¯¨³ 1. d3 e5 Here's a speed chess game played by the
2. Nd2 d5 author against his strong computer rival.
”“”¹“”“ 3. e3 Nc6 It's an illustration of what any amateur can
—˜ 4. Ne2 Nf6 do with the D-system - play decent chess.
“” 5. Ng3 Bg4
 6. Be2 Bxe2 Black uses the 2 pawn classical defense,
‘’– 7. Qxe2 Be7 and challenges white with a bishop early
8. O-O O-O attack and exchange. This often benefits
‘’‘–ª’‘’ the D-system player, simplifying the game.
¦¤²

§¨³ 9. Re1 Qd7 White holds his own after the opening. He
10. Nf3 e4 uses typical beginner's play, attacking
”“”“”“ 11. dxe4 dxe4 anything that gets too close. Black creates
­˜ 12. Nd2 Qd5 some damage to white's position and
 13. a3 Bd6 some disturbance with his knight foray,
‘“ 14. c4 Qe6 but black can cope with these problems.
’‘—’’ 15. b3 Be5
16. Rb1 Bxg3
–ª’‘ 17. hxg3 Ne5
¤¦² 18. Bb2 Nd3

§³ 19. Red1 Nxb2 White goes for control of the d-file, and is
20. Rxb2 Rfe8 able to get it. His only real problem is his
”“¯“” 21. Nf1 c5 poorly placed knight, which is completely
§˜” 22. Qd2 Qa6 out of the game. White has to remedy this
” 23. a4 Rac8 problem in order to have any hope of
‘‘“ 24. Qd6 Qa5 maintaining equality.
‘¬’’ 25. Qd2 Qb6
26. Qc3 Re6
¦’‘– 27. Rbd2 Qc7
¤² 28. Nh2 h6

§³ 29. g4 Qe7 White gives up a pawn in order to get his


30. Nf1 Nxg4 knight back into the game. Afterwards his
”““” 31. Rd7 Qh4 liberated knight is able to create some
¯˜” 32. Qc2 Re7 disturbance on the Q-side.
” 33. Rxe7 Qxe7
‘‘“ 34. Ng3 Re8
‘–’ 35. Qd2 Nf6
36. Ne2 Qc7
¬’‘ 37. Nc3 Qb6
¤²
The Defense Game in Action 61

Now white is able to equalize by bringing 38. Nb5 a6 §


his forces to the Q-side, after the 39. a5 Qc6
exchange of knights. The game actually 40. Nc3 Qc7
“”³
presents white some winning prospects, 41. Nd5 Nxd5 ”
since he will have a passed central pawn. 42. Qxd5 Qxa5 ª”¤
43. Qxb7 Qc3 ‘‘“
44. g3 a5 ’’
45. Rd5 a4
46. Qb5 Ra8
’°
47. bxa4 Qa1+ ¯
White is now able to go ahead materially, 48. Kg2 Kh7 
due to the positional circumstances, by 49. Rxc5 Qxa4
giving check and then taking a pawn. 50. Qb7 Ra7
´“
51. Qxe4+g6 ¦“”
52. Rd5 Qc6 
53. Qd4 Ra4 §‘
54. Qf4 Kg7 ’’
55. Qe5+ Qf6
56. Qxf6+ Kxf6
’°
57. Rd6+ Ke7 
White looks for a way to continue and 58. Rc6 Kd7 
bring his advantage toward a victory. 59. Rf6 Ke7
60. Rf4 Ra2
“
There follows an exchange of K-side 61. Rd4 Rc2 ´“
pawns, with white still holding on tightly to 62. Kf3 h5 
his precious passed pawn. 63. g4 hxg4+ ‘¤
64. Rxg4 Ke6 ’²
65. Kg3 Kd6
66. Rf4 Ke6
§’
67. Re4+ Kd6 
The game simplifies to a rook and pawn 68. Rd4+ Ke6 
versus rook endgame, difficult even for the 69. f3 f5
best of players. The author played on for 70. e4 Rc3
´
another twenty moves, but wasn't able to 71. exf5+ gxf5 
find a way to win. Still it's satisfying to 72. Kf4 Ke7 ’°
draw against the computer, especially 73. Kxf5 Rxf3+ 
when you have more material at the end! 74. Ke4 Rg3 ¤
75. Kd5 Kd7
76. c5 Rg1

77. Rd3 Kc7 ¨
Game 18: Defense Game Dv0 with Black
§¯³¨ 1. d4 d6 Here's a wild game with black playing the
2. e4 e6 standard Defense Game versus white's 3
”“”ž¹“”“ 3. c4 Ne7 pawn standard classical opening.
˜”“— 4. Nc3 Ng6
 5. Nf3 Be7 The Defense Game is not often played in
‘’‘ 6. Be3 Nd7 its standard form, because most of the
–›• 7. Bd3 Nb6 D-game close variants are stronger; but it
8. O-O Bd7 can be played when the adversary refrains
‘’’‘’ from attacking early, as in this case.
¦ª¤²

§¯³¨ 9. c5 Nc8 White attacks for all he's worth after the
10. Qb3 b6 opening, bringing his queen out and then
”ž˜“” 11. cxd6 Nxd6 exchanging the center pawns to clear files
”““ 12. e5 Nc8 for his rooks. Better for white was to
’ 13. d5 exd5 position his rooks before starting his full
 14. Nxd5 c6 onslaught; he is focused on an aggressive
ª• 15. Bxg6 hxg6 and direct attempt at refuting the opening.
16. Nxe7 Nxe7
‘’’‘’
¦¤²

§³ 17. Rad1 Qc7 White continues on the attack with a rook
18. Rd6 Nf5 invasion, then a knight sacrifice which has
”­§” 19. Ng5 O-O black under severe pressure.
”“‘“ 20. Nxf7 Rxf7
 21. Rxd7 Qxd7 Though his situation looks perilous, black
 22. e6 Nxe3 is in fact much better off than white. The
ª˜ important thing for black was to avoid
overreacting to the attack.
‘’’‘’
¤²

³ 23. exd7 Nxf1 Now white misplays slightly: better was
24. Kxf1 Rd8 23.exf7, retaining his rook for the sequel.
”§” 25. Qe6 Rxd7 For the first time white's furious attack
”ª“ 26. Qxc6 Rd2 runs out of steam, as black counters
 effectively with his rooks.

 A classic endgame is the result: queen
versus rooks, and the material is balanced.
‘’¨’‘’
°
The Defense Game in Action 63

Black's rooks invade the back rank and 27. f3 Kh7 
both sides prepare to grab pawns. Note 28. Qc4 Rf5
how black's doubled pawn shields his king 29. Qc3 Rd1+
”¬”³
from enemy queen checks, allowing his 30. Ke2 Rh1 ”“
rooks more autonomy of movement. 31. Qc7 Rc5 ¨

‘
‘’°‘’
§
Black's rooks are truly 'wild pigs' cleaning 32. Qxa7 Rc2+ 
up all of white's pawns. White's queen 33. Ke3 Rxb2
takes what she can, but the doubled pawn 34. h3 Rxg2
ª”³
can't be attacked. Black goes a pawn up, 35. Qxb6 Rxa2 “
and is now ready to win another pawn. 36. Qb3 Rg2 
37. Qf7 Rxh3 
²‘§
§

Black takes the pawn, exchanges pieces, 38. Qf8 Rgg3 
and advances for promotion with his 39. Qf4 Rxf3+
doubled pawn. Black then resigns. 40. Qxf3 Rxf3+
”
41. Kxf3 Kh6 
Though slightly less strong than most of 42. Kf4 Kh5 ”
its close variants, the standard opening is 43. Kf3 Kh4 ²´
nevertheless capable of performing well, 44. Kf4 g5+ 
as this game testifies. 0-1


Game 19: Distant Variant Dv55xE with White
§¯³¹¨ 1. d3 d5 Here's an exciting contest with white
2. Nd2 e5 playing the remotely classical looking
”“”“” 3. e4 Nf6 D-system distant variant Dv55xE.
˜ 4. Ne2 Nc6
ž”“ 5. Ng3 Be6 Black builds a solid 2 pawn defense, then
˜ 6. Be2 Nd4 moves his knight forward, accepting the
‘– 7. O-O h5 invitation to exchange for white's bishop.
8. exd5 Bxd5 He then throws in a rook pawn attack,
‘’‘–›’‘’ inviting white to take the gambit pawn.
¦ª¤²

³¨¹¨ 9. c3 Nxe2+ White has pressure on the half open e-file


10. Qxe2 Qe7 afterwards, but black is able to defend
”“”—¯” 11. Re1 Nd7 adequately and castle to safety.
” 12. Nf3 f6
ž”“ 13. d4 O-O-O Note the long diagonal filled with pawns:
’ rarely seen before in chess practice.
’•–
‘’ª’‘’
¦¦²

´¹¨ 14. dxe5 Bxf3 Heavy exchanges now follow. Playing thru
15. Qxf3 Nxe5 this part of the game, It appears as though
”“”§” 16. Qf5+ Kb8 each side has calculated his line one move
” 17. Ne4 Nd3 deeper than the opponent! The attacking is
“ 18. Rd1 Qd7 sharp on both sides, but the game remains
• 19. Qxd7 Rxd7 equal and perfectly balanced materially.
’—
‘’’‘’
¦¤²

¨ 20. Be3 Be7 White tries to apply pressure, but black
21. Rd2 Rhd8 saves himself with the fine 23..Nxb2. White
”“´§ 22. Rad1 g6 is now a move behind.
”“ 23. Bd4 Nxb2
¹“ 24. Rxb2 c5 The pawn structure is unbalanced, making
 25. Nxc5 Bxc5 a drawn game less probable than before.
’ 26. Kf1 Kc7
‘¦’‘’
¤°
The Defense Game in Action 65

More sharp exchanges follow, with white 27. Rdb1 Bxd4 
able to recoup a tempo with the rook 28. Rxb7+Kc6
checks and exchange. Now the pawn 29. Rxd7 Rxd7
”
asymmetry has been repaired, and the 30. cxd4 Rxd4 ”“
game definitely looks drawish. 31. Ke2 Ra4 ³“
32. Rb2 Kd5 §

‘¦°’‘’

Black and white struggle for control of the 33. f3 g5 
K-side, where the game can be won if a 34. Rd2+ Ke5
passed pawn is produced. After the rook 35. Kf2 g4

exchange, this reaches an impasse. 36. fxg4 hxg4 
37. Kg3 f5 ”“²
38. Kh4 Rd4 ‘³“
39. Rxd4 Kxd4 
40. Kg5 Ke4
41. a4 a5
‘’

White has his adversary in a bind - there's 42. g3 Ke5 
no way that black can support a pawn 43. Kh4 Kd4
advance now. Both pawns are exchanged, 44. Kg5 Ke4

and a race to the Q-side starts, with white 45. Kf6 f4 °
a move ahead. 46. gxf4 Kxf4 ”
47. Kg6 g3 ‘
48. hxg3+ Kxg3 ´


Here's how the situation resolves: white 49. Kf5 Kf3 
gets to the Q-side first, but the rook pawn 50. Ke5 Ke3
promotion cannot be forced, so it's a draw. 51. Kd5 Kd3

52. Kc5 Kc3 
The typical character of D-system Games 53. Kb5 Kd4 ²´
is seen in this game: after the opening 54. Kxa5 Kc5 ‘
come sharp exchanges, often leaving rook 1/2-1/2 
endgames and many pawns on the board.
Study up on rook endgames and you can

play great chess with the D-game! 
Game 20: Defense Game Dv5'E with Black
§ž¯¨³ 1. e4 e6 Here's a good example of tough positional
2. Nf3 d6 chess with the Defense Game. Black plays
”“”—¹“”“ 3. d4 Ne7 one of the main D-game lines, castling
”— 4. Be2 Nd7 prior to challenging the center with e5.
” 5. c4 Ng6
‘’‘ 6. O-O Be7 White's 3 pawn F back classical opening is
–• 7. Nc3 O-O one of the best responses to the D-game,
8. Be3 e5 going for long term positional strength
‘’›’‘’ rather than pressing with early attack.
¦ª¤²

§¨³ 9. Qc2 c6 After the opening both sides continue to


10. a3 Qc7 build. White constructs a big forward pawn
”¯ž¹“”“ 11. b4 Nf6 wall and then repositions his rooks. Black
”“”˜— 12. h3 Bd7 adopts a compact and resistant recessed
” 13. Rfd1 Rfb8 pawn formation, and replaces his pieces.
’‘’‘ 14. Rab1 b6 in the characteristic side-by-side manner.
’–•‘ The stage is set for contact on the Q-side.
ª›’‘
¤¤²

§ž¨³ 15. Rb2 a5 White tries to set up a rook barrage, but is


16. b5 c5 preempted by black's pawn advance, and
¹“”“ 17. dxe5 dxe5 closes the pawn structure instead. White
”¯˜— 18. a4 Be6 exchanges center pawns, creating a hole
”‘”•” 19. Rbb1 Rd8 for his knight on d5, which he then
‘‘‘ occupies. Black doesn't exchange with the
›•‘ forward knight, as this would create an
advanced passed pawn, which could be
ª’‘ decisive in the endgame.
¤¤²

¨§³ 20. Bd3 Bc8 White maintains his strong knight posting,
21. Nd5 Qd6 but is not able to bring any other pieces
ž—¹“”“ 22. Bc1 Bb7 forward to create an attack around it.
”¯— 23. Bb2 Re8
”‘”•” 24. Re1 Rad8 White's position is somewhat better, as he
‘‘‘ 25. Rbd1 Nd7 has more space and a piece in enemy
›•‘ territory; but exploiting this theoretical
advantage is not an easy task.
ª’‘
¤¦²
The Defense Game in Action 67

White tries reconfigurations of his pieces, 26. Qc3 Bf6 ¯¨§³


but he appears to be at a loss for ideas. 27. Bc2 Qb8
Black also shifts his pieces around, and 28. Qa3 Be7
ž—“”“
now is ready to move his knight to his own 29. g3 Ngf8 ”¹—
'hole' on d4. After he does so, he will be 30. Qc3 Bd6 ”‘”•”
well placed to attack on the K-side. 31. Bd3 Ne6 ‘‘‘
¬›•’‘
White's positional advantage has been
erased. Black is now at least equal, and
’
may even be slightly better off. ¤¦²
Black occupies his forward knight post; 32. Bf1 Nd4 ¨§¹³
after more piece relocations, he exchanges 33. Bg2 Bf8
with white's knight: finally a bit of action! 34. Qd2 Qd6
“”“
35. Qd3 Nf6 ”¯
Black has mobilized his K-side. and now 36. h4 Bc8 ”‘”‘”ž
challenges the white queen. Black has the 37. Nh2 Bd7 ‘‘˜’
initiative, still the game remains balanced. 38. Rd2 Nxd5 ª’
39. exd5 Bf5
¦’›–
¦²
Black now configures his attack on the 40. Qc3 Qg6 ¨³
K-side, with the participation of all his 41. Nf3 f6
pieces and a few mobile pawns. At the 42. Nh2 Bd6
¨”“
end he invades with his bishop and 43. Rc1 Re7 ”¹”­
threatens white's backward a-pawn. 44. Qe3 Bc2 ”‘”‘”
‘‘˜’
¬’
ž¦’›–
¦²
Although black can open a K-side attack 45. Qa3 Be4 ¨³
with 45..e4, it is not obvious that this can 46. Qe3 Bc2
succeed. Black prefers to go for a draw by 47. Qa3 Be4
¨”“
repetition instead. 48. Qe3 Bc2 ”¹”­
1/2-1/2 ”‘”‘”
If you like positional play and have the ‘‘˜’
patience to outlast your adversary, you ¬’
will find in the Defense Game an excellent
basis for this style of play.
ž¦’›–
¦²
Characterizing Play With the Defense Game

For players of all skill levels most of the moves of the standard opening can be carried with
minimal or no modifications, and a solid defense is constructed. Afterwards the system player
starts to expand his position with pawn advances and piece relocations, usually the knights.
Pawn advances inevitably push back the adversary and gain space. The knight replacements
typically draw pawn attacks, often marking the beginning of real contact on the board.

The recessed pawn formation of the Defense Game prevents any breakthru by the
adversary in the center. He usually settles for exchanging one or more pieces, especially if this is
seen to produce some damage in the pawn structure, or other positional advantage. In most
games, exchanges of pieces occur soon after the opening, whereas pawn exchanges are less
frequent. The center pawns typically are not exchanged until the system player prefers to do so.

There are many different ways to play this system, but the main lines are those which go for
development of the K-side portion of the standard opening, typically followed by castling and a
center challenge. The center challenge is well supported by the disposition of pieces, and forces
the opponent's hand in subsequent play. Another way of playing the system, less aggressive,
waits for the opponent to advance center pawns. In this latter case the system player can usually
decide whether to close or open the pawn structure.

Closed pawn structures give good drawing chances for lesser skilled players. Open
structures lead to sharper play, with good attacking prospects for both sides. There are also
many lines which attack exclusively on the flanks, but the most commonly used strategy in
continuing play from the standard opening is based on the building of a concentration of pieces
supporting a center pawn challenge.

The adversary responses to the Defense Game are highly predictable: typically he plays the
2 or 3 pawn standard classical openings, sometimes with a piece on the second instead of the
third rank. Since the adversary reactions are so predictable, it is easy for all players to develop
experience rapidly in playing this system. Even beginners can quickly acquire the experience and
tactical skills to play confidently and correctly after the opening and well into the middle game.

During the opening a system player carries out a standard opening, in most cases with no
modification forced by opponent play. This is the great strategic advantage of the Defense Game,
that it confronts successfully all possible adversary opening deployments. But development can
continue long after the standard moves, as he proceeds according to plan along preferred lines.
Using the standard opening, any system player can prepare deep into the middle game; and
anyone that well prepared will have an adequate basis to become an extremely solid player.
Early Attacks 69

5. Early Attacks on the Defense Game

The adversary of the Defense Game can choose from a large number of valid responses to
the D-system opening. He can focus on his own development, as does the Defense Game itself,
which he is free to pursue without opposition. Many opponents use this opportunity to build
strong classical positions which occupy and control the center, and provide good play afterwards.
In master level play, such well constructed classical defenses are those most frequently used.

It is also possible to attack the Defense Game during its opening moves, or immediately
afterwards. These early attacks have limited scope, seeking in general only to exchange a piece
or pawn. Early attacks do not seriously affect the standard opening, and are neither dangerous
nor disruptive. In many cases Defense Game lines can be completed despite an early attack; in
other cases a change of lines is better. Players of the Defense Game should be familiar with all of
the early attacks, and also know several of the most effective ways to respond to all of them.

The Defense Game always plays the same opening moves, so all the early attacks are
generally valid against it, that is they can almost always be played. For each type of early attack,
some sequences of the standard opening will be more vulnerable than others. The system player
therefore does well to vary his sequences of opening, to keep his opponent guessing.

Some of the early attacks are shut down by ‘prophylactic’ moves that are also occasionally
used in continuing play from the standard position. The most common prophylactic moves are
the rook pawn advances and second advances of the center pawns. If your opponent favors early
attacks you may prefer to introduce one of these moves. This only delays your standard opening
slightly and in most cases shuts down the early attack completely.

The underpinning provided by prophylactic moves justifies their introduction; but they are
mostly defensive in nature and so do not contribute best to an attack. The sharper lines therefore
are those where little use is made of prophylaxis, and the system player counter attacks rather
than defending against an early attack. The Defense Game is highly resistant to early attacks of
any kind; against all of them it is capable of generating sharp counter play, retaining equality and
a solid position, and occasionally punishing the adversary for his impatience and aggression.

The early attacks on the Defense Game fall into a small number of very distinct categories:
rook pawn, bishop, and center pawn. Combinations of early attacks are also possible. All the
early attacks are easy to recognize; and in most cases the obvious responses are also correct, so
even beginners should be able to deal with them adequately. Better players will be able to
formulate strong counterattacks to any early attacks. Beginners should stick to prophylaxis, and
avoid sharper exchange and counter attacking lines until their chess playing skills improve
significantly. in chess, before you attack you should be confidant that your defense is adequate.
Rook Pawn Early Attacks on the Defense Game
The most frequent early attack on the Defense Game is the rook pawn attack. In it your
adversary attacks your relocated knight with his rook pawn on that side. The attack may oblige
you to move the knight, so you must have a good relocation square for the knight. Rook pawn
attacks are somewhat disruptive, but experience in play has not shown them capable of providing
a decisive advantage. In many cases the advanced rook pawn becomes a liability, because it can
be attacked later. There are many different ways to respond to the rook pawn early attack: some
are quiet, others more aggressive. Here are a few examples of rook pawn early attacks and
responses, playing with black. The scenarios are very similar when the system player has white.

§ž¯³¨ Example 1: Rook pawn early attacks usually start as


1. Nf3 d6 soon as one of the knights is relocated.
”“”—¹“”“ 2. e4 Nd7 The most serious case is the K-side rook
”“— 3. d4 e6 pawn early attack against black, as shown.
‘ 4. Nc3 Ne7
’‘ 5. Bd3 Ng6 Here black develops his bishop after the
–›• 6. h4 Be7 rook pawn advance. On his next move
7. h5 ... white continues the rook pawn advance;
‘’‘’‘ black can now choose either Nf8 or Nh4.
¦ª²¤

§ž¯¨³ Example 1a: If the knight retreats, the adversary often


7. ... Ngf8 continues advancing his rook pawn; a
”“”““ 8. h6 g6 variety of responses are then possible.
—¹“’ 9. Be3 e5
” 10. Nd5 Nf6 Here is one of the easiest to play, 8..g6.
‘ 11. Nxf6+ Bxf6 White lodges the rook pawn, but it doesn't
›• 12. dxe5 dxe5 cause any real inconvenience for black,
13. Qe2 Ne6 who proceeds with normal development,
‘’‘ª’‘ 14. O-O-O O-O and a center challenge. This line is best for
²¤¤ beginners and most intermediate players.

§¯³¨ Example 1b: An aggressive alternative to 8..g6 is 8..g5 -


7. ... Ngf8 the doubly advanced knight pawn is well
ž”—¹““ 8. h6 g5 supported, and can advance further to
“”“—’ 9. Be3 Ng6 dislodge the knight, and participate in a
“’” 10. Qe2 a6 general K-side assault. Here we see one of
’ 11. O-O-O b5 the possible continuations based on this
–›• 12. e5 Bb7 strong counter attacking move.
‘’‘ª’‘
²¤¤
Early Attacks 71

The other alternatives playable for black's Example 1c: §ž³˜§


8th move are Rg8, gxh6, and Bf6. Here is 7. ... Ngf8
an example based on Rg8, inviting a pawn 8. h6 Rg8
”“—¹““
exchange and opening the g-file for 9. hxg7 Rxg7 “”
black's rook. In this continuation, black 10. g3 c6 ¯”
chooses a sharp counter attacking line. 11. Bh6 Rg8 ’‘
Though compromised, his position is still 12. Qd2 Qa5 –›•’
capable of warding off any white attack. 13. O-O-O e5
‘’‘¬’
²¤¤
The alternative move for black's Example 1d: §ž¨³
threatened knight is 7..Nh4, inviting an 7. h5 Nh4
exchange with the white knight. This can 8. Nxh4 Bxh4
”“”—““
be a very good line for black, as in the 9. h6 g6 ”““’
continuation shown here, where black is 10. Be3 Bg5 ¯
able to consolidate and maintain equality. 11. Bxg5 Qxg5 ’‘
12. Qf3 O-O –›ª
‘’‘’‘
¦²¤
Another way of reacting to the rook pawn Example 1e: §¯³¨
early attack is to block it with a double 6. h4 h5
advance of your own rook pawn, shutting 7. Be3 Be7
“”ž¹“”
down the attack. This is the standard 8. g3 Nb6 ˜”“—
reaction to the attack on the Q-side. On the 9. a4 a5 ”“
K-side it has liabilities, but avoids 10. O-O Bd7 ‘’‘’
pressure for a while. Here black shuts –›•’
down 2 rook pawn attacks, and completes
the Defense Game in standard form.
’‘’
¦ª¤²
It's also possible to counter attack in the Example 1f: §ž¯³¨
face of a rook pawn attack. The example 6. h4 e5
shown here with 6..e5 leaves black 7. h5 Ne7
”“”¹“”“
somewhat behind in development, but with 8. Be3 exd4 —”
free play, and no immediate threats. Also 9. Nxd4 Ne5 ‘
worth considering is 6..c5. You may wish 10. Be2 N7c6 ‘
to reserve these moves for surprise effect. 11. O-O Nxd4 –
12. Qxd4 c6
There are many valid responses to a rook
‘’‘¬›’‘
pawn early attack; develop your repertoire! ¦²¤
Bishop Early Attacks on the Defense Game

In the bishop early attack, your opponent brings a bishop out to attack your king or queen,
most commonly by pinning your knight. Bishop early attacks are frequently seen in play against
the Defense Game. Forward bishop placements can always be challenged, using flank pawn
advances, but these challenging moves weaken your position somewhat, and should be used with
reserve. The alternative reaction is to move your king or queen off the line of attack. The principal
aim of the attack is to provoke you into advancing one of your pawns, or to maintain pressure on
your game if you do not. There is a wide variety of adequate responses to this attack.

§ž¯³¹¨ Example 2: A bishop pin can be challenged by your


1. e4 e6 rook pawn and forced to exchange or
”“”—˜“” 2. d4 d6 retreat; most adversaries prefer to retreat.
”“” 3. Nf3 Ne7
 4. Nc3 Nd7 If the bishop retires to the flank, you can
’‘ 5. Bg5 h6 continue to harass it with flank pawn
–• advances. If it retreats to the center, you
have gained a move, but your advanced
‘’‘’‘’ flank pawn can prove to be a weak point in
¦ª²›¤ your normal development afterwards.

§ž¯³¨ Example 2a: Here white retreats to the flank, and black
6. Bh4 g5 pursues the bishop with his flank pawns,
”“”“¹ 7. Bg3 Bg7 then develops his bishop in fianchetto.
˜”“ 8. Bc4 Nb6
”“ 9. Bb3 Nc6 In subsequent play white's other bishop is
’‘ 10. h3 Na5 developed forward, challenged by black's
‘–•‘ 11. O-O Nxb3 knights, and exchanged off. Black is now
12. axb3 h5 in good shape, even though he has moved
’‘’‘ away from the standard lines.
¦ª¤²

§ž¯¨³ Example 2b: If the adversary bishop retreats to the


6. Be3 Ng6 center, you can proceed with your normal
”“”¹“” 7. Bd3 Be7 development, but keep in mind that your
˜”—” 8. Qd2 O-O knight on that side may be exchanged off
• 9. O-O-O e5 later, leaving you an undefended pawn.
–‘ 10. Nd5 exd4
› 11. Nxd4 Nb6 Here black completes his development and
pushes on the center with e5, exchanges
‘’‘¬’‘’ pawns and challenges the forward knight.
²¤¤ Also good here were 11..Nc5 and 11..Nf6.
Early Attacks 73

Regardless of how the opponent reacts, Example 2c: §ž¯³¨


after your rook pawn advance you can 6. Be3 g6
move into a close variant of the Beginner's 7. Bd3 Bg7
””—˜“¹
Game, while retaining the initiative. The 8. O-O b6 ””““”
Beginner's Game with its close variants 
have shown to be a powerful and versatile ’‘
general purpose opening system. In the –›•
diagram black plays B-system variant Bv8.
‘’‘’‘’
¦ª¤²
The forceful response to the bishop early Example 3: §ž¯³¹¨
attack is to advance your bishop pawn and 1. e4 e6
oblige it to retreat. On the Q-side this 2. d4 d6
”“”—˜”“
move is fine for everyone, but on the 3. Nf3 Ne7 ”“”
K-side it's recommended mostly for better 4. Nc3 Nd7 
players, because of additional risks to 5. Bg5 f6 ’‘
your king. –•
‘’‘’‘’
¦ª²›¤
Here black continues normal development Example 3a: §ž¯³˜¨
despite his weakened K-side. White then 6. Be3 Ng6
tries a rook pawn attack. Black later 7. Bd3 Be7
”“”¹“
counters in the center, but his position is 8. h4 Nb6 ˜””“’
somewhat weak after the f-pawn advance. 9. h5 Nf8 ”
10. h6 g6 ’‘
11. Qd2 e5 –›•
‘’‘¬’‘
¦²¤
Here's a more aggressive continuation: Example 3b: §³¹¨
black goes for the attack, and keeps it for 6. Be3 Nb6
several moves; white loses the initiative. 7. Bd3 e5
”“ž”“
8. O-O Bg4 ¯“””—
All of these lines, like the Defense Game 9. Be2 Ng6 
itself, will be unfamiliar to your adversary, 10. h3 exd4 –‘
allowing you to gain a psychological 11. Nxd4 Bd7 ‘
advantage with rapid and incisive play. 12. Nd5 c6
13. Nxb6 Qxb6
‘’‘›’‘
¦ª¤²
§ž¯³¹¨ Example 4: Of course you are under no obligation to
1. e4 e6 react to the bishop pin immediately; you
”“”˜“”“ 2. d4 d6 can continue your development on the
˜”“ 3. Nf3 Ne7 opposite side, and react later, if at all.
 4. Nc3 Nd7
’‘ 5. Bg5 Nb6
–•
‘’‘’‘’
¦ª²›¤

§³¹¨ Example 4a: Here's an example continuation with black


6. Bd3 Bd7 developing Q-side, and then moving off
“”­˜“”“ 7. O-O Bc6 the line of the bishop pin. Black
ž“ 8. a4 a5 exchanges center pawns, and now has
” 9. Re1 Qd7 various ways to react to the bishop attack.
‘‘’ 10. b3 d5
‘›• 11. exd5 Nbxd5
12. Nxd5 Bxd5
’‘’ 13. c4 Bc6
¦ª¦²

§ž³¨ Example 4b: A standard D-game response is to develop


6. Bd3 c6 your c-pawn and bring the queen out, so
“¯¹“”“ 7. O-O Qc7 relieving the bishop pin. You can then
˜“”— 8. a4 a5 proceed with your usual play.
”‘” 9. Qe2 e5
‘‘ 10. Be3 Ng6 The best defense is a good offense; here
–›• 11. d5 Be7 black's counter attack encourages white to
retire the invading bishop voluntarily.
’‘ª’‘’
¦¤²

§ž³¨ Example 4c: After you have freed the pinned piece, and
6. Bd3 c6 developed your knight and bishop on the
”“¯“”“ 7. O-O Qc7 attacked side, the adversary will have to
˜“”“— 8. Qd2 Ng6 exchange with your bishop, or retreat. In
 9. Rfe1 Be7 many games he chooses to exchange. In
’‘ 10. Bxe7 Qxe7 any case, that's the end of the episode.
–›•
‘’‘¬’‘’
¦¦²
Early Attacks 75

If your opponent persists in using the Example 5: §ž³¹¨


bishop early attack, you might want to 5. Bg5 e5
shock him occasionally with a completely 6. dxe5 dxe5
”“—˜“”
different reaction, such as this early 7. Be2 h6 ¯“”
departure from the system with a center 8. Bh4 c6 ”
challenge and a queen sortie, which is a 9. O-O Qb6 ‘
more aggressive way of eluding the pin. –•
‘’‘›’‘’
¦ª¤²
On the Q-side the bishop attack is less Example 6: §¯³¹¨
bothersome, and all possible reactions to 1. e4 e6
it are good. An immediate c-pawn push is 2. d4 d6
”ž˜“”“
especially strong, and fits into your game 3. Nf3 Ne7 “˜”“
perfectly, but the a-pawn push may be 4. Nc3 Nd7 “
even better, especially if your opponent 5. Bb5 a6 ’‘
chooses to retreat to the flank, as shown. 6. Ba4 b5 ›–•
7. Bb3 Nb6
You can also proceed with normal K-side 8. O-O Bd7
‘’‘’‘’
development and castle away from the pin. ¦ª¤²
Another bishop early attack is the pin on Example 7a: §ž¯³—¨
the pawn. You're not likely to see it unless 1. e4 d6
your opponent expects you're playing the 2. d4 Nd7
”“”“¹
D-system. The reactions to this attack 3. Bg5 h6 ””
include those already seen, plus several 4. Bh4 g5 ˜”
others that are valid. Here black runs the 5. Bg3 c5 ‘
bishop off with his flank pawns, develops 6. dxc5 Bg7 ’
the bishop in fianchetto, and uses it to 7. c3 Nxc5
equalize effectively early after opening.
‘’’‘’
¦•ª²›–¤
Since the knight is not pinned, it can be Example 7b: §ž¯¨³
brought out in normal fashion, offering 3. Bg5 Ngf6
another way to respond to the attack. Here 4. Nc3 e6
”“—¹“”“
black has completed a D-system variant 5. Nf3 Be7 “”“˜
and is in good shape, with the bishop 6. Bb5 c6 
attack no longer causing any difficulties. 7. Bd3 O-O ’‘
–›•
‘’‘’‘’
¦ª²¤
Center Pawn Early Attacks on the Defense Game

In the center pawn attack, your opponent advances one of his center pawns to the fifth
rank, proposing a center pawn exchange. Although center pawn attacks may seem to be a good
way of engaging the Defense Game, analysis and experience in play has shown that these moves
are not the best continuations for the adversary. In master level play against the Defense Game
they are rarely seen, confirming their relatively low value. Although center pawn attacks are not
particularly dangerous, they are playable; in amateur games you are likely to see them quite often.
Below are shown a variety of center pawn attacks, versus the Defense Game played with black.

§ž¯³¹¨ Example 8: Center pawn attacks can start as soon as


1. e4 e6 the 5th move, although they usually start a
”“”—˜“”“ 2. d4 d6 bit later. They are not really dangerous,
”“ 3. Nf3 Ne7 and are not usually the best attacking line.
‘ 4. Nc3 Nd7
‘ 5. d5 ... Here white starts a center pawn attack
–• early. Black has his choice of responses:
accept the exchange, advance his attacked
‘’‘’‘’ pawn or continue with his development.
¦ª²›¤

§ž¯§³ Example 8a: Here we see a continuation in which black


5. d5 exd5 accepts the exchange, and then continues
“”“” 6. exd5 Ng6 with his normal development. White later
“˜”¹“ 7. Bd3 Be7 exchanges his bishop for black's knight,
‘ 8. Bxg6 hxg6 causing some damage on the K-side, but
– 9. Qe2 O-O otherwise black's position is satisfactory.
– 10. Be3 Re8
11. O-O-O Bf6 The usual aim of the center pawn attack is
‘’‘ª’‘’ 12. Nd4 a6 to free the action of the bishop, allowing
²¤¦ 13. Rhe1 Nb6 this exchange. It's nothing really serious.

§ž¯¨³ Example 9a: When your opponent develops a 3 pawn


1. e4 e6 center, you are still not at risk, as long as
”“”—”“ 2. d4 d6 you delay development of your Q-side
”“¹— 3. Nf3 Ne7 knight, as black does here.
 4. c4 Nd7
‘‘ 5. Nc3 Ng6 White tries the center pawn attack; black
–›• 6. d5 Be7 continues with his normal development,
7. dxe6 fxe6 and emerges in very good shape after
‘’’‘’ 8. Bd3 O-O white exchanges a center pawn.
¦ª¤² 9. O-O Bf6
Early Attacks 77

Also good is initiating the exchange of Example 9b: §ž¯¨³


center pawns. Black has no difficulties at 6. d5 exd5
all in the continuation shown here. 7. cxd5 Be7
“”—¹“”“
8. Bb5 O-O “”—
Avoiding the exchange by advancing your 9. O-O a6 ›‘
attacked center pawn is quite playable, ‘
and recommended for beginners, because –•
it tends to closed games. It's not generally
the strongest line for better players.
‘’’‘’
¦ª¤²
Somewhat more problematic are the Example 10: §¯³¹¨
sequences of the D-game which develop 1. e4 d6
the Q-side knight early, against adversary 2. d4 Nd7
”“”ž˜“”“
3 pawn openings. Here black's knight will 3. Nf3 Nb6 ˜”“
be forced to retreat to c8, whether or not 4. Bd3 Bd7 ’
he chooses to exchange center pawns. 5. c4 e6 ’‘
6. Nc3 Ne7 –›•
7. c5 ...
‘’’‘’
¦ª²¤
In this continuation black is left with a Example 10a: ¨—¯³¹¨
cramped position, and now has problems 7. c5 dxc5
getting his pieces into play. Better was 8. dxc5 Nbc8
”“”ž“”“
bringing the knight to f6 so retaining the 9. Qb3 Rb8 —“
action of the king bishop against the 10. Be3 Nc6 ’
c-pawn advance, but this too is weak. 11. Rd1 Na5 ‘
Avoiding such early attacks is one of the 12. Qc2 Nc6 –›•
reasons that most lines of the D-game
relocate the Q-side knight only later on.
‘’ª’‘’
¤²¤
Against K-side 3 pawn centers, there is Example 11: §ž¯¨³
little to fear from center pawn attacks, 1. e4 e6
since the king knight has a flight square, 2. d4 Ne7
”“”—¹“”“
and threatens to exchange with the 3. Nc3 d6 ”
adversary's knight in its usual placement. 4. f4 Nd7 ‘
Here black initiates the exchange of pawns 5. Nf3 Ng6 ’
and knights, then castles and has a fine 6. Bd3 Be7 –›ª
game. Since the K-side of the D-game is 7. f5 exf5
very strong, this type of 3 pawn opening is 8. exf5 Nh4
‘’‘‘’
rarely attempted by the adversary. 9. O-O Nxf3+ ¦¤²
10. Qxf3 O-O
6. Playing Against the Defense Game

This can be considered a difficult subject, or an easy one. Until now no responses have
been found to the Defense Game that consistently put it in serious difficulty. But a large number
of responses have shown to be very strong. We can already identify many of the best defenses.
Among them are the strongest conventional openings that have ever been seen in chess; each a
theoretically perfect deployment. But non of them have proved superior to the standard opening.

The Defense Game allows the adversary to play any opening he wants, almost without
opposition. Responses to the standard opening are the least constrained and so in principle the
most varied possible. The Defense Game has to face hundreds of valid adversary defenses, more
than for other openings in chess. Most of these defenses are new, in the sense that they have not
been playable until the present. In fact, a completely new game of chess results from playing this
system, because the opening positions on both sides have never been seen before!

It is a fascinating quest to find the best rivals to the Defense Game. When one is at almost
complete liberty to compose, play in the opening becomes an exercise for the imagination, quite
different from the close contact and blow-by-blow character of conventional opening play. The
usual dynamic clash of force and constraint becomes instead a calm deployment phase as one
plays the component moves of a preferred opening position. It is as though you are setting up
the board deep into the opening and starting the game from there!

Here we present a sampler of adversary openings that have shown to be strong against the
Defense Game. It is a highly varied assortment of stunning new openings. All readers are
encouraged to choose a few that look interesting to try in play. Beginners and lesser intermediate
players should mostly play the variants of the Defense Game, while they are gaining experience in
the system. Better players should try some of everything. It’s a completely new game of chess!

This discussion of playing against the Defense Game is divided into five parts: early
attacks, classical defenses, custom defenses, B-system defenses, and C-systems defenses. These
are all strong responses, but none of them have shown to be stronger than the Defense Game.

Early Attacks:

Early attacks start at the 5th to 8th move. Those most frequently seen in master level play
are the rook pawn attacks and bishop early attacks; the center pawn attacks are used less often.
When attacked early, usually only one or two moves of the standard opening are affected; most
development and resulting play remains the same. In general early attacks do not succeed in
pushing the Defense Game significantly off track. Often they result in loss of time and initiative
for the adversary. All early attacks can be avoided by defensive play and can also be challenged
by aggressive counter play. Early attacks are aggressive, but not more aggressive than responses
which avoid early conflict and build strong positions. At master level, early attacks occur in a
minority of games: it would appear they are not the strongest responses to the Defense Game.
Playing Against the Defense Game 79

The author’s assessment of the different early attacks:


! Rook pawn attacks have a number of effective responses.
! Bishop attacks are not dangerous, but can provoke some weakness in pawn structure
! Center pawn attacks are usually not problematic.

Early attacks have scored wins in games from the positions shown below at 8 moves. Most wins
were recorded with the rook pawn attacks, but all the early attacks have won on occasion.
§˜ž¯³¨ §ž¯³¨ §ž¯³˜¨
”“”—¹“”“ ”“”““ ”“”—¹“”“
”“ —”““’ ”
‘  ”‘
‘’‘ ’‘¹ ‘’‘
–• –› –•
‘’›’‘ ‘’‘’‘ ‘’’‘
¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤ ¦ª²›¤
A4v8 Rook Pawn A3v88Gx Rook Pawn A4v8 Rook Pawn

§ž³¨ §¯³¹¨ §˜³¹¨


”“—¯“”“ ”“”ž˜“ ”“¯ž“”
“”“— ˜”“” “”“—”
 ” 
’‘ ‘’‘ ‘’‘
–›• ›• –•
‘’‘’‘’ ‘’’‘’ ‘’›’‘’
¦ª¤² ¦•ª¤² ¦ª²¤
A2vC3Cx Bishop A3vC3C Bishop A3vC3CF1 Bishop

§˜ž¯³¨ §˜ž¯³¨ §˜ž¯³§


”“”¹““ ”“”¹““ ”“”“¹“”“
“— “— “
“ “ ‘
’‘ ’‘ ’‘ª
–• –• –
‘’‘’‘ ‘’‘’‘ ‘’‘’‘
¦ª²›¤ ¦ª²›¤ ¦²›¤
A3v88xC2 Center Pawn A3v888xC2 Rook Pawn &Bishop A3v8GxD7 Rook Pawn &Queen
Classical Defenses:
The classical defenses shown here are the strongest conventional openings that exist.
They use two or three doubly advanced center pawns, and strong central piece placements.
Castling is usually performed, and the queen relocated. Classical defenses place a great mass of
material in the center, maximizing the potential for attack while retaining a strong defense. Those
shown below are among the defenses most commonly used. For purposes of illustration, only the
Defense Game standard opening is shown. These defenses were first described in 'The Beginner's
Game.' Coded names are explained briefly below; descriptive names are simpler but less precise.
§¯¨³ §³¨ §¯¨³
”““”“ ”““”“ ”“¹“”“
—¹ž˜ ¯—¹ž˜ —ž˜
”“” ”“” ”“”
  
•‘’– •‘’– •‘’–
‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’
¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤
C3v0 3 Pawn Standard C3vD2 3 Pawn Queen out C3vF1 3 Pawn F back

§¨³ §¨³ §¯§³


”“”­“”“ ”“”­“”“ ”“”ž“”“
—¹ž˜ —ž˜ —¹˜
“” ¹“” “”
  
•‘’– •‘’– •‘’–
‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’
¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤
C2v0 2 Pawn Standard C2vF2 2 Pawn F center C2vC1H1 2 Pawn C back

§¨³ §­¨³ §¯¨³


”“”­“”“ ”“”¹“”“ ”“”“¹“
—“˜ —ž˜ —ž˜“
¹“ž “” “”
  
•‘’– •‘’– •‘’–
‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’
¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤
C1v5C2F2 1 pawn FC center C2vD1F1 2 pawn F back C2v7F5 2 pawn F fianchetto
Playing Against the Defense Game 81

Custom Defenses:
A custom defense is one which has been specially designed to confront the Defense Game.
Many imaginative and often impressive openings can be designed. The custom defenses shown
below have all proved to be strong responses to the standard opening. These defenses were first
introduced and named by the author in 'The Beginner's Game.' Despite their expansive and
aggressive deployments, until the present the custom defenses have not proved to be stronger
than the more commonly played classical defenses. (NB: in this and next sections only Defense
Game standard opening is shown in diagrams; they are not starting positions from actual games.)

§¯³¨ §¯³¨ §¯³¨


”“”“ ”ž—“”“ ”“—˜”“
—¹ž˜ ”¹˜ ¹ž
”“”“ ”“” ”“”“
  
•‘’– •‘’– •‘’–
‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’
¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤
D4v0 4 pawn Standard D3v2B1C5 3 pawn ‘Shotgun’ D4vB1G1 4 pawn ‘Tomahawk’

§¯³¨ §˜¯³¨ §˜ž¯³¨


“”“” ž“”“ “˜”
—¹ž˜ ¹˜ ¹
”“”“ ”“”“” ””“”““
  
•‘’– •‘’– •‘’–
‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’
¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤
D4v18 4 pawn ‘Battle Axe’ D5vC1 5 pawn ‘Queen Wing’ D6vG1 6 pawn ‘Six Gun’

The coded names attempt to give details of the opening: first the type of response (early Attack,
B-system, Classical, custom Designed), then the number of doubly advanced pawns, then ‘v’
(meaning ‘variant’), and then the figures that moved differently from the related standard opening:
first numbers (1-8) for the pawns, and then letters (A-H) for the pieces. The pieces have several
variant moves; the number following the piece letter indicates which of these moves was made. If
a figure is moved twice, this is indicated by repeating the pawn number or piece letter. Note that
D-system openings have names starting with the Initials 'Dv', whereas custom designed defenses
have names with D3v, D4v, D5v, D6v, so the two naming schemes are easily distinguished. In the
same way the names of classical defenses are distinguished from the C-system defenses.
B-system Defenses
B-system openings are related to the Beginner's Game, and all obey a set of rules similar to
that of the D-system, using pawn chains and piece placement mostly behind the pawns. Their
names list component moves different from the Beginner's Game. The coded names use a more
compact form of the nomenclature used for classical and custom defenses. The defenses shown
below with black are a only a few of the many B-system openings that are strong responses to the
Defense Game. B-system close variants, which imitate closely the Beginner's Game, are among
the best defenses, but almost all of the B-system variants are playable, and most are very strong!
§¯³¨ §˜¯³—¨ §¯³¨
”ž”—˜“¹“ ”ž¹“ ”ž”˜“¹“
””““ ”“”“”“ ”—”““
  
  
•‘’– •‘’– •‘’–
‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’
¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤
Beginner's Game Bv3’6’ BvB

§¯¨³ §¯³¨ ³¨¹—¨


”ž”—¹“”“ ”ž”—˜“¹“ ”ž¯—“”“
””“˜ ””“ ”“”“
 ” 
  
•‘’– •‘’– •‘’–
‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’
¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤
BvEFG Bv5 Bv3’DE’

§˜³—¨ §˜³—¨ §¯³¨


ž¯”“¹“ ”ž­”¹“ ”“—˜”“
“”“ ””“ “¹ž”
“” ”“ “”
  
•‘’– •‘’– •‘’–
‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’
¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤
Bv123D Bv36D' Bv3'456'C'F'
Playing Against the Defense Game 83

C-system Defenses
Among the best defenses to the Defense Game are the variants of the C-system. Virtually
all of the C-system variants are playable against the Defense Game, and most all of them are also
very strong responses. Those shown below with black are just a few of the C-system variants that
have proved to be very effective against the standard opening. Variant names list their
component moves that are different from the six standard moves of the Center Game.

§˜¯³—¨ §¯³—¨ §˜¯¨³


”ž¹“ “ž¹“” “”ž¹“”
“”“” “—”“” “”“˜”
“” ” 
  
•‘’– •‘’– •‘’–
‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’
¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤
Cv27 Cv3B CvEG

§˜¯¨³ §¯³¨ §˜¯³¨


“”ž¹“” “ž¹“” “”ž¹
““˜” “—”“˜” “”“˜”
“ ” “”
  
•‘’– •‘’– •‘’–
‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’
¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤
Cv4EG Cv3BG Cv67G

§ž¯³—¨ §˜¯³—¨ §˜¯³—¨


¹”“ ž”“¹ ”ž¹“
“—”“ “”“” ””““
“”“ “” ”“
  
•‘’– •‘’– •‘’–
‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’ ‘’‘›’‘’
¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤ ¦ª²¤
Cv236B Cv27CF Cv12'7'8
In addition to the early attacks, classical openings, custom openings, and B and C system
openings, the D-system openings can also be played against other D-system openings, with good
results. In this case both players are generally being cautious about their opening play, preferring
to see how the other player deploys before committing themselves to an offensive line.

All of the defenses shown in this chapter are very effective against the standard opening.
But there are hundreds of others that are just as good. All of the openings in this great multitude
are as strong or stronger than anything which has ever been seen before in chess. We can only
react with utter amazement that none of this great multitude have proved to be consistently
effective against the standard opening, with its fixed set of moves!

The enormous variety of valid responses to the Defense Game increases the chance that
eventually some will be found which can present serious problems. But even if defenses are
found that put the standard opening in real difficulty, there are so many possible sequences, and
so many close variants, that there will always be ways of avoiding specific problematic lines. The
large number of move sequences and diversity of strong variants is the best possible guarantee
that the Defense Game will never be surpassed in its ability to respond to attacks of any kind.
The D-system Definition 85

7. The D-system Definition

We have already seen examples of variants of the Defense Game, which modify moves of
the standard opening. Some of these result from reactions to adversary play, as in the early
attacks. In most such variants however, introduced moves are not forced but voluntary. Often
introduced moves are chosen from those typically used in continuing play after the standard
opening. If the omitted moves are then performed later, these variants are in fact different threads
of the same basic opening, and should be included in a general system of play associated with it.

Pawn moves are commonly introduced during the opening, especially the center pawn,
rook pawn, and queen bishop pawns, but almost any of the possible pawn moves may be played.
Knight moves are also frequently introduced, especially when used as reactions to early attacks.
Castling is another example, but there also many other introduced moves that are playable. Most
of these moves contain valid lines and so merit inclusion in a general schema for opening play.

In an attempt to describe a complete system around the standard opening, which is both
valid and clearly related to it, the author here proposes the D-system definition. All openings in
the D-system contain most of the standard opening moves, and also resemble the Defense Game
in the general style of play that results. A simple rule-based definition of the D-system allows to
distinguish clearly openings that are in the system from those that are not.

Many of the variants of the Defense Game are in the B-system and the C-system; it would
be possible to base a D-system definition on a subset of these systems, eg. all B/C system
members that contain most of the standard moves. But many interesting variants of the Defense
Game are outside these system rules. The obvious violations of the B-system rules are pawn and
knight double moves. If we want to include these variants in the D-system, we must use a
different set of rules from that of these other two systems.

The D-system definition proposed differentiates and distinguishes the D-system from the B
and C-systems. The Defense Game itself is very different from the both, although some moves
figure in all three systems. They are also very different in the style of games that result. The
D-system rules chosen help keep these three systems at a significant and recognizable distance.

The D-system definition is based on openings at eight moves, as are the B-system and
C-system definitions, and is intended to contain most of the best lines associated with the
Defense game. Each D-system member contains at least four of the eight standard moves, and up
to four additional moves to distinguish it as a variant of the Defense Game.

Openings which are close to the Center Game and the Beginner's Game are of special
interest to chess. The author calls these openings the BD and CD hybrids. They contain aspects
of both these standard openings, and so are links between the two systems of play. Knowing how
to play the BD/CD hybrids increases a system player's capacity to move between and exploit the
natural strengths of these three powerful new chess opening systems.
D-system Rules:
An opening is in the D-system if and only if during the first eight opening moves:
! At least four of the eight standard moves of the Defense Game are played
! Bishops are developed initially behind the pawns
! Single pawn advances are generally used: double advances are allowed when that
pawn joins a pawn chain; (an exception is made for pawn double
advances used as response to the rook pawn early attacks.)
! At least one knight is relocated in the characteristic manner (Nd2-Nb3 or Ne2-Ng3)

The set of all openings which obey the above rules is called the D-system. D-system
members are also called D-system variants. Openings that perform six standard moves first are
also called Defense Games. Openings that play at least six standard moves are called close
variants. Openings that play only four or five standard moves are called distant variants.

The nomenclature for D-system openings makes clear their relationship to the Defense
Game. Members of the D-system are denoted by the letters 'Dv' (D-system variant), followed by 1
to 4 figure symbols for pawn or piece moves in that opening not in the standard set of six moves.

The variants generated using these rules are almost all playable and very strong. There are
not too many of them, it is a manageable collection. They also retain a clear similarity in style of
play to the Defense Game, the main characteristic sought for in the formulation of suitable rules.

There is another motive in defining the D-system other than to enrich play with the Defense
Game. The Defense Game is a completely new opening, and shows some promise of eventually
proving to be an optimal way to play chess. Most of the openings in the D-system are also brand
new, rarely if ever seen before in play. If defined correctly, this new system may also prove to be
optimal or very close to it. In other words the D-system attempts to define an optimal subset in the
space of all possible chess openings, which is at the same time is completely new.

Only very few members of the D-system have ever been seen before in play, and very rarely
at that. Those that have been played are considered experimental or alternative openings, and are
not documented in current catalogs of chess openings. The D-system as a whole bares little
commonality with or resemblance to chess openings played until the present. It is a totally new
approach to playing the game. In any case the D-system is distinguished from conventional
chess practice, and is certainly not based on any of the known openings.

The rules for the D-system are precise enough to allow us to determine immediately
whether any candidate opening is in the system or not. A few examples of valid D-system
openings, and openings not in the system are given here to make these distinctions clear:
The D-system Definition 87

§¯³¨ §˜¯¨³ §ž¯³¨


”“”ž¹“”“ ”“”ž¹“”“ “”¹“”“
˜”“— ”“— “˜”“—
  
Dv0 DvE Dv1'

§ž¯¨³ §¯¨³ §³¨


”“—¹“”“ ”“”ž¹“”“ ”“¯ž¹“”“
”“— —”“— ˜“”“˜
”  
Dv3E DvBE Dv3'DG

§ž¨³ §¯¨³ §ž¯³¨


”“”­¹“”“ “”ž¹“” ”“˜“”
—”“— “—”“—” ˜“¹“”
  “
DvBD'E Dv1'8'BE Dv3'48'F'

Valid D-system Openings

§ž¯§³ §³¹¨ §³¹¨


”“”“”“ ž”­”“”“ ”ž“¯“”“
—¹“— “˜”˜ ”—“—
“ “ ”
Only 3 standard moves Only 3 standard moves Only 3 standard moves
('borderline' opening) ('borderline' opening) ('borderline' opening)

§¯³¨ §¯¨³ §¯³¹¨


””ž¹“”“ ”“”¹“”“ ”ž˜“”
˜”“˜ ˜”˜ ”—”“”
“ ”ž ”
Advanced pawn Bishop developed No Knight Maneuver
not in pawn chain in front of pawn

Non D-system Openings


Note that the D-system also includes many openings which contain exchanges, whether or
not these are forced by adversary play. On the whole the D-system is a well-defined set: it’s fairly
easy for anyone to look at an opening and tell right away if it’s in the D-system or not.

The D-system rules result in the generation of hundreds of variants. The author has not yet
made an attempt to catalogue them all, but estimates that there are more than a thousand,
including the exchange variants. This gives a large variety of possible lines for D-system players.

The main characteristic of the Defense Game and the entire D-system is its extraordinary
resilience to adversary play. Most of the D-system openings are generally playable, meaning that
they confront successfully most adversary openings. The entire system gives you the best
possible guarantee of passing intact thru the opening, with a solid position for the ensuing game.
Like Defense Game itself, D-system openings can usually succeed in carrying out preconceived
developments with minimal or no alterations imposed by adversary play.

The D-system is so vast that a system player can stay comfortably within its limits, while
constantly varying his game. His opening moves may appear restrained because they are based
on compact and highly resistant defensive structures, but after the opening he will show his true
aggressiveness. His choice of moves will be highly varied, but whatever he plays in the opening
can build to a position within the D-system, without having to leave its large confines.

Also interesting are the 'borderline' openings, which obey the D-system rules except that
they contain only three moves of the standard opening. Borderline openings were defined
outside the D-system because they are considered too distant from main lines to be integral to the
system. Most of the borderline openings are completely new to chess. The borderline openings
constitute a vast constellation of openings associated with the D-system, which continue to share
many similarities in style of play. It is certainly worthwhile experimenting with these more distant
variants. Borderline openings of most interest to system players are those with introduced moves
for exchanges and BD and CD hybrids, which are variants of the Beginner's Game / Center Game.

D-system Rules OK

The D-system rules were quite ad-hoc, so it is quite possible that some other set of rules
could be even better. Relaxing the rules would include many more strong openings; tightening
them would refine the system. Here the author has drawn a line in the sand. On one side are the
Defense Game and the D-system, virtually unknown. On the other side are all the chess openings
played until the present, along with a great multitude of new openings that are even stronger,
including virtually everything which is conceivably playable. A great battle between them is about
to begin. You wouldn't think so at first, but the Defense Game and the D-system have a real
chance of winning this battle. If they do, then we'll say that the D-system rules OK.
D-system Variants 89

8. D-system Variants

The Defense Game is the basis for the definition of a new set of chess openings called the
D-system. All D-system openings respect a restrictive and well-defined set of rules for opening
play. They also resemble the Defense Game, containing most of its component moves, and adding
other moves which combine well with its basic pawn structure and recessed piece placements.

The main interest in defining the D-system is to identify openings close to the Defense
Game, in the sense of being alternative lines of the standard opening. Due to their proximity to the
Defense Game and their conformity to the same set of rules, all D-systems openings are related in
terms of the style of games that result, so there is good commonality of play in the entire system.

The classification system for D-system openings defines any opening in the system as a
variant of the Defense Game. Variants are named by indicating the pawn and piece moves in that
opening that are not present in the Defense Game. Pieces are labeled A - H, and pawns 1 - 8,
starting from the queen side. For example, a variant of the Defense Game in which the king knight
is developed to Bishop 3 is called a variant G, whether for white or for black. All variant names
start with the letters ‘Dv’ (meaning 'D-system variant') and then put the variant moves in first
numerical, and then alphabetical order. Variant names do not specify the move ordering used.

§ž¯¨³ §ž¯¨³ §˜ž¨³


”“”¹“”“ ”“—¹“”“ ”“¯¹“”“
˜”“— ”“— ”“—
 ” ”
DvE Dv3E Dv3DE

In some cases, such as for the variants shown above, the variant name gives a complete
list of the component moves of the opening. More commonly however, we do not know from the
variant name which moves of the standard opening were left out. If this detail is needed, we can
append a version qualifier to the variant name, listing the moves not played, as shown below. In
general we refer to D-system members using only the variant names, without version qualifiers.

§ž³¨ §ž³¹¨ §³¹¨


”“¯—¹“”“ ”“¯“”“ ”“¯ž˜“”“
”“— ˜”“— ˜”“
” ” ”
Dv3D - Version BC Dv3D - Version CF Dv3D - Version FG

The variant name, even with inclusion of the version qualifier, still does not give a complete
description of the opening. Missing in particular, is the move order. Also missing is a description
of how pawn and piece moves different from the Defense Game were actually performed. The idea
is to have a convenient nomenclature for openings in the D-system, that makes clear their
relationship to the Defense Game. Including too much information in the variant names makes
them long and unusable. We can leave out information on move order because, as in the Defense
Game, these variants may be produced using many different sequences of moves. But it is useful
to indicate for the modified moves how the piece or pawn actually moved.

A shorthand for variations of the modified moves is suggested here which appends
modifiers to the pawn number or piece letter for less frequently used moves, but not to the most
frequently used moves. This shorthand makes the variant names more precise, without making
them too complicated. The pieces and pawns have different rules for use of qualifiers, according
to which of their moves are most frequently made. Here is the suggested syntax:

Most Frequent Moves - No Qualifier Less Frequent Moves - Single Qualifier


Pawns: double advance Pawns: single advance
Knights: to Bishop 3 Knights: to Bishop 1*
Bishops: to Knight 2 Bishops: to King 3 / Queen 3
Rooks: to Knight 1 Rooks: to King 1 / Queen 1
Queen: to Queen Bishop 2 Queen: to Queen 2
King: King side castle King: Queen side castle

Other moves, eg. Bishop to rook 3, Queen to King 2 (or to King 1 or Queen Bishop 1), have
a double qualifier. The single qualifier is the apostrophe; the double qualifier is the quote sign.
The qualifier ‘x’ is used when a pawn or piece captures. If a piece moves a second time, only the
figure symbol is repeated in the variant name*. This scheme for use of move modifiers is almost
identical* with the one used for the C-system. With this shorthand for moves, we can now name
and catalog all the openings in the D-system. Below are some examples with move qualifiers:

§¯³—¨ §˜ž³—¨ §˜¯—¨


”—¹“” ­¹“” “”ž³”
ž””“” ”“”“” “¹“””
” ” “
Dv12'C" Dv13'D' Dv46'E"F'

This naming scheme allows us to refer to all D-system members in a convenient fashion.
Unlike other nomenclatures for chess openings, it succeeds in giving an accurate and adequate
description of an opening set of moves, in a way that anyone can understand and use quite easily.

The ‘distance’ of a D-system variant from the Defense Game is equal to the number of
moves in the first eight that are different from the standard opening, which is equal to the number
of figure symbols in the variant name. D-system variants exist at distances 1 to 4. Most Classical
openings are not in the D-system of course, but we can measure their distance from the Defense
Game in the same way. Most are 6 to 8 moves distant; the overall average is about 6.5 moves. So
the Defense Game doesn’t have much in common with conventional chess openings. Now we
present a brief catalog of D-systems variants. Although small, this D-system sampler contains
many of the better openings. They are listed according to their distance from the Defense Game.
D-system Variants 91

D-system Variants at Distance 1: Close Variants

§¯³¨ Distance 1 variants perform 7 of the 8 §¯³¨


standard moves, introducing just 1
”“”ž¹“”“ move from the allowable set. Dv4 and
”“”ž¹“”“
˜“— Dv5 perform all 7 of the other ˜”—
“ standard moves; the other distance 1 ”
Dv4 variants omit one bishop move. Dv5

§ž¯³¨ In most cases either of the bishop §¯³¹¨


moves may be omitted, so most of
“”¹“”“ the distance 1 variants have two
“”ž“”“
˜”“— versions, eg version C, shown in Dv1 “˜”“—
” left, or version F, as in Dv1' right. 
Dv1 Dv1'

§—¯³¹¨ Among the most commonly seen §ž¯³¨


distance 1 variants are responses to
”“”ž“”“ rook pawn early attacks; Dv8 right
”“”¹“”
”“— shuts the attack down with a pawn ˜”“—
 advance; DvB' left retires the queen “
DvB' knight when it is threatened. Dv8

§ž¯³¨ Dv3 and Dv3' are among the best §¯³¹¨


distance 1 variants. Dv3 especially
”“¹“”“ has proved to be an aggressive
”“ž“”“
˜”“— counter attacking line. Both prepare ˜“”“—
” for the queen move to queen bishop 
Dv3 2, its usual replacement. Dv3'

§ž¯³¨ Dv5' and Dv4' introduce a second §ž¯³¨


single advance of a center pawn,
”“”¹“”“ either striking at the opponent's
”“”¹“”“
˜”— pawn center or avoiding a pawn ˜“—
” exchange following an adversary “
Dv5' center pawn advance. Dv4'

§ž¯¨³ DvE left, is one of the few distance 1 §ž¯³¨


variants with only one version. Dv5x
”“”¹“”“ right has exchanged the king pawn
”“”¹“”“
˜”“— reacting to a center pawn attack. ˜”—
 Both are very commonly played. 
DvE Dv5x
D-system Variants at Distance 2: Close Variants

§ž¯¨³ Most of the main lines of the Defense §ž¯¨³


Game are distance 2 variants. The
”“—¹“”“ Q-knight is usually not relocated, and
”“—¹“”“
”“— a castle and c-pawn advance are “”“—
” commonly introduced, as in these 
Dv3E typical examples. Dv3'E

§ž¯§³ These two are perhaps the most §ž¯¨³


frequently played of all the distance 2
”“”—¹“”“ variants. Dv5'E strikes at the center
”“”—¹“”“
”“— on its 8th move, while DvEH moves ”—
 the rook onto the e-file before making ”
DvEH the e-pawn advance. Dv5'E

§ž³¨ Two strong and generally playable §˜³—¨


D-game lines are those with a c-pawn
”“¯—¹“”“ push, and a queen relocation. Dv3'D
“ž¹“”
“”“— left has not yet shown where it will “¯”“”
 attack, while Dv3D" has announced ”
Dv3'D its intention of attacking Q-side. Dv3D"

§ž¯³¨ A number of distance 2 variants are §¯³¹¨


reactions to early attacks; Dv3'6' has
”“—¹”“ reacted to one or two bishop attacks
“ž˜“”“
“”“”— and Dv13' has reacted to rook pawn ˜“”“
 and bishop attacks on the Q-side. ”
Dv3'6' Dv13'

§ž¯¨³ Other distance 2 variants seek to §ž¯¨³


move into other lines than those
””—¹“”“ commonly played in typical D-games.
”“”¹“”“
””“— Dv2E is a fianchetto variant worth ”“—
 trying; in DvB"E the forward knight ˜
Dv2E often tries to exchange for a bishop. DvB"E

§ž¯¨³ These are two other D-game lines §ž¯¨³


that are very commonly played. DvEF
”“”—“”“ left gives additional support to the e5
“”—¹“”“
”“¹— square; Dv1'E appears quiet, but can “”“—
 expand rapidly on the Q-side. 
DvEF Dv1'E
D-system Variants 93

§ž¯³˜¨ Among the numerous distance 2 §ž¯³˜¨


variants that are reactions to early
”“”—¹“”“ attack are these two, both are
”“”—¹““
” energetic responses to a adversary ”“
” rook pawn early attack. ”
Dv5'G' Dv7G'

§ž¨³ Other commonly seen reactions to §ž³¨


early attacks are these with an early
”“”—¯“”“ bishop exchange followed by
“”—¯“”“
”“— recapture by the queen. “”“—
 
DvDxE Dv1'Dx

§ž¯¨³ Many distance 2 variants result from §¯³¹¨


center pawn exchanges, which may
”“”—¹“”“ be due to an advanced D-game pawn
”“”ž˜“”“
“— as in Dv45x right, or an advanced ˜
 adversary pawn, as in Dv4xE left. 
Dv4xE Dv45x

§ž¯¨³ Two variants somewhat off the §¯³¹¨


beaten D-game track are Dv3'4, with a
”“—¹“”“ strong d-pawn based triangle, and
”“”ž˜”“
““— Dv66x, with an early opening of the ˜”“
“ f-file, leading to sharp continuations. 
Dv3'4 Dv66x

§—¯³¨ Dv3'5' is a main D-game line, striking §ž¯³¨


at the center after the c-pawn move.
”“”ž¹“”“ DvB'G is a strong close variant which
”“—¹“”“
”“˜ has reacted to the rook pawn attack “”—
 on the Q-side. Both are often played. ”
DvB'G Dv3'5'

§¯³¨ Rounding out the list are two other §ž¯³¹¨


distance 2 variants, DvCG with its
”“”¹“”“ conventional king knight placement,
”““”
˜ž”“˜ and Dv3'8', a cautious defensive line. ˜“”“—”
 
DvCG Dv3'8'
D-system Variants at Distance 3: Distant Variants

§˜ž¯³¨ Distance 3 variants contain a large §ž¯³¨


number of alternatives to the Defense
”“”—¹“” Game. Distance 3 variants begin to
”“”—“¹
”“” diverge from main D-game lines, so ”“—”
 enriching play in the D-system. ”
Dv8'G'G Dv78'F

§ž¯³¹¨ Often distance 3 variants are §ž¯³¹¨


reactions to early attacks. Dv3xBB
”“˜“”“ reacts to a center pawn attack, while
”“”—”“
˜”“ Dv45x6' responds to a bishop attack ”—
 and also includes a center pawn “
Dv3xBB challenge and exchange. Dv45x6'

§ž³¹¨ Many of the distance 3 variants delay §˜ž¯¨³


piece development in favor of pawn
”“¯—“” moves, establishing different lines of
”“¹”“
“”“—” defense and opening to alternative ”“”—
 attacking lines. ”
Dv3'8'D Dv36'E

§ž¯³¹¨ The combination of center pawn §ž¯³¹¨


challenges combined with multiple
”“˜“”“ knight moves gives rise to a number
”“”—“”“
”“ of alternative D-system lines, with —“
˜ sharp tactical continuations. 
Dv3BxG" Dv4xB"G"

§ž¯³¨ Many of the distance variants include §¯³¹¨


maneuvers with the knights, typically
”“¹“”“ in response to early attacks, but in
”“”ž“”“
˜“”“ other cases seeking to disorient an “˜—
— adversary expecting positional play. 
Dv3'GG" Dv44xB"

§ž¯¨³ Among the few possibilities for the §¯³¹¨


adversary are exchanges of pieces as
“”—“”“ in Dv1'GxE, or pawns as in Dv7'8'Cx.
”“”˜“
“”“— Opening exchanges rarely present ˜”ž“”
 any difficulties for D-system players. 
Dv1'GxE Dv7'8'Cx
D-system Variants 95

§ž¯³¹¨ Openings based on the characteristic §ž¯¨³


d-pawn triangle can be strong, even if
”“—˜“”“ several additional moves are used in
”“—¹“”“
““ its construction, as in Dv3'4'B" left. In ““—
“ Dv3'4E right no moves were 'lost.' “
Dv3'4'B" Dv3'4E

§ž¯³¨ The D-system rules generally result §ž¯¨³


in compact but resistant defensive
”“¹“” structures with plenty of offensive
”“¹“”“
˜“”“˜” potential. These two with 3 pawn ˜“”“˜
 centers are typical examples. 
Dv3'8'G Dv3'EG

§ž¯³¹¨ As in classical chess, early pawn §ž¯¨³


challenges in the center give you
”“”˜““ additional freedom of movement for
”“”¹“”“
˜”“ your pieces; many of the strongest ˜“˜
 distance 3 variants include them. “
Dv55x7' Dv4EG

§ž¯¨³ Try experimenting with Q-side pawn §ž¯³¹¨


triangular structures. Your K-side will
”—¹“”“ usually be immune to any attack,
”“—“”
””“— even after piece exchanges, such as “““
” in Dv3'48x right. “
Dv2'3E Dv3'48x

§ž¯³¹¨ Distant variants have different pawn §ž¯³¨


structures and enable alternative
”—“” piece placements. The number of
“¹“”“
“”“— playable lines is so large that your “˜”“˜
““ opponent cannot possibly orient any ”
Dv23'8 specific counter strategy. Dv1'3G

¨ž¯³¹¨ These two distance 3 variants with a ¨¯³¹¨


Q-side fianchetto are examples of the
”—“”“ many alternative lines possible with
”ž”—“”“
””“— the D-game. The adversary cannot ””“—
” anticipate which of the possible lines 
Dv2'3A you as system player will choose. Dv2'AC
D-system Variants at Distance 4: Distant Variants

§ž¯¨³ Distance 4 variants often result from §ž¯¨³


classical center challenges combined
”“”¹“”“ with conventional knight placements,
”“”¹“”“
˜”˜ as in these two typical examples. ˜˜
 ”
Dv55xEG Dv4x5EG

§ž¯³¹¨ Here are two more distance 4 variants §³¹—¨


of the same description: both have
”“˜“”“ made strong center challenges and
”“”“”“
˜ exchanged off the center pawns. ˜ž
“ 
Dv3'3x45x Dv4x5C'Dx

§ž¯³¹—¨ Here are two additional examples §˜ž¯³¨


with early pawn challenges and
”“” exchanges. Compact pawn structures
”“¹“”
“˜”“” of D-system openings are ideal for ““—”
 supporting these pawn pushes. 
Dv1'2Bx8' Dv3'44x8'

§˜¯¨³ A number of strong variants at this §˜¯³¨


distance are based on a standard
”ž“¹“”“ D-game K-side, with an expanded
”ž“¹“”“
”“— Q-side including the fianchetto. ”“—
” 
Dv2'3CE Dv2'33xC

§ž¯³¨ Try defining other pawn structures §ž¯³¨


and piece placements related to them
”“”¹“ and you will see the wide range of
“˜“”“
˜”˜” possibilities with the distant variants. ˜“¹“
”” ”“
Dv578'G Dv13'4F'

§¯³¨ Other strong distance 4 variants can §¯³—¨


be based on a K-side fianchetto, and
“”ž”“¹“ usually attempt an offensive on the
“ž”“¹“
˜”˜“ Q-side, lead by the advancing pawns. ˜”“
” ””
Dv17'FG Dv137'F
D-system Variants 97

§ž¯¨³ There are hundreds of distance 4 §ž¯³¨


variants, and a large number of them
“”“¹“” are generally playable, that is, valid
”“¹˜“”“
“—“—” against most lines of adversary play. ˜““
 “
Dv1'8'BE Dv3'4F'F

§­³¨ The wide variety of distant variants §ž¯³—¨


will allow you to define your own
”“”ž”“¹ D-system openings and use them
”“¹“
˜”” effectively in combination with the “˜”““
” more familiar system lines. “
Dv78'D"F Dv1'27'F

§ž¯¨³ The great range of possible lines §ž¯³¨


insures that a player of the D-system
”“”¹“”“ can vary his openings significantly,
”“”¹“
˜˜ while remaining within the same ˜”˜”
” basic structure for opening. ””
Dv4x5EG Dv578'G

¨ž¯³¹¨ These two variants are reactions to §˜ž¯³¨


rook pawn attacks. Dv18AB" shut
“”“” them down on both flanks. DvFxFFGx
”“”“““
—”“— responds by advancing and then “¹
”“ exchanging the challenged knight. 
Dv18AB" DvFxFFGx

³¨¹—¨ Here are two different styles of §¯³¨


distant variants, showing the great
“¯ž”“”“ variety of openings in the D-system.
“”ž“”“
“˜” Dv14F'G right has proved effective ˜¹“˜
” against K-side fianchetto openings. ”“
Dv1'3DE' Dv14F'G

The author hopes that the brief exposition of the D-system given here will stimulate all readers to
try them in play. You can be a true pioneer in chess by defining your own new openings in the
system and researching the best continuation lines well into the game. Set out on your own!
Borderline or DB Variants:

§ž¯¨³ Borderline variants contain only 3 §˜¯³¨


standard opening moves: a central
“””“¹“ pawn move, the knight move behind
”ž““”“
˜”˜“ it, and knight relocation. By definition ”“—
” they aren't in the D-system, but they ¹
DBv17'EFG still share many similarities in play. DBv233xCF

§¯³¹¨ The borderline variants are denoted §ž¯¨³


by the prefix 'DBv' followed by the
ž”““” moves not in the standard opening.
”“”““¹
“—“—” There are very many such variants, —“—”
“ probably more than there are in the ”
DBv1'28'BC D-system. Most of them are also new. DBv78'BEF

§ž³—¨ Many of the borderline variants are §¯³¹¨


exchange lines of D-system distant
”“””““ variants, such as these with central
”ž”“”“
˜“ pawn exchanges. Exchanges are ”—“—
 often initiated by the system player, 
DBv4x7'DxFFx as is the case in these two examples. DBv2'44xBC

§³¹¨ Many of the borderline variants are §ž¯³¨


also generally playable, that is, valid
”ž¯““”“ against most lines of adversary play.
”“”“¹
—”““— This is usually determined by their ˜“”“˜
 resistance to center pawn attacks. “
DBv2'3'B"CD DBv3'7'8FG"

§¯³¨ Many of the borderline variants are §˜³¹¨


more aggressive versions of system
”ž”“”“ openings, which attack early and
”ž““”“
”—¹“— move into different lines, based on a ”­“—
“ variety of piece placements. ”
DBv2'4BCF' DBv2'3CDD

§ž¯¨³ Like D-system openings, borderline §³¹¨


variants contain a great wealth of
”“””¹“ alternatives that can surprise your
ž”“¯“”“
˜”“˜ adversary and oblige him to enter “”—“—
“ lines that he has never seen before. 
DBv67'EFG" DBv1'2'BCD"
Try experimenting with the borderline openings; most of them are new and most are very strong!
Playing the D-system 99

9. Playing the D-system

D-system variants use opening play similar to that of the newly discovered Defense Game.
Play is positional, with single pawn advances or doubly advanced pawns in chains, and the
bishops placed behind the pawns. Like the Defense Game, D-system openings are basically
preconceived positions for starting play after the opening. All have many possible sequences of
their component moves, and many of them have several versions as well. All D-system openings
also have a number of transpositions to other members within the system.

The D-system probably includes more than a thousand different members, but they are all
somewhat similar in their style of play. Use of recessed pawn structures, the characteristic
knights relocations, and bishop placements initially behind the pawns tends to result in openings
that share many common aspects.

Though only a tiny subset of the possible openings, the D-system is believed to contain
some of the strongest opening lines in chess. The D-system rules result in most cases in
openings that share strengths of the Defense Game, such as a resistant defense and a powerful
offense. Most D-system variants give rise to tactical continuations within positional play.

There are so many openings in the D-system, that it is not possible in a book of this size to
present the entire system. Also most testing was done with the Defense Game and close variants,
in order to establish the validity of the standard opening lines. Research with the distant variants
has been limited to trying about one hundred of the more plausible ones as a quick test of their
general pliability. In these first tests almost all of them performed extremely well.

Several of the D-system variants are shown here in action during and after the opening.
Excerpts are taken from complete games in the final section of the book. The scant introduction to
playing the D-system given here is only sufficient to wet the intellectual appetite. Many of the
D-system variants are among the strongest openings in chess, and almost all of them are
completely new. Players of all levels should select a few interesting variants and experiment with
them. Your game will improve as you develop the ability to move from the standard opening into
chosen variants, especially when these have been carefully selected to respond to adversary play.

Close Variants

With the Defense Game alone a player can respond well to virtually anything the adversary
can do in the opening. The standard opening with its numerous strong continuation lines is a
complete system, offering great flexibility of play for those who wish to use it exclusively.

Close variants of the Defense Game have at least six of the standard opening moves, but
do not necessarily put them first in the actual move order played. By this definition all Defense
Games are close variants, but most close variants are not Defense Games. Introducing
nonstandard moves early in the opening gives more possibilities to the system player, allowing
him to enter lines not normally reachable with pure Defense Games.
In many cases, Introduced moves in close variants are reactions to an adversary early
attacks. When introduced moves are not reactions to early attack, they are often moves which
challenge the center. Adversary reactions to introduced moves often results in your having to play
into distant variants. This depends on the type of introduced moves, and when they are played.
The more aggressive the introduced moves and the earlier they are played, the more likely your
adversary is to react to them, and the more likely you are to play into a distant variant.

The best way for beginners and most intermediate players to approach the variants is to
move into them gradually, introducing moves relatively late, after having played most of the
standard moves. In this way you will be able to see the differences in the resulting games more
clearly, and your exploration of alternative lines of the Defense Game will be more systematic.
Close variants will not be discussed further here because they have already been discussed in
previous chapters. There are also many more examples of close variants in the games section.

Distant Variants
Distant variants include only 4 or 5 of the 8 standard opening moves. Distant variants
generally have at least one advanced pawn, and usually have forward piece placements as well.
These moves offer the opponent more to engage, so there are more lines with modifications
imposed by adversary play. Even so, many of the distant variants are generally playable, that is
strong against most adversary deployments. As D-system members, distant variants still retain
most characteristics of the Defense Game and general similarities in play.

Playing the distant variants requires more tactical skills than playing the Defense Game and
its close variants. Beginners and most intermediate players should venture into this enormous
space of possibility only after they have mastered the standard opening and its close variants,
and are enjoying some success in playing them. Better players can rely on their general skills to
start playing distant variants right away, but they too are encouraged to explore them
systematically. Examples of distant variants are shown in the examples below.

Game 13: Black's Dv13'8'D advances both rook pawns and develops the queen early. Both
sides go for tactical play after the opening. White's attack appears serious, but black is intent on
stealing the initiative from him early on, developing his own K-side threats soon after opening.
§ž³¹—¨ 1. d4 d6 9. c4 d5 §ž¨³
2. e4 Nd7 10. cxd5 exd5
“¯“” 3. Bg5 c6 11. exd5 Nxd5
“¯¹“”
˜“”“” 4. Nf3 Qc7 12. Re1 Nxe3 “•”
” 5. Bd3 Nb6 13. Rxe3+ Be7 ”
‘’‘ 6. a4 a5 14. Ne5 Nf6 ‘›’—
›• 7. O-O h6 15. Bc4 O-O ¦
8. Be3 e6 16. Ng6 Ng4
’‘’‘’ ’’‘’
¦•ª¤² ¦•ª²
Playing the D-system 101

Game 19: White's Dv55xE contains an early center pawn challenge and exchange. Both
sides have good play after the opening, but white remains a step ahead with sharp play. White has
pressure on his adversary with the pin on the knight, and was able to maintain initiative later on.
§¯³¹¨ 1. d3 d5 9. c3 Nxe2+ ´¨¹¨
”“”“” 2. 3.
Nd2 e5
e4 Nf6
10. Qxe2 Qe7
11. Re1 Nd7
”“”­”
˜ 4. Ne2 Nc6 12. Nf3 f6 ”
ž”“ 5. Ng3 Be6 13. d4 O-O-O ª“
˜ 6. Be2 Nd4 14. dxe5 Bxf3 •
‘– 7. O-O h5 15. Qxf3 Nxe5 ’—
‘’‘–›’‘’ 8. exd5 Bxd5 16. Qf5+ Kb8
17. Ne4 Nd3
‘’’‘’
¦ª¤² 18. Rd1 Qd7 ¦¤²
Game 101: Black starts with normal K-side moves, then shifts to fianchetto variant Dv2'3CE
following white's center pawn advance. After the opening black counter attacks with his pawns in
the center and on the Q-side, finding good play despite white's efforts to disrupt his game.
§˜¯¨³ 1. e4 e6 9. dxc5 bxc5 §¨³
2. Nf3 Ne7 10. Re1 Nc6
”ž“¹“”“ 3. d4 Ng6 11. Qe2 Qb6
ž¯¹“”
”“— 4. Bd3 Be7 12. Na4 Qc7 “—““
”’ 5. e5 O-O 13. Nc3 a6 ”’
’ 6. O-O b6 14. Qe3 d5 •”
–›• 7. Nc3 Bb7 15. Bxg6 hxg6 ª•
8. Bd2 c5 16. Na4 d4
‘’‘’‘’ 17. Qd3 Rfd8
‘’‘’‘’
¦ª¤² ¦¦²

Game 103: White's Dv3'44x5x counter attacks in the face of a combination of rook pawn,
center pawn, and bishop early attacks. In spite of the serious threats that his adversary develops
early on, white is able to win a pawn and start trading down towards a favorable endgame.
§˜ž¯³¨ 1. e3 e5 9. Kf1 Bf8 §˜³
2. Ne2 d5 10. e4 Qd6
”“”“” 3. Ng3 Nf6 11. fxg7 Bxg7
”““
’ 4. Be2 h5 12. exd5 Rxh2 “
“ 5. d4 h4 13. Rxh2 Qxh2 ‘¹
¹ 6. dxe5 hxg3 14. Kxf2 Be5 
’’ 7. exf6 Bb4+ 15. Qg1 Qg3+ ’
8. c3 gxf2+ 16. Kf1 Bg4
‘’›”‘’ 17. Qf2 Qxf2+
‘’°‘
¦•ª²¤ 18. Kxf2 Bxe2 ¦•
19. Kxe2 c6
Game 104: White's Dv37'BF with a K-side fianchetto challenges a 3 pawn classical defense.
White goes for the sharpest lines and wins material quickly after the opening. Afterwards white's
exposed position and retarded development obliged him to resolve his problems by drawing.
§˜ž¯¨³ 1. d3 e5 9. Nxb7 Bxb7 ³
2. Nd2 d5 10. Bxb7 Nbd7
”“¹“”“ 3. Nb3 Nf6 11. Bxa8 Qxa8
”­—¹“”“
˜ 4. Bd2 Be7 12. f3 c4 ˜
–”” 5. g3 O-O 13. Rc1 Rc8 ”
 6. Bg2 c5 14. b3 dxe2 
“’ 7. c4 dxc4 15. Qxe2 cxb3 ‘‘’
8. Na5 cxd3 16. Rxc8+ Qxc8
‘’‘’›’ 17. axb3 Qb7
ª’
¦ª²–¤ ²–¤

Game 78: White plays Dv4x5B" with a center challenge. Heavy exchanges occur during and
after the opening. White loses right to castle, but maintains equality and has an active position.
White was able to overcome his opponent later in a long and difficult four rooks endgame.
§ž¯³¨ 1. d3 e5 9. Bxf3 Qxd1+ §¨³
2. e4 Nc6 10. Bxd1 Be6
”“”¹“”“ 3. Ne2 Nf6 11. Bd2 h5
”“”¹“”
˜ 4. Nd2 d5 12. Bc3 h4 
” 5. Ng3 Be7 13. Nf5 Bxf5 ‘
‘ 6. Be2 Nd4 14. exf5 e4 “”
—– 7. Nf3 dxe4 15. Be2 Nd5 ’
8. dxe4 Nxf3+ 16. Bd4 Nf4
‘’‘›’‘’ 17. g3 Nxe2
‘’‘°’’
¦ª²¤ 18. Kxe2 O-O ¦¤

Game 83: Black's Dv4'5x6' responds to a bishop early attack, then strikes at the 3 pawn
center. Afterwards black goes for simplification, exchanging off several pieces, and causing some
damage to white's pawn structure. Black had a tough time of it later, but finally managed to draw.
§ž¯³¹¨ 1. d4 d6 9. Nc3 dxc4 §³¹¨
2. e4 e6 10. Bxc4 Nb6
”“”—”“ 3. c4 Nd7 11. O-O Nxc4
”“”“
”— 4. Nf3 Ne7 12. Qa4+ c6 “”
“ 5. Be2 Ng6 13. Qxc4 Bg4 ‘
‘’ 6. Bg5 f6 14. d5 Bxf3 ’—
• 7. Be3 d5 15. gxf3 Ne5 –
8. exd5 exd5 16. Qe2 Qd7
‘’›’‘’ 17. f4 Qg4+
‘’’’
¦•ª²¤ 18. Qxg4 Nxg4 ¦¤²
Playing the D-system 103

Game 85: Black responds to a bishop incursion, and then moves into the fianchetto variant
Dv7'8'Cx. Black finds good play later, threatening white's Q-side with his fianchetto, and later
winning two pawns by exploiting effectively the lines open for his bishop and rook.
§¯³¹¨ 1. e4 e6 9. Bxb6 axb6 ´¨
2. d4 d6 10. Bc4 Bg7
”“”˜“ 3. Nf3 Ne7 11. Qd3 Bxc4
“”­˜
˜”ž“” 4. Nc3 Nd7 12. Qxc4 Qd7 ””“”
 5. Bg5 h6 13. Qd3 f5 
‘ 6. Be3 Nb6 14. O-O fxe4 •
–• 7. d5 g6 15. Nxe4 Bxb2 ’ª•
8. dxe6 Bxe6 16. c3 Kd8
‘’‘’‘’ 17. Rab1 Rxa2
§¹’‘’
¦ª²›¤ ¤¤²

Game 84: Black plays Dv36'E with a late challenge in the center. Sharp exchanges follow
the opening, but black maintains the initiative, and finally takes a pawn. The game continued with
more exchanges and a quick entry to the endgame, where black always stayed in the lead.

§˜ž¯¨³ 1. c4 e6 9. h4 cxd4 §ž¯³


2. Nc3 Ne7 10. Nxd4 Nxh4
”“¹”“ 3. d4 d6 11. Bg4 f5
”“¹§”“
”“”— 4. Nf3 f6 12. exf5 exf5 ”
” 5. e4 Ng6 13. Bf3 Nxf3+ 
‘’‘ 6. Be2 Be7 14. Qxf3 Rf7 —–ª
–• 7. O-O O-O 15. Rad1 f4 –
8. Be3 c5 16. Bc1 Nd7
‘’›’‘’ 17. Bxf4 Nb6
‘’’‘
¦ª¤² 18. Qe4 Nxc4 ¤¤²

Game 88: Black's Dv3BxG plays right into a rook pawn attack, losing two moves, but later
striking against white's center and regaining lost time. Black advances the K-side pawns,
exchanges pieces, and succeeds in opening the white castle. The game ended in an early draw.
§ž¯³¹¨ 1. e4 e6 9. O-O Bd7 §¯³¨
2. d4 Ne7 10. b4 Nxd3
”“˜“”“ 3. h4 d6 11. Qxd3 Nc6
”“¹“
”“ 4. Nf3 Nd7 12. Rb1 Rc8 —”
˜‘ 5. Nc3 Ng6 13. Bf4 e5 ”“
‘ 6. h5 Ne7 14. Bg5 f6 ’‘
–›• 7. Bd3 c5 15. Be3 Bg4 –ª‘
8. dxc5 Nxc5 16. h6 Bxf3
‘’‘’‘ 17. hxg7 Bxg7
‘‘’
¦ª²¤ 18. gxf3 f5 ¤¤²
Game 89: Black's Dv4xBG draws a center pawn attack and exchange, and gains a pawn
quickly, when white is unable to find a forcing continuation. Black then consolidates his position
nicely, and is in excellent shape for the ensuing game, where he was able to win.
§ž¯³¹¨ 1. Nf3 d6 9. Bb5 Bxc5 §ž¨³
2. d4 Nd7 10. Qd2 O-O
”“”—“”“ 3. e4 e6 11. Rd1 Qe7
”¯“”“
—“ 4. c4 Ne7 12. O-O Nde5 ”““—
’ 5. Nc3 Nb6 13. Nxe5 Nxe5 
‘ 6. c5 dxc5 14. Be2 b6 ‘
–• 7. dxc5 Nd7 15. Bxc5 Qxc5 –¬
8. Be3 Nc6 16. Rc1 Qe7
‘’’‘’ 17. Qf4 Ng6
‘’›’‘’
¦ª²›¤ 18. Qg3 c6 ¦¤²

Game 95: White's Dv55xD"Dx includes a conventional center pawn challenge and an
unusual line with a queen exchange. Black tries to disrupt white's game after the opening,
sacrificing a piece for two pawns, but white survives his assault and went on to win handily.

§ž³¨ 1. d3 d5 9. Nc4 h4 ³¨¨


2. Nd2 e5 10. Ne4 h3
”“”¹“” 3. e4 Nc6 11. c3 hxg2
”“”¹“”
— 4. Ne2 Nf6 12. Bxg2 Be6 
—”“ 5. Ng3 h5 13. b4 Ndxb4 ž–
 6. exd5 Qxd5 14. cxb4 Nxb4 ˜•
‘– 7. Qf3 Be7 15. Ke2 O-O-O ‘
8. Qxd5 Nxd5 16. Nxe5 Nc2
‘’‘–’‘’ 17. Rb1 Bxa2
¦’›’
¦²›¤ 18. Rb2 Nd4+ °¤
19. Kf1 Bd5

By now the reader should have a better appreciation of the D-system and its relevance to
the Defense Game. Players of all levels are encouraged to stay within the D-system when they
play variants of the Defense Game. In this manner you will profit most from any improvisations
you make, taking note of the variants that you are playing, and how well they do versus different
adversary responses. With experience you should be able to select familiar variants that respond
more sharply to adversary play than does the Defense Game with its continuation lines.

The author hopes that the brief introduction to playing the D-system given here will
stimulate the interest of all readers to experiment with them. Try playing some of the variants
shown, and others in the D-system variants chapter and in the games section. Better yet, define
new openings of your own in the system, and carry them forward to victory!
Why Wasn't It Found Before? 105

10. Why Wasn’t It Found Before?

As with the discoveries of the Beginner's Game and the Center Game, the author was once
again amazed to discover yet another vast and completely new system for the chess opening.
How was it possible that such strong and valid systems had gone so long undiscovered? Surely
this was a terrible oversight in the natural progression of our understanding and mastery of the
game. The author likens this oversight to that of failing to discover several of the continents of the
earth until the present day. In fact, it's even worse, because while few people have the necessary
backing and experience to go on long expeditions, hundreds of millions of people have played
chess, and any of them could have discovered these new systems as easily as did the author.

The obvious reason for this failure is that our play in the chess opening has been purely
imitation. Most players seem to have accepted tacitly that the openings have already been
thoroughly researched, and that the best anyone can do is to imitate the established lines. That
almost all players repeat as best they can the known lines still seems a strange, given that in the
rest of the game everyone is completely on his own. Imitation rather than innovation has always
characterized any traditional activity, but often to its detriment. Starting with the premise that it
was possible to find something new, the author discovered three new and completely valid
systems for playing chess that, placed together, are as vast as all of existing opening practice.

Aside from our error in imitating rather than thinking for ourselves, fault has to be laid with
the whole world of chess, for doing so little to make the opening accessible for beginners. The
style of playing chess used by the best players has always been proposed for those learning to
play or trying to improve. But the type of play used by the best players is not at all similar to that
used by everyone else. Top players have developed an ability to visualize the chessboard as it
appears after many moves, and so they can analyze in depth. Lesser players don't have this
capability to any real extent; in general they can't see anything more than just a few moves away.

The result is that lesser players are not even capable of understanding, much less of
imitating, master level play, and so it's not a practicable approach to tell them to try to do so. The
insight and intuition necessary to play chess at master level is out of the reach of most players.
You can't imitate what you don't understand, and no one should be optimistic about finding
brilliant combinations when he has almost no capacity to think forward on the chessboard.

What was needed instead were systems of play that lesser players can understand and
play well, systems that naturally develop into positions that are easier to scan and do not require
the depth of analysis that is needed to play chess the way it has been played until now. All the
systems invented by the author are simple to play in the opening, but the Defense Game is
certainly the best of the lot, because it is easy to play the whole game! With this new system
everyone can play decent chess the entire game, and have good chances of drawing against
players far stronger than themselves. This is something very significant for the future of chess.

A analogy that the author likes to use is that of chess with music. If you sit a beginner at
the piano, tell him that he should play any notes, and then ask him to make an improvisation, you
can only expect that most horrendous cacophony imaginable. If on the other hand you tell him to
limit his choice of notes to a major scale, the result will be better, but still not very melodic. But if
you teach him a five note blues scale, not only will he be able to make fair improvisations in short
order, soon he will also be able to play along with any music he hears, and sound reasonably
good. When his choice of notes is more limited, he understands more quickly, and develops a
basis for improvisation, that is a true start towards the development of real competence.

Now in chess we have the equivalent of what the blues was in music - something simple,
that everyone can play. While classicists will lament the vulgarization of their exalted and complex
art forms, the general public will probably be delighted to learn that chess, like music, is not at all
difficult to master in this simpler form. Soon they will be showing more appreciation for the music
coming from next door than for that coming from the high altar. There's more music being made
today using basic blues than there is based on classical forms, and in the near future we can
expect the same shift of tastes in chess. Philosophically speaking, people who are free to choose
will eventually prefer something that they can understood and master to something they cannot.

Other arguments on why these chess opening systems were not found before are given in
'The Beginner's Game.' These are listed in summary form here
! Play in the opening was mostly imitation, even for players who knew only a few moves.
! The most aggressive opening moves have always been preferred, eg. e4 or d4.
! Opening moves have always been preferred which react closely to adversary play.
! The object of opening play for both sides was control of the center.
! Play in the opening aimed at obtaining any advantage, however slight.
! Practically no one was looking for new ways of playing the opening.
! There was little interest in using systems playable for both white and black.
! The less aggressive opening moves (such as e3 and d3) were particularly neglected.
! The few master level players who experimented with openings still played aggressively.
! Chess playing programs used their openings books, and so did not innovate.
! Even without openings books computers would not have discovered these new systems.

The Defense Game is one of the best openings in chess largely because it is free of many
of the preconceptions and prejudices of the past. it avoids conflict, shuns exchanges and
simplifications, and does not attempt to produce any advantage. Not only is it completely free of
psychological factors, it is virtually independent of, and largely uninfluenced by, adversary play.
It is capable of confronting even the most aggressive adversary responses, while remaining
within a structure for play that even beginners can master quickly and use effectively.

The intent is neither to bury classical chess nor to praise it. Classical openings have
evolved from the simpler style of early days to the positional play of recent years. At the end of
this long road we have found the Beginner's, Center, and Defense Games. This is a great advance
in the evolution of chess practice, especially for average players, who should now be able to
confront even the strongest adversaries without fear of being torn apart in the opening moves.
Why Wasn't It Found Before? 107

No reference is made in this book to any of the known openings, and minimal reference to
the players that invented or used them. Nor are there any examples taken from the rare games of
others who played D-system openings; all the games reported here were played by the computer,
or by the author. Here many readers will object, arguing that all that anyone can do is add to the
existing knowledge, and that this is best done by referring to what has already been agreed and
documented. But this argument is not valid in the present case, for several reasons.

The standard opening and the close variants are completely new, and even the distant
variants are virtually unknown in the current practice of chess. The D-system contains no lines of
the well known conventional openings. Extremely few games taken from conventional play
respect the D-system rules, and these rules are definitely not in conformity with the guidelines for
opening play expounded in virtually every book ever written on chess. The Defense Game and the
D-system are as radically different from conventional chess theory and practice as can be
imagined. You could say that they are ideologically opposed to classical chess.

All of the openings described in this system are eight moves deep. This results in the least
possible overlap with any existing openings, systems, or nomenclatures that have been used to
date. Openings in the D-system that have ever been played before may be better described and
understood by relating them to this new system than to any previous one.

The Defense Game and the D-system were discovered by the author without referring to the
accumulated knowledge of the chess openings. No other player had any influence on him in
making this discovery. The few players who have used openings in the D-system obviously have
not recognized the full extent or significance of the system. Few of them used the same openings
with white and black, or with different move sequences, both key aspects of play in the D-system.

To date, the author has not found games on record in which the standard opening or its
close variants were played. A handful of distant variants have been played, but they are extremely
rare (a few games in 100,000). Those instances were mostly with black, and from recent years, by
players of different master levels. The few players who tested this approach to opening play
abandoned it quickly; probably their impression was that it was too passive.

Rare and isolated occurrences should not detract from the serious and authentic claims to
the discovery of the Defense Game and its related system of variants. Never before has there
been any real familiarity with or understanding of this vast and powerful new system for playing
chess, nor a suitable announcement of it to the world. It is one thing to pass along a new pathway
and notice something glittering on the ground. It is quite another to dedicate a good portion of
one’s life to working there, mining and refining the precious matter hidden below, and then
bringing it back to town, minted into coin whose value anyone can recognize.
11. How the Defense Game Was Found

The Defense Game was discovered by the author alone, unassisted by other persons, or
special chess playing programs, and without reference to the chess literature or previously played
games. It is completely original, not based on or even similar to, other openings used to date.

The chess opening is probably the most researched subject of all time, so nothing could be
more surprising than finding something completely new, making a pristine discovery. Here in the
midst of the incredible complexity of the chess opening was a simple arrangement that even a
small child could reproduce with ease. It was perfect in shape, proved very hard to break, and
had sharp cutting edges: it was a true jewel, something unique, of great and everlasting beauty.

The Defense Game was discovered by the author following the publication of 'The
Beginner's Game' and 'The Center Game'. It resulted from an attempt by the author to define a
new opening system related to both these two new and powerful systems. The original idea was
to find a third system that was 'between' the other two, in the sense that it shared moves of each
but was still recognizably distant from each of them.

The first effort to find a new opening was tried with the moves d3 and e3 (with white) of
both Beginner's and Center Games, then the knight moves Nd2 and Ne2 of the B-game, followed
by the pawn moves a3 and h3 of the C-game, and later redeploying the knights with Nb3 and Ng3.
This trial opening soon proved to be too passive and vulnerable, and was discarded after only a
few games. The next attempts left out the rook pawn advances a3 and h3, and proved to be much
better. When the bishop placements Bd2 and Be2 were added, the Defense Game was born.

The new Defense Game soon showed to be extremely easy to play, because it had a
relatively small set of good lines. In the first experiments, the new opening began to hold its own
against a variety of classical defenses. It was already demonstrating strong resilience to
adversary play, the main characteristic sought by the author in all his research on chess. It
definitely merited further research.

Significant discoveries are rarely lucky finds. If you are not actively looking for something
definite, even if you stumble on an important find you may not recognize it at all. The author found
the Beginner's Game and the Center Game and their related systems only because he was actively
looking for them. When the Defense Game was first composed, the author quickly recognized its
high degree of independence to adversary play, as had the other two systems. The Defense Game
was not a lucky find, and that’s the way it should be, because chess is a game of skill, not of luck.

The Defense Game showed early on to be tough defensively: in the first games played it
was able to shut down any adversary attack, and was never put in serious difficulty. The key to its
resistance was its extremely solid center, but also its flanks proved quite resistant. The adversary
seemed at a loss for finding ways to attack after the opening. He rarely attempted any attack in the
center - this seemed to be one of the least promising approaches. Most often he was content to
How It Was Found 109

trade off pieces, or close the pawn structure and wait. Early experiments were limited to playing
with black, so provided early confirmation of the validity of the system for white as well.

The previously invented B-system and C-system generally did not respect conventional
guidelines for opening play, and the Defense Game was also radically opposed to them. The
recessed pawn structure and the knight replacements were a completely new way of playing the
game of chess. A quick scan of the games databases revealed that practically no one had ever
even experimented with this approach to opening play: this was a new way of playing the game!

When the Defense Game was tested more extensively, the results were surprising indeed:
in spite of its apparent vulnerability to early attack, it was always able to defend adequately. The
seeming weaknesses of the opening could not be exploited easily by the opponent, who could do
little to disrupt opening play. These were important first tests of both its validity and strength.

Adversary responses to the Defense Game were invariably the same: 2 and 3 pawn
classical defenses and close variants. The limited range of reactions to the Defense Game was a
significant finding of early research, pointing not only to the validity of the opening, but also to its
potential optimality. If an optimal opening system exists, it probably has this characteristic, that it
provokes or constrains the adversary to play one of a limited number of standard responses.

A surprising finding emerging from early research was the aggressiveness of the Defense
Game. On defense it rarely conceded the adversary any piece placements on its side of the
board; the compact and resistant pawn structure and aggressive piece placements didn't allow
them. In most games there was no adversary penetration on our side of the board until the middle
game. There were the obvious challenges with the bishop and rook pawn early attacks, but all the
possible responses to these attacks proved acceptable. On our side play was rarely forced.

On offense, the Defense Game consistently showed an aggressive character. Following the
standard opening It almost always found good attacking lines, and quickly gained ground against
the adversary, who often lost several moves with his pieces adjusting to this new and unfamiliar
deployment. In the middle game it consistently controlled its share of the chessboard. All the
early research pointed to both the validity and the strength of the new system.

The author remained skeptical during experimentation, because the D-game seemed too
passive to be a solid candidate for inclusion in the collection of tried and true openings. In
particular, the apparent vulnerability to the bishop and rook pawn early attacks placed it in a
questionable light. All the possible refuting lines had to be thoroughly explored before beginning
to look at its performance along lines where it was not challenged in the opening moves.

Extensive experimentation with the Defense Game gradually began to wear away the
author's skepticism. In game after game played at master level, the opening piled up wins and
draws. With black results were truly impressive: this was a fighting defense! The quality of these
first games was excellent; each was a valid original contribution to chess.
Three months of continuous experimentation confirmed the validity of the Defense Game.
The opening did well against all the classical defenses, and had even less problems with custom
designed unconventional openings. All the possible responses were explored, and none were
found which could put the standard opening in real difficulty, or give any impression of being a
refuting line. The computer was main tool for this research, but only to test openings improvised
by the author. All the D-system openings were designed by the author, not the computer.

After playing several hundred games at master level, the author compiled the results. The
Defense Game had consistently won its share of games. With white, results were good; with
black, they were excellent. Most importantly, no defense or early attack was found which could
defeat the system in a series of games. Soon the Defense Game was worthy of presentation to the
entire world. It clearly merited a complete exposition in a book of its own. The selection of games
and drafting work began, using the format of the first two books.

The most remarkable thing about the D-game is the ease of play with this system. The
author has been able to draw many games against some of the world's best chess playing
programs, and increased his ELO rating about 200 points within a few weeks of adopting the
system. Ease of play of the D-game is the key to its success - many of the best lines for playing
the system are obvious. Everyone who tries the system should appreciate this, but they should
also see a dramatic improvement in their results in competition play.

The author is an amateur chess player who is in no sense an 'authority'. He enjoys chess,
but is not a master level player. Some readers may disparage this book because it was written by
an amateur, but this is unfair. Most serious players now make extensive use of chess playing
computers; using them even amateurs can do valid research and analysis, and make significant
discoveries. Games generated by computer are more likely to be correct than games between
humans. In any case top players frequently use lines suggested by computer analysis, and the
original content of master level games during opening play is typically quite small.

The Defense Game is not a just a curiosity to be filed away in the literature on irregular
openings. It is a new approach to playing chess, with the potential to change the entire practice
of the game. Based on a standard configuration that can almost always be played, and a
constellation of variants closely related to it, the Defense Game, like the Beginner's Game and the
Center Game before it, is another of the perfect jewels of chess. You can only marvel at its
simplicity and beauty, which like chess itself, is eternal. The author hopes that the amazement this
discovery must provoke in others will inspire them to use their own ability to think for themselves,
which is the only way that we can rise above our limitations, and gain true mastery of our lives.
Can It Be Refuted? 111

12. Can It be Refuted? Is It Optimal?

The singular properties of the Defense Game and the positive results using it in play at
master level make these two questions quite serious indeed. Of course we must start by trying to
answer the first question, whether the Defense Game can be refuted. All serious chess players
will certainly try their best to do so, and we can expect that in the period following the
announcement of this system there will be widespread and concerted efforts to overturn it. But it
is improbable that this system will ever be refuted, for a number of good reasons.

There are many possible ways of playing the opening moves. If some of these sequences
prove to be problematic, we can use other sequences instead. In this respect the Defense Game
is less likely to be refuted than conventional openings, with strict or limited move orderings.

Experimentation doesn’t support the conjecture. In hundreds of games played at master


level, there have been very few in which the Defense Game was in any real difficulty during or
after the opening. Serious problems were seen only where the continuation of the opening was
badly misplayed. No adversary opening has yet been found which could consistently win from
the same opening positions, and most of the best defenses and early attacks have been tried.

All games seen to date demonstrate the difficulty of attacking this opening. The defense is
so compact and coherent that it resists all attacks. There are practically no weaknesses that can
be exploited. Even if some lines are found where serious weaknesses can be provoked, strong
responses will be found: there are always other sequences of the standard opening that counter
effectively, or we can move into one of the large number of variants.

The D-system close variants are all extremely strong. Further research will determine which
of them are strongest in the context of particular adversary responses. The distant variants add a
large number of lines, which retain the basic character of the system. All of this insures that the
D-system should be able to resist any opposing play, while remaining close to its main lines.

On the offense, there is always a range of options present. The open field in front of the
position makes almost all the pawn moves playable. The pieces all have relocation squares, and
are ideally placed to support the pawn advances, which can be made on any front. Various queen
placements and castling options exist as well. The attacking potential of the Defense Game has
been demonstrated in the games played with it. It seems to be a natural consequence of the
standard opening that it can always uncoil into powerful attacks.

Certainly some D-systems openings will prove useful only in defined contexts, because
they contain forward placements that can’t always be supported, or because other members in the
system are more effective along given lines. The main lines of the Defense Game are almost
certainly the most generally playable of the D-system openings. But most of the openings in this
new system should prove valid against most lines of adversary play, and the entire D-system is
worthy of inclusion in a revised compendium of chess openings. In summary, it is highly unlikely
that the Defense Game, and most of its variants in the D-system will ever be refuted.
Optimality:

There are various possible definitions of optimality. The strong definition is that it is
always possible to win or draw using the opening. If an optimal solution in this sense is found, it
constitutes in effect a solution to the game of chess. Optimality in this sense is extremely hard to
prove, given the immense number of possible games, even from advanced starting positions. A
simpler, operational definition would be that the opening results in the largest percentage of wins
(and draws) in games at master level between players with similar ratings.

If an optimal opening according to the strong definition does exist, it is likely to have the
characteristics of the Defense Game. Principal among these is use of the same opening for black
and white, and the ability to confront any adversary with a standard deployment. The existence of
a small and well defined set of related variants, such as the variants of the D-system, would also
likely be a part of an optimal system. These variants offer flexibility in responding to those few
situations in which an adversary could develop a significant advantage.

General playability of a standard set of opening moves may be considered an indicator of


possible optimality, but the real question is of course, what happens after the opening. Here a
candidate for optimality must show superior ability on offense and on defense. Experience in play
to date with the Defense Game strongly supports its validity, but can only hint at optimality.

The author had suggested the optimality of the Beginner’s Game and the Center Game; for
the Defense Game the conjecture arises again, with different prospects for success. There are
some factors which enhance its prospects, and others which diminish them. During the opening,
the Defense Game can be attacked, and these represent possible refutation lines. The Defense
Game also has a more restricted set of lines than do the other two opening systems. But this can
also work in its favor, because it is easier to demonstrate validity of a smaller number of lines. The
author believes that the Beginner's Game and Center Games have better chances of eventually
proving to be optimal however, because in general they develop more complex positions.

A true test of strong optimality would require the compilation of millions of games, with
extensive research into lines that put the standard opening in difficulty. The vast majority of
these games could be generated by computer, but still with significant human participation. The
Defense Game was not found by a computer, and the best defenses to it may not be found by a
computer either. A real test of strong optimality can only be done with massive experimentation;
but even a limited experiment would furnish an excellent indication of operational optimality.

With highly specialized chess playing programs alone we should be able to come very
close to a definitive response to the question of strong optimality. The participation of many
experts would still be necessary: not only expert players, but also designers and analysts capable
of modifying and improving these programs. Any competent group that decides to dedicate
themselves to this research will certainly find a receptive audience for their findings.
Can It Be Refuted? 113

With even a modest amount of organization, it should be possible to collect and build
databases of games generated by players of this system. The chess playing community could be
enlisted to research advanced positions, and submit results for compilation. Using large game
databases, we can identify problematic lines, and begin pruning the move trees. With the
participation of a large number of interested persons, it should be possible to obtain a very
reliable response to the question of strong optimality.

Because the entire process is one of gradually approaching absolute certainty, research
into the optimality of the Defense Game may go on for many years. And if the final answer is
affirmative, it doesn’t mean the end of chess, or even the end of chess as it has been played until
the present. It does mean the end of the real competition between humans and computers. They
will finally be unbeatable, as has always been predicted. But this shouldn’t conceal the triumph of
the human over the computer, because most of the moves of their lookup game will have been
taught to them by humans. Moreover it was humans who designed, built, and programmed them!

The author ventures the following odds on the possible results of strong optimality:
! White can always win or draw: about 1/8
! Black can always win or draw: about 1/8

In all this discussion we have not considered what is probably the best practical definition
of optimality: that the greatest number and variety of players can adopt the system and
immediately improve their game. Under this definition the Defense Game is definitely optimal!

The X3 series Experiments

The author ran a controlled experiment with the Defense Game and D-system to see how
strong it is. A series of 100 games was generated, played by the computer from the ninth move
onwards, using different ‘personalities’. Most games used classical defenses, invented by the
computer. A small minority of games used strong custom defenses such as those presented
previously, invented by the author. Both sides had equal computing time of 45 minutes.

The results of this experiment are good: the Defense Game won 39% and drew 29% of the
games. Wins with black were almost as frequent as with white, whereas white showed a higher
percentage of draws. The first impression from reading these results is that this is definitely a
fighting system for black, and most probably a drawing system for white. Other experiments
showed that, using the D-system, anyone can play at master level thru the first 10 moves, and has
a reasonable chance of maintaining equality thru 15 moves. With this system even beginners can
play well enough in the opening to make the game interesting for any opponent, however skilled.

Although far too limited to be a serious indicator of how well the Defense Game will
perform in practice at master level, these experiments should nevertheless serve to arouse our
interest. Not only have we found the easiest and probably one of the best systems ever for
playing the opening, we may well have found an optimal way of playing the game of chess.
13. What Happens Now to Chess?

Unless extensive analysis and experience in play refutes this new system, or proves it to be
inferior, it is almost certain that the game of chess will never be the same as before, or even
anything like it. If this new system proves valid and strong in play, as the author believes it will,
then it definitely has the potential to change dramatically the entire practice of chess.

Regardless of the evaluation that master level players will finally condescend to give it, this
system has already found a niche in chess, at the amateur level. Here it will certainly survive and
prosper, because it is by far the easiest way of playing the opening that has ever been found.
With this system any beginner can play correctly not only in the opening but during the entire
game. When complemented with modest middle game and endgame skills, the Defense Game
becomes the quickest route ever found to what can be called true mastery of the game of chess.

Another niche where the Defense Game will certainly thrive, and find many enthusiastic
practitioners, is in speed chess. In games of 15 minutes or less, this system should prove to be a
stellar performer. The main component in its favor is again the ease of opening play, but also the
limited nature of typical responses. The combination of the two allows blitz players to quickly
master a number of strong lines which will surprise and confound the adversary, and help them
gain an important psychological edge with rapid and incisive play during and after the opening.

Beginners and lesser intermediate players should be easy converts to the Defense Game:
for it is the quickest route to playing well, and one of the few systems allowing them to survive for
more than a few moves against superior opponents. Better players will be more difficult to
convince, but as they face these openings more often, they will learn not only how to play against
them, but how to play with them. As their initial curiosity in the novel system grows to a deep
appreciation, more and more good players will try it, in casual play at first, then in competition.

Most advanced players will be reluctant converts, because they have made tremendous
efforts to master their current games and push their way up using them. But current openings do
not work against this new system, and like it or not, they are moving into a completely different
practice of opening play. The lines they wish to pursue against it are rich in possibility, so every
top player can have his own novel defense. We can expect to see plenty of tough chess against
the Defense Game, and certainly there will be many top players who will relish bringing it down.
But even the best players should finally appreciate that there is no easy way to stop the D-system.

Given the impact the new system will make on chess, it is likely to divert the interest of
analysts. The Defense Game and its related system is an very fertile field for original research.
The strongest defenses to confront them have to be found, and the sharpest lines explored.
These defenses will be strong in the hands of superior players. But where skills are evenly
matched, the new system should begin to show a positive balance of outcomes.

In chess, as in most difficult games, better players usually win, and that formula doesn’t
change with the introduction of a new opening, however strong it is. So the best players with
What Happens Now to Chess? 115

their well known classical openings will probably remain at the top for a long time. Eventually
some champions will come forward from the increasing ranks of good players already using the
system regularly. Maybe some of them will have learned to play chess with the Defense Game!

Can we say adieu to classical chess? Not at all: it will continue to live and thrive. But it will
gradually be less practiced, first by beginners, then by occasional and club players, and finally by
the top players. Will the new chess be better or worse than the old chess? In the opinion of the
author it will be much better. It will be better because it will be more accessible: there is no
reason now why anyone cannot learn quickly to play reasonably well. There should be a surge in
new players, and so an increase in interest in the game as played at championship levels. Even
top players holding out against the new system will benefit from all the new interest in the game.

The new chess will also be better because the quality of games resulting from play with this
system is superior. All of the games the author has seen with the Defense Game and the
D-system are very interesting; many of them are superb. These openings give rise naturally to
highly complicated positions that encourage the most brilliant combinations and tactical play.

Another principal improvement will be that more games will be close, between players of
differing skill levels. When in the past could a beginner offer an interesting game to an expert
player? Many potentially interested people have turned away from chess after a few humiliating
experiences of being badly beaten. The better player is often bored or arrogant, making
everything worse. Most people don’t react well to failure, especially when it reflects on their
intelligence. But anyone who plays well can feel satisfied, even in defeat. This is very important.

Chess is fascinating, even exciting, to those interested in it, but it is incredibly boring to
those who aren’t. A little compassion for non-players goes a long way. What is the interest of
sitting in silence for hours hunched over a board? Life is to be lived, not contemplated. Now
even those with a justified aversion to chess can learn quickly to play reasonably well, and so
begin to share your passion for the game. Your whole world will brighten up if you spend more
time with your loved ones and less in the isolation of a pastime they cannot appreciate.

Chess has always been a predominately male pursuit. Wives, daughters, sisters, and
girlfriends take note: you can gain the respect of someone close to you by learning to play. In the
process maybe you can help them understand that all games, and life in general, should be fun.
Chess is also famous for attracting and producing introverts, lost in this interior world. There is
too often a somber atmosphere to the game, imposed by those who take it too seriously. So what
if you lose - set the pieces up again! Reintroduce the human element into the game: lighten up,
enjoy yourself, laugh when you lose, and do something else occasionally than play chess.

The world of chess should recognize that this totally new system is valid and strong.
Finally the game of chess is accessible to all; never again should beginners and lesser players be
humiliated in the opening moves of the game. Good chess playing is now within the reach of
everyone, not just a select few with the perseverance to study and master the arcane world of
opening theory. Now everyone can play good chess - power to the people!
14. Games Section

Now we propose a large collection of complete games. In all games the author played the
D-system opening to at least eight moves. After that, unless otherwise noted, the computer
played both sides until the conclusion. In all games the computer played at top strength, and was
given one and a half hours computing time, with equal time for each side. Games have been
analyzed to insure they are free from serious errors, and that lines chosen by both sides
consistently from among the most promising. The quality of play overall is at the master level.

These are excellent chess games, but they are not really a careful selection. They were
taken from a series of less than 250 generated games. The intention of this compilation is
principally to document the variety of openings in the system, and some of the best defenses,
especially the classical ones. Many of these games may prove to contain best lines for playing
the D-system, but in general they should be considered as first experiments with the system.

Only wins and draws are presented in this collection. Of course there were losses, and
many of them are quite interesting and instructive. The author is not proposing strategies for the
adversary however: finding best defenses to the Defense Game and other D-system openings is
left to the imagination and analytical skills of all readers.

The collection presents a variety of openings. There are many Defense Games, Containing
at least six standard moves, but with various continuations, some of which are responses to early
attacks. Then there are many games with close variants, also containing at least 6 of the standard
moves, but with introduced moves figuring in the first six. There is also a good selection of
distant variants, which include only four or five moves of the standard opening. Games are
ordered by the distance of the variants that are played.

Games are reported on one page each, with a brief text outline giving highlights of each.
Six diagrams per game are shown, presenting snapshots of the ongoing contest. Better players
should be able to follow most of the action from these diagrams alone. In all games the position
of the board after eight moves each side is shown. Afterwards, diagrams show the progress of
the game at intervals, trying to catch some of the more interesting moves. Diagrams are labeled
with the move about to be made. Asterisks in the move lists flag the corresponding diagrams.

There are a large number of openings in the D-system; this collection only attempts to
document some of the interesting ones. It is just an introduction to the system; the variants
presented here still have to be tested more thoroughly in order to firmly establish their validity.
Hopefully this collection of games will stimulate the interest of all readers to research the
D-system openings, and by using them in competition help to establish their rightful places in the
openings pantheon.
Games Section 117

Openings in the D-system give rise to highly positional games. Most have a series of
exchanges soon after the opening, but resulting in no material gain for either side. A fairly
complex middle game then follows in which superior combinatorial skills are needed in order to
obtain any advantage. Many games remain balanced until relatively late in the game, while others
are characterized by sacrifice of material in exchange for superior position.

The Defense Game and the D-system openings generally evolve from positional struggles
and simplify quickly with rapid exchanges, often reaching the endgame by the 30th move. To
succeed with this system, you must develop a feel for finding the best continuations from your
chosen initial deployment, and a natural intuition of how best to exchange off the pieces. You
usually do not need to find brilliant combinations in order to play this system well however; it is
usually sufficient to concentrate on solid defense, maintain equality materially, and strive to
obtain slight positional advantages that can be decisive in the endgame.

Even with an easy to play system like the Defense Game, master level games can be hard to
follow for lesser skilled players. Master level games challenge your ability to follow and
understand the moves chosen. This book makes an important step towards making chess
accessible for everyone, especially the chess opening, but it cannot make the game simplistic.
The beginner's level strategy for drawing with the Defense Game is easy to understand and
imitate, but master level play with the D-system is far more complex. If you want to play chess at
master level you must work hard and develop your skills. Playing thru games in this collection
will help you acquire a feel for correct and incisive play, and help develop your mastery of chess
in the middle and endgames, where the contest is usually decided.

As with any collection, readers should look for games of special interest and play them
first. But all of these games are worthy of review; they are all good examples of play within the
D-system, and each one you work thru and understand will help you on the road to complete
mastery of the game of chess. Find those that appeal and .. attack!
Game 21: Defense Game Dv0 with White
White's Dv0 triumphs over a 3 pawn custom opening (9) in an interesting display of tactical chess.
After a few opening trades black abandons his rook pawn for the attack (15), and finds a good
continuation (25), but not enough to equalize. White is then able to find the right moves (34,39) to
win in a tricky bishop and pawn endgame. The Defense Game is definitely one tough opening!

§ž¨³ 1. d3 d5 33. cxb4 Ke7 


2. e3 e5 34.* d5 Kd6
”“”¹”“ 3. Ne2 f5 35. dxc6 Bxc6
›ž´”“
—¯˜ 4. Nd2 Nf6 36. Ba6 Kc7 “
“”“ 5. Nb3 Nc6 37. g4 Kb6 
 6. Bd2 Be7 38. Bd3 g5 ’’
•‘’– 7. Ng3 O-O 39.* Bxh7 Kb5 
8. Be2 Qd6 40. Ke3 Kxb4
‘’‘›’‘’ 9.* O-O f4 41. Kd4 Bf3
²‘’
¦ª²¤ 10. Nh5 Nxh5 42. Bf5 Kb5 
9. O-O 11. Bxh5 fxe3 43. Ke5 Kc5 34. d5
12. fxe3 Rxf1+ 44. Kf6 Kd6
§³ 13. Qxf1 Be6 45. Kxg5 Ke7 
14. Qe2 a5 46. Kg6 Bg2
“”¹”“ 15.* a4 Rf8 47. h4 Kf8 “
—¯ž 16. Nxa5 Nxa5 48. Kf6 Bf3 ´ž
”“”› 17. Bxa5 Bg5 49. g5 Bh5 ”
‘ 18. Bc3 d4 50. Be6 Bf7 ’‘
19. exd4 exd4 51. Bg4 Bd5
•‘’ 20. Bd2 Bxd2 52. h5 Ke8
›
’‘ª‘’ 21. Qxd2 Bd7 53. h6 Be4 ²’
¦² 22. a5 Rf5 54. Bf5 Bxf5 
15..Rf8 23. Bf3 Rb5 55. Kxf5 Kf7 39. Bxh7
24. c4 dxc3 56. g6+ Kg8
25.* bxc3 Rxa5 57. Ke6 Kh8
³ 26. Rxa5 Qb6+ 58. Kf6 Kg8
“”ž”“ 27. d4 Qxa5 59. g7 Kh7
¯ 28. Bxb7 Qa1+ 60. Kf7 Kxh6
’§ 29. Kf2 c6 61. g8=Q Kh5
 30. Qc2 Qa5 62. Qg3 Kh6
31. Qb3+ Kf8 63. Qh4#
’‘› 32. Qb4+ Qxb4
¬‘’
¦²
25..Rxa5
Defense Games 119

Game 22: Defense Game Dv0 with Black


Black's standard D-game faces the 3 pawn standard classical opening (9). White offers a pawn,
with a dangerous attack ensuing (11), but black is able to consolidate and retain the pawn (20). In
the face of an immanent K-side pawn storm white tries for counter play (31), but black keeps the
lead, trading down to a comfortable endgame, and even offering a piece (48) to move things along
quickly. Though they seem vulnerable, D-game knight placements have proved to be quite good.
§¯³¨ 1. e4 e6 32. Rxd7 Rxd7 ´¨
2. d4 d6 33. Qxf6 Qxf6
”“”ž¹“”“ 3. c4 Ne7 34. Bxf6 gxh4
”§
˜”“— 4. Nc3 Nd7 35. Bxh4 Kb7 ”­””
 5. Nf3 Ng6 36. Re7 Rxe7 —”
‘’‘ 6. Be3 Be7 37. Bxe7 Nd5 ’’
–›• 7. Bd3 Nb6 38. Bf8 h5 ª
8. O-O Bd7 39. g3 a5
‘’’‘’ 9.* c5 Nc8 40. Kg2 Kc6
’‘
¦ª¤² 10. Qb3 b6 41. Kf3 Kb5 ¤¦²
9. c5 11.* c6 Bxc6 42. Ke4 Kc4 31. Bb2
12. d5 Bd7 43. f3 a4
§—¯³¨ 13. dxe6 Bxe6 44. Bh6 b5 
14. Bb5+ Bd7 45. Bc1 b4
””ž¹“”“ 15. Nd4 c5 46. g4 hxg4 
””“— 16. Nc6 Qc7 47. fxg4 a3 
’ 17. Nd5 Qb7 48.* g5 Kb3 —’
’‘ 18. Ncxe7 Ncxe7 49. Kxd5 a2 ”³°
19. Nxe7 Nxe7 50. Bf4 a1=Q
ª–›• 20.* Rad1 O-O-O 51. Be5 Qb1
”
‘’’‘’ 21. Bxd7+ Rxd7 52. Ke6 Qg6+ 
¦¤² 22. Rfe1 d5 53. Bf6 Kc2 
11. c6 23. exd5 Nxd5 54. Ke5 b3 48..Kb3
24. Bc1 f6 55. Kf4 Kd3
25. a3 Rhd8 56. Kg4 Ke4
§³¨ 26. Qh3 Kb8 57. Kg3 Qf5
”­ž˜“”“ 27. Qf3 g5 58. Bd4 Qf3+
”” 28. h4 h6 59. Kh2 Qg4
›” 29. b4 cxb4 60. Be5 Kf3
‘ 30. axb4 Qc6 61. Bg3 Qxg3+
31.* Bb2 Nxb4 62. Kh1 Qg2#
ª
‘’’‘’
¤¤²
20..O-O-O
Game 23: Defense Game Dv0 with White
The author with white plays the D-game standard against black's 2 pawn classical opening with
rook pawn attack (9). White follows an easy line trying for simplification and black obliges (17). In
view of black's strong Q-side pawns white decides to exchange his knight for three pawns (24),
livening up a slow game somewhat. White trades rooks (32) and develops his promotion threat to
go a pawn up (46), but is not able to win in the pawn endgame. Close, but not quite enough!
§³¨ 1. e3 e5 37. b4 Kd6 ¨¨
2. d3 d5 38. c4 Bd4
“”¯“”“ 3. Nd2 Nc6 39. a4 Nf8
“”
—¹ž˜ 4. Nb3 Nf6 40. Ke2 Ne6 ¹³—”
”“” 5. Ne2 Bd6 41. a5 Ba7 ”
 6. Ng3 Be6 42. Kd3 Ng5 ‘‘
•‘’– 7. Be2 Qe7 43. f4 Ne6 ’‘’
8. Bd2 a5 44. f5 Nd4
‘’‘›’‘’ 9.* O-O a4 45. Bc3 Kc6
’‘°
¦ª²¤ 10. Nc1 O-O 46.* b5+ Kb7 ¤¦
9. O-O 11. a3 Rfd8 47. b6 Bb8 32..Rxd8
12. Re1 h6 48. Bxd4 exd4
§¨³ 13. Na2 Qd7 49. Kxd4 Bxg3 
14. Nh5 Nxh5 50. c5 Be1
”­˜“” 15. Bxh5 b5 51. Kc4 Bxa5 ¹“”
¹ž” 16. h3 Ne7 52. Kb5 Bc3 ³”
““” 17.* Bg4 Bxg4 53. c6+ Kc8 ’‘”‘
“› 18. Qxg4 Qxg4 54. Kc4 Be5 ‘˜‘‘
19. hxg4 c5 55. Kd5 f6
’‘’‘ 20. f3 Rab8 56. Ke6 Bd4
°’
•’‘’‘ 21. Nc3 c4 57. b7+ Kc7 
¦ª¦² 22. dxc4 dxc4 58. Kf7 Be5 
17..Bxg4 23. Rad1 b4 59. Kxg7 Kxc6 46. Kb7
24.* Nxa4 c3 60. Kxh6 Kxb7
25. Nxc3 bxc3 61. g5 Bf4
¨¨³ 26. Bxc3 Bc7 62. Kg6 Bxg5

˜“” 27. e4 Kf8 63.* e5 fxe5 ³
¹” 28. Kf2 Bb6+ 64. Kxg5 e4 ”°
” 29. Ke2 Ng6 65. Kf4 Kc6 ‘¹
“”“‘ 30. g3 Ke7 66. Kxe4 Kd6 ‘
31. Bb4+ Ke6 67. Kf4 Ke7
’–’‘ 32.* Rxd8 Rxd8 68. Kg5 Kf7 
’‘‘ 33. Rd1 Rxd1 69. f6 Kf8 
¤¦² 34. Kxd1 Bf2 70. Kg6 Kg8 
24. Nxa4 35. Be1 Bd4 71. f7+ Kf8 63. e5
36. c3 Bb6 72. Kf6 1/2-1/2
Defense Games 121

Game 24: Defense Game DvE with Black


Black plays DvE against an irregular opening by white (9). Black expands his position; white has
difficulty finding good lines, and finally sacrifices a pawn to open the game (17). Afterwards
black's extra pawn is a constant aggravation (26), requiring white to regroup and defend. Another
try for counterplay is sidelined by black's knight tour (37). The tension climaxes when black defers
recapture to push his pawn (44). White is unable to cover the multiple threats (53) and goes down.
§ž¯¨³ 1. b4 e6 29. Re1 Qc7 §³
2. Bb2 d6 30. Rbb1 b6
”“”¹“”“ 3. e3 Ne7 31. Rbc1 Qd7
“”“
˜”“— 4. Nc3 Nd7 32. Qc2 Qb7 ­”“—
 5. Nf3 Ng6 33. Re3 Rdc8 ¨ž‘
’’ 6. Be2 Be7 34. Qb1 Ra5 ‘
–’• 7. O-O O-O 35. Nd2 Qa6 ”–¦
8. d4 Nb6 36. Qa2 Bb5
‘‘›’‘’ 9.* Qd2 d5 37.* d5 Nf4
ª–’‘’
¦ª¤² 10. a3 Bd7 38. Qa1 Nd3 ¦²
9. Qd2 11. Rab1 Bd6 39. Rd1 Nb4 37..Nf4
12. Bd3 a6 40. Rg3 Nc2
§¨³ 13. Qe2 Qf6 41. Qa2 Nd4 §³
14. Rfd1 Rfd8 42. Ndb1 Bc4
“”ž¯“”“ 15. Na2 a5 43. Qd2 Ne2+ “”“
˜¹“— 16. b5 Qe7 44.* Nxe2 a2 ­”“
”‘“ 17.* c4 dxc4 45. dxe6 g6 ¨‘
’ 18. Bxc4 Nxc4 46. exf7+ Bxf7 ž‘
19. Qxc4 Bxa3 47. Na3 Rxa3
’›’• 20. Bxa3 Qxa3 48. Rxa3 Qxa3
”¦
•‘ª’‘’ 21. Nc3 c6 49. Ra1 Qb3 ¬•’‘’
¤¤² 22. e4 Rac8 50. Qe1 Qb2 •¤²
17. c4 23. Rb3 Qe7 51. Nf4 Rc4 44..a2
24. bxc6 Bxc6 52. Nd3 Qd4
25. Qd3 a4 53.* Rxa2 Qxd3
§¨³ 26.* Rb2 a3 54. f3 Qc3
³
“¯“”“ 27. Rb6 Ra8 55. Qxc3 0-1 ž“
ž“— 28. Qe2 Qd6 ”“
 
“’‘ §¯‘
–ª• •
¦’‘’ “’‘’
¤² ¦¬²
26..a3 53. Rxa2
Game 25: Defense Game Dv4' with Black
Black's Dv4' counters in response to a rook pawn attack (9), a response worth remembering.
Black gains a tempo with another counter attack (15), and after the exchange of minor pieces, is
able to win a pawn beginning (22). A long and tough queen and rooks endgame follows (35), but
black presses well (45,54), cleaning up white's pawns to insure the win. A very instructive game.
§ž¯³¨ 1. e4 d6 40. Qh5 R8f6 ¨³
2. d4 Nd7 41. Rd7 Rg6
”“”¹“”“ 3. Nc3 e6 42. Re2 Qc3
“¨”
˜“— 4. Nf3 Ne7 43. Rd1 Qg3+ ­”
“ 5. Be2 Ng6 44. Kh1 Rgf6 ¤
‘’‘ 6. O-O Be7 45.* Kg1 Rh4 
–• 7. Be3 Nb6 46. Qe8 Rxh3 ª‘
8. a4 d5 47. Qe4+ Rg6
’‘›’‘’ 9.* a5 dxe4 48. Rf2 Rh4 ‘²
¦ª¤² 10. axb6 exf3 49. Qf5 Qh2+ ¦
9. a5 11. bxc7 Qxc7 50. Kf1 Rg4 35..Qc2
12. Bb5+ Bd7 51. Re1 Qh1+
§¨³ 13. Qxf3 O-O 52. Ke2 Qh4 
14. Bxd7 Qxd7 53. Rc1 Re4+
”“­¹“”“ 15.* d5 Bb4 54.* Kd3 Ra4 “”³
“— 16. Bxa7 Bxc3 55. g4 Qxg4 ¨”
‘ 17. dxe6 fxe6 56. Qxg4 Rgxg4 ª
 18. Qxc3 Nf4 57. Rb1 Rg3+ ¨
–ª 19. Qf3 Qb5
20. Rfe1 Qxb2
58. Ke2 Re4+
59. Kf1 Re7
¯‘
’‘’‘’ 21. Qe4 Rac8 60. Rfb2 Rf7+ ¤‘
¦¤² 22.* Be3 e5 61. Ke2 Rc7 ¤²
15..Bb4 23. Bxf4 Rxf4 62. Kd2 Rcc3 45..Rh4
24. Qd5+ Rf7 63. Rxb7 Ra3
§¨³ 25. Rad1 Qxc2 64. Ke1 h5
26. Rxe5 Qxf2+ 65. R1b4 Rg2

“”“ 27. Kh1 Kh8 66. Kf1 Raa2 “”³
“ 28. h3 Rfc7 67. Rf4 Rh2 §”
 29. Qe4 Qf7 68. Kg1 Kh6 ª
ª˜ 30. Re1 Kg8 69. Rb6+ g6 §¯
31. Rf5 Qd7 70. Re4 Rag2+
 32. Rh5 h6 71. Kf1 Rc2 °
¯‘’‘’ 33. Rd5 Qc6 72. Kg1 Rhf2 ¦‘
¦¦² 34. Qd3 Rf8 73. Rbe6 Rg2+ ¦
22..e5 35.* Kh2 Qc2 74. Kf1 Rh2 54..Ra4
36. Qg3 Rcf7 75. Kg1 Rcg2+
37. Rd6 Kh7 76. Kf1 Rf2+
38. Re5 Rf3 77. Kg1 Rhg2+
39. Qg4 R3f4 78. Kh1 Rb2
Defense Games 123

Game 26: Defense Game DvE with Black


Black plays DvE against the 2 pawn standard classical defense (9). White offers a pawn for the
attack (12), but it backfires seriously when black counters (17). Even so white continues to press
for a long while afterwards (33), finally succeeding in regaining some lost material with a fork of
king and queen, but not enough to equalize. Black avoids subsequent forks (42) and cruises on
to victory. A good illustration of the resistance of the Defense game to center pawn attacks.
§ž¯¨³ 1. d4 e6 32. Nb6 Rb4 ¦
2. Nf3 Ne7 33.* Nd7 Kg6
”“”¹“”“ 3. e4 d6 34. Re1 Rxb2
”³
˜”“— 4. Nc3 Nd7 35. Nf8+ Kf7 §–““””
 5. Bd3 Nb6 36. Nxe6 Rxf2 ”­
’‘ 6. Be3 Ng6 37. Rd7+ Ke8 ¨
–›• 7. Qd2 Be7 38.* Nxg7+ Kxd7 
8. O-O O-O 39. Nxh5 Rf5
‘’‘¬’‘’ 9.* a4 a5 40. g4 Re5
’‘’
¦¤² 10. d5 c5 41. Nxf6+ Ke6 ¦²
9. a4 11. dxc6 bxc6 42.* Ne4 Ke7 33. Nd7
12.* e5 Nxe5 43. Kf2 a4
§ž¯¨³ 13. Nxe5 dxe5 44. Ke3 a3 ³
14. f4 exf4 45. Kd4 Re6
¹“”“ 15. Bxf4 Bc5+ 46. Kc3 Ra4 ¤”
˜“”“— 16. Be3 Nc4 47. Kb3 Rexe4 §“•””
” 17.* Bxc4 Qxd2 48. Rxe4+ Rxe4 ”­
‘‘ 18. Bxc5 Re8 49. Kxa3 Rxg4 
19. Ne4 Qxc2 50. Kb3 Rh4
–›• 20. Nd6 Rf8 51. Kc3 Rh3+

’‘¬’‘’ 21. Rf2 Qg6 52. Kd4 Kd6 ¨‘’
¦¤² 22. Raf1 h6 53. Ke4 c5 ¦²
12. e5 23. Rd2 Ba6 54. Kf4 c4 38. Nxg7+
24. Bxa6 Rxa6 55. Kg4 Rd3
25. Nc4 Rb8 56. Kf5 c3
§ž¯¨³ 26. Rd7 f6 57. Ke4 Rd5

“”“ 27. Rc1 Rb3 58. Kf3 c2 
““ 28. Rcd1 Qh5 59. h4 c1=Q §“³”
”¹ 29. Bf2 Rb4 60. Ke2 Qc3 ”¨
‘— 30. Rc1 Rxa4 61. Kf1 Rd2 •‘
31. Rd8+ Kh7 62. h5 Qa1#
–› 
’‘¬‘’ ’
¦¤² ¦²
17. Bxc4 42..Ke7
Game 27: Defense Game DvE with White
White plays DvE, as black builds the impressive 4 pawn standard custom defense (9). White foils
all his adversary's attempts at attacking later in the center (15). Black keeps trying, but in the
second wave of exchanges (21) he loses a pawn. The sequel is a tricky queen and rooks
endgame, where white improves his position (32) and wins another pawn. Afterwards white has
the necessary advantage to overpower black (36) and win (50). The D-game is tough enough!
§¯³¨ 1. d3 d5 35. Qe3 Rd3 ¨
2. Nd2 e5 36.* Qe6+ Qxe6
”“”“ 3. e3 c5 37. Rxe6 Rxb3
­³
—¹ž˜ 4. Ne2 f5 38. Rxg6+ Kf7 ““”
”“”“ 5. Ng3 Nf6 39. Rxc6 Rxb2 §
 6. Nb3 Nc6 40. h4 Rb5 ¤
•‘’– 7. Be2 Be6 41. f4 Rb2 ‘¬’
8. O-O Bd6 42. Kf2 Rd3
‘’‘›’‘’ 9.* Bd2 O-O 43. Rc7+ Ke6
’”’’
¦ª¤² 10. Nh5 Qc7 44. h5 Rd5 ¤²
9. Bd2 11. Nxf6+ Rxf6 45. h6 Rh5 32. Qe3
12. Nc1 e4 46. h7 Rh2+
§³ 13. g3 d4 47. Kg1 Rh5 ¨³
14. exd4 cxd4 48. Kg2 Kd6
”“¯”“ 15.* Bg5 Rff8 49. Rg7 Kc6 ¦
—¹ž¨ 16. Nb3 Rae8 50.* g4 Rh4 “ª¯“
“ 17. Qd2 h6 51. Kg3 Rh6 
”“ 18. Bf4 Kh7 52. Rg6+ Rxg6 
19. Bxd6 Qxd6 53. h8=Q Rb3+
‘’ 20. dxe4 fxe4 54. Kh4 Rd6
‘§’
‘’‘›’’ 21.* Bb5 d3 55. Qc8+ Kb6 ’”’’
¦–ª¤² 22. cxd3 Bxb3 56. Qb8+ Kc6 ¤²
15. Bg5 23. Bxc6 bxc6 57. Qxb3 Kc7 36..Qxe6
24. axb3 exd3 58. Qc3+ Kb7
25. Rxa7 Qd4 59. Qc5 Rh6+
§¨ 26. Ra4 Qd7 60. Kg5 Rc6

”“”³ 27. Qc3 Rd8 61. Rb1+ Kc7 ¦‘
—¯ž” 28. Re4 d2 62. Qe7+ Kc8 ³
› 29. Rd1 Rf5 63. Qe8+ Kc7 §
”“ 30. Qc2 g6 64. Qb8+ Kd7 ’
31. Qc3 Rd5 65. Rb7+ Rc7
•’ 32.* Qe3 Qf5 66. Qxc7+ Ke8 ’
‘’‘¬’’ 33. Re7+ Kg8 67. Rb8# ¨”°
¦¤² 34. Qxh6 Qf6 ¤
21..d3 50. g4
Defense Games 125

Game 28: Defense Game Dv1 with Black


Black plays Dv1, shutting down the Q-side rook pawn attack (9), then closing the center. Black
offers his Q-side pawns in exchange for a strong K-side attack (16). A solid rook sacrifice (23)
allows him equalize and take the initiative. In the endgame material is balanced, but white has a
passed pawn (33), so black brings the game to an early conclusion with perpetual check (44,50).
This game, like many others, shows the surprising capabilities of the D-game for counter attack.
§¯³¹¨ 1. d4 d6 29. d7 Qd2 §³
2. e4 Nd7 30. Qxe5 Qxd7
“”ž“”“ 3. Nf3 Nb6 31. Qxa5 h6
­“”
˜”“— 4. Nc3 Bd7 32. Qb4 Ra8 ”
” 5. Bd3 e6 33.* Ra1 Qd5 
‘’‘ 6. a4 a5 34. h3 Qa5 ‘¬
–›• 7. O-O Ne7 35. Qe4 Rd8 
8. Be3 Ng6 36. Rb1 Qc7
’‘’‘’ 9.* d5 e5 37. Qb4 Ra8
‘’
¦ª¤² 10. Qd2 Be7 38. Rd1 Qe5 ¦°
9. d5 11. Bxb6 cxb6 39. Qh4 Ra5 33..Qd5
12. Qe3 O-O 40. Qc4 Qe8
§­¨³ 13. Bb5 Bxb5 41. Rd4 Qe1+ ³
14. Nxb5 Qc8 42. Kh2 Qe5+
“¹“”“ 15. Qxb6 Nf4 43. g3 g6 “
¬– 16.* Nxd6 Qg4 44.* h4 Rxa4 “”
”‘” 17. Ne1 Qg6 45. Rd8+ Kg7 ¨¯
‘‘˜ 18. Nc4 Qxe4 46. Qxa4 Qe2+ ‘ª¦’
19. Ne3 Rac8 47. Kg1 Qe1+
• 20. Nd3 Rxc2 48. Kg2 Qe2+
’
’‘’‘’ 21. Qxb7 Re2 49. Kh3 Qf1+ ²
¦¤² 22. Rac1 Qxd3 50.* Kh2 Qe2+ 
16..Qg4 23.* Qxe7 Rxe3 51. Kg1 Qe1+ 44..Rxa4
24. fxe3 Ne2+ 52. Kh2 Qf2+
25. Kh1 Nxc1 53. Kh3 Qf1+
¨³ 26. Rxc1 Qxe3 54. Kh2 Qe2+
¦
¬“”“ 27. Rg1 Qd4 1/2-1/2 “´
 28. d6 Qxb2 “”
”‘” 
‘˜ ª’
­– ’
’§’‘’ ²
¦¤² ­
23..Rxe3 50..Qe2+
Game 29: Defense Game DvB' with Black
Black's DvB' responds to the rook pawn early attack (9). Black expands on the Q-side and wins
white's isolated rook pawn (18). After calmly adjusting his position, black opens a Q-side attack
(39,48), then begins slicing thru the white defenses (57,68), all the while defending neatly against
potential mating threats. By all standards of the game, truly a lovely victory for black.

§—¯³¹¨ 1. d4 e6 39.* Rf3 b4 ¯³


2. Nf3 Ne7 40. Qc2 bxc3
”“”ž“”“ 3. e4 d6 41. bxc3 Rb3
¹“”§
”“— 4. Nc3 Nd7 42. Qd2 Bb6 ž“
’ 5. Bd3 Nb6 43. Qa2 a5 ”“’“
’‘ 6. O-O Ng6 44. Nf1 Rh5 “’’
–›• 7. a4 Bd7 45. h4 Qb8 §’¤
8. a5 Nc8 46. Rh3 Bc7
’‘’‘’ 9.* a6 b6 47. Qe2 Rh7
ª’‘
¦ª¤² 10. Be3 Be7 48.* Bc1 Rb1 ¦•²
9. a6 11. Qd2 O-O 49. Qa2 Rxa1 48..Rb1
12. Bc4 c6 50. Qxa1 Bd8
§—¯¨³ 13. e5 d5 51. h5 a4 ³
14. Bd3 Bb4 52. Bf4 Be7
”ž“” 15. Bxg6 hxg6 53. h6 a3 ¹“’§
‘”““ 16. Qd3 c5 54. Bc1 Qb3 “
“’ 17. Ne2 c4 55. Re3 Qd1 “’“
¹“’ 18.* Qd1 Bb5 56. hxg7 Ba4 ž“’
19. c3 Ba5 57.* Qb1 Bg5
• 20. Qc2 Ne7 58. Qb4 Kxg7
”’¦
’‘•’‘’ 21. Rfd1 Qd7 59. Bxa3 Bc2 ’‘
¦ª¤² 22. Bg5 Bxa6 60. Qf8+ Kg6 ª­•²
18..Bb5 23. Ng3 Bb5 61. Qg8+ Rg7 57..Bg5
24. Nh4 Rac8 62. Qh8 Bxe3
25. Rf1 Nf5 63. Bf8 Bh6
¨³ 26. Ngxf5 gxf5 64. Bxg7 Bxg7

¯“”§ 27. Nf3 a6 65. Qh3 Bd3 “³
“ž“ 28. Rfe1 Ra8 66. Qg3+ Kh7 “¹
¹““’“ 29. Re2 Qc7 67. Qh3+ Bh6 “’“
“’ 30. Qb1 Rfe8 68.* g3 Qe1 “’
31. Re1 Reb8 69. Qg2 Qxc3
’¤– 32. Nd2 Kh7 70. f4 Qxd4+ ’ž’ª
’¬’‘’ 33. Qd1 Rh8 71. Qf2 Qxf2+ ’
¦² 34. Nf1 Kg8 72. Kxf2 c3 ­•²
39..b4 35. Ng3 Bc6 73. Ne3 d4 68..Qe1
36. Qe2 b5 74. g4 fxg4
37. Qd2 Rh7 75. Ng2 c2
38. Re3 Rb8 76. Ne1 c1=Q
Defense Games 127

Game 30: Defense Game Dv1 with Black


Black's Dv1 shuts down a rook pawn attack (9). White tries to build an offensive based on his
pieces in the center, but black dismantles it without complications (17). White sacrifices a pawn
temporarily to try another attack, but black covers everything easily (29), retaining the initiative
and threatening to clean up on the Q-side (35). Black drives for promotion (43), but white is able
to stop his opponent short of victory with an exchange sacrifice (50) and hold on for the draw.

§¯³¹¨ 1. d4 e6 38. g3 e4 ª¹


2. e4 d6 39. Qxe4 Qxb3
“”ž“”“ 3. Nc3 Ne7 40. Rb1 Qf7
´“
˜”“— 4. Nf3 Nd7 41. Kg2 Qa2+ ”—
” 5. Bd3 Nb6 42. Kh3 a4 ””
‘’‘ 6. O-O Bd7 43.* Rb7 a3 ‘¯
–›• 7. a4 a5 44. Ra7 Qb2 ‘
8. Be3 Ng6 45. Qe6 Qf6
’‘’‘’ 9.* Nd2 Be7 46. Qc4 Ne5
‘’
¦ª¤² 10. f4 e5 47. Qe2 Qh6+ ¤°
9. Nd2 11. fxe5 dxe5 48. Kg2 Qc6+ 35. Qf3
12. Nc4 Nxc4 49. Kh3 Qc5
§¯¨³ 13. Bxc4 O-O 50.* Rxa3 Qxa3 
14. Qf3 exd4 51. Qxe5+Bf6
“”“”“ 15. Bxd4 Be6 52. Qc7+ Kh6 ¤¹´“
¹ž— 16. Nd5 Bd6 53. Qf4+ Bg5 —
”• 17.* Qc3 c6 54. Qf5 Qe7 
‘›‘ 18. Nb6 c5 55. Kg2 Kg7 “ª
19. Bxg7 Qxb6 56. h4 Be3
¬ 20. Bxe6 fxe6 57. Qg4+ Kh6
’°
’‘‘’ 21. Bxf8 Bxf8 58. Qf5 Qd6 ­’
¦¤² 22. Rad1 Bg7 59. Qe4 Bc1 
17..c6 23. Qh3 Qc6 60. g4 Qg6 43..a3
24. b3 Qxe4 61. Qc4 Bd2
25. Rde1 Qd4+ 62. g5+ Bxg5
§´ 26. Kh1 e5 63. hxg5+ Kxg5

“¤¹“ 27. Rd1 Qb4 64. Qd5+ Kh4+ ¦¹´“
ª— 28. Qe6+ Kh8 65. Kh1 Qb1+ 
””” 29.* Rf7 Rf8 66. Kh2 Qb2+ ¯˜
‘¯ 30. Qd5 b6 67. Kg1 Qg7+ 
31. Rxf8+ Bxf8 68. Kh1 Qe7
‘ 32. Qa8 c4 69. Qd4+ Kh5 ”’°
‘‘’ 33. Rf1 cxb3 70. Qd5+ Kh6 ª’
¤° 34. cxb3 Kg7 71. Kg2 Qe2+ 
29..Rf8 35.* Qf3 Be7 72. Kg3 Qe1+ 50. Rxa3
36. Rd1 b5 1/2-1/2
37. axb5 Qxb5
Game 31: Defense Game DvE with White
White's DvE faces the 2 pawn F center classical defense (9). Following the opening trades, the
position remains balanced (21). Both sides look for K-side attacking angles, but there are none to
be found (33). Black finally sacrifices a pawn to launch his rook pawn (47), and white later follows
suit. Despite best efforts by both sides to prevail in the endgame, a drawn game is the result (78).
§¯¨³ 1. e3 e5 40. Bf1 Qd6 
2. Ne2 d5 41. Bc4 Qe7
”“”“”“ 3. Ng3 Nf6 42. Qd5 h4
“´
¹—ž˜ 4. Be2 Nc6 43. gxh4 c6 “
“” 5. O-O Bc5 44. Qf3 b5 ”›¹¯
 6. d3 O-O 45. axb5 cxb5 ’
•‘’– 7. Nd2 Be6 46. Bxb5 Qe5+ ’’ª‘
‘’‘›’‘’ 8. Nb3 Bb6
9.* Bd2 a5
47.* Kg2 Bxe3
48. Ba4 Bf4
’°
¦ª¤² 10. a4 Qd6 49. c4 Qd4 
9. Bd2 11. c3 Ne7 50. Qd5 Be5 47..Bxe3
12. d4 Nf5 51. Qxd4 Bxd4
¨§³ 13. Nxf5 Bxf5 52. f4 Kf6 ›
14. dxe5 Qxe5 53. Kf3 Ke6
“”“”“ 15. Nd4 Ne4 54. Ke4 Bc5 “
¹ 16. Nxf5 Qxf5 55. Bb5 Ba3 ¹³“
”­ 17. Qc2 Rfe8 56. Be8 Bd6 ”
‘›— 18. c4 dxc4 57.* f5+ gxf5+ ‘°’’
’ 19. Bxc4 Rad8
20. Bc3 Qh5
58. Ke3 Ke5
59. h5 Bc5+
‘
’ª’‘’ 21.* Rfd1 Nxc3 60. Kf3 Kf6 
¦¤² 22. bxc3 Bc5 61. h6 Kg6 
21. Rfd1 23. Be2 Qh4 62. Bd7 Bd6 57. f5+
24. Rab1 Rxd1+ 63. h7 Kg7
¨³ 25. Rxd1 b6
26. Bd3 Bd6
64. Ke3 f4+
65. Kd4 f6

”¯““ 27. h3 Qh5 66. h4 Kxh7 
”“ 28. Bf5 Rd8 67. Kd5 Bc7 ¹‘
”¹ 29. Rd4 g6 68. Ke4 f5+ ›
‘¦ 30. Be4 Qe5 69. Bxf5+ Kh6 “”
31. g3 Qe7 70. Bd7 Kh5
’’’‘ 32. Bg2 Bc5 71. c5 Kxh4 °´
ª’› 33.* Qe4 Qf6 72. Ba4 Kg3 
² 34. Rd5 Kg7 73. Bd1 Bb8 
33. Qe4 35. Rd3 Rxd3 74. c6 Bc7 after 78. Kd3
36. Qxd3 Qd6 75. Be2 Bd8
37. Qc2 Qd7 76. Bd1 Bb6
38. Qe4 h6 77. Bh5 a4
39. Kh2 h5 78.* Kd3 1/2-1/2
Defense Games 129

Game 32: Defense Game Dv1 with White


In an example taken from analysis of beginner's style D-game lines white's Dv1 confronts a 2
pawn standard classical defense with Q-side rook pawn attack (9). White's pawn offer (14) results
in a doubled pawn for black. White attacks on open lines (23), and forces simplifications (30). The
endgame is fairly easy for beginners; it allows the opponent to draw (36,48), but only if he doesn't
make any mistakes. Finally something even beginners can understand and play well!

§¯¨³ 1. e3 e5 31. Nxd6 Bb3 §´


2. Ne2 d5 32. Ne4 Re8
“”“”“ 3. Ng3 Nf6 33. Ra1 Kg7
•““
—¹ž˜ 4. Be2 Bd6 34. Kg1 Rd8 “”
”“” 5. d3 O-O 35. Nc5 Bc2 ”
‘ 6. Nd2 Nc6 36.* Rc1 Rd2 ‘ž¯
•‘’– 7. Nb3 a5 37. b3 f5 ‘¬
8. a4 Be6 38. h3 Kf6
’‘›’‘’ 9.* Bd2 Re8 39. f4 h5
’‘’
¦ª²¤ 10. O-O Qe7 40. h4 Ke7 ¦°
9. Bd2 11. Re1 e4 41. g3 f6 30. Qd6+
12. d4 Nb4 42. Re1+ Kf7
§§³ 13. Bc3 c6 43. Re3 Bd1 ¨
14.* Nc5 Bxc5 44. Nb7 Rd5
“¯“”“ 15. dxc5 Qxc5 45. Kf2 Bc2 “´“
“¹ž˜ 16. Bxf6 gxf6 46. Rc3 Be4 “”
”“ 17. c3 Nd3 47. Ke2 Ke7 ”–
‘˜’“ 18. Bxd3 exd3 48.* Ke3 Kf7 ‘
19. Qxd3 Qf8 49. Nc5 Bb1
•’– 20. e4 Qh6 50. Rc4 Ba2
‘
’‘›’‘’ 21. exd5 Bxd5 51. Rc2 Bb1 ’ž‘’
¦ª¦² 22. c4 Be6 52. Rc1 Ke7 ¦²
14. Nc5 23.* Ne4 Bf5 53. Rxb1 Rxc5 36..Rd2
24. Qg3+ Kf8 54. Kd4 Kd6
25. Nd6 Rxe1+ 55. Re1 Rd5+
§§³ 26. Rxe1 Qd2 56. Kc4 Rc5+

“““ 27. f3 Qd4+ 57. Kd4 Rd5+ •´
“ž”¯ 28. Kh1 Be6 58. Kc4 Rc5+ “”
” 29. Nxb7 Bxc4 59. Kd4 1/2-1/2 ”§““
‘‘ 30.* Qd6+ Qxd6 ‘ž’’
ª– ‘¦²’
’’‘’ 
¦¦² 
23. Ne4 48..Kf7
Game 33: Defense Game DvB' with Black
The author with black retreats from the rook pawn attack with DvB' (9). After a few trades, black is
able to pile up on and win the isolated rook pawn (23,26), but white later equalizes and threatens
to attack Q-side. Black simplifies further (33), and pushes for promotion, allowing white's queen to
invade (42). White then chooses to force draw by perpetual check (49). All quite straightforward.
§—¯³¹¨ 1. e4 e6 26.* Nf3 Nb8 ž¨³
2. d4 Ne7 27. Ne1 Rxa6
”“”ž“”“ 3. Nf3 d6 28. Nd3 Rxa2
—¯”“
”“— 4. Nc3 Nd7 29. Qxa2 a6 •““
’ 5. Bd3 Nb6 30. Nc5 Nd7 ““’
’‘ 6. O-O Bd7 31. Nxa6 c5 ’’
–›• 7. a4 Ng6 32. b4 cxd4 –
8. a5 Nc8 33.* cxd4 Bb7
’‘’‘’ 9.* a6 b6 34. Nc5 Nxc5
ª’‘’
¦ª¤² 10. Be3 Be7 35. bxc5 Ra8 ¦²
9. a6 11. Qe2 O-O 36. Qb2 Rxa1+ 33..Bb7
12. Rad1 c6 37. Qxa1 Bc6
§ž³ 13. e5 d5 38. Qa5 Qb7 ¬
14. Bxg6 fxg6 39. Qb4 Qa6
”—¯§”“ 15. Qd2 b5 40. Qd2 Qa4 ³”“
‘“““ 16. Ne2 Nb6 41. Qg5 Kf7 ž““
““’ 17. b3 Bc8 42.* Qd8 b4 “’“’
’ 18. Ra1 Nd7 43. Nf1 b3 ­’
19. Ra2 Nb8 44. Qc7+ Bd7
‘’• 20. Rfa1 Nd7 45. Qb7 Ke8
–
¤¬•’‘’ 21. Bg5 Rf7 46. Qb8+ Ke7 ’‘’
¦² 22. Bxe7 Qxe7 47. Qb7 Ke8 ²
23..Rb8 23.* c3 Rb8 48. Qb8+ Ke7 42..b4
24. Ng5 Rf8 49.* Qb7 Ke8
25. Ng3 Rb6 1/2-1/2
ž¨³ 
”—¯”“ ªž´”“
‘¨“““ ““
““’ ’“’
’ ­’
‘’•– “
¤¬’‘’ ’‘’
¦² •²
26..Nb8 49..Ke8
Defense Games 131

Game 34: Defense Game DvE with White


White's DvE faces the impressive 4 pawn standard custom defense, striking immediately at the big
forward pawn wall (9). Black is content to trade down (14); white tries to keep the game going.
Black attempts to simplify by creating an isolated doubled pawn (19) but his scheme fails. White is
a pawn up in an early finale (27) and keeps his advantage until the end, but can't quite force a win
(44). Experience in play shows that more expansive defenses are no better than classical ones.

§¯³¨ 1. d3 d5 24. Bxc5 Rd2 ³


2. Nd2 c5 25. Bxa7 Rxa2
”“”“ 3. e3 e5 26. Rd1 Rc2
”“
—¹ž˜ 4. Ne2 f5 27.* f4 exf4 
”“”“ 5. Nb3 Nc6 28. Rd8+ Kf7 ˜”
 6. Ng3 Nf6 29. Rd7+ Ke6 
•‘’– 7. Be2 Be6 30. Rxg7 Rxc3 ’
8. O-O Bd6 31. Rxh7 Nc6
‘’‘›’‘’ 9.* e4 fxe4 32. Bb6 Rc1+
§’‘’
¦ª¤² 10. dxe4 Nxe4 33. Kf2 Ne5 ¤²
9. e4 11. Nxe4 dxe4 34. Rg7 Rc2+ 27. f4
12. Nd2 O-O 35. Kf1 f3
§¯¨³ 13. Nxe4 Be7 36. gxf3 Rxh2 ¦
14.* c3 Qxd1 37. Rg3 Rb2
”“¹”“ 15. Rxd1 Rad8 38. Bd4 Rb3 
—ž 16. Be3 b6 39. Bxe5 Rb1+ ´
”” 17. b3 Rxd1+ 40. Kf2 Kxe5 
• 18. Rxd1 Rd8 41. Rg8 Rb4 ’
19.* Rc1 c4 42. Kg3 Kf6
’ 20. Bxc4 Bxc4 43. f4 Rb1
²
‘’›’‘’ 21. bxc4 Na5 44.* Rf8+ Ke7 
¦ª¤² 22. c5 bxc5 45. Rf5 1/2-1/2 §
14..Qxd1 23. Nxc5 Bxc5 44..Ke7

¨³
”¹”“
”—ž
””
•
‘’
‘›’‘’
¦²
19..c4
Game 35: Defense Game Dv5'E with Black
Black plays Defense Game main line Dv5'E, against white's 2 pawn standard classical opening
(9). Black gains space, attacking on both flanks (19). White's attempts to counter (25,28) result in
disastrous loss of material (36,40), and he goes down like a sawn tree. Analysis shows white's
play was valid, but the result was total destruction. What does that say about the Defense Game?
§ž¯¨³ 1. e4 e6 26. cxb3 b4 §³
2. d4 Ne7 27. Ne4 Nxd5
”“”—¹“”“ 3. Nf3 d6 28.* h4 Nxh4
­ž¹”“
”— 4. Nc3 Nd7 29. f3 Nxe3 §”—
” 5. Bd3 Ng6 30. Rxe3 d5 —”
’‘ 6. O-O Be7 31. Rd3 Be6 ”•
–›• 7. Be3 O-O 32. Qc2 dxe4 ‘‘
8. Qd2 e5 33. fxe4 Qc8
‘’‘¬’‘’ 9.* a4 Nf6 34. Qxc8+Bxc8
›¬’‘–
¦¤² 10. h3 c5 35. Rd2 Bb7 ¦¦°
9. a4 11. d5 Bd7 36.* Ng4 Bxe4 28. h4
12. a5 Qc7 37. Kh2 Bxg2
§¨³ 13. Qe2 Nh5 38. Kg3 Rg6 §³
14. Bc4 Nhf4 39. Rc1 Bf3
­ž¹“”“ 15. Qd1 b5 40.* Rc4 e4 ž¹”“
”— 16. axb6 axb6 41. Kf2 Bxg4 §
“”‘” 17. Qd2 Qb7 42. Rxe4 Bc5+ ”
‘˜ 18. Rfe1 b5 43. Kf1 Bf3 ”‘•˜
19.* Ba2 f5 44. Rf2 Rxa2
–•‘ 20. exf5 Rxf5 45. Re8+ Kf7
‘
›’‘¬’‘ 21. Nh2 Rff8 46. Rf8+ Kxf8 ›¦‘
¦¦² 22. Kh1 Ra6 47. Rxf3+ Ke7 ¦°
19..f5 23. Bb3 c4 48. Rg3 Rxg3 36..Bxe4
24. Ba2 Rfa8 49. Ke1 Rg1#
25.* b4 cxb3
§³ §³
­ž¹”“ ¹”“
§”— §
“‘” ”
“˜ ”¤•˜
–‘ ‘ž²
›’‘¬’‘– ›¦
¦¦° 
25. b4 40..e4
Defense Games 133

Game 36: Defense Game DvDxE with White


White responds to the frequently seen bishop early attack, playing DvDxE (9). After center pawns
are exchanged, white piles up on black's advanced pawn and wins it (17), then retains his lead
after minor pieces and queens are traded (22,36). White's powerful Q-side passed pawns provide
the winning margin, but it takes careful play to bring them home (51,68). An educational game.
§¯³¨ 1. e3 e5 36.* a4 Ra2 
2. Ne2 d5 37. a5 e5
”“”¹“”“ 3. d3 Nf6 38. Rxb7+Kf6
“³”“
—˜ 4. Nd2 Nc6 39. b4 e4 “
“” 5. Ng3 Bg4 40. b5 Ra1 ¤
 6. Be2 Bxe2 41. Kg3 Ke5 ‘
‘’– 7. Qxe2 Be7 42. a6 Ra3+ ‘
8. O-O O-O 43. Kg4 h5+
‘’‘–ª’‘’ 9.* Nf3 e4 44. Kxh5 e3
‘¨‘²
¦¤² 10. Nd4 Nxd4 45. Re7+ Kd6 
9. Nf3 11. exd4 c5 46. Re4 Kc5 36. a4
12. dxe4 dxe4 47. Kg4 Rc3
§§³ 13. dxc5 Bxc5 48. Kf3 g5 
14. Bg5 Re8 49. Re5+ Kb6
”““”“ 15. c3 Qb6 50. Re6+ Ka7 ´
¯˜ 16. Rae1 Rac8 51.* Re7+ Kb6 ‘¤
¹ 17.* Bxf6 Qxf6 52. Rb7+ Kc5 ‘”
“ 18. Nxe4 Qf5 53. b6 g4+ ‘
19. Qc2 Bb6 54. Ke2 Rc2+
’– 20. Re2 Re6 55. Kxe3 Rxg2
¨”°
‘’ª’‘’ 21. Qa4 Bc7 56. Rb8 Rg3+ ‘
¦¤² 22.* Ng3 Bxg3 57. Ke4 Rc3 
17. Bxf6 23. Rxe6 Bxh2+ 58. b7 Rxc4+ 51. Re7+
24. Kxh2 fxe6 59. Ke5 Kb5
25. Qxa7 Qb5 60.* Rg8 Kb4
§³ 26. Qe3 Rc6 61. b8=Q+Kc3
¦
”“¹“”“ 27. Rb1 Rd6 62. Qb1 Rc5+ ‘
§ 28. b3 Qd3 63. Kf4 Rc4+ ‘
­ 29. Qc5 Qd5 64. Ke3 Rb4 ³²
ª• 30. Qb4 Ra6 65. Rc8+ Rc4 §“
31. c4 Qd6+ 66. Qe1+ Kc2
’ 32. Qxd6 Rxd6 67. Rxc4+ Kb3 
‘’¤’‘’ 33. Re1 Kf7 68. Rb4+ Ka2 
¤² 34. Re5 Rd2 69. Qf2+ Ka3 
22. Ng3 35. Rb5 Rxf2 70. Qb2# 60. Rg8
Game 37: Defense Game Dv7G with Black
Black's Dv7G with a double advance of the g-pawn is an energetic response to the rook pawn
attack. Black's scattered position offers good play, and he takes a pawn with an interposed check
(18). White's attempt to attack the king (27) drops another pawn; black always seems to find a way
to trip up his adversary (35). White's last attempt to win (43) goes down in equally humorous
fashion (53), and black takes his pawn in for the victory. A thoroughly entertaining contest.

§ž¯³˜¨ 1. Nf3 e6 35.* a4 f5 ´¨


2. d4 Ne7 36. Ree1 Bd7
”“”—¹““ 3. c4 d6 37. Kb2 Rd2
””“‘
”“’ 4. e4 Nd7 38. Kc3 Rxg2 
” 5. Nc3 Ng6 39. Rxe5 Rg7 ž”§”
‘’‘ 6. h4 Be7 40. Rb1 Kc8 ‘¤”
–• 7. h5 Ngf8 41. Bd3 c6 ‘
8. h6 g5 42. Ba6+ Kc7
‘’’‘ 9.* Be3 Bf6 43.* Re6 Bxe6
›‘
¦ª²›¤ 10. Rh5 Rg8 44. Rb7+ Kd6 ²¤
9. Be3 11. Bd3 e5 45. Rxg7 Bd5 35..f5
12. dxe5 Nxe5 46. Bd3 Ke5
§¯³§ 13. Nxe5 Bxe5 47. Rxa7 Bxf3 ¨
14. Qa4+ Bd7 48. Rf7 Be4
””ž““ 15. Qb3 b6 49. a5 f3 ”´ž¨‘
””’ 16. Bc2 Ne6 50. Bxe4 fxe4 ›“
¹” 17. O-O-ONf4 51. Kd2 c4 ”¦“
‘‘˜ 18.* Rhh1 Bxc3 52. a6 Ke6 ‘”
19. Bxf4 Bxb2+ 53.* Rc7 c3+
ª– 20. Qxb2 gxf4 54. Ke3 Kd5
²‘
‘’›’‘ 21. e5 Qg5 55. Rd7+ Kc4 
²¤¤ 22. f3 dxe5 56. Rd4+ Kb5 ¤
18..Bxc3 23. Bxh7 Rh8 57. Rxe4 Rxh7 43. Re6
24. Be4 O-O-O 58. Kxf3 c2
25. h7 Qe7 59. Re1 Ka4
³¨¨ 26. Qc2 Rdf8 60. Rg1 Kb3
¨
””ž¯“‘ 27.* c5 Qxc5 61. Ke4 Re7+ ¦‘
” 28. Qxc5 bxc5 62. Kd4 Ra7 ‘“³
” 29. Rh6 Be6 63. Rg3+ Kb2 
‘›” 30. Bb1 Rd8 64. Rg2 Kb1 ““
31. Re1 Rd5 65. Rg1+ c1=Q
‘ 32. Bc2 Kd8 66. Rxc1+ Kxc1 “
‘ª‘ 33. Re4 Bd7 67. Kc5 Rxa6 ²
²¤¤ 34. Rh1 Bb5 0-1 
27. c5 53..c3+
Defense Games 135

Game 38: Defense Game DvDxE with Black


Black's DvDxE responds to a bishop early attack and exchange (9). Both sides try to inflict
structural damage (17), but black succeeds more, leaving white's king exposed to queen and rook
checks (25), and gaining enough time to grab a pawn. Black then exchanges off the remaining
pieces (32) and pushes white's king away from the game winning passed pawn (39,45). Like many
others, this game shows one of the best ways to play the D-system: trade everything in sight!

§ž¨³ 1. d4 d6 26. b3 Rg6+ 


2. e4 Nd7 27. Kf1 Qh3+
”“”—¯“”“ 3. Nf3 e6 28. Ke2 Qh5+
”“¦“”³
”“— 4. Nc3 Ne7 29. Kf1 Qxh2 §
 5. Be2 Ng6 30. Qd3 Qh1+ “­
’‘ 6. Bg5 Be7 31. Ke2 Qh5+ ’
–• 7. Bxe7 Qxe7 32.* Qf3 Re6+ ‘ª
8. O-O O-O 33. Rxe6 Qxf3+
‘’‘›’‘’ 9.* Qd2 Nf6 34. Kxf3 fxe6
‘°’
¦ª¤² 10. e5 Nd5 35. Kf4 Kg6 
9. Qd2 11. exd6 cxd6 36. b4 Kf6 32..Re6+
12. Nxd5 exd5 37. b5 a5
§¨³ 13. c4 dxc4 38. bxa6 bxa6 
14. Bxc4 Bg4 39.* a3 e5+
”“­“”“ 15. Bd5 Qd7 40. dxe5+ Ke6 ”
› 16. Be4 d5 41. a4 a5 ““´
“ 17.* Bxg6 Bxf3 42. f3 g6 “
’ž 18. Bxh7+ Kxh7 43. Ke3 Kxe5 ’²
19. gxf3 Qf5 44. f4+ Kf5
• 20. Rac1 Rac8 45.* Kd4 Kxf4
’
‘’¬’‘’ 21. Rfe1 Qxf3 46. Kxd5 g5 ’
¦¤² 22. Rxc8 Qg4+ 47. Kc4 g4 
17..Bxf3 23. Kf1 Rxc8 48. Kb5 g3 39..e5+
24. Re7 Qf3 49. Kxa5 Ke5
25.* Kg1 Rc6 0-1
§ 
”“¦“”³ 
 “
“ ”“³
’ ‘’
­ ²
‘’¬’’ 
° 
25. Kg1 45. Kd4
Game 39: Defense Game Dv5'G' with White
Challenged by the rook pawn early attack, white retreats with the knight, then strikes at the center
with Dv5'G'. Following the opening trades, white's position is compact and active (17). Black
opens the attack with a pawn offer (19), but white is able to cover all his threats and take 2 pawns
in the process (28,34). White has the winning margin, but it still takes a while to close it out (54).
§¯³¹¨ 1. e3 e5 36. Qg6 Rg7 ´¨
2. d3 Nf6 37. Qf6 Rh2
”““” 3. Ne2 d5 38. Qf8+ Qxf8
”“§
—ž˜ 4. Nd2 c5 39. Rxf8+ Kc7 ¯”¦
”“” 5. Ng3 h5 40. Re8 Kd6 ”
‘” 6. Be2 h4 41. c5+ Kxc5 ‘¹‘ª
‘ 7. Ngf1 Nc6 42. Rxe5+ Kd6 ‘
8. e4 Be6 43. Ra5 b6
‘’‘–›’‘’ 9.* exd5 Nxd5 44. Rd5+ Ke6
‘‘
¦ª²•¤ 10. Bf3 Nd4 45. Kb3 Rhg2 ²¤
9. exd5 11. Ne3 Nxe3 46. a4 R7g5 28. Rb1
12. fxe3 Nxf3+ 47. Rd8 Rg8
³¨¹¨ 13. Qxf3 Qc7 48. Rd4 Ke7 ´¨
14. b3 h3 49. Rc4 Kd6
”“¯“” 15. Bb2 hxg2 50. Kc3 R2g5 ”“§
ž 16. Qxg2 O-O-O 51. d4 Rg3+ 
”” 17.* O-O-O Kb8 52. Kb4 a6 ”
 18. Kb1 f6 53. c3 Rg2 ‘¯‘
19.* h4 c4 54.* Rxg2 Rxg2
‘‘’ 20. Nxc4 Bd5 55. Rc8 Rb2+
‘
‘‘–ª’ 21. e4 Bxc4 56. Kc4 Kd7 ‘¦‘ª
¦²¤ 22. bxc4 Bc5 57. Ra8 b5+ ²¤
17. O-O-O 23. h5 Rd7 58. Kd5 bxa4 34. a3
24. Qg4 Rhd8 59. Rxa6 Rb3
25. h6 Qb6 60. Rxa4 Rxc3
´¨¹¨ 26. Ka1 gxh6 61. e5 Rb3
§
”“¯” 27. Rxh6 Bd4 62. e6+ Ke7 
ž” 28.* Rb1 Rc7 63. Ra7+ Ke8 “”´
”” 29. Rg6 Rh7 64. Ke5 Kf8 
’ 30. Qg2 Qc5 65. d5 Re3+ ‘²¤’‘
31. Rxf6 Bxb2+ 66. Kd6 Re4
‘‘’ 32. Rxb2 Rdh8 67. Ra8+ Kg7 ’
‘‘–ª 33. Rf1 Qd4 68. e7 Kg6 ¦§
°¤¤ 34.* a3 Qd7 69. e8=Q+ Rxe8 
19..c4 35. Ka2 Qe7 70. Rxe8 1-0 54. Rxg2
Defense Games 137

Game 40: Defense Game DvDxE with White


The author plays DvDxE against black's 2 pawn classical opening with bishop early attack (9).
White simplifies with piece exchanges (17), then begins chasing the black queen (25). Twenty
moves later the situation is much the same (45), with little chance of a break thru for either side,
and so a draw is agreed. The D-game is ideal when playing for a draw against stronger players.
§¯¨³ 1. e3 e5 24. Qf3 Qd3 ¨§³
2. Ne2 d5 25.* Qf1 Qe4
”“”¹“”“ 3. d3 Nf6 26. Qf3 Qa4
”“”“
—˜ 4. Nd2 Nc6 27. a3 Qb3 ”¹
“” 5. Ng3 Bg4 28. Rb1 a5 ”“
 6. Be2 Bxe2 29. Re1 Qc2 ’
‘’– 7. Qxe2 Be7 30. Qd1 Qg6 ’­’ª‘
8. O-O O-O 31. Qg4 Qe4
‘’‘–ª’‘’ 9.* c3 Qd7 32. Qf3 Qa4
‘’‘
¦¤² 10. d4 Rae8 33. Qd1 Qc6 ¦¤²
9. c3 11. Nb3 b6 34. Qf3 a4 25. Qf1
12. dxe5 Nxe5 35. Kf2 Qb5
§¨³ 13. Nd4 c5 36. Qe2 Qb3 ¨³
14. Nf3 Bd6 37. Qd1 Qc4
”“”“ 15. Nxe5 Bxe5 38. Qe2 Qe4 ¹“”“
”­˜ 16. Rd1 Qe6 39. Qf3 Qd3 ”­
”“¹ 17.* Nh5 Rd8 40. Qe2 Qc2 ”“
 18. Nxf6+ Bxf6 41. Qd1 Qg6 “§’’
19. Bd2 Rfe8 42. Qg4 Qh6
’’– 20. Qf1 Qg4 43. g3 Re4
’’’ª’
‘’ª’‘’ 21. h3 Qg6 44. h4 Be7 ’²
¦¤² 22. Rac1 Be5 45.* Qf3 Qg6 ¤¦
17. Nh5 23. f4 Bf6 1/2-1/2 after 45..Qg6
Game 41: Defense Game DvCG with White
White's interesting DvCG confronts black's 3 pawn C center classical defense (9). After the
opening exchanges white pursues a provocative line offering a pawn for control of the open files
(20). A bishop sacrifice (29) opens an attack with the queen and rooks. Black keeps in the lead
and threatens promotion (44), but his undeveloped castle position obliges him to fall back to
defend (51). White then cramps his position, and delivers the coup de grace (65). Great chess!
§¯¨³ 1. e3 e5 37. Rbd1 Rf8 §³
2. Be2 d5 38. Kf2 Qa4
”““”“ 3. d3 Nf6 39. Qxa4 bxa4
“”“
—¹˜ 4. Nd2 Bd6 40. Ra5 c2 
”“”ž 5. Nb3 c5 41. Rc1 Rfc8 ‘
 6. Bd2 O-O 42. Rxa4 Rd7 ’
•‘’• 7. Nf3 Nc6 43. b5 Rd1 ’
8. Bc3 Bf5 44.* Raa1 Rd2+
‘’‘›’‘’ 9.* O-O Qc7 45. Ke3 Rxh2
“²’
¦ª²¤ 10. Ng5 Rad8 46. b6 Re8+ ¦¦§
9. O-O 11. e4 dxe4 47. Kd3 Rd8+ 44..Rd2+
12. dxe4 Bxe4 48. Ke4 Rhd2
­¨§³ 13. Nxe4 Nxe4 49. b7 Re8+ §³
14. Qd3 Nxc3 50. Kf3 Rd3+
”“”“ 15. Qxc3 e4 51.* Kg2 Rdd8 ‘“”“
”¹ 16. g3 b6 52. Rxc2 Rb8 
” 17. Qe3 Rfe8 53. Rc7 Kf8 
˜“ 18. Rad1 Qc8 54. g4 Rbd8 ’
19. Nd2 Nb4 55. Ra2 Rb8
¬’ 20.* Nxe4 Nxc2 56. Kf3 Red8
§’
‘’‘–›’’ 21. Qc3 Rxe4 57. g5 Kg8 “°
¤¤² 22. Qxc2 Re5 58. Re2 Rf8 ¦¦
20. Nxe4 23. Bd3 Rh5 59. Rd7 Kh8 51..Rdd8
24. f4 c4 60. Rc2 Kg8
25. Be2 Rc5 61. f5 Rbe8
­¨³ 26. Rfe1 c3 62. Kf4 Rb8
¨¨
¨“”“ 27. b4 Rc7 63. Rdc7 h5 ‘¦“”³
”¹ 28. a3 a5 64. gxh6 Kh7 ’
” 29.* Ba6 Qxa6 65.* Rc8 Rfxc8 ‘
’’ 30. Rxd6 Rf8 66. bxc8=QRxc8 ²
31. Rd3 axb4 67. Rxc8 gxh6
’”’ 32. axb4 Qa3 68. Ke5 Kg7 
ª›’ 33. Rc1 Rfc8 69. f6+ Kg6 ¤
¤¦² 34. Rb1 b5 70. Rg8+ Kh5 
29. Ba6 35. Rd5 Qa7+ 71. Rg7 Kh4 65. Rc8
36. Kf1 Qa8 72. Rxf7 1-0
Defense Games 139

Game 42: Defense Game Dv3E with White


White's Dv3E is one of the best Defense Game attacking lines (9). Here white maintains easy
equality after the opening, foiling black's attempted attack (18) and winning a pawn in the process.
Black finds no way to equalize (25), as white simplifies (31) and takes another pawn. Even his two
pawn advantage doesn't guarantee white a win however (48,57). Still . . better 2 up than 2 down!

§ž¯¨³ 1. e3 e5 31.* Rxd7 Rxe2 ³


2. Ne2 d5 32. Rxa7 Kg7
”“¹“”“ 3. d3 Nf6 33. Kf1 Rc2
”—““
—˜ 4. Ng3 Be7 34. a4 Kf6 §“
”” 5. Be2 O-O 35. a5 Ra2 
“ 6. Nd2 c5 36. f4 h5 ‘
‘’– 7. O-O Nc6 37. e5+ Ke6 ‘
8. c4 dxc4 38. h4 Ra4
‘’–›’‘’ 9.* Nxc4 Be6 39. Ra6+ Ke7
‘§¦•‘’
¦ª¤² 10. Bf3 Qc7 40. g3 Ra2 ¤²
9. Nxc4 11. Bxc6 Bxc4 41. Kg1 Ra1+ 31. Rxd7
12. dxc4 Qxc6 42. Kg2 Ra2+
¨§³ 13. Qc2 b5 43. Kh3 Ra3 
14. cxb5 Qxb5 44. Ra7+ Ke6
”¹“”“ 15. b3 Rfc8 45. Kg2 Ra2+ ¦“
˜ 16. Ba3 Rab8 46. Kf3 Ra3+ ³“
¯”” 17. Rfd1 Qa5 47. Kf2 Ra2+ ’’“
 18.* Bb2 c4 48.* Ke1 Rg2 ’’
19. bxc4 Rb4 49. Ra6+ Ke7
‘’– 20. Qc3 Rcxc4 50. Rb6 Rxg3
’
‘ª’‘’ 21. Qxe5 Qxe5 51. a6 Rg2 §²
¦¤² 22. Bxe5 g6 52. Kf1 Ra2 
18..c4 23. Rd2 Rb6 53. Rb7+ Ke6 48. Ke1
24. f3 Re6 54. a7 f6
25.* Bd4 Bc5 55. Rb6+ Kf5
³ 26. Bxc5 Rxc5 56. Rxf6+ Kg4

”¹““ 27. e4 Rec6 57.* Rxg6+ Kxf4 ’
§˜“ 28. Ne2 Rc2 58. Rg7 Kxe5 ¦“
 29. Rad1 Nd7 1/2-1/2 ’“
§ 30. Rxc2 Rxc2 ’³’
’‘– 
‘¦‘’ §
¦² °
25..Bc5 57. Rxg6+
Game 43: Defense Game Dv66x with White
White strikes at the big four pawn wall of a custom defense with Dv66x (9). After several sharp
exchanges in the center white has to castle to safety, and he loses a pawn (16). White has several
opportunities to regain it later, but attacks instead (21,28), emerging a pawn up (32) with a winning
position in the pawn endgame (38). Chess will never cease to surprise and delight us!

§¯³¹¨ 1. d3 d5 30. a4 Qd4 ³¨


2. e3 e5 31. a5 Qc3
”“ž”“ 3. Ne2 f5 32.* Qd5+ Kc7
““
˜ 4. Nd2 Nf6 33. a6 Qe1+ “
”“˜“ 5. Nb3 c5 34. Kxb2 Qb4+ ª“
 6. Bd2 Nc6 35. Qb3 Qxb3+ 
•‘’ 7. f4 Bd7 36. Kxb3 f4 ¯
8. fxe5 Nxe5 37. Kc4 Kb6
‘’‘•‘’ 9.* Nc3 c4 38.* Kd5 Kxa6
‘”‘‘’
¦ª²›¤ 10. Nd4 Bc5 39. Ke5 Kb5 °¤
9. Nc3 11. Nf3 Qe7 40. Kf5 h6 28. Rxd8+
12. d4 Nxf3+ 41. h3 Kc4
§³¨ 13. Qxf3 Bxd4 42. Kg6 Kd4 ´
14. Nxd5 Nxd5 43. Kxh6 g4
”“ž¯”“ 15. Qxd5 Bxe3 44. hxg4 Ke3 ª“
 16.* O-O-O c3 45. Kg6 f3 
ª“ 17. Bxe3 Qxe3+ 46. gxf3 Kxf3 ’“”
“ 18. Kb1 O-O-O 47. Kf5 Ke3 
19. Bd3 Qb6 48. Ke5 Kd2
¹ 20. Qc4+ Qc7 49. g5 Kxc2
¯
‘’‘‘’ 21.* Qd4 cxb2 50. g6 Kd3 ”‘‘’
¦²›¤ 22. Qxa7 Qc3 51. g7 Ke3 °
16. O-O-O 23. Qb6 g6 52. g8=Q Ke2 32. Qd5+
24. Rhe1 Rhe8 53. Ke4 Kf2
25. Rxe8 Rxe8 54. Qg4 Ke1
³¨¨ 26. Bb5 Bxb5 55. Qg2 Kd1

”“¯ž”“ 27. Qxb5 Rd8 56. Kd3 Ke1 “
 28.* Rxd8+Kxd8 57. Qg1# ‘´
“ 29. Qxb7 g5 ”
ª °”
”› 
‘’‘‘’ ‘‘’
°¤¤ 
21. Qd4 38. Kd5
Defense Games 141

Game 44: Defense Game DvDxE with Black


Black responds to the bishop early attack, playing DvDxE (9). After the opening black is left with
an isolated center pawn, but has no real problems otherwise until white opens the Q-side (15),
resulting in the gain of a pawn. Black can equalize, but has poor prospects of winning and so
brings the game to a quick conclusion instead with perpetual check (21,23). As easy as it gets!
§ž¨³ 1. e4 e6 16. axb5 axb5 ³
2. d4 Ne7 17. Rxa8 Bxa8
”“”—¯“”“ 3. Nf3 d6 18. Nxb5 Bxf3
–—¯”“
”“— 4. Bd3 Nd7 19. gxf3 Rxf3 ““
 5. O-O Ng6 20. Nxc7 Rf5 ’§
’‘ 6. Bg5 Be7 21.* Rd1 Qh4 
–›• 7. Bxe7 Qxe7 22. f3 Rxf3 ‘
8. Nc3 O-O 23.* Qxd7 Rg3+
‘’‘’‘’ 9.* Qd2 Nf6 24. hxg3 Qxg3+
‘¬’’
¦ª¤² 10. e5 dxe5 25. Kh1 Qh3+ ¤²
9. Qd2 11. dxe5 Nd7 26. Kg1 Qg3+ 21..Qh4
12. Rfe1 a6 27. Kh1 Qh3+
§ž¨³ 13. Bxg6 fxg6 28. Kg1 Qg3+ ³
14. b3 b5 29. Kh1 1/2-1/2
”—¯”“ 15.* a4 Bb7 –ª”“
“““ ““
“’ ’
 ¯
‘–• ‘§
‘‘¬’‘’ ‘’
¦¦² ¤²
15. a4 23..Rg3+
Game 45: Defense Game Dv3'E with White
Here is a typical example of the many draws that the author has produced playing the Defense
Game. White's Dv3'E faces a 2 pawn standard classical defense (9). Black closes the center and
then exchanges knights (13), bishops, and queens (19). Afterwards the presence of all the pawns
on the board leaves little scope for the remaining rooks, and white's knight covers the holes in the
pawn structure (30). Black maneuvers for a while afterwards (40), but can't break thru anywhere.

§¯§³ 1. e3 Nf6 27. f3 Ke7 §


2. Ne2 d5 28. Ne2 Ne6
”“”“”“ 3. d3 e5 29. Kf2 Nc5
“”´“”
—¹ž˜ 4. Nd2 Nc6 30.* Nc1 Re6 ¨”
“” 5. Ng3 Bd6 31. Rdd2 Rh8 ˜”
 6. Be2 Be6 32. Ke1 h5 “‘”‘‘
’‘’– 7. O-O O-O 33. gxh5 Rxh5 ’‘‘
8. c3 Re8 34. Rf2 Reh6
‘’–›’‘’ 9.* e4 Be7 35. Rf1 g5
’¤•²‘
¦ª¤² 10. Re1 Qd7 36. Rcf2 Rh2 ¤
9. e4 11. Bf3 d4 37. Rg1 Ke6 30. Nc1
12. c4 a5 38. Kf1 b6
§§³ 13.* Nh5 Nxh5 39. Ke2 f6 
14. Bxh5 a4 40.* Kf1 Rh1
“”­¹“”“ 15. a3 Bg5 41. Rd2 c6 ”
—ž˜ 16. Nf1 Bxc1 42. Kf2 R1h2 ”³”¨
”” 17. Rxc1 Ra5 43. Kf1 Rh7 ˜””
‘”‘ 18. h3 h6 44. Kf2 Kd6 “‘”‘
19.* Bg4 Bxg4 45. Kf1 Rh8
‘›– 20. Qxg4 Qxg4 46. Kf2 R8h6
’‘‘
‘’–’‘’ 21. hxg4 Ra6 47. Kf1 Ke6 ’¦‘¨
¦ª¦² 22. Ng3 Rb6 48. Kf2 Kf7 –°¦
13. Nh5 23. Rc2 Rb3 49. Kf1 Ne6 40..Rh1
24. Rd1 Nd8 50. Ne2 Rh7
25. Ne2 Kf8 51. Kf2 Rh8
§³ 26. Nc1 Rb6 52.* Kf1 Ke7
¨
“”­“” 1/2-1/2 ´
—ž” ”“—”
¨” ””
“‘”‘› “‘”‘
’‘‘ ’‘‘
’’‘ ’¦•‘¨
¦ª¦•² °¦
19..Bxg4 after 52..Ke7
Defense Games 143

Game 46: Defense Game Dv5'E with Black


The author with black plays Defense Game Dv5'E (9) and draws against his strong computer rival.
Black invites the knight for bishop exchange, consolidates, and challenges the king knight (15).
White obliges with trades of pieces and queens, producing a doubled pawn, but no real problems
otherwise (20). Black then challenges on the open file and exchanges both rooks (24). All that's
left is to close out the pawn structure (30) and then it's a draw (35). Chess has never been easier!
§ž¯¨³ 1. e4 d6 20.* c5 Rd8 §¨³
2. Nf3 Nd7 21. cxb6 cxb6
”“”—¹“”“ 3. d4 e6 22. a4 Bd7
ž“
”— 4. Nc3 Ne7 23. a5 b5 “”””
” 5. Bd3 Ng6 24.* Rac1 Rdc8 ’“‘”
’‘ 6. O-O Be7 25. g3 Rxc1 ’‘
–›• 7. Be3 O-O 26. Rxc1 Rc8 ›
8. Re1 e5 27. Rxc8+ Bxc8
‘’‘’‘’ 9.* Nd5 Nf6 28. Bc2 Kg7
’‘’
¦ª¦² 10. Nxe7+ Qxe7 29. f4 Kg6 ¦¦²
9. Nd5 11. d5 a6 30.* f5+ Kg7 24..Rdc8
12. c4 Nd7 31. Kg2 Bd7
§ž¨³ 13. b4 b6 32. Kh3 Bc8 ž
14. Qc2 Nh4 33. Kg4 Bd7
”—¯“”“ 15.* Qe2 Nxf3+ 34. Kh5 Bc8 “
“”” 16. Qxf3 Nf6 35.* Bd3 Bd7 “””³”
‘” 17. Bg5 h6 36. Be2 Bc8 ’“‘”
’‘‘˜ 18. Bxf6 Qxf6 37. Bd1 1/2-1/2 ’‘’
19. Qxf6 gxf6
›• ’
‘ª’‘’ ›’
¦¦² ²
15. Qe2 30. f5+

§ž¨³ ž
”“ “´
“”””” “”””
‘” ’“‘”‘°
’‘‘ ’‘
› ›’
‘’‘’ ’
¦¦² 
20. c5 35..Bd7
Game 47: Defense Game Dv6G" with White
White counters a rook pawn attack with Dv6G" (9). White launches an all-out assault (16) which
pushes black to the wall, even going two pawns down temporarily to keep up the pressure (24).
Black trades down to relieve pressure, but white keeps finding sharp lines (34), and later a clear
path to promotion for his passed pawn (44). In a tense finale black barely salvages a draw. Heavy!
§ž¯³¹¨ 1. e3 e5 39. Rb8 Rb1+ —³
2. Ne2 d5 40. Kf2 Bd3
”““” 3. d3 c5 41. Ke3 Rd1
”“”
—˜ 4. Ng3 Nf6 42. Bg2 Nf5+ “
”“” 5. Be2 h5 43. Kf2 Ra1 ›’
’ 6. O-O h4 44.* Rb2 Ra4 ‘
‘’“ 7. Nh1 Nc6 45. Bd2 Be4 ž
8. f4 h3 46. Bxe4 Rxe4
‘’‘›‘’ 9.* g4 Bd6 47. Rb7 Nd4
§’
¦•ª¤²• 10. Nc3 exf4 48. Kg3 Re2 ¦²
9. g4 11. exf4 Ne7 49. Bf4 Rc2 34. Rd1
12. g5 Nd7 50. Bd6 Kg6
§¹¯³¨ 13. Nb5 Bb8 51. Rxa7 a5 
14. c4 Nb6 52. h4 Nf5+
”“˜“” 15. a4 Be6 53. Kg4 Rc4+ ”“”³
˜ž 16.* a5 Nbc8 54. Bf4 Nxh4 “
•”“’ 17. Nc3 O-O 55. Ra6+ f6 ’—’
‘‘’ 18. Bf3 Bc7 56.* gxf6 Ng2 
19. a6 bxa6 57. fxg7+ Kxg7
‘“ 20. Ng3 Rb8 58. Rxa5 Nxf4
ž
’›’ 21. f5 Nxf5 59. Kf5 Nd3 ¦²›’
¦ª¤²• 22. Nxf5 Bxf5 60. Ke6 Nb4 ¨
16. a5 23. Bxd5 Qd7 61. Rb5 Re4+ 44..Ra4
24.* Qa4 Qxa4 62. Kd6 Rd4+
25. Nxa4 Bxd3 63. Ke6 Rc4
¨—¨³ 26. Rf3 Bg6 64. Rb6 Re4+

”¹­“” 27. Nxc5 Bb6 65. Kd6 Kf7 ”
“ 28. Be3 Re8 66. c6 Re6+ ¤’³
”›ž’ 29. Bf2 Bxc5 67. Kc5 Nd3+ ”’
‘ 30. Bxc5 Rxb2 68. Kb5 Re5+ §°˜
31. Rxh3 Rc2 69. Kc4 Nf4
–‘“ 32. Re3 Rxe3 70. c7 Re1 
’’ 33. Bxe3 Bd3 71. Rc6 Rc1+ 
¦ª¤² 34.* Rd1 Bf5 72. Kb5 Rxc6 
24. Qa4 35. c5 Ne7 73. Kxc6 Ng6 56..Ng2
36. Bb7 Re2 74. Kd7 Ne7
37. Bf4 Rb2 75. c8=Q Nxc8
38. Rd8+ Kh7 1/2-1/2
Defense Games 145

Game 48: Defense Game Dv3'E with White


The author with white plays Defense Game Dv3'E versus the 2 pawn standard classical defense
(9). White retreats from a center challenge and is under some pressure afterwards (18), but his
D-game defense holds, and he can even look for attacks (26). After some maneuvering white is
able to force a series of trades (33,37,49), and close out the game for a draw. Not at all bad.
§¨³ 1. e3 e5 30. Nf4 Bh7 ¨³
2. Ne2 d5 31. Rcd1 Rde8
”“”¯“”“ 3. d3 Nf6 32. Bc1 Rd8
¯¨“”ž
—¹ž˜ 4. Nd2 Nc6 33.* c4 dxc4 ”˜”
“” 5. Ng3 Be6 34. Rxd8+Qxd8 ”ª”“
 6. Be2 Bd6 35. Qxc4 Qb8 –‘
’‘’– 7. O-O Qe7 36. Rd1 Re5 ’’‘
8. c3 O-O 37.* Nd5 Nxd5
‘’–›’‘’ 9.* Re1 Rad8 38. Rxd5 Qe8
‘’²‘
¦ª¤² 10. Bf3 e4 39. Rxe5 Qxe5 ¤¤
9. Re1 11. Be2 Bxg3 40. Qb5 Qe6 33. c4
12. hxg3 exd3 41. e4 Bg6
¨§³ 13. Bxd3 Ne5 42. Bf4 Qxa2 ¯³
14. Qc2 Nxd3 43. Qxb6 a4
”“¯“”“ 15. Qxd3 Rfe8 44. Kg3 Qb3 “”ž
˜ 16. Nf1 c5 45. Qb8+ Kh7 ”˜”
”“ 17. Qe2 Bg4 46. Qxb3 axb3 ””¨
ž 18.* f3 Bh5 47. Bd2 f6 ª–‘
19. g4 Bg6 48. Kf4 Be8
’’’ 20. Bd2 b6 49.* e5 fxe5+
’‘
‘’ª’‘ 21. Rad1 h6 50. Kxe5 Bb5 ‘’²‘
¦¦•² 22. Ng3 Qe5 51. g5 hxg5 ¤
18. f3 23. Kf2 Bc2 52. Bxg5 Bf1 37. Nd5
24. Rc1 Bh7 53. g3 Kg6
25. Rcd1 a5 54. Be3 c4
¨§³ 26.* Qb5 Qc7 55. Bd4 Be2
ž
“”ž 27. Rh1 Bc2 56. f4 Bg4 ”³
”˜” 28. Rc1 Bg6 57. Kd5 Be2 ””
””“¯ 29. Ne2 Re7 1/2-1/2 ”
‘ ‘²‘
’’‘– “‘
‘’ª²‘ ’‘
¤¦ 
26. Qb5 49. e5
Game 49: Defense Game DvB'G with White
White's DvB'G reacts to a rook pawn attack, and uses one conventional knight placement (9).
White retreats initially, then expands his position (15,22). He builds the tension nicely and opens
an attack with a fine sacrifice of the exchange (27). White then exploits the position perfectly (35),
finally capturing all of black's remaining pawns (45) for a resounding victory. Wunderbar!
§ž¯¨³ 1. d3 e5 35.* Qa5 Ne6 ¨³
2. Nd2 d5 36. Nxe6 Kxe6
“”“”“ 3. e3 Nc6 37. a4 Qd5
”­”“
—¹˜ 4. Be2 Nf6 38. Qc3 Qa2+ 
“” 5. Nb3 a5 39. Kg3 Qxa4 ”“
“ 6. Bd2 a4 40. Qxg7 Qb4 §—’—¦
‘’• 7. Nc1 Bd6 41. Qg8+ Kf6 ”ª’
8. Nf3 O-O 42. Qd8+ Kf5
‘’‘›’‘’ 9.* O-O Qe7 43. Qd5+ Kf6
‘••‘’
¦–ª²¤ 10. d4 e4 44. Kf4 c5 ¤²
9. O-O 11. Ne1 a3 45.* Qe5+ Kf7 27. Rxe4
12. b3 Be6 46. Qxe4 c4
§¨³ 13. c4 b6 47. Qxh7+Kf6 
14. f3 Bb4 48. Qh8+ Kf7
”¯“”“ 15.* Nc2 Bxd2 49. Qd4 Qb8+ ”´”“
”—ž˜ 16. Qxd2 Qd6 50. Kf3 Qc8 
“ 17. cxd5 Bxd5 51. Qd5+ Kf8 ˜
¹‘’“ 18. Bc4 Bxc4 52. Ke2 Qa6 ­–“
19. bxc4 Ra4 53. Qf5+ Kg7
”‘’‘ 20. fxe4 Nxe4 54. Kd2 Qa2+
¬’
‘›‘’ 21. Qd3 Qe7 55. Qc2 Qa6 ‘²‘’
¦–ª–¤² 22.* c5 Na5 56. Kc3 Qf6+ 
15. Nc2 23. Ne2 Nc4 57. Kxc4 Qc6+ 35. Qa5
24. Rf4 f5 58. Kd3 Qd5+
25. Raf1 bxc5 59. Kc3 Qc6+
¨³ 26. Qb3 Qd7 60. Kb2 Qb5+

”¯“”“ 27.* Rxe4 fxe4 61. Kc1 Qf1+ “
”— 28. Rxf8+ Kxf8 62. Qd1 Qc4+ ´
 29. Nc3 Nb2 63. Kd2 Qd5+ ”ª
§‘’— 30. Nxa4 Nxa4 64. Ke1 Qxg2 ¯“²
31. Qxa3 Qb5 65. Qd4+ Kg6
”ª’ 32. Kf2 Ke7 66. Qd6+ Kf7 ’
‘•‘’ 33. dxc5 Nxc5 67. Qf4+ 1-0 ‘’
¦–¤² 34. Nd4 Qc4 
22. c5 45. Qe5+
Defense Games 147

Game 50: Defense Game DvFxG with Black


Black reacts to the rook pawn early attack by bringing his knight forward and exchanging (9).
White sacrifices a pawn in an attempt to build an attack (14,23), but it soon fizzles out, leaving him
two pawns to the worse. After that he has to fall back and defend (34). Black opens the castle for
his rook and bishops (43), and crushes the rest with unerring precision (63). Grandiose!
§ž¯³¨ 1. e4 e6 38. Qh4 c4 ¨³¹
2. d4 Ne7 39. dxc4 dxc4
”“”—“”“ 3. Nf3 d6 40. Ne2 Bd3
”­“
”“ 4. Nc3 Nd7 41. Qg4 Rxf1 ”“’
‘ 5. Bd3 Ng6 42. Rxf1 Bh8 ”“¨ž
’‘¹ 6. h4 Be7 43.* Rf2 c3 ”–¦
–› 7. h5 Nh4 44. Bc1 cxb2+ ‘¬
8. Nxh4 Bxh4 45. Bxb2 Qe6
‘’‘’‘ 9.* Qg4 Bf6 46. Qxe6+Rxe6
‘’‘
¦ª²¤ 10. Ne2 e5 47. Nc1 Re1 ²¤
9. Qg4 11. Qg3 exd4 48. a4 Be4 34. Rhh1
12. h6 g6 49. Ka2 Bd5+
§ž¯¨³ 13. Bf4 O-O 50. Ka1 Bc6 §³¹
14.* O-O-O Nc5 51. Ba3 Re8
”“”—““ 15. Kb1 Be6 52. Nd3 Bxa4 “
”¹“’ 16. Bd2 Nxd3 53. Rb2 b5 ”¯“’
 17. cxd3 Qe7 54. Bc5 b4 ”
”‘ 18. Rc1 Rae8 55. Rd2 Bb5 “”ª
19. f3 c5 56. Kb2 Bf6
›¬ 20. Ka1 Qd7 57. g4 Bg5
ž
‘’‘•’‘ 21. Rcd1 Be5 58. Rd1 Re2+ ‘’•¦‘
¦²¤ 22. f4 Bh8 59. Kb1 Ba4 ²
14. O-O-O 23.* f5 Bxf5 60. Rf1 Bc2+ 43..c3
24. Nf4 Bg4 61. Ka1 Bxh6
25. Rc1 f5 62. g5 Bg7
§¨³¹ 26. exf5 Bxf5 63.* Rf3 Re3
³
”“­““ 27. Rhf1 Re5 64. Rf4 Rxd3 ¹“
”ž“’ 28. Rf2 Rfe8 65. Kb2 b3 “
” 29. Rh1 d5 66. Rf1 Rd1 ”’
”‘’ 30. Rc1 b6 67. Rf6 Rb1+ ””
31. Rh1 Bg4 68. Ka3 d3
‘¬ 32. Rff1 Rf8 69. Be3 Ra1+ •¤
‘’•‘ 33. Rh4 Bf5 70. Kb2 Ra2+ ž§
²¤¤ 34.* Rhh1 a5 71. Kc3 b2 ²
23. f5 35. Rf2 Ree8 72. Kc4 b1=Q 63..Re3
36. Rc1 Be5 73. Rb6 Bb3+
37. Rff1 Qd6 0-1
Game 51: Defense Game Dv7'G' with Black
Black's Dv7'G' is the cautious reaction to the K-side rook pawn early attack (9). Black then
advances on both flanks and gains some space (16). Black has to react to a queen invasion (25)
and goes a pawn down as white gains tempo by attacking (36). Black has a rough time of it in the
four rooks endgame but finally equalizes (58) and is able to make a goal line stand (71). Whew!
§ž¯³˜¨ 1. d4 d6 40. Rf4+ Ke6 ž¨³
2. e4 e6 41. Rc6+ Kd5
”“”—¹““ 3. Nf3 Ne7 42. Rcc4 Rb7
¨“
”““’ 4. c4 Nd7 43. Rfd4+ Ke6 “’
 5. Nc3 Ng6 44. Re4+ Kf6 ¦“
‘’‘ 6. h4 Be7 45. Rg4 Rd7 “›
–• 7. h5 Ngf8 46. Rc5 Ra7 
‘’’‘ 8. h6
9.* Be3 e5
g6 47. Rf4+ Ke6
48. Rcc4 Re2
‘’’‘
¦ª²›¤ 10. d5 f5 49. Kg3 Ra5 ¤²
9. Be3 11. Be2 Nf6 50. Rc6+ Kd7 32. Be6+
12. O-O Nxe4 51. Rb6 Re7
§ž¯³¨ 13. Nxe4 fxe4 52. Rb7+ Ke8 ¦
14. Nd2 Nd7 53. Rfb4 Ra7
”“”¹“ 15. Nxe4 Nf6 54. R7b5 Kd8 ¨´“
”˜“’ 16.* Ng3 c5 55. a5 Re3+ “’
‘” 17. dxc6 bxc6 56. Kf4 Re2 ’
‘ 18. Bf3 d5 57. Rb8+ Kc7 ¦²
19. cxd5 cxd5 58.* a6 Rxa6
– 20. Qc2 O-O 59. R4b7+Kc6

‘’›’‘ 21. Rfd1 Bb7 60. Rxh7 Rxg2 §‘
¦ª¤² 22. Ne4 Qd7 61. Rg7 Ra4+ 
16..c5 23. Nxf6+ Rxf6 62. Kf3 Rag4 58. a6
24. Rac1 Rd8 63. Rc8+ Kd5
¨³ 25.* Qc7 Rf7
26. Bxa7 Qxc7
64. Rd8+ Ke5
65. Re8+ Kf5

”ž¬­¹“ 27. Rxc7 Ba8 66. Rf8+ Ke5 ¤‘
¨“’ 28. Bb6 Rb8 67. Re7+ Kd6 ´“
“” 29. Bc5 Bxc5 68. h7 R4g3+ 
 30. Rxc5 e4 69. Ke4 Rh3 °¦§
31. Bg4 Ra7 70. Rb7 Rg4+
› 32.* Be6+ Kf8 71.* Rf4 Rgh4 §
‘’’‘ 33. Bxd5 Bxd5 72. Rxh4 Rxh4+ 
¦¤² 34. Rdxd5Rxb2 73. Kf3 Ke6 
25..Rf7 35. a4 Rb1+ 74. Kg3 g5 71..Rgh4
36. Kh2 Rb2 75. h8=Q Rxh8
37. Rc8+ Kf7 76. Kg4 Rf8
38. Rd4 Rxf2 77. Kxg5 1/2-1/2
39. Rxe4 Ra2
Defense Games 149

Game 52: Defense Game Dv7G' with Black


Black plays Dv7G', a more aggressive response to the rook pawn attack (9). Black launches his
K-side pawns into the attack (15), despite the risks of exposing his king. A standoff in the center
is broken up by a pawn sacrifice by white (24), who brings both knights forward, but can then find
no better continuation than to offer the exchange (34), and draw by perpetual check (38,45).
§ž¯³˜¨ 1. e4 e6 28. Qd2 g3 ¨¯¨³
2. d4 d6 29. f3 Nd4
”“”—¹““ 3. c4 Nd7 30. b4 Rf8
”“
”“’ 4. Nc3 Ne7 31. bxc5 dxc5 “ž’
” 5. Nf3 Ng6 32. Ne5 c6 ”–¹¤
‘’‘ 6. h4 Be7 33. Nxf4 Bg5 ˜‘–
–• 7. h5 Ngf8 34.* Nxe6 Bxd2 ›‘”
8. h6 g5 35. Nxd8 Bxc1
‘’’‘ 9.* Bd3 Ng6 36. Bc4+ Kh8
‘¬‘
¦ª²›¤ 10. Be3 e5 37. Ndf7+ Kg8 ¦²
9. Re1 11. Nd5 g4 38.* Nd6+ Kh8 34. Nxe6
12. Nd2 exd4 39. Nef7+ Kg8
§ž¯¨³ 13. Bxd4 Nde5 40. Ng5+ Kh8 ¨¨³
14. Be2 O-O 41. Ndf7+ Kg8
”“”¹““ 15.* Be3 f5 42. Nd8+ Kh8 ”•“
”—’ 16. Qb3 f4 43. Ngf7+ Kg8 “’
•˜ 17. Bd4 Kh8 44. Nd6+ Kh8 ”–¤
‘‘“ 18. Rh5 b6 45.* N8f7+ Kg8 ›˜‘
19. Rc1 Bd7 46. Rg5+ Bxg5
 20. Qa3 Bh4 47. Nxg5+ Kh8
‘”
‘’–›’‘ 21. Kf1 Kg8 48. Ngf7+ Rxf7 ‘‘
¦ª²¤ 22. Kg1 Be6 49. Nxf7+ Kg8 ¹²
15..f5 23. Qc3 Rf7 50. Ne5+ Kh8 38. Nd6+
24.* c5 bxc5 51. Nf7+ Kg8
25. Bxe5 Nxe5 52. Ne5+ Kh8
§¯³ 26. Nc4 Nc6 53. Nf7+ Kg8
¨–¨´
””§“ 27. Bd3 Rb8 1/2-1/2 ”“
””ž—’ “–’
•˜¤ ”¤
‘‘”“¹ ›˜‘
¬ ‘”
‘’–›’‘ ‘‘
¦² ¹²
24. c5 45. N8f7+
Game 53: Defense Game DvBE with White
White plays the strong Defense Game DvBE (9), and wins in this remarkable contest. After some
position adjustment, white opens two files (19), but black seizes control, winning three pawns
(30,42) as white keeps trying to find a counter attack. Poor coordination among the black forces
later allows white to equalize, drive for promotion, and build a mating attack (58,62). Black has to
surrender a piece, and after that it's all white's game. Plenty of surprises in this one!
§¯¨³ 1. d3 e5 39. Qe2 Ra3 ¨
2. Bd2 d5 40. Rf1 d3
“”¹“”“ 3. e3 Nc6 41. Qf3 Kh7
“”³
“—ž˜ 4. Ne2 Nf6 42.* Rc7 Rxa4 ”¹­”
“” 5. Ng3 Be7 43. Be3 Ra2 ”•
 6. Be2 O-O 44. Rb7 d2 ‘˜‘
–‘’– 7. O-O Be6 45. Rd1 b5 ¨“ª
8. Nc3 a6 46. Rxb5 Nc6
‘’‘›’‘’ 9.* a3 Re8 47. Rd5 Ne5
‘’
¦ª¤² 10. Bf3 Qd6 48. Qf1 Rxd5 ¦¤²
9. a3 11. b4 Red8 49. exd5 Qg4 42. Rc7
12. e4 d4 50. Bxd2 Nc4
§¨³ 13. Na2 Qd7 51. h3 Qe4 ¹
14. Nc1 h6 52. Bf4 g5
˜­¹“” 15. Nb3 b6 53. Bc1 a4 ‘“
”“ž˜” 16. Be2 a5 54. d6 Kg6 ˜­³”
”‘” 17. b5 Na7 55. Ng3 Qc6 ”
‘”‘ 18. a4 c6 56. d7 Bd8 “¦
19.* f4 exf4 57. Rd4 Nb6
•‘– 20. bxc6 Nxc6 58.* Bd2 Kg7 –‘
‘›’‘’ 21. Bxf4 Rac8 59. Nf5+ Kg8 §‘
¦ª¤² 22. Qb1 Nb4 60. Rd6 Qc4 ª²
19. f4 23. Bd1 Ng4 61. Nxh6+Kg7 58. Bd2
24. Bxg4 Bxg4 62.* Bc3+ Kf8
§³ 25. Rf2 Be6
26. Re2 Re8
63. Qf5 Nxd7
64. Rxd7 Bb6+
¹
­“” 27. Rf2 Bh4 65. Kh2 Qf4+ ‘“´
”§ž” 28. Re2 Rc6 66. Qxf4 gxf4 ˜¦–
” 29. Kh1 Rec8 67. Rxf7+ Ke8 ”
‘˜”‘¹ 30.* Kg1 Nxc2 68. Be5 a3 “­
31. Ra2 Bxb3 69. Bd6 Kd8
•‘– 32. Qxb3 Nb4 70. h4 Ra1 ‘
‘¤‘’ 33. Ra1 Rc3 71. Rxf4 Kd7 §‘
¦ª² 34. Qd1 Qg4 72. Be5 Re1 ª²
30..Nxc2 35. Bd2 Rxd3 73. Ng4 Bg1+ 62. Bc3+
36. Nf5 Bf6 74. Kg3 Bc5
37. Re1 Qg6 75. h5 Rh1
38. Rc1 Rd8 76. h6 1-0
Defense Games 151

Game 54: Defense Game Dv3E with Black


Black's powerful Dv3E strikes at the center of white's 3 pawn opening. White retreats rather than
exchange (9), and the game remains closed until black starts to open it gradually (20,33). After
lengthy maneuvers black is able to create and win a doubled pawn (49), and push on to win in a
long and difficult positional battle (73). If you like positional play, and have the patience to outlast
your adversary, then the Defense Game and the D-system is absolutely the best that you can find.
§ž¯¨³ 1. d4 d6 38. Re3 Qb6 §¯§³
2. e4 e6 39. Na3 Nb3
”“—¹“”“ 3. Nf3 Ne7 40. Rde2 Nd4
ž“¹
”“— 4. c4 Nd7 41. Rd2 Nf5 “”“
” 5. Nc3 Ng6 42. Rf3 Nxh4 ˜‘“
‘’‘ 6. Bd3 Be7 43. gxh4 Qb4 ““‘’’
–• 7. O-O c5 44. Qb1 Nf6 ––¦‘
8. Be2 O-O 45. Nc2 Qb6
‘’›’‘’ 9.* Be3 b6 46. Na3 Nd7
’¦›²
¦ª¤² 10. Qc2 Bb7 47. Kh2 Nc5 ª
9. Be3 11. d5 Re8 48. Rg3 Qd8 49..Bf6
12. Rad1 a6 49.* Rf2 Bf6
¨§³ 13. Rfe1 Qc7 50. Rf1 Bxh4 ¨³
14. Nd2 Bf6 51. Re3 Nb3
ž­“”“ 15. Ndb1 Be5 52. Qd1 Qb6 §ž
“””“˜— 16. Qd2 Nf6 53. Qe2 Nd4 “”“¹
”‘¹ 17. f3 Rab8 54. Qd2 Qa7 ˜‘“
‘‘‘ 18. Bf1 Rbd8 55. Rd1 Bf6 “‘’”
19. a4 Qd7 56. Bh1 Rc7
–‘ 20.* Bf2 exd5 57. Rg3 h4
’‘
’¬‘’ 21. cxd5 Bf4 58. Rgg1 Nb3 ¤–›²
•¤¦›² 22. Qc2 Bg5 59. Qe2 Bd4 •¤
20..exd5 23. Na3 Qc7 60. Rg2 Bg7 73..Nd3
24. g3 Ne5 61. Nab1 Bc8
25. Bg2 Bh6 62. Rgg1 Bd7
§§³ 26. Qe2 g6 63. Rgf1 Rb8
75. Kg1 Rc7
76. Na5 Re8
87. Nc6 Rf4
88. Kd2 Re4
ž¯—“¹ 27. Rf1 Bg7 64. Bg2 Nd4 77. exf5 Bxf5 89. Kc2 Re2+
“””“ 28. Rfe1 h5 65. Qf2 Rcb7 78. Kh1 Ne1 90. Rd2 Rxd2+
79. Ra2 Bg3 91. Kxd2 a3
‘“ 29. Be3 Nfd7 66. Rd2 Nb3 80. Rd2 Bd3 92. Kc2 g5
‘“‘’— 30. Bg5 Rc8 67. Qxa7 Rxa7 81. Rf6 Nf3 93. Ne3 Rb7
31. f4 Ng4 68. Rc2 Rab7 82. Rxd3 Re1+ 94. Kd3 g4
–’ 32. Nc2 c4 69. Nd1 f5 83. Bf1 Rxf1+ 95. Nd4 gxh3
’•¦ª›’ 33.* Rd2 b5 70. Rg1 Nc5 84. Kg2 Rg1+ 96. Ng4 h2
¦² 34. Kh1 bxa4 71. Nd2 c3 85. Kxf3 Rf1+
86. Ke2 Rxf6
97. Nxh2 Bxh2
0-1
33..b5 35. h3 Ngf6 72. bxc3 Bh6
36. Qd1 Nh7 73.* Rf1 Nd3
37. Bh4 Nc5 74. Nc4 Bxf4+
Game 55: Close Variant Dv4 with Black
Black's Dv4 responds well to any 2 pawn center, here a K-side fianchetto (9). Black loses a pawn
and is invaded K-side (22), but his defense holds and he follows by taking all white's Q-side
pawns. Black appears to have the game won (51), but after harassment by white's queen he loses
his lead and nearly loses the game (69,77). Chess is full of surprises, this game is one of them!
§¯³¨ 1. g3 e6 40. Qc3 N6d7 ³
”“”ž¹“”“ 2. Nf3 Ne7
3. d4 d5
41*. Nd3 Qe3+
42. Kg2 Qh6
¯
˜“— 4. Nc3 Nd7 43. Ne5 Nxe5 ““
“ 5. Bg2 Nb6 44. dxe5 Ra8 ““’
’‘ 6. O-O Bd7 45. f4 Ne6 §’ª
–ª•’ 7. Qd3 Ng6 46. Nd4 Nxd4 ’
8. e4 Be7 47. Qxd4 Qg7
‘’‘’›’ 9.* h4 h5 48. Qa1 Ra4
“°
¦¤² 10. exd5 exd5 49. Qd1 b5 ¦
9. h4 11. a4 a5 50. Qg4 a2 51..d4
12. Re1 O-O 51.* Ra1 d4
¨§³ 13. b3 c6 52. Qe6+ Qf7 
14. Bg5 Bxg5 53. Qxc6 Ra5
““” 15. Nxg5 Qf6 54. e6 Qa7 ¨­´
“¯˜— 16. Nf3 Rfe8 55. Qe8+ Kg7 ‘
”“ž 17. Qd2 Bf5 56. Kh3 Qb7 
‘’’ 18. Nh2 Nd7 57. f5 gxf5 ¬
19. Bf3 Qd6 58. Qd8 Ra7
‘–›’ 20. Bxh5 Nf6 59. Qg5+ Kh8
“’°
‘¬’– 21. Bf3 Rad8 60. Qxf5 b4 “
¦¦² 22.* h5 Nf8 61. Qe5+ Kg8 ¤
22. h5 23. h6 gxh6 62. Qxd4 b3 69..Qe7
24. Qxh6 Bxc2 63. Qd8+ Kg7
§˜³ 25. Rxe8 Rxe8
26. Ng4 Bg6
64. Qd4+ Kg6
65. Qg4+ Kh7

““ 27.* Ne5 Qb4 66. Qh4+ Kg6 ³
“¯˜ž¬ 28. Ne2 Qxb3 67. Qg4+ Kh6 ¨
”“– 29. Re1 Qxa4 68. Qh4+ Kg7 ¬
‘’ 30. Kg2 Qb4 69.* Rf1 Qe7 ‘
31. Rh1 N6h7 70. Qg4+ Kh8
‘–›’ 32. Bh5 Be4+ 71. Rf7 Qxf7 “
’ 33. f3 Bg6 72. exf7 Rxf7 “°
¦² 34. Kf2 a4 73. Qd4+ Kh7 
27..Qb4 35. Bxg6 fxg6 74. Kg2 Rf8 after 77..Kf7
36. Qe3 Qd6 75. Qe4+ Kg7
37. Qd3 a3 76. Qe5+ Rf6
38. Qb3 Qe7 77.* g4 Kf7
39. Re1 Nf6 1/2-1/2
Close Variants 153

Game 56: Close Variant DvB' with White


White responds to a rook pawn attack Q-side, then completes his standard opening (9). Black
closes the center (19), and waits for white to open it (26). White picks off black's advanced pawn
easily (35), and follows with a serious K-side assault (43) that nets him two more pawns and the
exchange (66), and then overcomes black's crumbling defense. An Impressive win!
§ž¯¨³ 1. d3 d5 40. Bh6 Re8 §³
2. Nd2 e5 41. Nf5 Nf8
“”“”“ 3. Nb3 Nc6 42. Bxf8 Rxf8
—¨““
—¹˜ 4. Bd2 a5 43.* Qg5 Nh7 ¯˜“
“” 5. e3 a4 44. Qg3 Ra6 ““‘
“ 6. Nc1 Nf6 45. Rc7 Qe6 ““’
‘’– 7. Nge2 Bd6 46. Ne7+ Kh8 ’’‘–
8. Ng3 O-O 47. Re1 Qd6
‘’‘’‘’ 9.* Be2 Qe7 48. Rc5 Qxg3
’¬“‘’
¦–ª²›¤ 10. a3 Rd8 49. hxg3 Rb8 ¦¦²
9. Be2 11. O-O Bc5 50. Nxd5 Nf8 35. Nxf2
12. c3 Bb6 51. Rc7 Rd6
§¨³ 13. d4 Bd7 52. Nb4 Kg8 §¨³
14. Bb5 Nb8 53. Ree7 Ne6
“—“”“ 15. Bxd7 Nbxd7 54. Ra7 Nd8 ¦“
¹­˜ 16. Nce2 Qe6 55. d5 Rc8 ­˜“
“” 17. Qc2 c5 56. g4 Kg7 ““•
““’ 18. Rfc1 c4 57. g5 Kg8 ““’
19.* Re1 e4 58. Re8+ Kg7
’’’– 20. Nf4 Qc6 59. f4 Rb8
’’‘
’ª•’‘’ 21. Nf5 Re8 60. Na6 Rc8 ’¬‘’
¦¦² 22. Qd1 Kh8 61. Nc7 Rd7 ¦²
19..e4 23. Rf1 Bc7 62. Nxb5 Rxd5 43. Qg5
24. Ng3 Kg8 63. Nd4 Rb8
§§³ 25. Qc2 g6
26.* f3 Bxf4
64. Rxa4 Rc5
65. Ra7 Rd5
¨˜¤
“¹—““ 27. exf4 e3 66.* Ne6+ Nxe6 ¦“´
­˜“ 28. Bc1 Re7 67. Rxb8 Nxf4 “
“ 29. Re1 Rae8 68. Rbb7 Rf5 §’
““’“– 30. f5 b6 69. g4 Ne2+ “–’
31. Nf1 e2 70. Kg2 Rf4
’’’– 32. Ng3 Qd6 71. Rb8 Rxg4+ ’’
’ª’‘’ 33. Bg5 b5 72. Kf3 Rxg5 ’‘
¦¤² 34. Qd2 Ra8 73. Kxe2 Re5+ ²
26. f3 35.* Nxe2 Ree8 74. Kf3 Rf5+ 66. Ne6+
36. Bf4 Qb6 75. Kg4 Kh6
37. Ng3 Rec8 76. Rh8+ Kg7
38. fxg6 hxg6 77. Rc8 Kh6
39. Re7 Qc6 78. Rxc4 1-0
Game 57: Close Variant Dv5'E with Black
The author plays his favorite opening, avoiding a central pawn exchange with Dv5'E (9). Black has
no difficulties following the opening, and deploys his forces K-side (19). Black's multiple threats
win a pawn (25), which he returns with an exchange sacrifice (28), opening the white castle. Black
is just a hair away from winning when white offers the exchange (64), and then stalemates (74).

§ž¯¨³ 1. e4 e6 38. Kg2 Rd4 ¨­¨´


2. d4 d6 39. Re4 Bg5
”“”—¹“”“ 3. Nf3 Ne7 40. Re2 Kg8
¹”
”— 4. Nc3 Nd7 41. a5 Kf7 ““””
‘” 5. Be2 Ng6 42. Rc2 Ke6 ”
‘ 6. d5 e5 43. Kf1 c4 ‘
–• 7. O-O Be7 44. Ra4 d5 ˜•‘
8. Be3 O-O 45. Ke2 g6
‘’‘›’‘’ 9.* Qd2 a6 46. Ra3 Kf5
’ª’‘
¦ª¤² 10. a3 Nf6 47. Ra1 Rd3 ¦¦²
9. Qd2 11. Qd3 Ng4 48. Ra4 Rb3 28..Rxf3
12. Bd2 Nf4 49. Ra2 Rb4
§¯¨´ 13. Qc4 Nxe2+ 50. Kd1 Bf6 ¦
14. Qxe2 f5 51. Ke2 Kf4
“”¹” 15. Qc4 Nf6 52. Rc1 Rb3 
“”˜” 16. exf5 Bxf5 53. Rd1 Rb5 “”
‘”ž 17. Rfc1 Kh8 54. Rg1 g5 ’“
ª 18. h3 h6 55. Rc1 e4 “¹
19.* Be3 Bh7 56. fxe4 Kxe4
’–•‘ 20. Qb3 Qd7 57. Rc2 Rb3
§³
’‘’‘ 21. a4 c6 58. h4 gxh4 ¤’’”
¦¦² 22. dxc6 bxc6 59. Kf1 h3 °
19..Bh7 23. Rd1 Rab8 60. Re2+ Kf3 64. Rxf4+
24. Qc4 Qc8 61. Re6 Bg5
25.* Bc1 Bxc2 62. Re8 h2
¨­¨´ 26. Re1 Nd5 63. Rf8+ Bf4

¹”ž 27. Qe2 Nxc3 64.* Rxf4+ Kxf4 
““”˜” 28.* Qxc2 Rxf3 65. Kg2 d4 “
” 29. gxf3 Nd5 66. Ra4 Rxb2 ’“
‘ª 30. Kg2 Rb4 67. Rxc4 Rxf2+ 
31. Re4 Qf5 68. Kh1 Kg3
–•‘ 32. Re2 Qxc2 69. Rc3+ Rf3 “§´
’‘’‘ 33. Rxc2 c5 70. Rd3 h5 ”
¦¤² 34. Bd2 Rh4 71. Rd1 Kh3 ¤°
25. Bc1 35. Kg3 Nf4 72. Rd3 Kg3 74..Rxd3
36. Bxf4 Rxf4 73. Rd1 d3
37. Re2 Bh4+ 74.* Rxd3 Rxd3
1/2-1/2
Close Variants 155

Game 58: Close Variant Dv3'6' with Black


Black's solid Dv3'6' faces the 3 pawn classical defense with an early bishop attack blocked by his
f-pawn advance (9). Black jams the center, and refuses to initiate exchanges (14,19), resulting in a
completely closed position. Afterwards black explores opportunities to break thru (25), but neither
side finds motivation to open the game (35). The game ends in an agreed draw with all pieces and
pawns on the board (51), evidence of the amazing tenacity of the Defense Game and its variants.
§ž¯³¨ 1. d4 d6 27. Kg2 Nb6 §¨˜³
2. c4 c6 28. Re1 Nbd7
”“—¹”“ 3. Nc3 e6 29. Nb3 Qc7
“¯—¹ž”“
“”“”— 4. e4 Ne7 30. Bf5 b6 “””
 5. Bg5 f6 31. Nd2 Rdb8 ”‘”
‘’‘ 6. Be3 Ng6 32. h4 Rd8 ‘‘‘
–›• 7. Bd3 Nd7 33. Bh3 Bh5 –’›
8. Nf3 Be7 34. Qd3 Qb7
‘’’‘’ 9.* O-O e5 35.* Kh2 Bf7
’ª–’’
¦ª²¤ 10. Be2 O-O 36. Qe2 Qc7 ¦¤²
9. 0-0 11. Qc2 Nb6 37. Nb3 Qb7 25..Qa5
12. Rad1 Be6 38. Qc2 Bg6
§¨³ 13. Qb3 Qd7 39. Nd2 Bf7 §¨˜³
14.* d5 Bf7 40. Bg4 h5
”“­¹”“ 15. a4 Qc7 41. Bf5 Ng6 ­—¹”“
˜“”ž”— 16. Rfe1 Nd7 42. Kg2 Qc7 “”””
‘” 17. Qc2 a6 43. Bf2 Qb7 ”‘”ž
‘‘ 18. Bf1 Rfe8 44. Bg1 Qc7 ‘‘‘’
19.* Rc1 c5 45. Be3 Qb7
ª–• 20. Nd2 Nf4 46. b3 Qc7
–ª‘’›
‘’›’‘’ 21. g3 Ng6 47. Rac1 Rdb8 ’–°
¤¤² 22. Bg2 Rec8 48. Qd3 Re8 ¦¦
14..Bf7 23. Ra1 Rcb8 49. Rcd1 Qb7 35. Kh2
24. Red1 Ngf8 50. Ra1 Qc7
25.* Bh3 Qa5 51.* Kh2 Qb7
§§³ 26. f3 Rd8 52. Bh3 Red8
§§³
“¯—¹ž”“ 1/2-1/2 ¯—¹ž”
““””— “”””—
‘” ”‘”›“
‘‘‘ ‘‘‘’
–• ‘–ª‘’
’ª’‘’ –²
¦¦›² ¦¦
19..c5 51..Qb7
Game 59: Close Variant Dv3'E with Black
The author with black plays Dv3'E (9), this time going for the win. White backs away from a
bishop exchange and black consolidates his defense (17). After further exchanges, black is able
to bring both knights downfield (28) and exchange them off effectively. The crunch comes when
white has to abandon the defense of his backward pawn (41), giving black the lead. Black pushes
thru a tangled mass of pawns (49) and stays ahead in the difficult endgame exercise (62).
§ž¯¨³ 1. Nf3 e6 38. Qf3 Nf4 §³
2. e4 d6 39. Nxf4 Qf1+
”“—¹“”“ 3. d4 Ne7 40. Kh2 gxf4
”
“”“— 4. Bd3 Nd7 41.* Ra2 Qe1 ””
 5. Nc3 c6 42. Qe2 Qxe2 “‘”
’‘ 6. O-O Ng6 43. Rxe2 Rxc3 ‘”‘
–›• 7. Bg5 Be7 44. Rb2 Rc5 ¦’ª‘
8. Be3 O-O 45. Kg2 g6
‘’‘’‘’ 9.* Qd2 e5 46. h4 f5
’²
¦ª¤² 10. Rad1 Bf6 47. f3 Kg7 ­
9. Qd2 11. d5 c5 48. Kf2 Kh6 41. Ra2
12. Nb5 Nb6 49.* Kg2 fxg4
§—¯¨³ 13. h3 a6 50. fxg4 Rc3 
14. Nc3 Bd7 51. Rxb5 Rg3+
“ž“”“ 15. Rb1 Nc8 52. Kf2 Rxg4 
“”¹— 16. b4 cxb4 53. Rb6 Rxh4 ”“´
‘” 17.* Rxb4 b5 54. Rxd6 Rh2+ “¨‘”“
¦‘ 18. Rfb1 Nh4 55. Kf3 Rh3+ ‘”‘’
19. Ne1 Be7 56. Kg4 Re3
–›•‘ 20. g4 h6 57. Re6 Rxe4
‘
‘‘¬’‘ 21. R4b2 Bg5 58. d6 Re3 ¦°
¤² 22. Bxg5 hxg5 59. d7 Rg3+ 
17..b5 23. a4 bxa4 60. Kh4 Rd3 49..fxg4
24. Rb7 f6 61. Re7 f3
25. Ra1 Ra7 62.* Kg3 g5
¯¨³ 26. Rxa7 Nxa7 63. Rxe5 Rxd7

ž” 27. Nxa4 Nb5 64. Kxf3 Rf7+ ‘¦
“”” 28.* Nb2 Nd4 65. Kg3 Rf1 “´
—‘”” 29. Kh1 Bb5 66. Re8 Rg1+ ”
‘‘˜ 30. Bxb5 axb5 67. Kf2 Rb1 
31. Qe3 Qc7 68. Kg3 Rb3+
›‘ 32. c3 Nb3 69. Kg4 Rb4+ §“²
–‘¬’ 33. Ra3 Nc5 70. Kg3 Rc4 
¦–² 34. Ned3 Nxd3 71. Rg8 Kh5 
28..Nd4 35. Nxd3 Rc8 72. Rh8+ Kg6 62..g5
36. Qe2 Ng6 73. Rg8+ Kf6
37. Qd1 Qc4 74. Rf8+ Kg7
Close Variants 157

Game 60: Close Variant Dv4xE with Black


Black's Dv4xE responds well to a center pawn early attack (9), preventing white from castling.
White drops a pawn trying to develop any threat (13). The tension builds as black powers thru in
the center (27). When black brings his rook downfield (40), it starts a complex series of exchanges
leaving white with a doomed piece (46). Black then brings his own pieces close in for the kill (78).
§ž¯¨³ 1. d4 d6 40.* Bf1 Rb2 ¨¨³
2. e4 e6 41. Qxa3 Qxa3
”“”—¹“”“ 3. c4 Nd7 42. Nxa3 e3
¯¹”
“— 4. Nf3 Ne7 43. Bc4 Bxc4 ž”
’ 5. e5 dxe5 44. Nxc4 Rc2 “‘
‘ 6. dxe5 Ng6 45. Rxc2 Nxc2 •˜“’¦
•’ 7. Qe2 Be7 46.* Rh2 Nxe1 ”¬’
‘’ª’’ 8. g3
9.* Bg2 Nc5
O-O 47. Nxe3 Nf3
48. Rb2 Nd4
‘
¦•²›¤ 10. Nc3 Nd3+ 49. Rb7 Re8 ¦›°
9. Bg2 11. Kf1 c5 50. Nc4 Rc8 40..Rb2
12. h4 f6 51. Ne3 Ba5
§ž¯¨³ 13.* Be3 Ngxe5 52. Rd7 Rd8 ¨³
14. Rd1 Qb6 53. Re7 Bb4
”“¹”“ 15. Nxe5 Nxe5 54. Rb7 Be1 ¹”
“”— 16. f4 Nc6 55. Kh2 Ra8 ”
”’ 17. Kg1 Nd4 56. Rb2 Ra3 “‘
‘’ 18. Qf2 Rd8 57. Nf1 Rf3 •’¦
19. Na4 Qa5 58. Kg2 Kh7
–—•’ 20. b3 e5 59. a4 Ra3
”’
‘’ª’› 21. Bd2 Qc7 60. Kh3 Rxa4 ‘—
¦°¤ 22. Nc3 Bd6 61. Rb1 Nc2 °
13..Ngxe5 23. Nd5 Qf7 62. Rb2 Rc4 46. Rh2
24. Re1 Be6 63. Rb7 Re4
§¨³ 25. h5
26. Bc3 Rac8
h6 64. Ra7 Re2
65. Nh2 Ne3

”“­” 27.* Be4 f5 66. Ra1 Bc3 ¤
¹ž”” 28. Bg2 e4 67. Rc1 Bf6 ”
”•”‘ 29. Ne3 Bc7 68. Rc8 Nd1 “³
‘˜›’ 30. Rc1 a6 69. Nf1 g5 ¹’—
31. Be1 a5 70. hxg6+ Kxg6
‘’ 32. Qb2 a4 71. Rc7 Nf2+ ’
‘¬ 33. Rh4 Rb8 72. Kg2 Ne4+ ¨
¦²¤ 34. b4 b5 73. Kh3 Kh5 •²
27..f5 35. bxc5 bxc4 74. Rh7 Nf2+ 78..Rxf4+
36. Qf2 Qe7 75. Kg2 Ng4+
37. Kh1 a3 76. Kh1 Rf2
38. Nxc4 Qxc5 77. Kg1 Bd4
39. Qe3 Qa7 78.* Rd7 Rxf4+
Game 61: Close Variant Dv3'D with Black
Black's Dv3'D continues with normal development despite the bishop early attack (9). White offers
a pawn to open the center, but black still maintains the initiative (19). White tries hard to get his
pawn back (33), but nothing seems to work (41). Down 2 pawns in the four rooks endgame (59)
white has to scramble but finally manages to draw, since black's passed pawn can't advance (78).
§ž³¨ 1. d4 d6 40. Re3 Rb4 ¨´
2. e4 e6 41.* Bxc6 Rxg4+
”“¯—¹“”“ 3. Nf3 Ne7 42. Kh1 bxc6
”““
“”“— 4. c4 Nd7 43. Rxh3 Rf2 ›“
 5. Bg5 c6 44. b3 a5 ’
‘’‘ 6. Nc3 Qc7 45. Rd3 Kg7 ¨‘
–• 7. Be2 Ng6 46. h3 Rgg2 ¦ž
8. O-O Be7 47. Re7+ Kh6
‘’›’‘’ 9.* Bxe7 Kxe7 48. Rdd7 Rh2+ ’’
¦ª¤² 10. Qd2 Re8 49. Kg1 Rfg2+ ¦²
9. Bxe7 11. Rad1 Kf8 50. Kf1 Rb2 41..Rxg4+
12. e5 dxe5 51. Rxh7+Kg5
§ž§³ 13. dxe5 Ndxe5 52. Kg1 Rhc2 
14. Nxe5 Qxe5 53. h4+ Kf4
”““”“ 15. Rfe1 Qf4 54. Rhf7+ Kg3 ¦
““ 16. Qd3 Kg8 55. Rd1 Rxb3 “¤
­ 17. Ne4 Qf5 56. Rf6 Rxc5 ”¨
‘•˜ 18. Qc2 Nf4 57. Rxg6+Kxh4 ´
› 19.* Bf3 Nh3+
20. Kf1 Ng5
58. Rd7 Rbc3
59.* Rdg7 Rd5
¨
‘’ª’‘’ 21. Rd3 e5 60. Kf2 Rf5+ 
¤¦² 22. Qb3 Qg6 61. Ke2 Rcc5 ²
19..Nh3+ 23. Nxg5 Qxg5 62. Rg1 Rg5 59..Rd5
24. Rde3 Qe7 63. R7xg5 Rxg5
§´ 25. Kg1 f6
26. Qc2 Rd8
64. Rh1+ Kg3
65. Rc1 a4

”““ 27. Be4 g6 66. Rxc6 Ra5 
““ 28. Bd3 Rd4 67. Rc3+ Kf4 
’­” 29. g3 Bh3 68. Ra3 Ke4 ¤
¨ 30. f4 Qd7 69. Kd2 Kd4 “´
31. fxe5 fxe5 70. Kc2 Kc4
¬›¦’ž 32. c5 Kh8 71. Rf3 Re5 §
‘’’ 33. Qc3 Qd5 72. Kb2 Rd5 °
¦² 34.* Be4 Qxa2 73. Ka3 Kb5 
34. Be4 35. Bf3 Qc4 74. Rf8 Rd3+ after 78..Kb4
36. Qxc4 Rxc4 75. Ka2 Rh3
37. Rxe5 Rb4 76. Rf5+ Kb6
38. R5e2 Rb5 77. Rf4 Ka5
39. g4 Rf8 78.* Rf5+ Kb4
Close Variants 159

Game 62: Close Variant Dv5'Cx with Black


White tries a combination bishop and center pawn early attack; black responds with Dv5'Cx (9).
White goes all-out on the attack (21), but black's active defense holds well (28), and retains a pawn
advantage. Afterwards black invades with a coordinated and insistent assault which finally wins
him the exchange (44). His rook pair keeps white nailed to the back rank, allowing black's king to
come down the board (58). Black closes the game out with a clever knight trap (69). A solid win.
§¯³¨ 1. e4 d6 38. Rbb1 Nb3 ¨³
2. d4 Nd7 39. Rc2 Qb4
”“”ž¹“”“ 3. Nd2 e6 40. Nf1 a4
§¯”“
”— 4. Bd3 Ne7 41. Rc6 a3 ”
‘” 5. Bb5 Ng6 42. Ra6 Bc4 ”
‘ 6. d5 e5 43. Nc2 Qe7 ž‘
• 7. Ngf3 Be7 44.* Rxa3 Nd2 ¦—‘
8. Bxd7+Bxd7 45. Rc3 Bxf1
‘’‘–’‘’ 9.* O-O O-O 46. Rxf1 Nxf1
•¬‘’
¦ª²¤ 10. Re1 c6 47. Kxf1 Rd1+ ¤•²
9. O-O 11. Nf1 cxd5 48. Ne1 Qb4 44..Nd2
12. Qxd5 Qc7 49. Qa2+ Kf8
§¨³ 13. Bd2 Qxc2 50. Qc4 Qxc4+ 
14. Rac1 Qxb2 51. Rxc4 R8d2
”ª¹“”“ 15. Rb1 Qa3 52. Rc8+ Kf7 ”
”ž— 16. Qxb7 Be6 53. Rc7+ Kg6 ””
¤”• 17. Ne3 Bxa2 54. Rc6 Rb1 ”´
‘ 18. Rb5 Be6 55. Rc3 h6 ‘
19. Bb4 Qa2 56. Ra3 Kg5
• 20. Nf5 Rae8 57. Re3 Ra1
‘
­’‘’ 21.* Nxd6 Rd8 58.* Re2 Raa2 ¨¤‘’
¦² 22. Nf5 Rd7 59. Re3 h5 ¨–°
21. Nxd6 23. Qc6 Bxb4 60. Rb3 g6 58..Raa2
24. Rxb4 Rfd8 61. Rc3 h4
25. Ne3 f6 62. h3 Kf4
¨³ 26. Reb1 Bg4 63. Rc1 Rf2+

”§˜”“ 27. Ne1 Ne7 64. Kg1 Ke3 
” 28.* Qc5 Be6 65. Rc3+ Ke2 ”“
¬” 29. Qb5 a6 66. Nc2 Rf1+ ”
¦‘ž 30. Qf1 a5 67. Kh2 Kd2 ‘”
31. Rb6 Nc8 68. Ne3 Rb1
– 32. R6b2 Qa4 69.* Ra3 Rxa3 ¦–‘‘
­’‘’ 33. Rc1 Nd6 70. Nc4+ Kd3 §´‘²
¤–² 34. Qa6 Bf7 71. Nxa3 Rb3 §
28..Be6 35. f3 Qa3 72. Nc2 Kxc2 69..Rxa3
36. Qe2 Nb5 0-1
37. Qf2 Nd4
Game 63: Close Variant Dv4xG with White
White's Dv4xG invites a center pawn attack (9). Despite his damaged pawn structure, white castles
K-side, again inviting the attack (14). Black has difficulty finding a forcing continuation; he offers a
pawn (19) and regains it easily, but white then starts a series of simplifying exchanges (25,30), and
forces a draw (49). The D-game defies the normal logic of chess, winning or drawing with tactics
that until now have been considered inferior, or contrary to established principles of sound play.

§ž¯³¨ 1. d3 d5 27. Bc6 Rb2 ¨³


2. Nd2 e5 28. Rg3 Nxc2
”““”“ 3. Nb3 c5 29. Nxc2 Qc1+
”“¨“”
—¹˜ 4. Bd2 Nc6 30.* Rg1 Qxc2 ¹”
” 5. e3 Nf6 31. Qxc2 Rxc2 ¤
“ 6. Nf3 Bd6 32. Rd1 Be7 –¯
•’• 7. Be2 e4 33. Rd7 Rxc3 ’˜›‘
8. dxe4 dxe4 34. Bd5 Rc1+
‘’‘›’‘’ 9.* Ng5 h6 35. Kg2 Rc5
‘‘ª’
¦ª²¤ 10. Nh3 Bxh3 36. Rxe7 Rxd5 ¦°
9. Ng5 11. gxh3 O-O 37. Rxa7 Rd2+ 25. Rxb7
12. f4 exf3 38. Kg3 Rd3+
§¯¨³ 13. Bxf3 Ne4 39. Kg2 Kf8 ³
14.* O-O Qg5+ 40. a4 Rd2+
”““” 15. Kh1 Qe5 41. Kg3 Ke8 ”“”
—¹” 16. Qe2 Rae8 42. a5 Rd3+ ›¹”
” 17. Qg2 c4 43. Kg4 g6 
— 18. Nd4 Nxd2 44. h4 f5+ 
19.* Qxd2 c3 45. Kf4 Rd4+
•’›‘ 20. bxc3 Na5 46. Ke5 Rxh4
’¦‘
‘’‘’ 21. Qe2 Re7 47. a6 Ra4 ‘¨•ª’
¦ª¤² 22. Rg1 Nc4 48. Ke6 Kd8 ¯°
14. Qg5+ 23. Rab1 Nxe3 49.* Kd6 Ke8 30. Rg1
24. Rb5 Qf4 50. Ke6 Kd8
25.* Rxb7 Rxb7 51. Kd6 Ke8
§¨³ 26. Bxb7 Rb8 52. Ke6 1/2-1/2
´
”““” ¦
—¹” ‘°“”
¯ “
“– §
’›‘ 
‘’‘¬’ ’
¦¤° 
19..c3 49. Kd6
Close Variants 161

Game 64: Close Variant Dv4'5x with Black


Black departs early from the standard opening, striking at the center with Dv4'5x (9). Black trades
down quickly (16,24), and keeps pace with his adversary in the endgame (31), where his fine play
defends well against white's promotion threat (40,50), and a draw results. The early departures are
interesting lines of the D-system which are certain to surprise even the most expert opponents.

§¯³¹¨ 1. d4 d6 33. Ke1 Rxh2 


2. e4 e6 34. Rxg7+Kf5
”“”ž˜“”“ 3. Nf3 Ne7 35. b4 h5
”¤”“
˜ 4. c4 Nd7 36. Rh7 Nc4 ”³
›‘ 5. Nc3 d5 37. b5 Nd2 
’ 6. cxd5 exd5 38. b6 Nxf3+ ˜
–• 7. exd5 Nb6 39. Kd1 Rh1+ ‘
8. Bb5+ Bd7 40.* Kc2 Nd4+
‘’’‘’ 9.* Qe2 Bxb5 41. Kd3 Nc6
’¨‘’
¦ª²¤ 10. Qxb5+Qd7 42. b7 h4 °
9. Qe2 11. Qxd7+Kxd7 43. Rh5+ Kg6 31. Rxa7
12. Ne5+ Ke8 44. Rc5 Nb8
§³¨ 13. O-O Nexd5 45. Rc8 Nd7 
14. Re1 Be7 46. Kc2 Rh2+
”“”¹”“ 15. a4 f6 47. Kc3 Rh3+ ¤
˜” 16.* a5 Nxc3 48. Kc4 Rh1 ’”
’—– 17. axb6 Nb5 49. Rd8 Rc1+ ³“
’ 18. Nc4 Kf7 50.* Kb5 Nxf8 
19. bxc7 Nxc7 51. Rxf8 Rb1+
– 20. Bf4 Nd5 52. Kc6 Kf5
—
’’‘’ 21. Nd6+ Bxd6 53. b8=Q Rxb8 °
¦¦² 22. Bxd6 Rhd8 54. Rxb8 h3 §
16..Nxc3 23. Ba3 Rdc8 55. Kd6 Kg4 40..Nd4+
24.* Rac1 Rxc1 56. Ke6 Kg3
25. Rxc1 Re8 57. Rg8+ Kf2
§§ 26. Kf1 Re4 58. Rh8 Kg2
¦
”“³”“ 27. Rc8 Rxd4 59. Rd8 h2 ‘—
” 28. Rb8 Nf4 60. Rd2+ Kg1 ”³
— 29. Rxb7+Kg6 61. Rd1+ Kg2 °
’ 30. f3 Rd2 62. Rd2+ Kg1 ”
31.* Rxa7 Nxg2 63. Rd1+ Kg2
 32. Bf8 Ne3+ 64. Rd2+ 1/2-1/2 
’’‘’ 
¦¦² ¨
24..Rxc1 50..Nxf8
Game 65: Close Variant Dv3'4 with Black
Black's Dv3'4 consolidates the K-side early, and then tries a center pawn attack (9). Black
prepares carefully, then begins his invasion (17), gradually gaining territory and opening lines
(25). Black wins the exchange (35) and never lets up the pressure afterwards in a long knights and
rooks endgame (55,63). This particular opening may interest those seeking an aggressive D-game
variant which offers solid positional play and a gradual opening on the Q-side. Looks good!
§ž¯¨³ 1. e4 e6 39. Nc6 Rxa3 ³
”“—¹“”“ 2. d4
3. Nf3 Ng6
Ne7 40. b4
41. Ra1 Nd5
Rab3
¯““
““— 4. Be3 Be7 42. Kf1 Rb2 ”“
“ 5. Nc3 O-O 43. g3 Kg7 ¨“’”
’‘ 6. Bd3 c6 44. h4 b5 –—˜ª
–›• 7. O-O d5 45. Rc1 Kh6 ’‘¨•
8. Re1 Nd7 46. Nd8 Kg6
‘’‘’‘’ 9.* Qe2 a6 47. Nb7 Rxb4
’‘’
¦ª¦² 10. a3 b6 48. Nbc5 Ra3 ¤¦²
9. Qe2 11. Nd2 Qc7 49. Nd6 Ra2 35. Rxe4
12. Qf3 Bb7 50. Nd3 Rd4
§§³ 13. Qh3 Rfe8 51. Nc5 b4 
14. e5 c5 52. Re1 Rc2
ž¯¹“”“ 15. Nf3 cxd4 53. Nb5 Rdd2 “
“”“— 16. Bxd4 Nc5 54. Ne4 Rd3 “³
˜“’ 17.* Qg3 Ne4 55.* Rb1 b3 •—’“
 18. Qg4 Rec8 56. Na3 Rd4 ”•’
’–›•¬ 19. Ne2 a5
20. Qh5 Ba6
57. Nd6 Rb4
58. Re1 Rc3
§’
’‘’‘’ 21. Rac1 a4 59. Ndb5 Rc5 §’
¦¦² 22. Red1 Bc5 60. Nd6 Nc3 ¤°
17..Ne4 23. Ra1 Ra7 61. f4 b2 55..b3
24. Rab1 Kh8 62. Kf2 Rb3
§´ 25.* Qh3 Bxd4
26. Nexd4 Kg8
63.* Ndc4 Nb5
64. Rb1 Nxa3

¨¯“”“ 27. Ra1 Bc4 65. Nxa3 Rc1 “
ž”“— 28. Qh5 Ra5 66. Kg2 Rb4 “³
¹“’ 29. Rab1 Qe7 67. g4 Rc3 ¨’“
“— 30. Bxc4 Rxc4 68. f5+ exf5 •’’
31. Re1 Nf4 69. gxf5+ Kxf5
’›•ª 32. Qg4 g5 70. e6 fxe6 –§˜’
’‘•’‘’ 33. b3 axb3 71. Rf1+ Kg6 ”²
¤¤² 34. cxb3 Rc3 72. Nb1 Rc1 ¦
25..Bxd4 35.* Rxe4 h5 73. Rf2 Rxb1 63..Nb5
36. Qxg5+Qxg5 74. Kf3 Rg4
37. Nxg5 dxe4 75. Rg2 Rf1+
38. Nxe4 Rd3 76. Ke3 b1=Q
Close Variants 163

Game 66: Close Variant DvGG with Black


Black feints a classical opening and wastes 2 knight moves with DvGG (9), but still wins in truly
impressive style in this brilliant game. Black invites the attack time and again (16,21), and can
afford to do so, because his advanced pawn is headed for early promotion (26). Afterwards
white's lone queen is no match for the bishop and rook pair (36,44), and white gets roasted. The
moral: there is more in the chess opening than there was in our conception of how to play it!

§ž¯³—¨ 1. c4 Nf6 37. Kg2 Rxc6 §¨´


2. Nc3 e6 38. Kh3 Rc2
”“¹“”“ 3. e4 Be7 39. Qd7 Be5
”ª”
˜”“ 4. e5 Ng8 40. Qe6 Bf6 ‘”
 5. d4 d6 41. Kg4 Kh7 
‘’ 6. exd6 cxd6 42. h4 R8c4+ 
–›• 7. Nf3 Nd7 43. Kh3 R2c3 ¹
8. Bd3 Nb6 44.* Kh2 Rg4
‘’’‘’ 9.* O-O Nf6 45. Qe1 Ra3
‘“’‘’
¦ª²¤ 10. Bg5 h6 46. h5 Rg5 ¤²
9. O-O 11. Bxf6 Bxf6 47. Kg2 Rb3 26..c1=Q
12. c5 dxc5 48. Kh3 Rxh5+
§¯³¨ 13. dxc5 Nd5 49. Kg4 Rg5+ ¹¨´
14. Nxd5 exd5 50. Kh3 Bd4
”““” 15. Re1+ Be6 51. Kg2 Rb2+ ¨”
ž¹” 16.* Nd4 O-O 52. Kh3 Bf2 ‘”
’“ 17. Nxe6 fxe6 53. Qe5 Rxg3+ ª‘
– 18. Rxe6 Bxb2 54. Qxg3 Bxg3 
19. Rb1 Qc8 55. Kxg3 h5
› 20. Bc4 dxc4 56. Kf3 Rb3+
’
‘’’‘’ 21.* Qd5 c3 57. Kg2 Kh6 ’
¦ª¦² 22. Re8+ Kh8 58. f6 g5 °
16..O-O 23. Rxc8 Raxc8 59. f7 Kg7 36..Rfc8
24. Qxb7 Ba3 60. Kf2 h4
25. Rf1 c2 61. Kg2 h3+
§­¨³ 26.* c6 c1=Q 62. Kf2 Rb2+

”“” 27. Rxc1 Bxc1 63. Ke3 Ra2 ”³
¤” 28. g3 Bd2 64. Ke4 h2 ª¹”
’ª 29. a4 Bc3 65. Kd3 h1=Q ‘
“ 30. f4 Bd4+ 66. f8=Q+ Kxf8 §’
31. Kf1 Bb6 67. Ke3 Qe1+
 32. a5 Bxa5 68. Kd3 Rd2+ ¨’
‘¹’‘’ 33. Qxa7 Bc7 69. Kc4 Qc1+ ²
¤² 34. Qa6 Bb8 70. Kb3 Rb2+ 
21..c3 35. f5 Rc7 71. Ka4 Qa1# 44..Rg4
36.* Qb5 Rfc8
Game 67: Close Variant Dv13' with Black
Black plays Dv13' against a 2 pawn classical defense with a rook pawn attack (9). Black strikes at
the center with a surprising gambit (12) that he recovers quickly, then presses the attack (21).
Black takes a pawn and sets up for a devastating continuation (28.30), which wins a piece and
threatens mate. White ends up having to throw away material to delay an inevitable rout (34). An
impressive and overpowering win with black, using the newly discovered D-game!
§¯³¹¨ 1. e4 d6 23. Ne4 Qh5 §³
2. Nf3 Nd7 24. Qe3 Rf5
“ž˜“”“ 3. d4 e6 25. Bc4 Bxc4
“¤”“
˜“”“ 4. Nc3 Nb6 26. Rxd7 Rxe5 “
” 5. Bd3 Bd7 27. Qd4 Bd5 ”ž¨­
‘’‘ 6. O-O c6 28.* Re3 Bxe4 ‘¬•
–›• 7. Be3 Ne7 29. h4 c5 ¦“’
8. a4 a5 30.* Qc3 f2+
’‘’‘’ 9.* Re1 Ng6 31. Kxf2 Qf5+
’‘’
¦ª¤² 10. Nd2 Be7 32. Ke1 Rae8 ²
9. Re1 11. Qh5 O-O 33. Qc4+ Kf8 28..Bxe4
12.* Nf3 e5 34.* Rf7+ Qxf7
§¯¨³ 13. dxe5 dxe5 35. Qxf7+ Kxf7 §³
14. Nxe5 Be6 36. Kd2 Bf5
“ž¹“”“ 15. f4 Bd6 37. Rxe5 Rxe5 “¤”“
˜“”“— 16. Nxg6 fxg6 38. h5 Rd5+ 
”ª 17. Qf3 Bxf4 39. Kc3 Be6 ””¨­
‘’‘ 18. Bxf4 g5 40. h6 Rg5 ‘ž’
19. Rad1 gxf4 41. hxg7 Rxg3+
–›• 20. e5 Qg5 42. Kd2 Rg2+
¬¦“’
’‘’‘’ 21.* Qf2 f3 43. Kd3 Kxg7 ’‘
¦¦² 22. g3 Nd7 0-1 ²
12..e5 30..f2+

§¨³ §´
“”“ “¤”“
˜“ž 
”’¯ ””¨­
‘” ‘ªž’
–› ¦’
’‘¬‘’ ’‘
¤¦² ²
21..f3 34. Rf7+
Close Variants 165

Game 68: Close Variant Dv3'D with Black


Black's Dv3'D confronts the 2 pawn F back classical defense (9) in this interesting contest. Black
invites a sacrifice (13), which quickly reveals to be a ghastly failure (15). Afterwards black's strong
across-the-board attack soon has white on his knees (21) and ready for execution, which comes in
crisp style (34,38). An impressive victory with superior tactical play using the powerful D-game!
§ž³¨ 1. Nc3 d6 26. Ne4 Qxb2 §ž¨³
2. d4 Nd7 27. Qa5 Rxd3
”“¯—¹“”“ 3. Nf3 e6 28. Qa6 Rcd8
”¯“”
“”“— 4. e4 Ne7 29. Nxf6+ Qxf6 “¹›˜
 5. Be2 c6 30. Qxa7 Qd6 
’‘ 6. O-O Qc7 31. Qe7 Qxe7 –’
–• 7. Be3 Ng6 32. Rxe7 Nxf5 ’–
8. Qd2 Be7 33. Re5 Ne3
‘’‘¬›’‘’ 9.* Bg5 Nf6 34.* Re1 c4
’‘¬‘’
¦¤² 10. Rae1 O-O 35. Kg1 c3 ¦¤²
9. Bg5 11. Bc4 e5 36. Rc5 c2 21..Ba6
12. a3 h6 37. h3 Rd1
§ž¨³ 13.* Bxh6 exd4 38.* Kf2 Rxe1 ¨³
14. Nxd4 d5 39. Kxe1 Rd4
”“¯¹“” 15.* exd5 Ng4 40. Rc8+ Kh7 “”
“”˜—” 16. f4 Nxh6 41. Rc3 Rc4 
” 17. dxc6 bxc6 42. Rxc2 Rxc2 ”¦
›’‘ 18. Bd3 Bf6 43. g4 Ra2 ‘
19.* Bxg6 Rd8 44. a5 Kg6
’–• 20. Nb3 Qb6+ 45. a6 Kg5
§˜
’‘¬’‘’ 21.* Kh1 Ba6 46. a7 Kf4 ‘’
¦¤² 22. Bd3 Bxd3 47. g5 Kxg5 ¦°
13. Bxh6 23. cxd3 Qxb3 48. a8=Q Rxa8 34..c4
24. f5 c5 49. Ke2 Kf4
25. a4 Rac8 50. Kd2 Rh8
§ž¨³ 0-1
¨³
”“¯¹“” “”
“˜— 
‘ ¦
›– ‘
’– ˜‘
’‘¬’‘’ “²‘
¦¤² §¦
15..Ng4 38..Rxe1
Game 69: Close Variant Dv3'E with Black
Black's mainstream Dv3'E challenges a 2 pawn standard defense with a bishop early attack (9).
Black opens the game with a well coordinated Q-side advance (14), bringing his pieces forward
carefully, then striking hard with a two-pronged attack (28). Black brings his rooks into the action
(32), and then systematically destroys white's position with an overwhelming assault (37,41).
Games such as this demonstrate the enormous offensive potential of the D-system openings.
§ž¯¨³ 1. e4 e6 29. Nb5 Nxf2 ¨§³
2. d4 Ne7 30. Bf3 Ne4
”“—¹“”“ 3. Nf3 d6 31. Bxe4 Bxe4
“”“
“”“— 4. Nc3 Nd7 32.* Ke2 Rd8 ¯“
 5. Bb5 c6 33. Rbd1 Rd5 ”•¹
’‘ 6. Be2 Ng6 34. Re1 Rbd8 ‘“ž
–• 7. O-O Be7 35. Rxd5 Rxd5 ¬’
8. Be3 O-O 36. Rf1 Bg1
‘’‘›’‘’ 9.* Qd3 b5 37.* Nc1 Bxc2
•’‘¦°’
¦ª¤² 10. a3 Bb7 38. Qf3 f5 ¤
9. Qd3 11. Rfd1 a6 39. Ke1 Be3 32..Rd8
12. a4 Qc7 40. Nc3 Bd2+
§¨³ 13. Qd2 b4 41.* Ke2 Qxb2 ³
14.* Na2 c5 42. Kf2 Bxc3
ž¯—¹“”“ 15. dxc5 Nxc5 43. Ne2 Bd3 “”“
““”“— 16. Qxb4 a5 44. Rd1 Bxe2 ¯“
 17. Qa3 Nxe4 45. Qxe2 Rxd1 ”•§
‘”’‘ 18. Qb3 Rfc8 46. Qxb2 Bxb2 ‘“ž
19. Rac1 Nc5 47. Ke2 Rd4
• 20. Bxc5 dxc5 48. Ke3 c3
¬’
•’‘¬›’‘’ 21. Qe3 Bd6 49. Kxd4 c2+ ’‘°’
¦¤² 22. g3 c4 50. Kc5 c1=Q+ –¤¹
14..c5 23. Rd2 Bc5 51. Kd6 Kf7 37..Bxc2
24. Qc3 Bd5 52. g4 Be5+
25. Nd4 Rab8 53. Kxe5 Qc5+
¨§³ 26. Rb1 Qb6 54. Kf4 Qf2+
³
“”“ 27. Bh5 Ne5 55. Ke5 Ke7 ”“
¯“ 28.* Kf1 Nd3 56. g5 Qe3# ¯“
”¹ž˜› ”§“
‘“– ‘“
¬’ –ª’
•’‘¦’’ ’ž¹°’
¤° –¤
28..Nd3 41..Qxb2
Close Variants 167

Game 70: Close Variant Dv5'G' with Black


Black retreats from the K-side rook pawn attack, and then strikes at the center with Dv5'G' (9).
White castles Q-side, offering a pawn to open the king rook file (13). Black covers all white's
threats while counter attacking (24), winning another pawn. White continues to throw his forces
on the ramparts (30), but it achieves nothing (35); black pushes on for a decisive victory (58).
§ž¯³˜¨ 1. d4 d6 40. Kc2 Re3 §³
2. e4 e6 41. Rd3 Re2+
”“”—¹“”“ 3. c4 Ne7 42. Rd2 Re6
”“¯¨“”
” 4. Nc3 Nd7 43. Rd7 a6 ¦”
”‘ 5. Nf3 Ng6 44. Bc4 Rf6 ›”‘
‘’‘ 6. h4 Be7 45. Ra7 Rf3 ¹‘
–• 7. h5 Ngf8 46. Kd1 Rb1+ 
8. Be3 e5 47. Kc2 Rb2+
‘’’‘ 9.* dxe5 dxe5 48. Kd1 Rb8 ‘’ª
¦ª²›¤ 10. Qc2 c6 49. Rxa6 Rc3 °¤
9. dxe5 11. O-O-OQc7 50. Bb5 Ra3 30. g4
12. g3 Nf6 51. Rc6 g5
§ž³˜¨ 13.* Nh4 Nxh5 52. Rc7 g4 §³
14. Nf5 Bxf5 53. Ke2 Kg7
”“¯¹“”“ 15. exf5 Nf6 54. Rd3 Ra2+ ”¯¨“”
“˜ 16. Be2 h6 55. Rd2 Rxd2+ ”
”‘ 17. f4 N8d7 56. Kxd2 g3 ›”¦
‘‘ 18. fxe5 Nxe5 57. Bc6 Rb2+ ’¹
–•’ 19. Ne4 O-O
20. Bf4 Rfe8
58.* Kd3 g2
59. Bxg2 Rxg2

‘’ª’ 21. Nxf6+ Bxf6 60. Kc4 Rb2 ‘ª
²¤›¤ 22. Kb1 c5 61. a5 Rb4+ °¤
13. Nh4 23. Rd5 Qb6 62. Kd5 Ra4 35..Qf4
24.* Be3 Nxc4 63. Ra7 Kf6
§§³ 25. Bxc4 Rxe3
26. Rd7 Re7
64. Kc6 Ra1
65. Ra8 c4

”““” 27. Rhd1 Rae8 66. Kb5 c3 ¦“´
¯¹” 28. R7d6 Qc7 67. Rc8 Kf5 ›
”¤˜‘ 29. Bb5 Rc8 68. a6 Ke4 ”
‘ 30.* g4 Bd4 69. a7 Rxa7 ‘¹
31. f6 Bxf6 70. Kc4 Re7
’ 32. R6d5 Bd4 71. Kb4 Kd3 °”
‘’ª› 33. b4 b6 72. Ka4 Rb7 ¨
°¤ 34. g5 hxg5 73. Ka5 c2 
24..Nxc4 35.* Rxg5 Qf4 74. Ka6 Ra7+ 58..g2
36. Rd5 Qe4 75. Kb5 Bc3
37. Qxe4 Rxe4 76. Rd8+ Ke3
38. bxc5 bxc5 77. Kb6 Ba5+
39. a4 Rb8 0-1
Game 71: Close Variant Dv1'Dx with Black
Black responds to a bishop early attack and exchange with Dv1'Dx (9). White opens the game
with the intention of attacking (13), but black refuses to retreat (18,23), matching blow for blow.
The contest simplifies to a symmetrical queen and rooks endgame favoring neither side, but black
surprisingly outplays his opponent to win a pawn (36), and the game (43). Really good chess!
§ž³¨ 1. e4 e6 26. Nxf7 Qxf7 ¨³
2. d4 Ne7 27. Raxd6 Rxf4
“”—¯“”“ 3. Nf3 a6 28. g3 Rf5
­”“
“”“— 4. c4 d6 29. R6d2 Rf8 ¤”•—
 5. Nc3 Nd7 30. Qe2 Qa7+ 
‘’‘ 6. Be2 Ng6 31. Kg2 Qc5 §
–• 7. Bg5 Be7 32. Rc2 Re5 ¬
8. Bxe7 Qxe7 33. Qd3 Qe7
‘’›’‘’ 9.* O-O O-O 34. h4 Re3
’‘’
¦ª²¤ 10. Qd2 b6 35. Qd5+ Kh7 ¤²
9. O-O 11. a4 Bb7 36.* Rdd2 Qa3 23..Ne5
12. Qe3 c5 37. Kh2 Rxg3
§¨³ 13.* a5 bxa5 38. Qe4+ Kh8 ¨
14. Rfd1 f5 39. Qe6 Rgf3
ž—¯“”“ 15. exf5 Rxf5 40. h5 Qb4 ¯”³
“””“— 16. dxc5 Nxc5 41. Qc4 Qb8+ ”
” 17. Rxa5 Rb8 42. Kh1 Qg3 ª
‘‘’‘ 18.* b4 Bxf3 43.* Rf2 R8f4 ’
19. bxc5 Bxe2 44. Qxf4 Qxf4
–¬• 20. Nxe2 Rxc5 45. Rxf3 Qxf3+
¨’
’›’‘’ 21. Rxa6 Rxc4 46. Rg2 Qxh5+ ¤¦°
¦¤² 22. Nd4 Qd7 47. Kg1 g5 
13. a5 23.* Nxe6 Ne5 48. Rd2 Kg7 36..Qa3
24. Ng5 h6 49. Ra2 Qd1+
25. f4 Nf7 50. Kh2 0-1
¨³ ¨´
ž¯”“ ”
“”“— ”
¦˜§ ‘
’‘ ª
–¬• §¯
›’‘’ ¤¦
¤² °
18..Bxf3 43..R8f4
Close Variants 169

Game 72: Close Variant Dv3'D with White


White plays strong close variant Dv3'D, against black's 3 pawn center with rook pawn attack (9).
Black lodges the pawn, but it causes no inconvenience to white's well coordinated defense (18).
White tries for the offensive beginning (24) and is able to press somewhat (30,38), but finally has
to settle for a draw (41). The Defense Game puts master level chess within the reach of amateurs!
§ž¯³¨ 1. e3 e5 32. Rxa4 Qxa4 ³
2. d3 d5 33. Qxe7 Qd1+
”““” 3. Ne2 Nf6 34. Kf2 Qxd3
­¹“”
—¹˜ 4. Nd2 c5 35. Qd8+ Kh7 
”“” 5. c3 Nc6 36. Qh4+ Kg6 ”
” 6. Qc2 Bd6 37. Qg4+ Kf6 ¨ª
’‘’– 7. Ng3 h5 38.* Qxd4+ Qxd4 ‘’’“
8. Be2 h4 39. exd4 Ke6
‘’ª–›’‘’ 9.* Ngf1 h3 40. Kf3 f5
–’
¦²¤ 10. g3 O-O 41.* g4 Kd5 ¦²
9. Ngf1 11. e4 Be6 42. gxf5 Kxd4 30. d4
12. exd5 Nxd5 43. Kg4 Ke4
§¨³ 13. Ne3 Be7 44. Kxh3 Kxf5 
14. O-O Qd7 45. Kg3 Kg6
”“­¹“” 15. b3 Nxe3 46. Kg4 Kh6 “”
— 16. fxe3 Bg4 47. Kf5 Kh5 ´
”” 17. Ne4 Rfd8 48. Ke6 Kg5 
•ž 18.* Nf2 Bxe2 49. Ke5 Kg4 ”ª
19. Qxe2 a5 50. Ke6 Kh5
‘’‘’’“ 20. c4 a4 51. Kf5 Kh6
­’’“
‘ª›’ 21. Bb2 axb3 52. Kg4 Kg6 ²’
¦¤² 22. axb3 Rxa1 53. h3 Kh6 
18. Nf2 23. Bxa1 Ra8 54. h4 Kg6 38. Qxd4+
24.* Qh5 Ra3 55. Kf4 Kf6
25. Bxe5 Nxe5 56. h5 Ke6
§³ 26. Qxe5 Rxb3 57. Kg5 Kf7

“­¹“” 27. Ra1 b5 58. Kf5 Ke7 ”
— 28. cxb5 Rxb5 59. Ke5 Kd7 ³
”” 29. Qe4 Rb4 60. Kd5 Kd8 “
‘ 30.* d4 cxd4 61. Ke6 Ke8 ’
31. Nd3 Ra4 1/2-1/2
‘‘’’“ °’“
ª–’ ’
¤² 
24. Qh5 41. g4
Game 73: Close Variant Dv3'5' with White
White's mainstream Dv3'5' challenges the center of the 3 pawn f back classical opening (9). White
trades knights for bishops and has a fine position later, when black sacrifices a pawn (19)
followed by a rather desperate attempt to build an offensive (25,30). But white survives all his
schemes easily, and wins by virtue of an overwhelming material advantage (49) in the finale.

§¯¨³ 1. d3 d5 35. Rxd4 Nxd4 ³


2. c3 e5 36. Qd1 a4
”“¹“”“ 3. Nd2 c5 37.* bxa4 Qxa2
“
—ž˜ 4. e3 Nf6 38. Be5 Nc6 ““¬
”“” 5. Ne2 Nc6 39. Bc3 Qc4 ­
‘ 6. Ng3 Be7 40. Qa1 Kf8 ’˜§
’‘– 7. Be2 O-O 41. a5 Ke7 ‘
8. e4 Be6 42. a6 Ke6
‘’–›’‘’ 9.* O-O Qc7 43. Bg7 Kd5
‘§’‘’
¦ª²¤ 10. Qc2 b5 44. Bh6 g5 ¦¤²
9. O-O 11. Nb3 c4 45. Bxg5 Qe4 30..Nf5
12. Nd2 cxd3 46. Be3 Qe8
§¨³ 13. Bxd3 Rac8 47. Qa2+ Kd6 ³
14. exd5 Bxd5 48. a7 Qa8
¯˜““ 15. Nf5 a6 49.* Qxf7 Qh8 “
“˜“ 16. Ne4 Bxe4 50. h3 Qa8 “
“” 17. Bxe4 g6 51. g4 Nxa7 ­
 18. Nxe7+ Nxe7 52. Qxa7 Qxa7 ‘˜
19.* Bf3 e4 53. Bxa7 Ke5
’› 20. Bxe4 Rfe8 54. h4 Kd5

‘’ª’‘’ 21. Bg5 Nxe4 55. h5 Ke6 ‘’‘’
¦¤² 22. Qxe4 Nf5 56. g5 Kf5 ª²
19..e4 23. Qf3 b4 57. g6 Ke6 37..Qxa2
24. cxb4 Qe5 58. Bd4 Kf5
25.* b3 h6 59. g7 Ke4
§§³ 26. Bd2 Nd4 60. g8=Q Kxd4
­
““ 27. Qe3 Qd5 61. h6 Kc5 ’“
““ 28. Qxh6 Rc2 62. Qg5+ Kd4 —´
¯— 29. Bf4 Re4 63. h7 Kc4 
’ 30.* Bg3 Nf5 64. h8=Q Kb3 
31. Qg5 Rxb4 65. Qb5+ Kc2
‘ª 32. Rac1 Rxc1 66. Qhb2+ Kd1 
‘’‘’ 33. Qxc1 a5 67. Q5e2# ª’‘’
¦¤² 34. Rd1 Rd4 ²
25..h6 49. Qxf7
Close Variants 171

Game 74: Close Variant Dv3'E with Black


The author with black plays the main line Dv3'E, and wins against his strong computer rival, here
playing the 3 pawn standard classical opening (9). Black goes for a closed game in the center,
then offers a knight exchange (15). Black's bishop is trapped, but there's a answer to this (25)
which opens the K-side to his pieces (35). Still equal in the endgame, white tries to free the way
for his b-pawn (46), but it turns out to be in black's favor instead (54). Finally won one!
§ž¯¨³ 1. Nf3 e6 31. Rbd1 Bg4 ¨³
2. d4 Ne7 32. Rc1 Rxf1+
”“—¹“”“ 3. c4 d6 33. Rxf1 Bh3

“”“— 4. e4 Nd7 34. Rf3 Bg4 ”’”
 5. Nc3 c6 35.* Rf1 Bh3 ”‘”‘¯”
‘’‘ 6. Bd3 Ng6 36. Rc1 Rf8 ‘ž¹
–›• 7. O-O Be7 37. Qd3 Bf5 ’–
8. Be3 O-O 38. Qd2 Re8
‘’’‘’ 9.* Qc2 e5 39. Bf2 Bxf2+
¬’
¦ª¤² 10. Rad1 Re8 40. Qxf2 Rf8 ¤²
9. Qc2 11. d5 c5 41. Qd2 Qxd6 35..Bh3
12. a3 a6 42. Rf1 Bg6
¨ž¯§³ 13. b4 b6 43. Rxf8+ Kxf8 
14. Rb1 Rb8 44. Na4 Ke7
—¹“”“ 15.* Qd2 Nh4 45. Qe3+ Kd7 ³
“””— 16. Nxh4 Bxh4 46.* Qe6+ Qxe6 ”¯ž”
”‘” 17. Bc2 h6 47. dxe6+ Kxe6 ”‘”‘”
’‘‘ 18. Ba4 Rf8 48. Nxb6 Kd6 •‘
19. b5 a5 49. Kf2 Bf7
’–›• 20. Bd1 f6 50. Ke3 h5
’¬
¬’‘’ 21. g3 Bg5 51. Ke4 g4 ’
¤¤² 22. f4 exf4 52. Nd5 Bxd5+ ²
15..Nh4 23. gxf4 Bh4 53. cxd5 h4 46. Qe6+
24. Bg4 Qe8 54. b6 h3
25.* Rf3 Ne5 55.* Kf4 c4
¨ž­¨³ 26. fxe5 Bxg4 56. b7 Kc7

—” 27. Rf4 f5 57. Kxg4 c3 
”””” 28. exd6 g5 58. Kxh3 c2 ’´
”‘”‘ 29. Rff1 Qe5 59. Kg4 c1=Q ””‘
‘‘’›¹ 30. exf5 Bxf5 0-1 ²“
’–¤ ’“
¬’ ’
¤² 
25..Ne5 55..c4
Game 75: Distant Variant Dv8'G'G with Black
Black responds to the rook pawn attack with a king knight tour, playing Dv8'G'G. White seizes the
center, but black counter attacks strongly on the K-side (16,24) and gains the initiative. Black
develops multiple threats to win the exchange (35), then simplifies for the endgame (40), where his
K-side pawns cannot be stopped (61). The D-system makes winning chess look easy!
§˜ž¯³¨ 1. d4 e6 34. Kg1 Re8 §³
2. c4 Ne7 35.* Bf2 Qe7
”“”—¹“” 3. Nc3 d6 36. Ng3 Bxd1
““”
”“” 4. e4 Ng6 37. Qxd1 Rd8 “”
‘ 5. h4 Be7 38. Qf3 Qd7 
‘’‘ 6. h5 Nf8 39. Kg2 Qd5 ž¯
–• 7. Nf3 h6 40.* Be3 Qxa2 
8. Be2 Nfd7 41. Qxb7 Qd5+
‘’›’‘ 9.* O-O O-O 42. Qxd5 Rxd5
‘’¬•
¦ª²¤ 10. Qc2 e5 43. Ne2 g5 ¤²
9. O-O 11. Rd1 exd4 44. Nc3 Rd8 35..Qe7
12. Nxd4 Bf6 45. Bf2 f5
§ž¯¨³ 13. Be3 Bxd4 46. b4 Rd2 ¨³
14. Rxd4 Nc6 47. Kf1 Rc2
”“”“” 15. Rd2 Nf6 48. Be1 Kf7 ““”
—”˜” 16.* c5 Bg4 49. b5 axb5 “”
’‘ 17. f3 Be6 50. Nxb5 f4 ­
‘ 18. Rad1 Nxh5 51. Nd4 Rb2 
19. cxd6 cxd6 52. Bc3 Rb1+
– 20. Qa4 a6 53. Kf2 h5
ª–
‘’ª¦›’‘ 21. Rxd6 Qh4 54. Kf3 Kg6 ‘’°
¦² 22. Nd5 Ng3 55. Ke4 h4 
16..Bg4 23. Bd3 Ne5 56. Nf3 h3 40..Qxa2
24.* Nc3 Bg4 57. Nh2 Rh1
25. Be2 Nxe2+ 58. Ng4 Rg1
§¨³ 26. Nxe2 Nxf3+ 59. Nh2 Rg2

““” 27. gxf3 Bxf3 60. Nf3 Re2+ 
“¦ž” 28. Qc2 Rac8 61.* Kd5 g4 ³
˜ 29. Qd2 Rfe8 62. Nd4 Re8 °”
ª‘¯ 30. e5 Rxe5 63. Nb3 h2 ”
31. Rd8+ Re8 64. Bd4 h1=Q+
–›‘˜ 32. Rxc8 Rxc8 0-1 •“
‘’‘ 33. Kf1 Bg4 §
¤² 
24..Bg4 61..g4
Distance 3 Variants 173

Game 76: Distant Variant Dv55xG with White


White responds to a rook pawn early attack by bringing his knight forward, playing Dv55xG (9).
White attacks the center, finding an interesting knight sacrifice (12) which disrupts black's game.
White has a positional edge, and goes a pawn up (22), but black gets the better of him in a piece
tangle in the corner (35), then simplifies for the draw (42,51). An action packed chess encounter!
§ž¯³¹—¨ 1. d3 d5 28. Rhc1 Rb8 ¦
2. Nd2 e5 29. Ba3 Rb3
”“”“” 3. e4 Nc6 30. Rc7 Ke8
ž´
 4. Ne2 Nf6 31. Ra7 Nd4+ ”
‘”• 5. Ng3 h5 32. Kf2 Nc2 ‘
˜” 6. Be2 h4 33. Ra8+ Kf7 
‘ 7. Nh5 Ng8 34. Rf8+ Kg7 §‘‘’“
8. exd5 Nd4 35.* Rd8 Nxa3
‘’‘–›’‘’ 9.* Nf3 Nxe2 36. Rxd7+Kg6
§’—²’
¦ª²¤ 10. Qxe2 Qe7 37. Ra7 Rxd3 ¤
9. Nf3 11. Nxe5 f6 38. g4 Nxb1 35..Nxa3
12.* Nxf6+ gxf6 39. Rxa2 Rxd5
§ž³¹—¨ 13. Ng6 Qxe2+ 40. b4 Rb5 
14. Kxe2 Rh5 41. Rb2 Nc3
”“”¯” 15. Nxf8 Kxf8 42.* Kg3 Nd5 
” 16. c4 h3 43. Kxh3 Rxb4 ”³
‘–• 17. g3 Bd7 44. Rxb4 Nxb4 §
” 18. Bf4 Rc8 45. Kg3 Nc6 ’‘
19. Be3 Ne7 46. h4 Ne5
‘ 20. f3 Rh7 47. g5 f5
˜‘²“
‘’‘ª’‘’ 21. Rae1 Nf5 48. h5+ Kxh5 ¦’
¦²¤ 22.* Bxa7 b6 49. Kf4 Kg6 
12. Nxf6+ 23. c5 Ra8 50. Kxe5 Kxg5 42..Nd5
24. cxb6 cxb6 51.* Kd5 Kf4
25. Bxb6 Rxa2 52. Ke6 Ke3
§´ 26. Bc5+ Kf7 53. Kxf5 Kxf3

”“”ž§ 27. Rb1 Rh8 1/2-1/2 
” 
‘— ²“´
‘ 
‘‘’“ ‘
‘’°’ 
¦¤ 
22. Bxa7 51. Kd5
Game 77: Distant Variant Dv3'35F with White
White avoids a center pawn exchange, and plays the bishop forward early with Dv3'35F (9). After
most of the pieces and the queens are traded (17), white's active bishop is enough to provide the
winning margin (23). Black drops the exchange rather than abandon the center file to white's
rooks, and the rest is a waltz for white (27). Winning chess doesn't get much easier than this!

§ž¯¨³ 1. d3 e5 27.* c5 c6 —³


2. Nd2 d5 28. Rd1 Nc7
“”¹“”“ 3. e4 Nf6 29. Rxd3 Ne6
”“”“
—˜ 4. Be2 Nc6 30. b4 axb4 
”” 5. c3 Be7 31. a5 Nxc5 ”
‘”‘ 6. Bf3 d4 32. Rxd4 Kf8 ‘‘”
•‘› 7. c4 O-O 33. Rxb4 Ke7 “
8. Nb3 a5 34. Rb6 Kd6
‘’’‘’ 9.* a4 Be6 35.* a6 Nxa6
’’‘’
¦ª²–¤ 10. Ne2 Bb4+ 36. Rxa6 g5 ¤²
9. a4 11. Bd2 Bxd2+ 37. Ra7 f6 27. c5
12. Qxd2 Qd6 38. Rxh7 c5
§§³ 13. O-O Nd7 39. Kf1 Ke5 
14. Ng3 Nc5 40. Ke2 Ke4
“”“”“ 15. Nxc5 Qxc5 41. h4 gxh4 “”“
—ž 16. Nf5 Rfe8 42. Rxh4+Ke5 ¦“´
”¯”•¬ 17.* Qg5 Bxf5 43. Kd3 f5 ’˜
‘‘”‘ 18. exf5 Qe7 44. f4+ Kd5 
19. Qxe7 Nxe7 45. Rh6 c4+
‘› 20. Rae1 Nxf5 46. Ke3 Kc5

’’‘’ 21. Bxb7 Rad8 47. Rf6 c3 ’‘’
¦¤² 22. Re2 Nd6 48. Rxf5+ Kc4 ²
17..Bxf5 23.* Bc6 e4 49. g4 c2 35. a6
24. Bxe8 exd3 50. Kd2 Kd4
25. Re5 Rxe8 51. g5 Ke4
¨§³ 26. Rxe8+ Nxe8 52. Rf8 1-0
›”“”“
˜
””
‘‘”
‘
’¤’‘’
¤²
23. Bc6
Distance 3 Variants 175

Game 78: Distant Variant Dv4x5B" with White


White pursues an interesting line with a center challenge and alternative knight relocation,
Dv4x5B" (9). Black continues to force exchanges (17), depriving white of castling and obliging an
early king sortie, but these turn out to be to white's advantage: he stays a step ahead of black in
the 4 rooks endgame (25,41,57) and this tempo provides the margin to win. Really good chess!
§ž¯³¨ 1. d3 e5 36. Rf2 Kg7 ³
2. e4 Nc6 37. Kh3 Kg8
”“”¹“”“ 3. Ne2 Nf6 38. Raf6 c6

˜ 4. Nd2 d5 39. Rd6 f5 “¦
” 5. Ng3 Be7 40. Kh2 Rc4 ““
‘ 6. Be2 Nd4 41.* h5 Kh7 §’
—– 7. Nf3 dxe4 42. Rxf5 Rxb2+ §’
8. dxe4 Nxf3+ 43. Kh3 Re2
‘’‘›’‘’ 9.* Bxf3 Qxd1+ 44. Rf7+ Kg8
’¦²
¦ª²¤ 10. Bxd1 Be6 45. Rb7 Re8 
9. Bxf3 11. Bd2 h5 46. Rdd7 Rc5 41. h5
12. Bc3 h4 47. Rg7+ Kh8
§³¨ 13. Nf5 Bxf5 48. Rh7+ Kg8 ³
14. exf5 e4 49. Rbg7+Kf8
”“”¹“” 15. Be2 Nd5 50. Rf7+ Kg8 ¤¤
 16. Bd4 Nf4 51. Rhg7+Kh8 “
‘ 17.* g3 Nxe2 52. g4 Re3+ “¨‘
“˜” 18. Kxe2 O-O 53. Kh4 Re1 ‘²
19. f3 exf3+ 54. Rh7+ Kg8
 20. Kxf3 Rfd8 55. Rfg7+ Kf8

‘’‘›’‘’ 21. Rhe1 Bf8 56. Rb7 Kg8 
¦²¤ 22. Re4 Rd5 57.* h6 Rh1+ ¨
17. g3 23. f6 Bc5 58. Kg3 Rg1+ 57. h6
24. Bxc5 Rxc5 59. Kh3 Rh1+
25.* Rxh4 Rxc2 60.* Kg2 Rxh6
§³ 26. fxg7 Kxg7 61. Rxh6 Rc4
³
”“”“” 27. Rg4+ Kf8 62. Rd6 Rxg4+ ¤¤
’ 28. Rb4 Rb8 63. Kf2 Rf4+ “’
¨ 29. h4 b5 64. Ke3 Rf1 “¨
¤” 30. a4 a6 65. Rxc6 Re1+ ‘
31. axb5 axb5 66. Kd4 Rd1+
°’ 32. Ra5 Rc5 67. Kc5 Rd8 
‘’‘’ 33. Rf4 Rd8 68. Kxb5 1-0 °
¦ 34. Ra6 Rd3+ §
25. Rxh4 35. Kg4 Rb3 60..Rxh6
Game 79: Distant Variant Dv3DxE with White
White's Dv3DxE responds to a bishop early attack (9). White opens the Q-side (14) with a lively
combination that wins a pawn (21) and gives him strong control of the open lines. With all black's
pieces tied down for the defense, white invades the black position (33,42), winning another pawn
and leaving black a hopeless rout (49). When played aggressively the D-game is truly formidable!
§³¨ 1. d3 d5 31. Qa4 h4 
2. e3 e5 32. h3 Kh7
”“”­¹“”“ 3. Ne2 Nf6 33.* Qa8 g5
”“³
—˜ 4. Ng3 Bg4 34. Qb7 Rf6 ”—¨§“
“” 5. Be2 Bxe2 35. Qxc7 Na5 ­
‘ 6. Qxe2 Be7 36. Bb2 Qf5 ª’”
‘’– 7. O-O Nc6 37. R1c2 Nc6 ’¦’‘
8. c4 Qd7 38. Qb7 Qe6
‘’ª’‘’ 9.* a3 O-O 39. Rc1 Qf5
’‘
¦•¤² 10. b4 a6 40. R3c2 Na5 ¦²
9. a3 11. Bb2 Rfe8 41. Qc8 Qd5 33. Qa8
12. Nd2 d4 42.* Qg4 Rde6
¨§³ 13. Nf3 Rad8 43. Qh5+ Kg7 ª
14.* b5 axb5 44. Rc8 Rh6
“”­¹“”“ 15. cxb5 Na5 45. Qf3 Rd6 “³
“—˜ 16. Nxe5 Qd5 46. e4 Qb3 ”¨¨
” 17. Nc4 Qxb5 47. Qe2 Rh7 ˜­”
’‘” 18. Bxd4 b6 48. d5+ Kh6 ’”
19. Rab1 Qd5 49.* R1c7 Nc4
’‘’•– 20. Rfc1 Nc6 50. Rxc4 f6
’’‘
ª’‘’ 21.* Ba1 Qe6 51. e5 Qxc4 ¤’‘
¦¤² 22. d4 Bd6 52. Rxc4 Rd8 ¦²
14. b5 23. Nxd6 Rxd6 53. exf6 Rf7 42. Qg4
24. Qc2 g6 54. Qd2 Rxd5
25. Qa4 h5 55. Qxd5 Rf8
¨§³ 26. Ne2 Nd5 56. Rg4 Rg8
¤
”¹“”“ 27. Nc3 Nxc3 57. Qxg8 b5 ¦“§
”—˜ 28. Rxc3 Qe4 58. Qg7+ Kh5 ”¨´
­ 29. Qc2 Qd5 59. Rxg5# ˜‘”
• 30. Rc1 Ree6 ‘”
’‘’– ’­‘
ª’‘’ ª’‘
¤¦² ²
21..Qe6 49..Nc4
Distance 3 Variants 177

Game 80: Distant Variant Dv78'F with Black


Black responds to a bishop early attack by advancing the flank pawns with Dv78'F (9). The K-side
is opened, but white is not able to capitalize on black's more exposed position (15,19,24). In an
early endgame, black is able to keep pace (30,44) and draw. Aggressive responses to early attacks
are usually not required to maintain equality; but they should be part of your opening repertoire.
§ž¯³¨ 1. e4 e6 31. Rxc7 Rb5 §ž
2. d4 d6 32. Rd7 Rb6
”“”—“¹ 3. Nf3 Ne7 33. a4 Kf8
“”´“
”“—” 4. Bg5 h6 34. a5 Rb5 “”
” 5. Bh4 g5 35. Rxd6 Ke7 ›‘
’‘’ 6. Bg3 Ng6 36. Rb6 Rxb6 
–• 7. Nc3 Nd7 37. axb6 Kd6 
8. h4 Bg7 38. Kd2 Kc5
‘’‘’‘ 9.* hxg5 hxg5 39. Kc3 a5
‘’‘‘
¦ª²›¤ 10. Rxh8+Bxh8 40. Kb3 Kxb6 ²¦
9. c5 11. Qd2 g4 41. Ka4 Ka6 24..Kf6
12. Nh2 Nb6 42. c4 f5
§ž¯³ 13. O-O-Oe5 43. g3 Kb6 
14. dxe5 Bxe5 44.* b3 Ka6
”“”“ 15.* f4 gxf3 45. b4 axb4 “”“´
˜”— 16. Bxe5 Nxe5 46. Kxb4 Kb6 “”
¹ 17. Nxf3 Qe7 47. c5+ Kc6 ‘¨
‘“ 18. Nd5 Nxd5 48. Kc4 Kd7 ¤
19.* Qxd5 Qe6 49. Kd5 Kc7
– 20. Nxe5 Qxe5 50. Ke5 Kc6

‘’‘¬’‘– 21. Bb5+ Ke7 51. Kxf5 Kxc5 ‘’‘‘
²¤› 22. Rf1 Qxd5 52. g4 b5 ²
15. f4 23. exd5 a6 53. Ke4 b4 30..Rxd5
24.* Re1+ Kf6 54. Kd3 Kd5
25. Bd3 Bd7 55. g5 Ke6
§ž³ 26. Rf1+ Kg7 56. g6 Kf6

”“”¯“ 27. Bf5 Bxf5 57. Kc4 b3 “
” 28. Rxf5 Re8 58. Kxb3 Kxg6 ´
ª˜ 29. Rf4 Re5 1/2-1/2 ”“
‘ 30.* Rc4 Rxd5 °‘
• ‘’
‘’‘‘ 
²¤› 
19..Qe6 44..Ka6
Game 81: Distant Variant Dv2'8'G' with Black
Black reacts to a rook pawn attack, then prepares a Q-side fianchetto with Dv2'8'G' (9). Black has a
good position afterwards, which resists white's best attempts to disrupt it (18). Black is set to go a
pawn up, but first trades down (27) and adjusts his position. White's last hopes fade when he is
unable to protect his advanced pawn (42,49), and black rolls on to a convincing win (62). Forte!
§˜ž¯³˜¨ 1. e4 e6 38. Rd1 Rc3 
2. d4 d6 39. Rd8+ Kh7
””¹“” 3. Nf3 Ne7 40. Rd7 Nb5
¤”³
””“” 4. c4 Ng6 41. Rxf7 Rc4 ‘“”
‘ 5. h4 Be7 42.* Rb7 Rxb4 —
‘’‘ 6. h5 Nf8 43. f4 Kg6 –§
–• 7. Nc3 h6 44. Rb8 Rxf4 
8. Be2 b6 45. Rxb5 Rc4
‘’›’‘ 9.* O-O Nfd7 46. Rb6 Kf5
’‘
¦ª²¤ 10. Be3 O-O 47. Rb5+ Kf6 ²
9. O-O 11. Qc2 c5 48. Rb6 g6 42. Rb7
12. dxc5 bxc5 49.* Kf2 Ke5
§˜¨³ 13. e5 Bb7 50. Ke2 Kd5 
14. exd6 Bxd6 51. Rb3 Kxc6
ž—¹“” 15. Rfd1 Be7 52. Rg3 g5 
“¯“” 16. Bf4 Qb6 53. Rh3 Rh4 ¦‘“´“”
•”‘ 17. Nb5 a6 54. Rd3 e5 
‘ 18.* Bc7 Qc6 55. Rd8 h5 §
19. Bd6 Bxd6 56. Rh8 Kd5
• 20. Nxd6 Ra7 57. Ke3 Rg4

‘’ª›’‘ 21. Nxb7 Rxb7 58. Rxh5 Rxg2 ²‘
¦¤² 22. a3 Qc7 59. Kf3 Rg1 
18. Bc7 23. Rab1 Nc6 60. Rh8 Rf1+ 49..Ke5
24. Bd3 Nf6 61. Kg4 e4
25. Be4 Rfb8 62.* Re8 Kd4
¨³ 26. Bxc6 Qxc6 63. Kxg5 e3
¤
§“” 27.* b4 Qe4 64. Kg4 Kd3 
“­“˜” 28. Qxe4 Nxe4 65. Rd8+ Ke2 
”‘ 29. Rdc1 Nf6 66. Kg3 Rg1+ ³”
’‘ 30. Ne5 Nxh5 67. Kf4 Kf2 “°
31. Nd3 cxb4 68. Ke4 e2
’• 32. Rxb4 Nf6 69. Rf8+ Ke1 
ª’‘ 33. c5 Rxb4 70. Rb8 Rg7 
¤¤² 34. Nxb4 Ne8 71. Ke5 Kd2 §
27..Qe4 35. Nxa6 Ra8 72. Rb1 e1=Q+ 62..Kd4
36. Nb4 Rxa3 0-1
37. c6 Nc7
Distance 3 Variants 179

Game 82: Distant Variant Dv3xBB with Black


White's aggressive 4 pawn custom opening with center pawn attack (9) is quickly refuted by black,
who wins a pawn (12) and consolidates his position nicely. White tries desperately for an assault
(21), but black once again refutes his efforts, emerging with advantage of pawn and the exchange.
Black then demolishes the remains of white's hopeless position in short order (32,45). This game
should serve as a warning to ill prepared attackers: the D-system will teach you to respect it!
§ž¯³¹¨ 1. d4 d6 32.* Bb5 Rxb5 §¯¨³
2. e4 e6 33. axb5 Ra2
”“˜“”“ 3. Bd3 Ne7 34. Kf3 Rxf2+
“¹“
˜”“ 4. f4 Nd7 35. Ke4 e5 ›¤““
 5. c4 Nb6 36. Rc8+ Kg7 —
’‘’ 6. c5 Nd7 37. Kd5 Rxh2 ’•
›• 7. cxd6 cxd6 38. g5 Rg2 ª•’
8. Nf3 Nb6 39. Rc4 Rb2
‘’‘’ 9.* O-O d5 40. Kc6 f6
‘’’
¦•ª²¤ 10. exd5 Nexd5 41. gxf6+ Kxf6 ²
9. O-O 11. Nc3 Bd6 42. Ra4 g5 25..Nxd4
12.* Bd2 Nxf4 43. Ra8 g4
§ž¯³¨ 13. Bxf4 Bxf4 44. Rg8 h5 ¨³
14. g3 Bh6 45.* Kd5 Rxb5+
”““”“ 15. Qc2 a6 46. Ke4 Rb3 ¨““
˜¹“ 16. Rae1 g6 47. Kd5 g3 ¤““
— 17. Qb3 O-O 48. Rf8+ Kg5 ›
’’ 18. Ne4 Bg7 49. Rg8+ Kf4 ‘¹‘
19. Kg2 Bd7 50. Rf8+ Kg4
–›• 20. Rc1 Bc6 51. Rg8+ Kh3

‘’‘’ 21.* Rxc6 bxc6 52. Kc4 Rc3+ –°’
¦ª¤² 22. Rc1 Nd5 53. Kd5 g2 
12..Nxf4 23. Rxc6 Ne3+ 54. Ke6 Rg3 32..Rxb5
24. Kg1 Nf5 55. Rh8 h4
25.* Bxa6 Nxd4 56. Rh6 g1=Q
§¯¨³ 26. Nxd4 Qxd4+ 57. Rf6 Ra3
¤
““¹“ 27. Nf2 Qxb2 58. Rf7 Qg8 
“˜ž““ 28. Qxb2 Bxb2 59. Ke7 Ra7+ °´
 29. a4 Bd4 60. Kd6 Qxf7 ‘”“
’• 30. Kg2 Ra7 61. Kc6 Qd7# ¹“
31. g4 Rb8
ª›•’ 
‘’°’ ¨
¦¤ 
21. Rxc6 45. Kd5
Game 83: Distant Variant Dv4'5x6' with Black
Black repulses a bishop early attack with his f-pawn, then challenges the center with Dv4'5x6' (9).
Afterwards black trades down quickly (17) and later chooses a risky line, bringing his solo king
out to the Q-side (20,34). Despite his exposed and vulnerable position, black is able to survive a
dangerous white offensive (38,59), and finally clench a draw. Lesser skilled players should avoid
risky lines exposing the king unnecessarily; better players may find them worth investigating.
§ž¯³¹¨ 1. d4 d6 34.* h4 Ka3 ¨§¹
2. e4 e6 35. Rf7 Be7
”“”—”“ 3. c4 Nd7 36. Nc6 Rb7
¦”
”— 4. Nf3 Ne7 37. Nd4 g6 ”
“ 5. Be2 Ng6 38.* h5 Rb6 –“
‘’ 6. Bg5 f6 39. hxg6 Rxg6+ ³’’
• 7. Be3 d5 40. Kf2 Rf6 ’
8. exd5 exd5 41. Rxf6 Bxf6
‘’›’‘’ 9.* Nc3 dxc4 42. Nxf5 h5

¦•ª²¤ 10. Bxc4 Nb6 43. Kf3 h4 ¦²
9. Nc3 11. O-O Nxc4 44. e4 Rf8 34..Ka3
12. Qa4+ c6 45. Re1 Bd8
§³¹¨ 13. Qxc4 Bg4 46. Nd4 h3 §
14. d5 Bxf3 47. e5 Rh8
”“­”“ 15. gxf3 Ne5 48. f5 Kb4 §¹¤
“” 16. Qe2 Qd7 49. Ne6 h2 “”
‘˜ 17.* f4 Qg4+ 50. Rb1+ Kc4 “‘
’ 18. Qxg4 Nxg4 51. Rc1+ Kd3 –’
19. dxc6 bxc6 52. Rh1 Ba5
– 20.* Rfe1 Kd7 53. f6 Kc4
´’
‘’ª’’ 21. Red1+Kc7 54. f7 Bb4 
¦¤² 22. Rac1 Nxe3 55. Nf4 Rh6 ¦²
17..Qg4+ 23. fxe3 Rb8 56. Kg3 Kd4 38..Rb6
24. b4 Kb6 57. e6 Ke5
25. a3 a5 58. Kg4 Kf6
§³¹¨ 26. bxa5+ Kxa5 59.* Kf3 Bd6

””“ 27. Ne4 f5 60. Kg2 Ke7 ‘
“” 28. Nd2 Bxa3 61. Rxh2 Bxf4 ‘´¨
 29. Rxc6 Rhd8 62. Rxh6 Bxh6 
’— 30. Rc7 Bf8 63. Kf3 Kxe6 ¹–
31. Nc4+ Ka4 64. f8=Q Bxf8
– 32. Rc1 h6 1/2-1/2 °
‘’’’ 33. Ne5 Re8 ”
¦¦² ¤
20..Kd7 59..Bd6
Distance 3 Variants 181

Game 84: Distant Variant Dv7'EG with White


White's play looks dubious, but it is a valid response to the rook pawn attack: Dv7'EG followed by
the f-pawn advance (9). Black attacks white's vulnerable K-side ferociously (13) but white always
finds an answer (17), and wins the game with a fine combination (20,22) clearing the board and
allowing him to clean up black's badly arranged pawns (29). Try provocative opening lines like
this one in blitz and see if you don't impress your adversary and whoever else is looking on!
§˜ž¯³¨ 1. e3 e5 28. Kf3 f5 ¨³
2. Ne2 d5 29.* Nf2 Nxf2
”“¹“” 3. Ng3 Nf6 30. Kxf2 Kd6
”“¹“
˜ 4. Be2 h5 31. Kg3 Ke5 —˜
”“” 5. O-O h4 32. Kxh3 Ke4 ”
 6. Nh1 h3 33. Kg2 Ke3 ‘‘
‘’’“ 7. g3 Be7 34. Kf1 a5 ––“
8. d3 c5 35. a3 Kd4
‘’‘›’’ 9.* f4 exf4 36. h4 Ke5
‘’’
¦•ª¤²• 10. gxf4 Nc6 37. h5 f4 ¤²
9. f4 11. c4 dxc4 38. b4 axb4 20. Rxd8+
12. dxc4 Qxd1 39. axb4 Kd4
§ž³¨ 13.* Rxd1 g5 40. c5 bxc5 ´
14. fxg5 Rg8 41. bxc5 Kxc5
”“¹“” 15. Nc3 Rxg5+ 42. h6 Kd5 ”“¹“
—˜ 16. Ng3 Bg4 43. Kf2 Ke5 ˜
” 17.* e4 Bxe2 44. h7 Ke4 ”•
‘’ 18. Bxg5 Bxd1 45. h8=Q Kd5 ‘˜‘
19. Rxd1 Rd8 46. Qh5+ Kc4
’“ 20.* Rxd8+Kxd8 47. Kf3 Kd4
–“
‘’›’ 21. Nf5 Nd4 48. Kxf4 Kc4 ‘’’
¦•¤²• 22.* Kf2 Nxe4+ 49. Ke3 Kb3 ²
13..g5 23. Nxe4 Nxf5 50. Qb5+ Kc3 22. Kf2
24. Bxe7+ Kxe7 51. Qa4 Kb2
25. Nxc5 Nd6 52. Kd2 Kb1
§³ 26. b3 b6 53. Kc3 Kc1

”“¹“ 27. Nd3 Ne4+ 54. Qc2# ”´
—˜ ”
”¨ “
‘ž ‘—
–’–“ ‘°“
‘’›’ ‘–’
¦¤² 
17. e4 29..Nxf2
Game 85: Distant Variant Dv7'8'Cx with Black
Black responds to a combination of bishop and center pawn early attacks with Dv7'8'Cx (9). After
the opening exchanges, black's strong fianchetto allows him to win two pawns (14) while tripping
up white's counter attack (19). Black is under pressure later, especially after white's fine knight
sacrifice (31) opens the way for a pawn promotion, but black fights back and stops the threat. In
an unusual finale black's lead proves worthless: a four rooks endgame and a draw is the result.
§¯³¹¨ 1. e4 e6 35. Kg3 Rah1 
2. d4 d6 36. Rg7+ Kd6
”“”˜“ 3. Nf3 Ne7 37. Rbxb7Rxh6
“´
˜”ž“” 4. Nc3 Nd7 38. f4 Kd5 §”—¤”
 5. Bg5 h6 39. Rb5+ Kc4 ”
‘ 6. Be3 Nb6 40. Rbg5 Nd4 •§’
–• 7. d5 g6 41. Rc7+ Kd3 
8. dxe6 Bxe6 42. Rd7 Rf1
‘’‘’‘’ 9.* Bxb6 axb6 43. Kg4 Rh8
’‘
¦ª²›¤ 10. Bc4 Bg7 44.* Rgd5 Rg8+ ¤²
9. Bxb6 11. Qd3 Bxc4 45. Rg5 Rf8 31. hxg5
12. Qxc4 Qd7 46. g3 Rd1
§³¨ 13. Qd3 f5 47. Rgg7 Rg1 ¨
14.* O-O fxe4 48. Rh7 Rc8
“”­˜¹ 15. Nxe4 Bxb2 49. Rhe7 Rf1 ¤
””“” 16. c3 Kd8 50. Kh5 Rf2 
“ 17. Rab1 Rxa2 51. g4 Rxf4 ¤
‘ 18. Rfd1 d5 52. Rf7 Rh8+ ˜’°
19.* c4 Ra3 53. Rh7 Rhf8
–ª• 20. Qd2 Bg7 54. g5 Rf1
³
‘’‘’‘’ 21. cxd5 Kc8 55. Kg6 Rg8+ ‘
¦¤² 22. d6 Nc6 56. Rhg7 Rc8 §
14..fxe4 23. dxc7 Qxd2 57. Rgf7 Rg1 44..Rg8+
24. Nfxd2 Kxc7 58. Rf4 Rc4
25. Nc4 Ra6 59. Kf6 Rc6+
´¨ 26. Rd6 g5 60.* Kf7 Rxg5

“”­˜ 27. h4 Re8 61. Rdxd4+Kc3 ¤
”“” 28. Rg6 Rxe4 62. Rd1 Kc2 §²
“ 29. Rxg7+Re7 63. Rd8 Re5 ’
‘• 30. Rg6 Re4 64. Rf3 Rc7+ ˜¦
31.* hxg5 Rxc4 65. Kg6 Rce7
ª• 32. gxh6 b5 66. Rd6 R5e6+ ³
§¹’‘’ 33. Rxb5 Ra1+ 67. Rxe6 Rxe6+ 
¤¤² 34. Kh2 Rh4+ 1/2-1/2 ¨
19..Ra3 60. Kf7
Distance 3 Variants 183

Game 86: Distant Variant Dv3BE with Black


Here's a really impressive win with black with one of the strongest distance 3 variants, Dv3BE (9).
White opens the Q-side, but hasn't seen that black can leave his queen on offer (17), and ends up
dropping a pawn (23). White tries desperately to catch up (27) as black rips apart his position (32)
and races into the endgame, where he wins easily (39). Having the opening move has always been
considered to be to your advantage, but seeing games like this makes you wonder if it's really so!

§ž¯¨³ 1. c4 e6 32.* Kf3 Rxh2 §˜´


2. d4 Ne7 33. Bd3 Rh5
”“¹“”“ 3. Nc3 Ng6 34. Be4 Rg5
”¤¦“
—”“— 4. Nf3 Be7 35. Kf4 h6 “
” 5. e4 d6 36. Rb7 Kg7 ‘
‘’‘ 6. Be2 O-O 37. Ra7 Kf7 ž
–• 7. O-O c5 38. Ra6 Ng6+ ¨’’
8. Qc2 Nc6 39.* Bxg6+Rxg6
‘’ª›’‘’ 9.* Rd1 cxd4 40. Rxg6 Kxg6
’
¦¤² 10. Nxd4 Nxd4 41. Ke5 Bf5 ›²
9. Rd1 11. Rxd4 Bd7 42. d6 h5 27. Rxa7
12. Be3 Qc7 43. Kd4 Bd7
§§³ 13. Rd2 Rfc8 44. Ke4 Kg5
14. a4 Qa5 45. Ke3 Kg4
”“ž¹“”“ 15. c5 d5 46. Kf2 Bc6 ˜´
“— 16. b4 Qxb4 47. Ke3 Kxg3 ¦ž“
’“ 17.* Rb1 Bxc5 48. Kd4 h4 
‘¯‘ 18. exd5 Qh4 49. Kc5 Be8 ‘
19. g3 Qh3 50. Kb6 Kf4
– 20. Bf1 Qf5 51. Kc7 Ke5

ª¦›’‘’ 21. Rxb7 Bxe3 52. d7 Bxd7 ’
¤² 22. fxe3 Qxc2 53. Kxd7 h3 §²’
17..Bxc5 23.* Rxc2 Bxa4 54. Kc6 h2 ›
24. Rf2 Rxc3 55. Kc5 h1=Q 32. Kf3
25. Rfxf7 Nf8 56. Kc4 Qc6+
§§³ 26. Rxg7+Kh8 57. Kd3 Qc1
”¤ž“”“ 27.* Rxa7 Rxa7 58. Ke2 Ke4 
“— 28. Rxa7 Bd7 59. Kf2 Kf4 ž³
‘ 29. e4 exd5 60. Kg2 Qd2+ ¤—”
‘ 30. exd5 Rc1 61. Kh3 Qe2 ‘¨
31. Kf2 Rc2+ 62. Kh4 Qg4#
–’’ ›²
¤’ ’
›² 
23..Bxa4 
39. Bxg6+
Game 87: Distant Variant Dv36'E with Black
Black's Dv36'E is an interesting line for aggressive defense (9). White offers a pawn early (10), but
later has an advanced attacking position (22). Black avoids difficulties by trading down cleverly
(26,31). A balanced endgame results, in which black is able to exploit his quality advantage to go
ahead temporarily, but it's not enough to win (52). The D-system openings have shown to be
remarkably resilient to all types of adversary responses, in particular traditional classical ones.
§˜ž¯¨³ 1. c4 e6 32. Rxc5 Bxc5 ¯³
2. Nc3 Ne7 33. Kg3 Kf6
”“¹”“ 3. d4 d6 34. Ne3 Bxe3
¤§”“
”“”— 4. Nf3 f6 35. fxe3 Kf5 “¹
” 5. e4 Ng6 36. Kf3 h5 ¤ž
‘’‘ 6. Be2 Be7 37. e4+ Ke5 –ª
–• 7. O-O O-O 38. Ke3 a5 ¨
8. Be3 c5 39. a4 g5
‘’›’‘’ 9.* h4 cxd4 40. g3 Kd6
‘’‘
¦ª¤² 10.* Nxd4 Nxh4 41. Kd4 Ke6 ²
9. h4 11. Bg4 f5 42. Kd3 h4 26..Qxe7
12. exf5 exf5 43. gxh4 gxh4
§˜ž¯¨³ 13. Bf3 Nxf3+ 44. Ke3 h3 ¹
14. Qxf3 Rf7 45. Kf3 Ke5
”“¹”“ 15. Rad1 f4 46. Kg3 Kxe4 ³”“
”“”— 16. Bc1 Nd7 47. Kxh3 Kf3 “
 17. Bxf4 Nb6 48. Kh4 Ke3 ¦•
‘”‘’ 18. Qe4 Nxc4 49. Kg4 Kd4 
19. Ndb5 Nxb2 50. Kf4 Kc5
–• 20. Rd5 Bf6 51. Ke5 Kb4

‘’›’‘ 21. Bxd6 Bd7 52.* Kd4 Kxa4 ‘’‘²
¦ª¤² 22.* Rb1 Rc8 53. Kc4 Ka3 ¨
10. Nxd4 23. Rxb2 a6 54. Kc3 Ka2 31..Rc5
24. Nd4 Rxc3 55. Kc4 a4
25. Rxb7 Bf5 56. Kc3 Ka3
§¯³ 26.* Be7 Qxe7 57. Kc2 Kb4

”“ž§”“ 27. Qxe7 Bxe7 58. Kb1 Kb3 
¹ 28. Nxf5 Bf8 59. Kc1 Kc4 
•¤ 29. Rxf7 Kxf7 60. Kd2 a3 ”²
ª 30. Ra5 Rc1+ 61. Kc1 Kb3 ‘´
31.* Kh2 Rc5 62. Kb1 1/2-1/2
– 
‘˜’‘ 
¤² 
22. Rb1 52. Kd4
Distance 3 Variants 185

Game 88: Distant Variant Dv3BxG with Black


Black's Dv3BxG plays right into white's preemptive rook pawn attack, wasting two moves (9).
Black parries all white's attempted attacks with sharp counter play (14,19,24), and exchanges off
the remaining pieces (30) for an easily drawn endgame (45). Yet another demonstration of the
impressive resilience of the D-system openings in the face of early attack - they are truly amazing!

§ž¯³¹¨ 1. e4 e6 26. Qxb2 Qh5 ¯¨³


2. d4 Ne7 27. Qb3+ Rf7
”“˜“”“ 3. h4 d6 28. Rxd6 Qh1+
”““
”“ 4. Nf3 Nd7 29. Ke2 fxe4 ”
˜‘ 5. Nc3 Ng6 30.* Rf6 exf3+ “
‘ 6. h5 Ne7 31. Rxf3 Qh5 ’¬‘
–›• 7. Bd3 c5 32. a4 Kf8 ‘
8. dxc5 Nxc5 33. Qxf7+ Qxf7
‘’‘’‘ 9.* O-O Bd7 34. Rxf7+ Kxf7
‘¦§’
¦ª²¤ 10. b4 Nxd3 35. Kf3 a6 ¤²
9. O-O 11. Qxd3 Nc6 36. Kg4 Kg6 24..Qg5+
12. Rb1 Rc8 37. a5 h6
§¯³¹¨ 13. Bf4 e5 38. Kh4 Kf5 ³
14.* Bg5 f6 39. Kh5 Kf4
”“ž“”“ 15. Be3 Bg4 40. Kxh6 Kf3 ”“§“
—” 16. h6 Bxf3 41. Kg5 Kxf2 ¦
”‘ 17. hxg7 Bxg7 42. Kf4 Ke2 
’‘ 18. gxf3 f5 43. Ke4 Kd2 ’“
19.* Nb5 Nd4 44. Kd4 Kc2
–ª• 20. Rfd1 O-O 45.* Kc5 Kb3
ª‘
‘‘’‘ 21. Nxd4 exd4 46. b5 axb5 ‘°’
¤¤² 22. Bxd4 Bxd4 47. Kxb5 Ka3 ­
14..f6 23. Qxd4 Rxc2 48. a6 bxa6+ 30..exf3+
24.* Rb2 Qg5+ 49. Kxa6 1/2-1/2
25. Kf1 Rxb2
§¯³¨ 
”“¹“ “
—” “
•”“ ’
’‘ ’²
ª‘ 
‘‘’ ³
¤¤² 
19..Nd4 45. Kc5
Game 89: Distant Variant Dv4xBG" with Black
Black's Dv4xBG" responds well to a center pawn early attack (9), winning a pawn and developing
into a solid position later (22). Black explores attacks all over the chessboard, but can't crack the
white defenses until a set of exchanges beginning (65) opens the way for his pieces and pawns
(77) and then white must yield (82). A fine demonstration of tactical chess and tenacious defense!
§ž¯³¹¨ 1. Nf3 d6 40. Bf1 Bc8 ³
2. d4 Nd7 41. Rc1 Be6
”“”—“”“ 3. e4 e6 42. Ree1 Rdc8
¨”“
—“ 4. c4 Ne7 43. Kg2 Qd6 
’ 5. Nc3 Nb6 44. Red1 Qb6 ž
‘ 6. c5 dxc5 45. Qb2 a5 “’
–• 7. dxc5 Nd7 46. Rc3 Rd8 §–“’
8. Be3 Nc6 47. Rcc1 Bg4
‘’’‘’ 9.* Bb5 Bxc5 48. f3 Bd7 ¤
¦ª²›¤ 10. Qd2 O-O 49. Bd3 Ra8 ¦²
9. Bb5 11. Rd1 Qe7 50. Nf1 a4 77..Bd3
12. O-O Nde5 51. Nd2 Qd6
¨¨³ 13. Nxe5 Nxe5 52. Qa3 Bc8 ³
14. Be2 b6 53. Qb2 Bb7
”ž¯“”“ 15. Bxc5 Qxc5 54. Bb1 Qf6 ”“
”“— 16. Rc1 Qe7 55. Re1 axb3 
” 17. Qf4 Ng6 56. axb3 Rd8 
‘ 18. Qg3 c6 57. Qc3 Rcd7 “‘’
¬ 19. Rfd1 e5
20. Nb1 Bb7
58. Qe3 Qb6
59. Qc3 Qh6
§“
‘’–›’‘’ 21. Qe3 Rad8 60. Nf1 b4 ¤ž²
¦¤² 22.* Nd2 Nf4 61. Qe3 Qc6 §•¦
22..Nf4 23. Bf1 c5 62. Nh2 Qe6 82. Rexe2
24. Nf3 Qf6 63. Ba2 Nb5
¨³ 25. Re1 Ne6
26. Qa3 a6
64. Rc2 Nc3
65.* Nf1 f5
79. Nd1Rb1
80. Kf2 R7b3
92. Rf7 e3
93. Ke1 Rb2
ž§“”“ 27. Qc3 Nd4 66. Qxc5 fxe4 81. g4 Be2 94. g5 Rg1+
­ 28. Nd2 Rd7 67. Qxb4 exf3+ 82.*Rexe2 fxe2 95. Rf1 Rgg2
83. Kxe2 Rg3 96. Rf6+ Kd5
”” 29. Rcd1 Rfd8 68. Kh2 Nxa2 84. Ne3 Rh1 97. Kf1 e2+
”‘’ 30. Re3 Qf4 69. Rxa2 Rf7 85. Ra8+ Kf7 98.Kxg2e1=Q+
31. h3 Rd6 70. Qc3 e4 86. Ra7+ Ke6 99. Kh3 Rb3+
‘˜¬‘’ 32. g3 Qh6 71. Ne3 Rd3 87. Ra6+ Kd7 100. Rf3 Qh1+
›¤° 33. h4 Qe6 72. Qc5 Qc6 88. Ra7+ Kc6 101.Kg3 Qxf3+
¦• 34. Bc4 Qg4 73. Qxc6 Bxc6 89. Rxg7 Rh2+
90. Kf1 Rxe3
102. Kh2 Rb2+
103. Kg1 Qd1#
65..f5 35. Rde1 R6d7 74. Nc4 Re7 91. Rxh7 Rg3
36. Bd3 Rc7 75. Ne3 Rxb3
37. Bf1 Qe6 76. Rc2 Bb5
38. Bc4 Qe7 77.* Kg1 Bd3
39. b3 b5 78. Ra2 Reb7
Distance 3 Variants 187

Game 90: Distant Variant Dv3'8'D with Black


Black plays Dv3'8'D (9), responding to the bishop early attack. Black takes a pawn quickly and
then has to fall back, but later gains time with his knight foray (21), followed by a push on the
Q-side (35). White can do little to prevent a general invasion (44), and is a few moves away from
being totally crushed (51), but finally manages to sneak away with a draw by perpetual check (58).

§ž³¹¨ 1. d4 d6 33. Qc1 Bb6 §³


2. c4 Nd7 34. Bg4 Bd4
”“¯—“” 3. Nf3 e6 35.* Ne2 c5
”
“”“—” 4. Nc3 Ne7 36. Bf3 Rad8 “”
 5. Bg5 c6 37. Qc2 a6 “”‘”‘¯‘
‘’‘ 6. e4 Qc7 38. g4 Qg5 “¨‘
–• 7. Qd2 Ng6 39. Ka1 Rfe8 ›
8. Be2 h6 40. Kb1 Be3
‘’¬›’‘’ 9.* Be3 Be7 41. Nc3 Rd4
‘’¹ª
¦²¤ 10. h4 e5 42. Qe2 Bd2 °¤¤
9. Be3 11. h5 Ngf8 43. Nd5 Bxd5 44..e4
12. O-O-ONf6 44.* exd5 e4
§ž¹­¨³ 13. c5 exd4 45. Bg2 Re5 ³
14. Bxd4 dxc5 46. Bh1 Rdxd5
”“—“” 15. Be5 Qd7 47. f6 Rd3 ’
“˜” 16. Qc2 Qe6 48. a4 bxa4 “”
”‘‘ 17. Bg3 N8d7 49. Rf5 Rxf5 ”‘¯‘
‘ 18. Nh4 O-O 50. gxf5 e3 ““
19. f4 Bd8 51.* fxg7 a3
–• 20. f5 Qe8 52. Qf3 Kxg7
§”
‘’ª›‘ 21.* Nf3 Ng4 53. Qb7+ Kf8 ’¹ª
²¤¤ 22. Rd2 b5 54. Bd5 Qxf5 °¤›
21..Ng4 23. Kb1 Ne3 55. Qb8+ Ke7 51..a3
24. Qd3 Nc4 56. Qc7+ Ke8
25. Rdd1 Ba5 57. Qc6+ Qd7
§¨³ 26. Rc1 Qe7 58.* Qg6+ Kd8
³
”ž¯” 27. Qc2 Nde5 59. Qb6+ Qc7 ­
“” 28. Nxe5 Nxe5 60. Qf6+ Qe7 “ª”
¹“””‘‘ 29. Rcd1 Bb7 61. Qb6+ Qc7 ”›‘
‘ 30. Rhf1 f6 62. Qf6+ Qe7 “
31. Bxe5 fxe5 63. Qb6+ Qc7
–’ 32. g3 c4 1/2-1/2 ”§”
‘’ª› ’¹
°¤¤ °¤
35..c5 58. Qg6+
Game 91: Distant Variant Dv44xB" with Black
Black's Dv44xB" responds well to white's K-side fianchetto opening (9), and gives him a fine
position later on (18). Black initiates a fantastic series of exchanges (22), surviving a dangerous
white attack (26) with brilliant counterplay. In an equally sensational queen and rook endgame
black outplays his opponent (36,74) to win by a hair. Perilous chess, played at its very best.
§¯³¹¨ 1. g3 e6 40. Rg4+ Kf7 ¨­³
2. Nf3 d5 41. Rf4 Rg5+
”“”ž“”“ 3. Bg2 Nd7 42. Kf2 Qd6
““
“˜— 4. d4 Ne7 43. Qd4 Rd5 “”
 5. O-O Ng6 44. Qc4 b5 ¹—
ª“’ 6. c4 Nf6 45. Qe4 Rd2+ ª
–•’ 7. Nc3 dxc4 46. Kg3 Kg7 ’
‘’‘’›’ 8. Qa4+ Bd7
9.* Qxc4 Bc6
47. h4 Qe5
48. Qxe5 fxe5
‘’’›’
¦¤² 10. e4 Be7 49. Rf5 Rxa2 ¦²
9. Qxc4 11. Rd1 O-O 50. Rxe5 Ra3 26..Bxf2+
12. d5 exd5 51. Re7+ Kf6
§§³ 13. exd5 Bd7 52. Re3 a5 
14. Bg5 Re8 53. Kf2 Kg6
”“”­¹“” 15. Rac1 h6 54. Ke2 b4 “´
˜—” 16. Be3 Bg4 55. Re5 Kf6 “”­
‘ 17. Bd4 Qd7 56. Re3 Kf5 ¨“
ªž 18.* Re1 a6 57. Rg3 Kf4 
19. Ne5 Nxe5 58. Rg5 Ke4
–•’ 20. Bxe5 Rac8 59. Rg4+ Ke5 ‘’
‘’’›’ 21. Qd4 Rcd8 60. Rg3 a4 ‘¬²’
¦¦² 22.* Ne4 Nxd5 61. Rg5+ Kd4 ¦
18..a6 23. Bxg7 c5 62. bxa4 Rxa4 36..h4
24. Nxc5 Bxc5 63. Rg4+ Kc3
¨§³ 25. Rxe8+ Qxe8 64. Rg3+ Kc2
26.* Qxg4 Bxf2+ 65. Rg4 Ra2

“”­¹“” 27. Kh1 Ne3 66. Ke3 b3 
“˜” 28. Qf3 Kxg7 67. Rc4+ Kd1 
‘ 29. Qxf2 Nxg2 68. Rd4+ Kc1 ¤‘
¬•ž 30. Kxg2 Rd3 69. h5 Rh2 
31. Kg1 Qe6 70. Rc4+ Kb2
’ 32. b3 Re3 71. Rc5 Ka3 ´
‘’’›’ 33. Rf1 b6 72. Kd3 b2 ”°
¦¦² 34. Qd2 h5 73. Rb5 Rh1 §
22..Nxd5 35. Kf2 Re5 74.* Ke2 Rh3 74..Rh3
36.* Rc1 h4 75. h6 Rxh6
37. Rc4 hxg3+ 76. Kd3 Rh1
38. Kxg3 Rd5 77. Kc4 Rc1+
39. Qc3+ f6 78. Kd5 b1=Q
Distance 3 Variants 189

Game 92: Distant Variant Dv1'GxE with Black


Black counters a bishop early attack with Dv1'GxE (9). After the opening black has a comfortable
position with plenty of room to maneuver (25). Black drops his advanced pawn, but after a long
and difficult struggle (33,46), finds a way to equalize (51), and clean up white's remaining pawns
(56) to win. A fine example of complex tactical chess, at a level only the best players can achieve.

§ž¯¨³ 1. d4 d6 34. f3 Rxc5 ³


2. e4 e6 35. dxc5 Bb5
“”—“”“ 3. Nf3 Nd7 36. Qxd5 Nhf6
§“”“
“”“— 4. Bg5 Be7 37. Qd1 Nxc5 “—
 5. Bxe7 Nxe7 38. Nbd4 Bc4 ’¯—•
’‘ 6. Nc3 O-O 39. Qd2 Nd5 ž–›
–• 7. Be2 Ng6 40. Ng3 Rd8 ’‘
8. Qd2 a6 41. Ngf5 Ne6
‘’‘¬›’‘’ 9.* O-O b5 42. Be4 Qc5
‘’
¦²¤ 10. a3 Bb7 43. Kh1 Rd7 ¦¬°
9. O-O 11. Rad1 Qf6 44.* Qe1 Nf6 44..Nf6
12. Rfe1 Rfe8 45. Rb1 Nxe4
ž¨§³ 13. Bd3 Rac8 46. Qxe4 Qc7 ª
14. a4 b4 47. Rb6 g6
¯“”“ 15. Ne2 c5 48. Ne3 Nxd4 ¯¨“´“
“”“˜— 16. c4 bxc3 49. Nxc4 Re7 ““
’ 17. bxc3 c4 50. Qa8+ Kg7 ’
“’‘ 18. Bc2 Rb8 51.* Rb1 Nxf3 •˜
19. a5 Qd8 52. Qxf3 Qxc4
’– 20. Ra1 Nf6 53. g4 Re4
’‘
¤›–ª’‘’ 21. Ng3 Bc6 54. h3 Rf4 ‘’
¦² 22. Ra2 Qc7 55. Qe3 Qd5+ ¤°
25..Nf4 23. Qe2 Ba8 56.* Kg1 Re4 51..Nxf3
24. Nd2 Rec8 57. Qf2 Qxa5
25.* Rea1 Nf4 58. Rb7 Qd5
§³ 26. Qe3 N4h5 59. Rb2 Qe5

¯“”“ 27. Ne2 Rb5 60. Rb1 Re3 “´“
“ž˜ 28. Ra4 Rb2 61. Rd1 Qxc3 ““
’§¦“— 29. Rxc4 Bc6 62. Kg2 Rxh3 ’­
’ 30. Qd3 d5 63. Qd4+ Qxd4 ¨‘
31. exd5 exd5 64. Rxd4 Ra3
•’ª 32. Rc5 Rb5 0-1 ’¬‘
›•’‘’ 33.* Nb3 Ne4 
¦² ¤²
33..Ne4 56..Re4
Game 93: Distant Variant Dv3'4'B" with Black
Black's Dv3'4'B" falls back under pressure of white's big pawn wall (9), but later smashes open the
Q-side, exchanging a knight for 3 pawns (13). Black's pawn storm scatters white's Q-side pieces
(22,28), and his advanced pawn anchors the winning attack (35,38). Unpleasant surprises such as
this are in store for those who expect to smother the compact D-game under a blanket of pawns.

§ž¯³¹¨ 1. d4 d6 28.* Rb3 d3 §¯¨³


2. e4 e6 29. Nxd3 Bxd3
”“—˜“”“ 3. c4 Ne7 30. Qe1 Re8
¹“”
““ 4. Nc3 Nd7 31. Bc1 Qd7 “““
’“ 5. f4 c6 32. Qd2 Red8 ž’
’‘’ 6. Nf3 Nb6 33. f5 Bb5 ¬”’
–• 7. Be2 d5 34. Qe1 Qd1 ¤
8. c5 Nd7 35.* fxe6 Qxe1
‘’›‘’ 9.* e5 Ng6 36. exf7+ Kf8
‘“•‘’
¦ª²¤ 10. O-O Be7 37. Rxe1 Rd1 –¤°
9. e5 11. b4 O-O 38.* h4 Rxe1+ 28..d3
12. b5 a6 39. Kh2 Rxe2
§ž¯¨³ 13.* b6 Nxc5 40. Rf3 Rxe5 §¨³
14. dxc5 Bxc5+ 41. a4 Bxa4
“—¹“”“ 15. Nd4 Bxb6 42. Rf1 Rf5 ¹“”
“’““— 16. Ba3 c5 43. Rf3 Rxf3 “““
’“’ 17. Nb3 Bd7 44. gxf3 Rc3 ž’‘
’’ 18. Rb1 Rc8 45. Bb2 Be3 
19. Kh1 Ba7 46. h5 Rb3
–• 20. Bh5 b5 47. Bc1 Bxc1
¤
‘›‘’ 21. Bxg6 hxg6 48. Kg2 Bf4 ‘“•‘’
¦ª¤² 22.* Ne2 b4 49. h6 c1=Q ­¬¤°
13..Nxc5 23. Bb2 Bb5 50. hxg7+ Kxg7 35. fxe6
24. Nbc1 d4 51. f8=Q+ Kxf8
25. Qd2 c4 52. Kh3 Bd7+
§¯¨³ 26. Qxb4 c3 53. Kg2 Rb2#
§´
¹ž“” 27. Ba3 c2 ¹‘”
“““ ““
“”“’ ž’
’ 
• ¤
‘•‘’ ‘“•‘’
¤ª¤° §¦°
22..b4 38. h4
Distance 3 Variants 191

Game 94: Distant Variant Dv3'GG with Black


Black plays the interesting Dv3'GG variant (9), and draws quickly and effortlessly. Black counter
attacks in the center (13) instead of reacting to white's threats, and consolidates nicely (17). White
finds nothing better than to trade down (21) to an evenly matched endgame, which black closes
down with perpetual check (25). Guess white will have to go home and find something better!

§ž¯³¨ 1. d4 d6 17.* Kh1 O-O §¨³


2. e4 Nd7 18. bxa7 Be6
”“¹“”“ 3. Nc3 c6 19. Qc2 Qxa7
“”“
˜“”“ 4. Nf3 e6 20. Bd3 Qd4 “ž
—’ 5. Be2 Be7 21.* Bxf5 Bxf5 “
’ 6. O-O Nb6 22. Rxf5 Rxf5 ‘¯
–• 7. Be3 Nf6 23. Qxf5 Qxc4 ›
8. e5 Nfd5 24. Qd7 Rf8
‘’‘›’‘’ 9.* exd6 Qxd6 25.* h3 Rf1+
‘’ª‘’
¦ª¤² 10. Ne4 Qc7 26. Rxf1 Qxf1+ ¦¤°
9. Be3 11. c4 f5 27. Kh2 Qf4+ 21. Bxf5
12. Nc5 Nxe3 28. Kh1 Qc1+
§ž³¨ 13.* fxe3 e5 29. Kh2 Qf4+ ¨³
14. Nxe5 Bxc5 30. Kh1 Qc1+
”“¯¹”“ 15. dxc5 Qxe5 31. Kh2 Qf4+ “ª”“
˜““ 16. cxb6 Qxe3+ 1/2-1/2 “
–“ 
‘’ ­
’• ‘
‘’›‘’ ‘’‘
¦ª¤² ¦°
13..e5 25..Rf1+

§ž³¨
”“”“
’“
“
‘
¯
‘’›‘’
¦ª¤°
17..O-O
Game 95: Distant Variant Dv4'4x5x with White
White has fun at black's expense in this delightful game. White's Dv4'4x5x strikes at the middle of
the three pawn forward wall (9), scattering black's center like so many bowling pins, and winning
a pawn (15). White trades down neatly (23) producing a passed pawn that moves straight in (30),
forcing a queen exchange (36), and winning the race for promotion by a wide margin (47). Games
such as this give you the impression that maybe chess isn't so hopelessly complicated after all !

§ž¯³¨ 1. d3 e5 29. h3 Rc2 ¯³


2. Nd2 d5 30.* a4 Kg7
”““”“ 3. Nb3 Nf6 31. a5 Nc4
¬““
¹˜ 4. Bd2 Bd6 32. a6 Qd6 “
“˜ 5. e3 c5 33. Ne4 Qe5 
 6. d4 cxd4 34. f3 Re2 
• 7. exd4 Nc6 35. Kh1 Ne3 –‘
8. dxe5 Nxe5 36.* Qc5 Qxc5
‘’‘’‘’ 9.* Bb5+ Bd7 37. Nxc5 Ra2
‘˜§’‘
¦ª²›–¤ 10. Bxd7+Qxd7 38. Rb8 Ra1+ ¤²
9. Be3 11. Ne2 O-O 39. Kh2 Ra2 30. a4
12. O-O Rfe8 40. Kg3 g5
§§³ 13. Bg5 Ne4 41. f4 gxf4+ 
14. Bf4 Rac8 42. Kxf4 Nxg2+
”“­“”“ 15.* Qxd5 Nf6 43. Ke5 Nh4 ¬“´“
¹ 16. Qd1 Rcd8 44. Kd5 f5 ‘“
“˜ 17. Ng3 Qb5 45. Rb7+ Kh6 ¯
— 18. c3 Nd5 46. Rb4 Ng6 •
19. Bxe5 Bxe5 47.* Ra4 Ne7+
• 20. Qf3 Nf4 48. Ke6 Rxa4
˜‘‘
‘’‘•’‘’ 21. Rae1 Nd3 49. Nxa4 Nc6 §‘
¦ª¤² 22. Re2 g6 50. Nc3 f4 ¤°
15. Qxd5 23.* Nd4 Bxd4 51. Ne4 Kh5 36. Qc5
24. Rxe8+ Qxe8 52. Kd6 Na7
25. cxd4 Rxd4 53. Kc7 Kg6
¨§³ 26. Qxb7 Qd8 54. Kb6 Kf5

”“““ 27. Qxa7 Nxb2 55. Kxa7 Kxe4 “
“ 28. Rb1 Rd2 56. Kb6 1-0 ‘—´
­¹ –°“
 ¦
•’—ª– ‘
‘’¤’‘’ §
¤² 
23. Nd4 47. Ra4
Distance 3 Variants 193

Game 96: Distant Variant Dv6'7'F with Black


Black's Dv6'7'F starts out on a Beginner's Game line, then repulses a bishop early attack (9). White
prevents black from castling, but drops a pawn doing it (14). Black stays in the lead easily thru
further trades (23), and it becomes a tough knight and pawns endgame (29). Black protects his
lead well (47), but is unable to make progress towards promotion, and accepts the draw (54). All
players will find a world of new and useful ideas when they play the B and D-system variants.

§ž¯³¨ 1. d4 g6 33. Na5 c4 


2. Nf3 d6 34. Kc3 cxb3
”“”˜¹“ 3. g3 Nd7 35. Nxb3 g4
”“”
˜”“”“ 4. e4 e6 36. Nd2 a5 ˜³”
 5. Nc3 Bg7 37. f3 Na4+ “”
’‘ 6. Bg5 f6 38. Kc2 gxf3 ‘
–•’ 7. Bd2 Ne7 39. Nxf3 Nc5 ‘’
8. Qe2 Nb6 40. g4 Ne6
‘’‘ª’’ 9.* Bh3 Bd7 41. Nd2 Ng5
‘²’
¦²›¤ 10. d5 exd5 42. Kb3 Ne4 –
9. Bh3 11. Bxd7+Qxd7 43. Nf3 Kc6 29. Nd3
12. Nxd5 Nexd5 44. Nd4+ Kc5
§³¨ 13. exd5+ Qe7 45. Ne6+ Kb5 •
14.* Qxe7+ Kxe7 46. Nc7+ Kc6
”“”¯¹“ 15. O-O-O Nxd5 47.* Ne8 Nc5+ 
˜””“ 16. h4 Kf7 48. Kc4 Nd7 ³”
‘ 17. h5 Rhe8 49. Kb3 Kb5 ”
 18. hxg6+ hxg6 50. Nc7+ Kb6 —‘
19. Bh6 Nb6 51. Ne8 Ka6
•’ 20. Bxg7 Kxg7 52. Ka3 Kb5
°
‘’‘ª’’ 21. Rhe1 Kf7 53. Nd6+ Kc6 
¦²¤ 22. Rxe8 Rxe8 54.* Ne8 Nb6 
14. Qxe7+ 23.* Rh1 Kg7 55. Nxf6 Kd6 47..Nc5+
24. Re1 Rxe1+ 56. Ne4+ Ke5
25. Nxe1 Kf7 57. Nd2 Kf4
§ 26. Kd2 Ke6 58. Nb3 a4
•
”“”³ 27. b3 g5 59. Nc5 Nc4+ —
˜””“ 28. c4 d5 60. Kxa4 Nb2+ ³”
 29.* Nd3 dxc4 61. Kb5 Kxg4 ”
 30. Nc5+ Kd5 1/2-1/2 ‘
31. Nxb7 cxb3
•’ 32. axb3 c5 ²
‘’‘’ 
²¤ 
23..Kg7 54..Nb6
Game 97: Distant Variant Dv4xGG with Black
Black's Dv4xGG with 4 king knight moves flaunts conventional chess wisdom, but has white
under pressure from the beginning (9). Black advances on all fronts, challenging white's centrally
placed queen (18), scattering his knights, controlling open files (25), and threatening mate. White
loses rook for piece and pawn twice to stop his threats (32), then black's rooks clean up quickly
(41). Games like this make us reflect on how little we really knew about the chess opening.

§ž¯³¹¨ 1. e4 d6 37. c5 Qf5 §³


2. d4 Nd7 38. Qb3+ Qf7
”“”—“”“ 3. Nf3 Ngf6 39. c6 Qxb3
§”
“— 4. e5 dxe5 40. axb3 R4e6 “˜”
’ 5. dxe5 Ng8 41.* Nd4 Rd6 ”˜
 6. Be2 e6 42. Nxb4 Rxd4 •”‘“’
–• 7. O-O Ne7 43. Nxa6 Ra8 ’­
8. Nc3 Ng6 44. Nc7 Rc8
‘’‘›’‘’ 9.* Bg5 Be7 45. Nb5 Rd1+
‘’ª¤’–
¦ª¤² 10. Bxe7 Qxe7 46. Kg2 Rxc6 ¦²
9. Bg5 11. Qd4 O-O 47. Kf3 Rb6 32. Rxe4
12. Nb5 c5 48. Nc3 Re1
§¨³ 13. Qe3 a6 49. Ne4 Rxb3+ ­§³
14. Nc3 b5 50. Kf4 Rxb2
—¯“”“ 15. Bd3 Bb7 51. f3 Rb8 ¨”
““— 16. Be4 Bxe4 52. Kg4 Rd8 “”
”’ 17. Qxe4 b4 53. Nf2 Rd4+ ˜
•”ª 18.* Na4 f6 54. Ne4 Rf1 ”‘¤’
19. exf6 Nxf6 55. h5 Kf7
• 20. Qe2 Nf4 56. Kf4 Rd3
•’
‘’‘’‘’ 21. Qc4 Nd7 57. Ke5 Rdxf3 ‘’ª’–
¦¤² 22. Qe4 Rae8 58. g4 Re1 ²
18..f6 23. Rad1 Rf7 59. Kd5 Rd3+ 35..Nf3+
24. h4 h6 60. Kc4 Rd8
25.* Rd2 e5 61. Nc3 Rc1
§³ 26. Re1 Qe6 62. Kb4 Rb8+
§³
—¯§” 27. g3 Nh5 63. Kc4 Rc8+ ”
““” 28. c4 Nhf6 64. Kd3 R8xc3+ “‘§”
” 29. Qc2 e4 65. Ke4 Ke6 
•”ª˜’ 30. Nh2 Qh3 66. Kd4 Rc4+ ”–’
31. Rde2 Ne5 67. Ke3 R1c2
• 32.* Rxe4 Nxe4 68. Kf3 Ke5 ‘•’
‘’‘¦’‘ 33. Rxe4 Rfe7 69. g5 R4c3+ ’’
¤² 34. Nxc5 Qc8 70. Kg4 Rg2+ ²
25..e5 35.* Nd3 Nf3+ 71. Kh4 hxg5# 41..Rd6
36. Nxf3 Rxe4
Distance 4 Variants 195

Game 98: Distant Variant Dv4x5EG with White


White plays Dv4x5EG, containing an interesting gambit which black accepts and keeps (9). White
has a jump in development, obliging black to react (21). In a complicated situation white attacks
(24), but is still trying to regain his pawn late in the middle game (34,45). Finally white's persistent
attacking allows him to equalize, and simplify to a winnable endgame (78). Interesting contest!
§ž¯³¨ 1. Nf3 c5 40. Bc7 Kf5 §˜
2. d3 d5 41. Bb6 Kf6
”““”“ 3. Nbd2 Nc6 42. Kf1 Ne6
¯´
—¹“ 4. e4 e6 43. Rd7 Rf8 “”“”
” 5. Nb3 Bd6 44. Rh7 Ng5 ª”
— 6. Be2 Nf6 45.* Qg7+ Kf5 “”
•• 7. O-O dxe4 46. Rxh6 Rg8 ’‘
8. dxe4 Nxe4 47. Qa7 Rf8
‘’‘›’‘’ 9.* Nbd2 Nxd2 48. Qe7 Rf7 ‘’‘’
¦ª¤² 10. Qxd2 Qc7 49. Qd6 Ne6 ¤²
9. Nbd2 11. Rd1 Be7 50. g4+ fxg3 34. Bd8
12. c3 e5 51. hxg3 Qd7
§¨³ 13. Qc2 O-O 52. Qxd7 Rxd7 ­¨
14. Be3 Be6 53. Ke2 Rf7
”“¯”“ 15. Ng5 Bxg5 54. Rh8 Nf8 ¬¤
—¦ž 16. Bxg5 f5 55. Ke3 Kf6 “´“”
”” 17. Qa4 f4 56. Ke4 Kg7 ’“”˜
ª” 18. Qe4 Qf7 57. Rh1 Kf6 “”
19. Rd6 Rae8 58. Rd1 Rd7
’ 20. Bh4 Qc7 59. Rxd7 Nxd7
’‘
‘’›’‘’ 21.* Rad1 Nd4 60. Kd5 Ke7 ’‘’
¤² 22. Bd3 Bf5 61. Kc6 Nf6 °
21..Nd4 23. Qd5+ Be6 62. Kb7 Kd7 45. Qg7+
24.* Rxe6 Nxe6 63. Kxa6 Kc6
§¨³ 25. Bb5 Kh8
26. Qe4 c4
64. Be3 Nd5
65. Bd2 Nc7+
°
”“¯”“ 27. Bxe8 Rxe8 66. Ka7 Ne6 ˜
¦ž 28. f3 a6 67. Be3 Nc7 ³“
”ª” 29. Bf2 b6 68. Bg5 Nd5 ’“”
˜” 30. Rd5 Nf8 69. Kb8 Nc7 “‘
31. Rd1 g6 70. Be7 Nd5
’› 32. Bh4 h6 71. Bd8 Kd7 ’‘
‘’’‘’ 33. Qd5 Kg7 72. Bg5 Kc6 ’
¤² 34.* Bd8 Qa7 73. g4 Nc7 
24..Rxe6 35. a4 Qb8 74. Be7 Nd5 after 78. Bf6
36. a5 b5 75. Bh4 Nc7
37. Qc5 Kf7 76. Kc8 Na6
38. Qb6 Qc8 77. Be7 Nc7
39. Qa7+ Ke6 78.* Bf6 1-0
Game 99: Distant Variant Dv2'4F'F with White
White's Dv2'4F'F (9) stakes a claim in the center and aims for a Q-side offensive, but black trades
down (13) to reduce the threat. After the Q-side is closed (20), there is little scope for attack for
either side, although white tries his best (28,37,55). A draw is agreed after all invitations by white
to break the game open are refused. An example of tough positional chess with the D-system.
§ž¯¨³ 1. e3 e6 32. bxc6 bxc6 ¨³
2. d4 Nf6 33. Rb6 Qc7
”“”“”“ 3. Bd3 d5 34. Rcb1 Bc8
¨“ž¯“”“
—¹˜ 4. Ne2 Bd6 35. Qd2 h6 ““˜
“ 5. O-O O-O 36. R6b3 Ra7 ’“
’“ 6. b3 e5 37.* Qb2 g6 ‘’’“
‘’– 7. Ng3 e4 38. Qc2 h5 ’–
8. Be2 Nc6 39. Nf1 h4
‘‘›’‘’ 9.* c4 Ne7 40. h3 Kg7
¬›’‘’
¦•ª¤² 10. Ba3 Bxa3 41. Nd2 Nh7 ¦¦²
9. c4 11. Nxa3 a6 42. Rb8 Nf8 28. b5
12. Nb1 c6 43. R8b6 Nd7
§ž¯¨³ 13.* Qc2 Nf5 44. R6b3 f5 ž§³
14. Nxf5 Bxf5 45. Qb2 Nf6
“˜“”“ 15. Rc1 Re8 46. Qc3 Ra8 ¨¯“”
““˜ 16. Nd2 Qe7 47. Nf1 Ra7 “˜”
“ 17. Nf1 Rec8 48. Rb6 Nd7 ”’“
‘’“ 18. Ng3 Bd7 49. R6b2 Nf6 ‘’“
19. Qd2 Rab8 50. Rb3 Nd7
‘’– 20.* c5 Ra8 51. Qc2 Nf6
¤’–
‘ª›’‘’ 21. a4 Ra7 52. Qd2 Re7 ¬›’‘’
¦•¤² 22. Qb4 Be6 53. Rb6 Re8 ¤²
13..Nf5 23. Qa5 Raa8 54. Qb2 Nd7 37. Qb2
24. Qd2 Ra7 55.* Qc3 Ra8
25. b4 Rca8 56. R6b2 Nf6
¨§³ 26. Qc2 Bd7 57. Qb3 Nd7
ž§
“ž¯“”“ 27. Qb2 Rb8 58. Qc2 Ra7 ¨¯—´
““˜ 28.* b5 Raa8 59. Nd2 Nf6 ¦““
“ 29. Qb3 Be6 60. Qb3 Nd7 ”’““
‘’“ 30. Qc2 a5 61. Qc3 Nf6 ‘’“”
31. Rab1 Re8 1/2-1/2
‘’– ’‘
‘¬›’‘’ ¬›’‘
¦¦² ¤•²
20. c5