You are on page 1of 37

THE SOURCE OF THE TIDES

Tidal Energy Module

© James S. Wallace
1

PRIMARY TIDE GENERATING FORCES


• Gravitational attraction of the Sun and Moon on the oceans
• Centrifugal forces arising from the rotation of the earth‐sun‐
moon system
• Modified by interaction with the continents

© James S. Wallace
2

LUNAR CYCLE Sun


• Moon rotates about 
Moon
the earth every 29.5  29.5 
days days
• Spring (highest) tide  Spring
– Moon and sun are in 
alignment
Neap
• Neap (lowest) tide Neap
– Moon and sun are at  Earth
right angles to earth Spring
[After Sorenson, 2006]
© James S. Wallace
3

Rev 2 1
TIDAL PERIODS
From sun’s frame of reference,
• Earth rotates once every 24 hours
• During that time, moon makes 1/29.5 revolutions
• Solar tidal period = 12 hours
• 12 · 1 12.42
.

© James S. Wallace
4

MAJOR TIDAL COMPONENTS [SORENSEN, 2006]

Period Relative 
Symbol Description
(hours) strength
M2 12.42 100 Main lunar semidiurnal component

S2 12.00 46.6 Main solar semidiurnal component

N2 12.66 19.1 Lunar component due to monthly variation in distance moon to earth

K2 11.97 12.7 Sun & moon component due to changes in their respective declination

K1 23.93 58.4 With O1 and P1 accounts for lunar and solar diurnal inequalities

O1 25.82 41.5 Main lunar diurnal component

P1 24.07 19.3 Main solar diurnal component

Mf 327.86 17.2 Lunar bi‐weekly component

© James S. Wallace
5

ADDITIVE WAVES
2 sine waves out of phase Sum

© James S. Wallace
6

Rev 2 2
THE TIDE IS A GLOBAL LONG PERIOD WAVE
• Long period means shallow water approximation holds even 
in deep ocean
• 

•  9.81 · 1000 12.42 · 4,429



• 0.00023
 ,

• Velocity of tide depends on depth: 
© James S. Wallace
7

TIDES ARE AMPLIFIED BY RESONANT BASINS


• The tide is long wavelength 
wave
• Amplified by interaction 
with confined body of 
water, e.g. Bay of Fundy, 
Severn estuary in the UK
• Tide range increased many 
fold by resonance
Google maps
© James S. Wallace
8

TYPES OF TIDES
• Semidiurnal: 
– Two high tides and two low water tide in a tidal day (24.84 
hrs)
• Diurnal
– One high and one low water tide in a tidal day
• Mixed
– Large difference in tide levels of two cycles
• Sometimes cyclic transition from mixed to semidiurnal and 
back or from mixed to diurnal and back
© James S. Wallace
9

Rev 2 3
SEMIDURNAL TIDE – OKRACOKE ISLAND NC
• 2 high tides, 2 
low tides per 
day
• East coast of 
North America

[NOAA, http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/tide_predictions.html  ] 
© James S. Wallace
10

DIURNAL TIDE – MOBILE BAY, AL


• 1 high tide, 1 
low tide per day
• Gulf of Mexico, 
Caribbean 
Islands

[NOAA, http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/tide_predictions.html  ] 
© James S. Wallace
11

MIXED TIDE – SAN DIEGO, CA


• Large difference 
in tide levels of 
two cycles
• Pacific coast of 
North America

[NOAA, http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/tide_predictions.html] 
© James S. Wallace
12

Rev 2 4
SOURCES OF TIDE DATA
UK Hydrographic Office
• Total tide – tidal prediction program: 
http://www.ukho.gov.uk/ProductsandServices/DigitalPublicati
ons/Pages/ATT.aspx
Admiralty Tide Tables and Tidal Stream atlases (paper):
• http://www.ukho.gov.uk/ProductsandServices/PaperPublicati
ons/Pages/NauticalPubs.aspx’

© James S. Wallace
13

SOURCES OF TIDE DATA 2


US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
• NOAA Tide predictions: 
http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/tide_predictions.html
• “Generate tide predictions for up to 2 years in the past or future, at any of 
3000+ locations around the United States.” Both coasts of US plus the 
Caribbean and some Pacific islands. 
Canada (annual predictions)
• Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Canadian Tide and Current Tables, 
published annually.  Data available on Environment Canada website:  
http://waterlevels.gc.ca/eng
• “Predicted times and heights of high and low waters, and the hourly water 
levels for over seven hundred stations in Canada.”
Historical data also available from both sources
© James S. Wallace
14

EXERCISE FOR SELF-STUDY


• Find a source of tidal data for a costal location near you
• What type of tide prevails at this location?

© James S. Wallace
15

Rev 2 5
REFERENCES
• A.C. Baker, “Tidal Power,”  Peter Peregrinus Ltd, London (1991)
• R.H. Charlier and C.W. Finkl, “Ocean Energy; Tide and Tidal Power,”  Springer (2009)
• D. Pugh and P. Woodworth, “Sea‐Level Science, Understanding Tides, Surges, Tsunamis and Mean Sea‐
Level Changes,” Cambridge University Press (2014)
• R.M. Sorensen, “Basic Coastal Engineering,” 3rd Edition, Springer, New York, 2006.

© James S. Wallace
16

Rev 2 6
TIDAL BARRAGE
ENERGY AND POWER
Tidal Energy Module

© James S. Wallace
1

TIDAL BARRAGE
• Barrage
– Dam across existing bay or tidal 
estuary
• Turbine/generator 
• Sluice gate
– Controls flow in/out of tidal 
Sea
basin
• Accommodations Tidal basin
– Lock for ships to pass
– Fish ladder
© James S. Wallace
2

EBB GENERATION
Fill on flood tide Generate on ebb tide 

Basin Sea side

Cross‐section view
Cross‐section view

Top view Top view
© James S. Wallace
3

Rev 3 1
EBB AND FLOOD GENERATION
Generate on flood tide Generate on ebb tide 
Basin Sea side
Basin Sea side

Cross‐section view Cross‐section view

Top view Top view
© James S. Wallace
4

POTENTIAL ENERGY STORED


Consider differential slice of water 
w/surface area S
Surface area S

·
1

2
where:   = seawater density dh R
G = acceleration of gravity h
R = tidal range
S = tidal basin surface area
© James S. Wallace
5

TIDAL POTENTIAL ENERGY 1 (IDEAL)


For one tidal flow:   
• Substituting g= 9.81m/s2 and  = 1025 kg/m3,
1.397 10
for S (km2) and R (m)
Assuming semi‐diurnal tides, the number of annual cycles is:   
8760 /
~ 706 /
12.42

© James S. Wallace
6

Rev 3 2
TIDAL POTENTIAL ENERGY 2 (IDEAL)
For generation on both flood and ebb tides of a semi‐diurnal 
tide, the annual energy output is:
2 706 1.4 10
1.97 10
for S (km2) and R (m)
• Not realistic to recover this amount of energy!
• Utilization factor to account for potential energy recoverable
© James S. Wallace
7

TIDAL POTENTIAL ENERGY (REALIZABLE)


Bernshtein utilization factors [1]
• 0.224 for single basin, single tide
, , 0.44 10
• 0.34 for single basin, double tide
, , 0.67 10
for S (km2) and R (m)

© James S. Wallace
8

TIDAL POWER
Ideal average power over a single tidal flow (6.2 hours)


1.397 10
6.2
0.226 10
In practice, only about 25‐30% of that ideal can actually be 
achieved
.
© James S. Wallace
9

Rev 3 3
TURBINE CHARACTERISTICS
600 14
• Minimum head required

Water volume flow rate (m3/s)
500 12
• Power output depends on 

Power output (MW)
10
head 400
8
• Generator rating limits  300
6
power output 200
4
– Water flow reduced above  100
Q (m3/s)
Minimum head 2
rated head to limit power  Power (MW)

output to avoid  0
0 1 2 3 4 5 6
0

overpowering the generator Head (m)
Data from Baker [2]
© James S. Wallace
10

EBB GENERATION OPERATION


Basin height Sea height Turbine head
• Tidal cycle 24.84 hours 8

• Semi‐diurnal tides (2H,  7
6
2L)
Water height (m)

5
• 0.7m minimum head  4

to generate power 3
2
• Power generated: 1
– Hours 2 to 7.4  0
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
– Hours 14.4 to 19.8 Time (hours)

© James S. Wallace
11

TIDAL BARRAGE ENERGY & POWER SUMMARY


• Tidal barrage closes off a bay or tidal estuary to capture flooding 
and/or ebbing tides
• Estimate of annual energy output (single basin) for semi‐diurnal tide:
– Single tidal flow (ebb or flood) 
, , 0.44 10
– Double tidal flow ebb and flood
, , 0.67 10
• Average power available:
0.056 10
© James S. Wallace
12

Rev 3 4
REFERENCES
[1] R.H. Charlier, “Tidal Energy,  Van Nostrand Reinhold Co, New 
York (1982).
[2] A.C. Baker, “Tidal Power,”  Peter Peregrinus Ltd, London 
(1991).

© James S. Wallace
13

Rev 3 5
TIDAL BARRAGE EXAMPLES

Tidal Energy Module
Rev 2

© James S. Wallace
1

TIDAL BARRAGE EXAMPLES


• Lake Sihwa Tidal Power Station, Korea (2011, 1994 artificial lake)
– 254 MW
– Generates only on flood tide
• La Rance, France (1966)
– 240 MW
• Annapolis Royal, Canada (1984)
– 20 MW
• Jiangxia Tidal Power Station (1980)
– 3.2 MW
• Kislaya Guba Tidal Power Station, Murmansk, Russia
– O.4 MW, upgraded in 2006 to 1.2 MW 
– (12 MW planned but not under construction)
© James S. Wallace
2

LA RANCE TIDAL POWER PLANT


• World’s 2nd
largest and 
oldest tidal 
power plant
• Operated by 
EdF
• Located at St. 
Malo at Rance
river mouth
"Barrage de la Rance" by Tswgb

© James S. Wallace
3

Rev 2 1
LA RANCE FEATURES
• Site construction started 
1960, plant 1963
• Commissioned 1966, 
connected to grid 1967
• Barrage 750m long, power 
plant portion 332.5 m
• Lock to allow boat 
passage
• Photo shows powerhouse
"Rance tidal power plant" by User:Dani 7C3 
© James S. Wallace
4

LA RANCE
• Tidal basin 22.5 km2
• 24 turbines of 10 MW for 
peak rating of 240 MW
– 10 MW at 7m head
– 8 MW at 5 m head
– 3 MW at 3 m head
• Turbines have reversible 
blades 
– Can also act as pumps to 
store water
• Image shows model of 
powerhouse/turbine
"Coupebarrage Rance"

© James S. Wallace
5

VIDEO LINK
• http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rance_Tidal_Power_Station

© James S. Wallace
6

Rev 2 2
LA RANCE ECONOMICS
• Annual output about 600 million kWh, which corresponds to 
about 68 MW average power.
• Capacity factor 28.3%
• Cost 620 million Francs in 1966 – approx. 94.5 million Euros –
approx $USD 124.5 M
• Original cost has been recovered
• 1.8 c per kWh (no cost of capital)

© James S. Wallace
7

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
• Silting of Rance estuary
• Construction technology created large change 
• After many years:
– Sand eels and plaice have disappeared
– Sea bass and cuttlefish have returned

© James S. Wallace
8

BAY OF FUNDY, NOVA SCOTIA

Annapolis Royal 
Tidal Power Plant

Google Maps
© James S. Wallace
9

Rev 2 3
ANNAPOLIS RIVER BASIN
Annapolis River
Bay of 
Fundy

Google Maps
© James S. Wallace
10

ANNAPOLIS ROYAL HISTORY


• Owned and operated by Nova Scotia Power
• Construction began 1980
• Barrage already in place for roadway
• Operation began 1984
• Video: Annapolis Tidal Power Station, Nova Scotia Power:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pxCPXLv‐‐U4

© James S. Wallace
11

CHARACTERISTICS
• 6.5 m tidal range in Annapolis River basin
• Single‐effect, ebb flow system
• Water enters the basin through sluice gates and turbine (but 
no power generation) as tide rises.
• Once sufficient head is achieved in basin, generates electricity 
for 6 to 6.5 hours each tide

© James S. Wallace
12

Rev 2 4
STRAFLO (RIM GENERATOR) TURBINE
• New type of turbine at the time (less expensive but unproven) 
– Pilot program with only one turbine (basin has capacity for two)
• 7.6 m diameter runner
• 4 blades
• Rated output 17.8 MW at 5.5 m head
• Turbine efficiency 89.1% at rating
• Cannot pump (i.e. the turbine cannot be operated in reverse to 
pump water

© James S. Wallace
13

PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS


• Daily output of roughly 80‐100 megawatt hours, depending 
on the tides.
• Generates about 30 GWh annually
• Capacity factor 17.1 %
• 1985 cost $56 million Canadian (estimate was $46 million)
• Preexisting barrage (usually most costly)
• Cost/kWh not reported

© James S. Wallace
14

ANNAPOLIS ROYAL COST ESTIMATE


• Annual electricity production 30,000 MWh (E in equation)
• Capital cost ≈ $56,000,000
• Capital cost recovery factor (3% real return, 30 year lifetime):
0.03
0.0510
1 1 1 1 0.03

© James S. Wallace
15

Rev 2 5
ESTIMATED COST OF
ELECTRIC POWER PRODUCED
$56,000,000 0.051 0.02 $56,000,000

30,000,000 30,000,000
Lease, taxes and other costs unknown (& therefore not included)
$ $
0.095 0.037 0.133 $/

• In this example:
• Capital cost recovery – 71.4% of electricity cost
• O&M costs – 28.6% of electricity cost
© James S. Wallace
16

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
• Shoreline erosion 
– Basin water level increased when initially stated
– Erosion has stabilized
– Spring water levels are reduced to accommodate spring melt
• Fish mortality – conflicting reports
– Mortality of 10‐40% in fish going upstream through turbine to 
spawn.  Noise machine installed to deter.
– Upstream adult fish population has not changed.
– Other studies say that fishway did little to prevent fish mortality
• Impact may have been minimized by relatively small size
© James S. Wallace
17

TIDAL BARRAGE EXAMPLES SUMMARY


• Tidal barrages can produce power at reasonable rates over a 
very long period of time
• Environmental impact is difficult to assess, although damage 
done initially appears to at least partially recover
• Might be difficult to get a new tidal barrage project through 
environmental impact approval process.
– Example: Massive tidal barrage project in the Severn River 
estuary was rejected by the UK government in 2013 (see 
References 2 slide for details).
© James S. Wallace
18

Rev 2 6
REFERENCES
• Y.H. Bae, K.O. Kim and B.H. Choi, “Lake Sihwa tidal power plat project,” Ocean Engineering, 37 (5‐6), 
pp. 454‐463 (2010)
• R.H. Charlier, “Sustainable co‐generation from the tides: A review,”  Renewable and Sustainable 
Energy Review, 7, 187‐213 (2003)
• R.H. Charlier and C.W. Finkl, “Ocean Energy: Tide and Tidal Power,” Springer, Berlin, 2009.
• A.C. Baker, “Tidal Power,” Peter Peregrinus Ltd, London (1991)
• Nova Scotia Power, Video: “Annapolis Tidal Power Station,” 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pxCPXLv‐‐U4
• R.G. Rice and G.C. Baker, Annapolis, the Straflo turbine and other operating experiences,” in 
Tidal Power trends and Developments, Proc. 4th Conf.  On Tidal Power, Inst. Civil Engineers, 
London, 19‐20 March 1992.
• W. Sheperd, and D.W. Sheperd, Energy Studies, 2nd Ed., Imperial College Press, London (2003)

© James S. Wallace
19

REFERENCES (2)
Severn  Barrage Tidal Energy Project (£30bn)
• A comprehensive report was produced in 2010 by  Energy and Climate Change Select 
Committee of Parliament.  Quoting from the Summary Report: A Severn Barrage? 
[https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201314/cmselect/cmenergy/194/19403.htm]:
“The inquiry generated a high level of public interest, but many witnesses were concerned about the lack of detailed, 
publicly‐available information about the project. The lack of robust supporting evidence led to a sense of mistrust on the 
part of some stakeholders, made worse by the uncertainties surrounding a possible Hybrid Bill. Closer engagement with 
stakeholders from the outset and a more open approach was needed from the developers of such a huge and 
unprecedented scheme.”
“Hafren Power have failed to overcome the serious environmental concerns that have been raised. Further research, 
data and modelling are needed before environmental impacts can be determined with any certainty ‐ in particular 
regarding fluvial flood risk, intertidal habitats and impact to fish. The need for compensatory habitat on an 
unprecedented scale casts doubt on whether the project could achieve compliance with the EU Habitats Directive. “
• A group subsequently pushed the project again, but the UK government pulled the plug completely in 
2013:
“Severn barrage tidal energy scheme scrapped by Huhne,” [http://www.bbc.com/news/uk‐england‐somerset‐
11564284]

© James S. Wallace
20

PHOTO CREDITS
• "Barrage de la Rance" by Tswgb ‐ Own work. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons ‐
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Barrage_de_la_Rance.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Barrage_de_la_Ran
ce.jpg
• "Rance tidal power plant" by User:Dani 7C3 ‐ Own work. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 
via Wikimedia Commons ‐
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rance_tidal_power_plant.JPG#mediaviewer/File:Rance_tidal_po
wer_plant.JPG
• "Coupebarrage Rance". Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons ‐
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coupebarrage_Rance.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Coupebarrage_Ranc
e.jpg

© James S. Wallace
21

Rev 2 7
TIDAL LAGOONS

Tidal Energy Module

© James S. Wallace
1

ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ARE THE KEY


TIDAL BARRAGE WEAKNESS
Estuary disruption
• Silting
• Shoreline erosion
• Fish mortality
• Impact on fish migration patterns
• Estuary ecosystem impact

© James S. Wallace
2

TIDAL LAGOON
• A tidal lagoon moves the 
barrage away from the 
estuary
• Image right shows proposed 
Swansea Tidal Lagoon
• Man‐made U‐shaped barrage 
that encircles some 
shoreline, without blocking 
river access
[http://www.tidallagoonpower.com/wp‐content/uploads/2016/08/5471_Swansea_Image2‐
e1509616736303‐300x212.jpg]

© James S. Wallace
3

Rev 0 1
BARRAGE CONSTRUCTED OF ROCK

[http://www.offshorewind.biz/wp‐content/uploads/2014/03/UKs‐Tidal‐Lagoons‐to‐ [http://www.tidallagoonpower.cymru/wp‐content/themes/v1/images/banner.jpg]
Have‐Cheaper‐Power‐than‐Offshore‐Wind.jpg]

• 9.5 km long barrage [1]
• Enclosed area (11.5 km2) for recreation [1]
• Animation of tides available: http://www.tidallagoonpower.com/
© James S. Wallace
4

TIDAL LAGOON
• 16  x 20MW turbines
• 320MW total capacity
• GE Andritz TLSB ‘4 
quadrant’ variable speed 
bulb turbine
– 7.2m rotor diameter
– Claim 60% recovery of 
maximum energy
Data from Tidal Lagoon plc [1] [http://subseaworldnews.com/wp‐content/uploads/2015/03/Swansea‐Tidal‐Lagoon.jpg]

© James S. Wallace
5

ESTIMATED PERFORMANCE DATA


• Projected 120 years lifetime [1] • Estimated cost of power 
• Estimated annual energy output   production (Swansea Bay) 
>530GWh [1] £89.9/MWh [2]  = $Cdn 0.15/kWh
• Estimated capacity factor • Compares to £92.5/MWh 
estimated for proposed Hinkley

Point C nuclear plant [2] = $Cdn
0.154/kWh
/
• Larger Cardiff tidal lagoon 
CF 0.189 estimated cost of power 
production £65/MWh [2] = $Cdn
• Construction could start 2018,  0.108/kWh
completion 4 years later
£0.6 = $Cdn 1

© James S. Wallace
6

Rev 0 2
SWANSEA BAY TIDAL LAGOON
CURRENT STATUS
• Has received development consent [2]
• UK government review  (Hendry report) released in December 
2016 was supportive of the pilot Swansea Bay project  and of tidal 
lagoon technology in general[3]: 
“The more evidence I have seen, the more persuaded I have become 
that tidal lagoons do have an important role to play and there should 
be a government strategy in place to help this happen.”
• Needs to obtain Marine License from Natural Resources Wales (in 
progress)
© James S. Wallace
7

SWANSEA BAY TIDAL LAGOON


CURRENT STATUS 2
• Project is estimated to cost £1.3 bn ($2.17 bn Canadian)
– Tidal Lagoon plc has already invested £35 million [5].
• Would be privately financed but requires the equivalent of a 
power purchase agreement (Contract for Difference subsidy) [2]
• Tidal Lagoon plc proposed a 90 year contract with partial 
indexation for inflation.   The Hendry report recommended a 
shorter period of 60 years [3].
• The UK government has not yet negotiated a subsidy for the 
Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon project [4].
© James S. Wallace
8

OTHER POTENTIAL PROJECTS [1]


• Tidal Lagoon plc sees a opportunity for UK industry to lead a renewable 
energy technology (similar to Denmark and wind turbines) [6]
• Jobs in area with high unemployment
– 2,232 construction jobs @ Swansea [1] plus supplier jobs
• Other projects under consideration
– Cardiff (3000MW,  £8bn)
– Newport – Severn Estuary (1400‐1800MW)
– Colwyn Bay – North Wales
– West Cumbria
– Bridgwater Bay – Severn Estuary

© James S. Wallace
9

Rev 0 3
ONGOING CONCERNS
• Even for the Swansea Bay pilot project, environmental groups 
have expressed concerns [5]:
– Silt build‐up
– Unforeseen changes to floodwater movements
– Impact on marine and bird life
• While being highly supportive of the Swansea Bay project, the 
Hendry report recommended a 2 year hiatus on new projects 
following completion of the Swansea Bay project to allow for 
monitoring and assessment of environmental effects [3].
© James S. Wallace
10

TIDAL LAGOON SUMMARY


• Concept shows lots of promise
• Moving forward with the Swansea Bay pilot project would 
answer lots of questions, both economic and environmental.
• Requires electricity rate subsidy to move forward
• Subsidy unlikely to be approved by the present government, 
given the current weakness
• Additional approvals required by EU (as long as Britain is part 
of the EU).  
© James S. Wallace
11

REFERENCES
[1]  Tidal Lagoon plc website: http://www.tidallagoonpower.com/
[2]  R. McKie,  “Welsh tidal lagoon project could open way for £15bn revolution in UK energy, theguardian, 
October 8, 2016. https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/oct/08/tidal‐power‐swansea‐bay‐lagoon
[3] Charles Hendry,  “The role of tidal lagoons”, Report to the UK Secretary of State for Business, Energy and 
Industrial Strategy,  December 2016, https://hendryreview.files.wordpress.com/2016/08/hendry‐review‐final‐
report‐english‐version.pdf
[4] I. Bourke, “Swansea Bay: tidal power’s £1.3bn experiment,” New Statesman, April 28, 2017, 
https://www.newstatesman.com/microsites/energy/2017/04/swansea‐bay‐tidal‐power‐s‐13bn‐experiment
[5].  A. Vaughan, “Swansea Bay tidal lagoon backed by government review,”  theguardian, January 12, 2017. 
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/jan/12/tidal‐lagoons‐could‐ensure‐uk‐power‐supplies
[6] Ours to own, http://www.tidallagoonpower.com/wp‐content/uploads/2016/09/Ours‐to‐Own_Tidal‐
Lagoon‐Power_Oct‐2016.pdf

© James S. Wallace
12

Rev 0 4
TIDAL STREAM GENERATORS
ENERGY AND POWER
Tidal Energy Module
Rev 2

© James S. Wallace
1

TIDAL STREAMS (CURRENTS)


• Tidal currents can be significant in relatively shallow water 
near continents
• Tidal currents can include both tidal and non‐tidal 
components
– Tidal estuary – river and tidal components
• Speeds in the range of 9 to 19 km/h (2.5 to 5.3 m/s) reported

© James S. Wallace
2

TYPES OF TIDAL CURRENTS


• Semidiurnal: 
– Two high tides and two low water  in a tidal day (24.84 hrs)
• Diurnal
– One high and one low water tide in a tidal day
• Mixed
– Large difference in tide levels of two cycles
• Sometimes cyclic transition from mixed to semidiurnal and 
back or from mixed to diurnal and back
© James S. Wallace
3

Rev 2 1
TIDAL CURRENT EXAMPLE
• Gabriola Pass, British 
Columbia
• Near Nanaimo in the 
Georgia Strait separating 
Vancouver Island from 
mainland British Columbia

Google Maps
© James S. Wallace
4

GABRIOLA PASSAGE TIDAL CURRENT DATA


Gabriola Passage Tidal Current (Nov. 5, 2013)

• Mixed type of tidal  4

current 3

• 2 flood and 2 ebb  1
Current (m/s)

tides in a day with  0

-1
0 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24

significant variation  -2

between the speeds  -3

-4
of the morning and  Time

afternoon tides.
[Data from NOAA]
© James S. Wallace
5

TIDAL CURRENT GENERATORS


• Lots of variations, but many are 
propeller type turbines
• Quite similar to aerodynamic 
type wind turbines
• Already know how to evaluate 
these types of turbines
"Bottom Mounted Turbines"

© James S. Wallace
6

Rev 2 2
TIDAL CURRENT BASICS
Flow through a stream tube having area 2
A shaded section :

1
where  = density of water
Axial locations: 0
• Plane 0 = upstream of tidal current 
turbine
• Plane 1 = plane swept by tidal 
current turbine blades
• Plane 2 = downstream of tidal current 
turbine After Burton et al., 2001

© James S. Wallace
7

POWER AVAILABLE IN MOVING WATER


• Kinetic energy of moving water for tidal current speed V:

• Power mass rate at which tidal current moves through


turbine x kinetic energy/unit mass
1 1 1
· ·
2 2 2

© James S. Wallace
8

POWER COEFFICIENT
• Indicates the fraction of  • Characterize rotor speed by 
power available in the tidal  tip speed ratio:
current that is produced as  2

electrical output:
where:  R = blade radius
1 N = rotor speed (rpm)
2
 = water density
• Depends on tidal current 
speed and on rotor speed V0 = upstream tidal 
current  speed
© James S. Wallace
9

Rev 2 3
TIDAL CURRENT GENERATOR
• 4‐bladed 20m diameter  600

rotor 500

Turbine power output (kW)
• Constant rotor speed 20  400
rpm 300
• Nominal 500 kW power 
200
output
• Cut‐in tidal current speed  100

is 1 m/s 0
0 1 2 3 4 5
• Produces power on both  Tidal current speed (m/s)

flood and ebb tides Representative tidal current generator 
power output characteristics  [Bryden et al., 1998]
© James S. Wallace
10

TIDAL CURRENT GENERATOR


CHARACTERISTICS
Coefficient of Performance
500
0.5
• The swept area A = (/4)D2 = (/4)(20m)2 = 314.2 m2
1000
500
0.146
0.5 1025 314.2 2.8 /
© James S. Wallace
11

TIDAL CURRENT GENERATOR


CHARACTERISTICS 2
Tip speed ratio



. / ·

• 2.244

© James S. Wallace
12

Rev 2 4
OVERALL ROTOR PERFORMANCE
• Red rated point Rated power point V=3.8 m/s

0.35

• Max Cp a bit low  0.3

compared to good wind 
Coefficient of performance
0.25

turbine 0.2

– Fixed blade angle 0.15

– Fixed rotation speed 0.1

• Increasing tidal current  0.05

speed reduces tip  0
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

speed ratio Tip speed ratio

© James S. Wallace
13

EFFECT OF CUT-IN CURRENT SPEED


• Tidal current generator 
won’t produce power for 
tidal currents of less than  Gabriola Passage Tidal Current (Nov. 5, 2013)
1m/s.    4
– Dashed lines at +1m/s and ‐ 3
1m/s.   
2
• Four periods during the day  1
Current (m/s)

when there is no power  0
production:  -1
0 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24
– roughly 4‐6 am, 
-2
– roughly 10‐12 am,  
-3
– roughly 3‐5 pm and 
-4
– roughly 10pm‐midnight. Time

© James S. Wallace
14

POWER PRODUCTION OVER THE DAY


• Note 4 periods of zero  600

power production 500

• Anomaly 1‐2 am
Power output (kW)

400

– Power decreased, V  300

increased 200

– Decreasing Cp, fixed  100

blade angle, constant  0
rotation speed 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14
Time (24 hour clock)
16 18 20 22 24

© James S. Wallace
15

Rev 2 5
ENERGY PRODUCTION
600
• Power integrated over 
500
time Power output (kW) 400

• Piecewise integration  300

illustrated graphically  200

(red) 100

0
0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24
Time (24 hour clock)

© James S. Wallace
16

SAMPLE ENERGY CALCULATION


• Energy = 448.3kW x 0.5hr + 193.9kW x 1hr + 193.9kW x 1hr + 
503.8kW x 1hr + 52.9kW x 1hr + 0kW x 1hr + 24.4kW x 1hr + 
345.8kW x 1hr + 480.7kW x 1hr + 393.5kW x 1hr + 83.9kW x 
1hr + 0kW x 1 hr + 0kW x 1hr + 329kW x 1hr + 329kW x 1hr + 
24.4kW x 1 hr + 0kW x 1hr + 11.3kW x 1 hr + 408.3kW x 1hr 
+512.1kW x 1hr + 512.1kW x 1hr + 470.9kW x 1hr + 133.9kW x 
1 hr + 0kW x 1hr + 0kW x 0.5 hr = 5228 kWh

© James S. Wallace
17

CALCULATION OF CAPACITY FACTOR


Capacity factor = Energy output for one day/(24 hours x 
nameplate power rating)
• CF = 5227 kWh/(24hr x 500 kw) = 5227 kWh/12,000 kWh
• CF = 0.435
• Great capacity factor
– Tides are highly predictable and reliable
– This particular site has very strong tidal currents

© James S. Wallace
18

Rev 2 6
SOURCES OF TIDAL CURRENT DATA
UK Hydrographic Office
• Total tide – tidal prediction program: 
http://www.ukho.gov.uk/ProductsandServices/DigitalPublicati
ons/Pages/ATT.aspx
Admiralty Tide Tables and Tidal Stream atlases (paper):
• http://www.ukho.gov.uk/ProductsandServices/PaperPublicati
ons/Pages/NauticalPubs.aspx’

© James S. Wallace
19

SOURCES OF TIDAL CURRENT DATA 2


US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
• NOAA Tide predictions: 
http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/tide_predictions.html
• “Generate tide predictions for up to 2 years in the past or future, at any of 
3000+ locations around the United States.” Both coasts of US plus the 
Caribbean and some Pacific islands. 
Canada (annual predictions)
• Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Canadian Tide and Current Tables, 
published annually.  Data available on Environment Canada website:  
http://waterlevels.gc.ca/eng
• “Predicted times and heights of high and low waters, and the hourly water 
levels for over seven hundred stations in Canada.”
Historical data also available from both sources
© James S. Wallace
20

TIDAL CURRENT GENERATOR SUMMARY


• Tidal currents can have significant speeds (e.g. 2.5 to 5.3 m/s)
• Tidal currents exhibit semidiurnal, diurnal and mixed behavior
• Turbine type tidal current generators can be evaluated with 
parameters developed for wind turbines, Cp and TSR
• Energy production can be calculated by integrating turbine 
power output over time
• Capacity factor can be good due to predictability of tidal 
currents
© James S. Wallace
21

Rev 2 7
REFERENCES
• I.G. Bryden, S.J. Couch, A. Owen, and G. Melville,  “Tidal current resource assessment,” J. Power and 
Energy, Proc. IMechE , 222(Part A), 125‐ 135 (2007).
• I.G. Bryden, S. Naik, P. Fraenkel and C.R. Bullen, “Matching Tidal Current Plants to Local Flow Conditions,” 
Energy, 23 (9), 699‐709 (1998).
• R.H. Charlier, “Sustainable co‐generation from the tides: A review,”  Renewable and Sustainable Energy 
Reviews, 7, 187‐213 (2003).
• R.H. Charlier, C.W. Finkl, Ocean Energy, Springer, Berlin (2009).

© James S. Wallace
22

PHOTO CREDITS
• "Bottom Mounted Turbines" by self ‐ Own work. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution‐Share 
Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons ‐
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bottom_Mounted_Turbines.png#mediaviewer/File:Bottom_Mou
nted_Turbines.png

© James S. Wallace
23

Rev 2 8
TIDAL STREAM GENERATORS
EXAMPLES
Tidal Energy Module

© James S. Wallace
1

SEAGEN
• Developed in the UK by Marine 
Current Turbines (part of 
Siemens since 2012)
• First prototype 1994 with 15 
kW system in Loch Linnhe, off 
the west coast of Scotland
• In 2003, 300kW Seaflow
turbine installed off Lynmouth
• Blades can be rotated all the 
way around to reverse flow
"Seaflow raised 16 jun 03" by Fundy 
© James S. Wallace
2

SEAGEN
• Installed in Strangford Narrows 
in Northern Ireland April 2008
• 1.2 MW between 18 and 20 
hours of the day
• Grid connected Dec 2008 – first 
large scale commercial tidal 
stream generator
• Decommissioning environmental 
completed Dec 2016.
• Next decommissioning window 
Nov 2017‐April 2018 [s]
• Decommissioning contract not 
yet awarded (Nov. 2017). "Strangfordloughmap" by Fundy 
© James S. Wallace
3

Rev 3 1
SEAGEN INSTALLATION

"SeaGen installed" by Fundy 
"Seagenraised" by Fundy 
© James S. Wallace
4

SEAGEN
BLADE

• 16m diameter 
rotor, 
• 2MW total 
output

“Tidal electricity generator awaiting installation,” by Fundy
© James S. Wallace
5

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT
• Extensive studies have been carried out at the Strangford Narrows 
SEAGEN installation
• MCT (SEAGEN manufacturer) set up a £2m programme to monitor 
SeaGen's environmental impact. 
– Scientists from the Queen's University Belfast and from the Sea 
Mammal Research Unit (SMRU) at St Andrew's University.
– During commissioning, marine mammal observer on SEAGEN, which 
was operated only during daylight hours.
– Sonar system monitored seal movements
– Project given environmental all‐clear in January 2012 under the 
Environmental Monitoring Programme led by the environmental 
consultancy, Royal Haskoning.
[://www.power‐technology.com/projects/strangford‐lough/]
© James S. Wallace
6

Rev 3 2
OPENHYDRO TIDAL TECHNOLOGY
• Based in Ireland
• Acquired by DCNS 
(France) in 2013.
• Images and videos 
at:
http://www.openhy
dro.com/images.ht
ml OpenHydro seabed mounted, http://www.openhydro.com/images.html
© James S. Wallace
7

OPENHYDRO PROJECTS
• OpenHydro first to install prototype at European Marine Energy Centre, 
Orkney Islands, Scotland (2006)
– Testing 7th generation prototype  since 2014 (Nov. 2017)
– 10,000 hours of operation accumulated.
• Bay of Fundy 
– One 2 MW unit installed Nov. 2016 and grid connected.
– http://fundyforce.ca/technology/openhydro‐nova‐scotia‐power/
• France – deal with EdF for Paimpol‐Bréhat in Brittany (France)
– Two 2 MW tidal turbines were installed in 2016
• Channel Islands ‐ The island of Alderney. 
– OpenHydro and Alderney Renewable Energy (ARE)  2014 established joint 
venture to develop 300 MW tidal array
– 150 turbines (2.0MW each)    
– Awaiting power connection availability (2021!) before proceeding
© James S. Wallace
8

OpenHydro CONCEPT

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyamCR6Alv8#t=10

© James S. Wallace
9

Rev 3 3
FORCE- BAY OF FUNDY
• The Fundy Ocean 
Research Center 
for Energy (FORCE): 
“Canada’s leading 
research centre for in‐
stream tidal energy, 
located in the Bay of 
Fundy, Nova Scotia.”
[http://fundyforce.ca/]
Google maps
© James S. Wallace
10

FORCE - BAY OF FUNDY


• Host to technology developers, providing the electrical 
infrastructure to deliver power to the grid; it also acts as 
watchdog, providing independently reviewed environmental 
monitoring.
• FORCE receives funding support from the Government of 
Canada, the Province of Nova Scotia, Encana Corporation, and 
participating technology developers

© James S. Wallace
11

FORCE - BAY OF FUNDY


FORCE Mandate to conduct environmental assessments.  Research includes:
• Fish monitoring measures changes in fish distribution and behaviour, and 
assesses the probability of fish encountering a turbine.
• Marine mammal monitoring detects changes in the distribution of the 
harbour porpoise in relation to operational in‐stream turbines.
• Lobster monitoring measures whether the presence of a turbine affects 
the number of lobster entering traps. 
• Marine noise monitoring measures both ambient noise and noise 
generated by in‐stream turbines, for prediction of effects on marine life.
• Seabird monitoring captures site‐specific species abundance and behavior 
data
• Monitoring since 2009.   All reports are public  [http://fundyforce.ca/environment/]
© James S. Wallace
12

Rev 3 4
FORCE TEST SITE 1
Minas Passage
• 5 km wide
• At mid‐tide, volume flow 
of water about 4 cubic 
kilometers/hour
• During the incoming 
tide, a sea water mass of 
approximately 14 billion 
tonnes flows through 
the Minas Passage
[http://fundyforce.ca/about/force‐test‐site/]
© James S. Wallace
13

FORCE TEST SITE 2


Four test sites
• Each supported by a 34.5kV subsea 
power cable (2 to 3 km in length 
depending on site) 
• Electrical substation connected to 
Nova Scotia grid via 10 km 
transmission line
• Electrical feed‐in limited to 22 MW 
total
• Water depths up to 45 m at low tide
• Water speeds up to 5 m/s on ebb and 
flood

[http://fundyforce.ca/about/force‐test‐site/]
© James S. Wallace
14

PLANNED TESTS @ FORCE


Cape Sharp Tidal
• Partnership between Emera and OpenHydro
• 2 x 2 MW
• First 2 MW unit deployed November 7, 2016; Grid connection Nov. 8.
• Current design incorporates improvements from previous experience:
– Earlier 1MW OpenHydro turbine deployed November 12, 2009.
– Turbine blades popped out due to forces exceeding expected design 
values
– Damaged turbine and gravity base successfully recovered 
on December 16, 2010 

© James S. Wallace
15

Rev 3 5
PLANNED TESTS @ FORCE - 2
Cape Sharp Tidal
• The unit under test was recovered June 16, 2017 to update the 
Turbine Control Centre (TCC) [2]
– “The TCC is like a subsea substation that allows us to transform 
the raw power from the generator into grid‐compatible AC 
power. It also sends operational and environmental sensor data 
to shore in real‐time through our subsea cable“
• Redeployment is planned when the work is completed, followed 
deployment of the second unit as originally planned.
• No further news as of Nov. 2017.
[http://fundyforce.ca/technology/cape‐sharp‐tidal/]
© James S. Wallace
16

SUMMARY
• Tidal current generators have been tested  or are being tested 
at the European Marine Energy Center (Orkney Islands) and at 
FORCE in the Bay of Fundy
• No commercial service yet (other than grid connected test 
programs) but some initial demonstration projects are in 
development for late 2016
• Tests have facilitate studies of environmental impact, which 
appears to be much reduced compared to tidal barrages.

© James S. Wallace
17

REFERENCES

[1] http://www.strangfordlough.org/news/seagen‐decommissioning‐update.html
[2] http://capesharptidal.com/update‐cape‐sharp‐tidal/

© James S. Wallace
18

Rev 3 6
PHOTO CREDITS
• "SeaGen installed" by Fundy (Fundy) ‐ Own work. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution‐Share 
Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons ‐
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:SeaGen_installed.jpg#mediaviewer/File:SeaGen_installed.jpg
• "Seagenraised" by Fundy ‐ Own work. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution‐Share Alike 3.0 via 
Wikimedia Commons ‐
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seagenraised.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Seagenraised.jpg
• "Seaflow raised 16 jun 03" by Fundy ‐ Own work. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution‐Share 
Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons ‐
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seaflow_raised_16_jun_03.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Seaflow_raised
_16_jun_03.jpg
• "Strangfordloughmap" by Fundy ‐ Own work. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution‐Share Alike 
3.0 via Wikimedia Commons ‐
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Strangfordloughmap.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Strangfordloughmap.
jpg
• “Tidal electricity generator awaiting installation,” by Fundy, Public domain, 
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:SeaGen_marine_current_turbine_HandW.jpg

© James S. Wallace
19

PHOTO CREDITS 2
• OpenHydro seabed mounted, http://www.openhydro.com/images.html

© James S. Wallace
20

Rev 3 7