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AURORA’S STUDENT HAND BOOK 2012-2013 MCA 3rd YEAR - 1st SEMESTER

STUDENT HANDBOOK 2012-2013


MASTER OF COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
3rd Year - 1st Semester

AURORA’S PG COLLEGE
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STUDENT HANDBOOK
2012-2013

MASTER OF COMPUTER APPLICATIONS


3rd year 1st SEMESTER

AURORA’S PG COLLEGE
RAMANTHAPUR, HYDERABAD - 500013
PH: 040-27030787 Fax: +9140 27036468

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WELCOME NOTE

My dear Students,

The College has produced 13 MBA batches and 15 MCA batches of students till now. Majority of the students have
been placed in reputed Multinational Companies and many got admitted into renowned National and International
Institutes of higher learning. Now it is time for you to emulate your exemplary seniors and to reach higher echelons
of the society.

The College has a clearly defined goal of evolving into one of the best institutes for Post Graduate education. The
central concern of this institution is to strive for pedagogical and scholastic excellence. To reach the envisaged goal,
the college provides highly committed and qualified faculty and excellent infrastructural facilities for curricular, co-
curricular and extra-curricular activities. . Dynamism, experience and erudition characterize the teaching community
at Aurora. Highly qualified with MBA/MCA/M. Tech/M.Phil and Ph.D. degrees, the faculty bring their veritable
expertise and application oriented attitude to the classroom.

One of the innovative features of Aurora is its novel teaching-learning process, that synthesizes conventional
mechanisms of learning through lectures and laboratory sessions, with interactive process like Seminars, Guest
Lectures, Industry-Institute Interaction, Mini Projects, problem - solving sessions and Assignments that makes
learning a pleasure. This handbook, another unique feature of this college, helps you as a ready reckoner in giving
detailed institute interaction and assignment dates to prepare you well in advance. In addition, it also helps in
creating a base for you to prepare for competitive examinations like IES, GATE, GRE etc with its exhaustive reference
material.

The college has been successful in getting reputed organizations for placements and I am happy that preparations
are made to see that all the students of this college would have their future clearly defined.

From the Institute’s side, we assure you that we leave no stone unturned to implement and achieve the above goals.
You too, as a student, have a crucial role to play in this arduous but exciting enterprise of making Aurora synonymous
with learning.

I invite you all to join me in this journey towards excellence.

with all best wishes

Principal

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PURPOSE OF THE BOOK

Education has to be placed and organized in an effective manner, both from the institutions’ side as well as the
students’. This would help to achieve things with great clarity and commitment.

Aurora is the first in the country to give a comprehensive student handbook which forms a major aid for the students
to prepare for the classes in advance, know the details of various deadlines, details of the syllabus, co-and extra
curricular activities to be organized etc. It also gives indication of events and activities planned for each semester so
that the student will have an advanced view of all the academic schedules to be implemented in the course of the
semester.

The handbook seeks to inform the student about the rules and regulations of the college, in order that they may
conduct themselves in an appropriate manner. In addition, the handbook makes the student aware of the history of
the college, and the culture and values that it upholds.

The publication of this student handbook was taken up to help students chalk out a systematic plan of study and
to make optimal use of their time. Though a laborious task, our faculty took the preparation of the handbook as a
challenge and completed it in time with high sense of commitment.

Structure of the book

The first part, or the administrative section, comprises the history of the college, college timings, courses offered,
festivals and functions, rules and regulations, code of conduct, facilities, student support system, student related
matters and activities, teaching-learning process & centers of excellence.

The second part gives academic details, like the departmental profile, departmental tree, purpose of the department
almanac for course duration and tentative dates of theory and lab exams; course structure for credits and the number
of hours allocated for various programs; time table - a week-wise calendar of the subject, class time, and the name of
the faculty handling the subject; subject-wise details like the session plan, question bank assignments, guest
lectures, and students seminars; laboratory details; adjunct courses; industrial tours and visits; and finally, the
schedule of unit tests.

The third part provides student details, distribution of students into learning groups and the tasks assigned to each
of these groups.

Everyone’s cooperation in the successful implementation of all the activities listed out in the handbook is earnestly
solicited. Suggestions for improvement are always welcome.

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ADMINISTRATIVE DETAILS
Page No
1. HISTORY 3
1.1 The Beginning
1.2 The Leap
1.3 The Name and Logo
1.4 The Icon & Heritage
1.5 The Traditions
1.6 The Culture
1.7 The Vision
1.8 The Mission
1.9 Quality Policy
2. THE COLLEGE 4
2.1 Introduction
2.2 The Goal
2.2.1 Research
2.2.2 Teaching
2.2.3 Training
2.3 Timings
3. COURSES OFFERED 4
3.1 Department of Management
3.1.1 Master of Business Administration
3.1.1.1 Course Objective
3.1.1.2 Distinct Features of the Course
3.1.1.3 Graduate Destinations
3.2 Department of Computer Applications
3.2.1 Master of Computer Applications
3.2.1.1 Course Objective
3.2.1.2 Distinct Features of the Course
3.2.1.3 Graduate Destinations
4. FESTIVALS AND EVENTS 5
4.1 Festivals
4.1.1 Independence Day
4.1.2 Teachers’ Day
4.1.3 Ganesh Chaturthi
4.1.4 Republic Day
4.1.5 Guru Purnima
4.1.6 Vasantha Panchami
4.2 Events and Celebrations
4.2.1 Induction Day
4.2.2 Foundation Day
4.2.3 Aurora Family Day
4.2.4 Annual Day
4.3 Events
4.3.1 National Paper Presentations
4.3.2 Adjunct Courses
5. RULES & REGULATIONS 7
5.1 Dress Code
5.2 ID Cards
5.3 Attendance
5.4 Cell Phones iv
Page No
6. CODE OF CONDUCT 8
6.1 Ragging
6.2 Discipline
6.3 Lab Code
6.4 Punctuality
6.5 Academic Punishments
7. FACILITIES 11
7.1 Academic Facilities
7.1.1 Library
7.1.2 Laboratory Facilities - MCA Department
7.1.2.1 Language Laboratory
7.1.2.2 DBMS & Application Lab
7.1.2.3 Software Engineering Laboratory
7.1.2.4 OS and Networks Lab
7.1.3 Laboratory Facilities - MBA Department
7.1.4 Laboratory Facilities - Communication Department
7.2 General Facilities
7.2.1 Internet
7.2.2 WIFI Facility
8. SUPPORT SYSTEMS 12
8.1 Placements
8.1.1 Academic Requirement
8.1.2 Attendance
8.1.3 Limited Opportunity
8.1.4 Penalization for Non-acceptance
8.1.5 Commitment
8.1.6 All About You
8.2 Website
9. STUDENT MATTERS 14
9.1 Admission Procedure
9.1.1 Eligibility
9.1.1.1 Management Quota
9.1.1.2 Merit Quota
9.1.2 Filling in the Form
9.1.3 Documents & Admission
9.2 Fees
9.3 Examination System
9.3.1 Internal Evaluation - MCA
9.3.1.1 Theory
9.3.1.2 Practicals
9.3.2 External Evaluation
9.3.2.1 Theory
9.3.2.2 Practicals
9.3.3 Project Evaluation
9.4 Promotion / Detention Rules
9.5 Eligibility for Degree
9.5.1 Award of Division
9.5.2 Award of MCA Degree
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Page No
9.6 Readmission Rules
9.6.1 Detained for Shortage of Attendance
9.7 Issue of Documents
9.7.1 Bus Passes and Bonafide
9.7.2 Originals
9.7.3 Memorandum of Marks
9.8 Scholarships

9.9 Violation of Academic Issues


9.9.1 Backlogs
9.9.2 Assignments
9.9.3 Seminars
9.10 Change of Address
9.11 Transfer of Admission
9.11.1 From College to College
10. STUDENT CLUBS 18
10.1 Literary Club
10.2 Cultural Club
10.3 Nature Club
10.4 IT Club
11. TEACHING-LEARNING PROCESS 18
11.1 Conventional Learning Methodology
11.1.1 Lectures
11.1.2 Laboratories
11.1.3 Projects
11.2 New Teaching Methodology (Interactive Learning)
11.2.1 Learning Groups
11.2.2 Guest Lectures
11.2.3 Student Assignments
11.2.4 Student Seminars
11.2.5 Industry - Institute Interaction
11.2.6 Mini Projects
11.2.7 Industrial Tours
11.2.8 Adjunct Courses
11.2.9 Student Counselling
11.2.10 Alumni Association
11.2.11 IT Meets
11.3 Guidelines for Final year project work
11.4 Guidelines for Interactive Learning Methodology
11.4.1 Guest Lectures
11.4.2 Student Assignments
11.4.3 Student Seminars
11.4.4 Industry-Institute Interaction
11.4.5 Mini Projects
11.4.6 Adjunct Courses
11.4.7 Student Counselling
11.4.8 Alumni Association
12. CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE 26
12.1 Centre for Communications & Personality Development
12.2 Centre for Career Counselling
13. IMPORTANT RELIGIOUS FESTIVALS 26
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ACADEMIC DETAILS

1. Department Profile 28
2. Tree View-Theory 40
3. Almanac 41
4. Course Structure 42
5. Subject-Wise Details
5.1 Software Testing 43
5.2 Middleware Technology 51
5.3 Object Oriented System Development 65
5.4 E-Commerce 81
5.5 Software Reuse Techniques 93
5.6 XML and Web Services 109
5.7 Mobile Computing 121
5.8 Information Security 135
5.9 System Administration 145
5.10 Rich Internet Application 155
5.11 Software Project Management 161

6. Laboratory Details
6.1 Object Oriented System Development Lab 173
6.2 Middleware Technology Lab 181

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ADMINISTRATIVE DETAILS

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1. HISTORY

1.1 THE BEGINNING


It was in 1989 that Ramesh Nimmatoori, a young post-graduate in Computer Science and Engineering, dared to
dream. He made a humble but determined beginning with Aurora Degree College, set up under the aegis of the
Aurora Educational Society. The college had four departments, namely mathematics, computer science, statistics,
and electronics, with 62 students. They were housed in a rented premises in the then suburban locality of
Habsiguda. The college was later shifted to Gandhinagar, but by December 1992, the college moved to its
current location at Chikkadpally, a bustling area in the heart of the city.

1.2 THE LEAP


In 1993, two new departments were added -- Biological Sciences and Commerce. The student strength rose to
600 that year. From then on, there was no looking back and by 1998, the Degree College had more than 2000
students enrolled in various branches of study, and is now rated among the top 20 degree colleges in the
country. In 1995, the Aurora Educational Society established a postgraduate college which offered two
programmes, namely, Master of Computer Applications and Master of Business Administration. In 1998,
Aurora touched new heights when it established its engineering college on a sprawling 600 acre campus. It
was a bold venture in the area of higher education. Not long after, four more engineering colleges came up,
followed closely by two postgraduate colleges. Today, Aurora happens to be one of the largest educational
groups in the state of Andhra Pradesh, with 17000 students on its rolls, more than 1400 faculty and around 500
administrative staff.

1.3 THE NAME AND LOGO


Aurora – the name for the college derives from aurora borealis, the celestial northern lights. It also has
association with the Sun God Apollo and the Roman Goddess of Dawn, Aurora. The name symbolises the
fusion of Indian and Western traditions of representing the Sun as a symbol of knowledge and power.
Education is a penance for knowledge and Aurora treats it thus. The logo has three critical components -- the
Italian colours – lilac and wild pink; the Egyptian pyramid signifying the letter A, and most importantly, the logo
being emblematic of the spirit of the college – i.e. the temple of learning.

1.4 THE ICON AND HERITAGE


Aurora is inspired by the great Indian Teacher Chanakya, who redefined the role of a teacher as being that of
a torchbearer of society. He gave the clarion call “Tasmat Uttishta Bharata” – Oh Indian, Awake! Seeking
inspiration from this great Indian, Aurora imparts man-making education which is firmly rooted in India’s rich
tradition, with our focus clearly on modern science & technology.

1.5 THE TRADITIONS


Aurora is known for establishing unique traditions in every aspect of its functioning. Be it pedagogical
practices, advertising strategies, discipline, extra curricular activities and events, Aurora is in the forefront.
Today, it is no exaggeration that people across the country believe that Aurora is a trendsetter.

1.6 THE CULTURE


Aurora nurtures a knowledge culture. It facilitates in tapping the latent potential of both the students and the
staff. Aurora’s students and faculty command a distinct recognition among their peers and counterparts. It is
this unique culture which has become the hallmark of Aurora.

1.7 THE VISION


Achieving high standards of excellence in computer education and research by synergizing professional
inputs, cutting edge technologies, learning ambience and social relevance.

1.8 THE MISSION


To groom high caliber software professionals who are familiar with cutting edges and emerging technologies
and who embrace continuous learning as the mission of their life and career.
1.9 QUALITY POLICY
We at APGC, are committed to offer the best in class academic services to students in terms of quality
teaching, state-of-art infrastructure, continuous and updated curriculum, cutting edge professional inputs,
intense learning ambience and ceaseless search for excellence so that we become a leading school of com-
puter science in the country in a decade from now.

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2. THE COLLEGE

2.1 INTRODUCTION
The College is located at Ramanthapur, 10 km from the Secunderabad Railway Station. The college offers
postgraduate courses in Management and Computer Applications (MBA & MCA).

Aurora prepares not just students with PG degrees in their hands, but people with a rounded personality.
It is for this reason that Aurora has become a brand to be trusted among students looking for quality
education.

2.2 THE GOAL


In seeking to fulfill its comprehensive mission, Aurora pursues three principal institutional goals: effective
teaching, meaningful research, and service to society. Contribution towards the realization of these
goals essentially constitutes the standard by which members of the academic staff are evaluated.

2.2.1 RESEARCH
The college acknowledges that the preservation and expansion of knowledge through scholarly
enquiry are functions that distinguish institutions of higher learning. The institution believes that
scholarly enquiry promotes effective teaching, besides being a service to society. Aurora, therefore,
seeks to preserve knowledge in its archives and libraries; employs teaching faculty holding research
degrees awarded by reputed institutions of advanced education; honours those who achieve
distinction as scholars; maintains laboratories, research centers, and numerous administrative
entities that function to promote the expansion of knowledge.

2.2.2 TEACHING
Aurora is committed to the transmission of knowledge. The Institution’s primary responsibility is
to its student clientele, and, in this regard, effective classroom teaching is Aurora’s most pervasive
medium for the dissemination of the results of its faculty’s scholarly endeavors. The central
concern of the Institution is, therefore, excellence in those instructional activities that provide
students with opportunities for a comprehensive education and a specialized professional training.
The Institution assigns substantial weight to teaching in its process of faculty evaluation,
recognizing that excellence requires not only knowledge on the part of a teacher but a continuing
quest for knowledge, a constant review of curricula and modern teaching methods, flexibility and
creativity in the classroom, and an unceasing effort to individualize instruction. Towards this end,
Aurora seeks to measure the quality of instruction through both student and peer evaluation, and
regularly subject its academic programs to external review by accrediting agencies.

2.2.3 TRAINING
Aurora is an educational institution striving to utilize the services of its highly motivated team of
people, whose collective expertise encompasses virtually every field of human endeavor for the
benefit of the community. Aurora reaches out to serve society by training young men and women
not only in their respective areas of specializations but also in all aspects of human development.

2.3 TIMINGS
The college functions 6 days a week, from 9:10 AM to 4:30 PM, with a lunch break of 40 minutes, from
12:30 to 1:10 PM.

3. COURSES OFFERED
The college offers two Post-Graduate Courses viz.,
1. Master of Computer Applications (MCA)
2. Master of Business Administration (MBA)

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3.1 MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

3.1.1 COURSE OBJECTIVE


The MBA degree offered by the OU is a two-year programme which aims to equip students with the basic
knowledge of all areas of management and provide in-depth knowledge in a choosen area of specialization.

The first two semesters focus on the fundamentals of marketing, finance & human resources. Apart from
core specialization subjects, students are also taught general foundation courses like statistics, operations
research and operations management. The last two semesters provide in-depth knowledge in an area of
choice. In these semesters, students are taught general management subjects like strategic management
and technology management, which help them perform well in middle-level managerial positions.

3.1.2 DISTINCT FEATURES OF THE COURSE


The MBA is a professional course comprising four main streams -- Marketing, Finance, Human Resources
and Systems . The student is expected to choose one of the above at the beginning of the Third Semester
in order to specialize in it.

3.1.3 GRADUATE DESTINATIONS


Students can seek admission into research programmes in various business schools across the globe.
They can also get into the executive-level or middle-level management positions. Some of the companies
which recruit our MBAs regularly are HSBC, GE, Satyam, Bajaj Alliance, Food World, Mudra, ICICI,
HDFC, SIS InfoTech, Mahindra Satyam, Bloom Soft, Value Labs, HCL, Leisux, ING Vaysya, Cap Gemini,
Garim Industries Ltd, iGate Global Services, Deloitte, NCR, Choice Solutions, Amdocs etc.

3.2 MASTER OF COMPUTER APPLICATIONS


3.2.1 COURSE OBJECTIVE
The main objectives of the course are: to impart basic understanding of concepts, strategies, tools and
techniques of information technology; to provide a strong foundation in all technical aspects of
computers and their applications; to develop communication and soft skills necessary for IT professionals;
and to give hands-on experience in IT applications in industry through projects on computer application
software.

3.2.2 DISTINCT FEATURES OF THE COURSE


The program aims at imparting comprehensive knowledge with equal emphasis on theory and practice.
The course curriculum will have enough flexibility to enable a student to undertake advanced studies in
Computer Science.

3.2.3 GRADUATE DESTINATIONS


The MCA program prepares students to take up positions as Systems Analysts,
Systems Designers, System Developers and Managers in any field related to information technology.

4. FESTIVALS & EVENTS


Following are the important events in the Aurora calendar that all the colleges of Aurora Consortium
celebrate. These celebrations symbolize the cultural features that are unique to Aurora.

4.1 FESTIVALS
4.1.1 INDEPENDENCE DAY
August 15 is one of the most important days celebrated at Aurora. The day does not hold mere
ceremonial significance for us. On this day, the faculty, staff and students of Aurora reaffirm their
commitment towards the process of nation-building. Various social development activities and community
services are initiated on this day.

4.1.2 TEACHERS’DAY
September 5, the birthday of Dr. Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, is celebrated as Teachers’ Day all over the
country. One of the important days in the Aurora calendar, it is a day on which students give the campus
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a festive look. Cultural programs and a formal get-together mark the occasion. The faculty highlight the
role and contribution of a teacher in a student’s life. The college presents the ‘Best Teacher’ award for
teachers who have distinguished themselves in their fields. Senior teachers from other institutions are
also invited and honoured on this day.

4.1.3 GANESH CHATURTHI


On this day, the Aurora fraternity worships Lord Ganesha, also known as the Vighnaharta. His blessings
are sought for the smooth conduct of all activities. This year the chaturthi of the bright lunar fortnight
comes on 19th Sept 2012 and will be celebrated as the birthday of Lord Ganesha.

4.1.4 REPUBLIC DAY


Celebrated on January 26, the Republic Day is another occasion when the staff and students get an
opportunity to uphold their commitment as responsible citizens of India and derive inspiration from the
great leaders and intellectuals whose vision has guided this nation on the path of progress.

4.1.5 GURU PURNIMA


The first guru, Sri Krishna Dvypayana (Vyasa Bhagavan), born on Ashada Purnima, is considered to be
the most revered among all the gurus. Aurora celebrates Guru Purnima in order to recognize his contribution
to the world of letters.
The college celebrated Guru Purnima on 2nd July, 2012.

4.1.6 BASANTHA PANCHAMI


It is an auspicious day for the Aurora Consortium. On this day, in the year 1989, we laid the foundation
stone of the AURORA EDUCATIONAL SOCIETY. On Vasantha Panchami, we worship Devi Saraswati -
- the Goddess of Learning and Intelligence.
The college celebrated Basantha Panchami on 28th January, 2012.

4.2 EVENTS AND CELEBRATIONS


4.2.1 INDUCTION DAY
Every year the new batch of students is warmly welcomed by the college. While the induction is meant
to make students feel at ease in their new environs, it has a serious purpose behind it. It is an initiation
into the culture and traditions upheld by the college. Students are primed about the rules and norms of
the college, and the challenges that they would encounter over the years in such a demanding course. A
week-long celebration consisting of lectures by distinguished personalities, cultural events, and a formal
get-together mark the induction process every year.
For the batch of 2011, the induction day was held on November 19th, 2011.
4.2.2 FOUNDATION DAY
On the Foundation Day of the college, an eminent personality is invited to give the Foundation Day
Lecture. This is the day when the college takes pride in reaffirming its commitment to the cause of
education.
The Foundation Day is held on Basantha Panchami every year.
4.2.3 AURORA FAMILY DAY
The Aurora Family Day is a festive occasion organized every year by the Aurora Consortium. The staff
along with their families are invited for a get-together. It is an opportunity for everyone to know one
another and to strengthen personal and professional bonds.
The Aurora Family day is planned tentatively in the first week of January, every year
4.2.4 ANNUAL DAY
The annual day celebrations of the college take place at the end of the academic calendar. Sports, cultural
and literary competitions are conducted as a run-up to the main program. Parents, alumni, and other
guests are invited for the event. The annual day is an occasion for the college to speak about its
commitments and its achievements in the academic year. The annual report is presented to the college
board a week before the proposed day.
The annual day celebrations are planned tentatively on 10th during March/April of every year.

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4.3 EVENTS
4.3.1 NATIONAL PAPER PRESENTATION
A national level paper presentation is intended to be organized in the month of October. More than 200
colleges from all over India are expected to participate. The event includes paper presentation. This event
will make Students & Faculty aware of the various developments in the field of Information Technology
& instill an interest for research for them.
For 2010-2011 academic year it was held on 9th & 10th of February 2011.
4.3.2 ADJUNCT COURSES
An adjunct course on LINUX Administration and Database Administration was conducted for the
faculty of Computer Applications on 8th, 9th & 10th of March 2011.

5. RULES & REGULATIONS


5.1 DRESS CODE
Students must observe the following dress code:
Gents: Formal Shirt of Light Cream Color, Jet Black Trousers & Tie. Black Shoes, Belt and ID-Card.
Ladies: Formal Shirt of Light Cream Color, Jet Black Trousers, Half/full Shoes and ID-Card.
Please note that Jeans and T-shirts do not form part of the dress code. Those who are improperly dressed, and
have a shabby appearance will not be allowed into the college premises.

5.2 ID CARDS
Students will be issued ID cards only after they fill up their details in a prescribed form that will be issued to
them at the time of registration. Students are expected to come with their blood group details for this purpose.In
case the card is lost, a duplicate ID card will be issued against a payment of Rs 100. Students will not be allowed
into the college campus without the ID card.

5.3 ATTENDANCE
The continuous evaluation system adopted by the OU and the college clearly expects every student to be
responsible for regularity to class, internal tests and other tasks assigned to him/her in the course. As such,
students are advised not to absent themselves without the prior submission of leave letter to the respective
counselors.
1. A student has to put in a minimum of 75% attendance in aggregate of all the subjects in the semester.
2. Condonation of shortage of attendance in aggregate upto 10% (between 65% to 75%) in a semester may
be recommended by the College Academic Committee to the OU with supporting evidence only in
genuine and valid cases.
3. A student will not be promoted to the next semester unless he/she satisfies the attendance requirement
of the present semester.
4. Shortage of attendance below 65% in aggregate shall in no case be condoned.
5. Students whose shortage of attendance is not condoned are not eligible to take their examination of that
class and their registration shall stand cancelled. They may seek re-admission for that semester when
offered next.
6. A stipulated fee shall be payable towards condonation of shortage of attendance.
7. Students coming out in the middle of a class or entering late into a class will be seriously viewed and
attendance will not be given for that hour.
8. The monthly attendance of each student, along with the unit test marks, will be displayed on the
notice board in the first week of every month. Also a copy of that will be sent to the parents at the address
registered with the college. Postage costs will be borne by the student.
9. Students will not be given lab attendance unless they submit practical records of the previous lab
sessions.
10. In case of ill-health, a student has to submit the proof or evidence of absence and the leave application
to the Principal/Head of the department, immediately on rejoining the college. Late submission of leave
application will not be accepted for consideration at the time of condonation of shortfall of attendance.
11. Students with less than 75% of attendance will not be permitted to participate in co-curricular, extra
curricular and sports activities. No college facilities like bus pass, travel concessions, scholarships will
be admissible for them.

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5.4 CELL PHONES
Students are NOT allowed to keep their cell phones in SWITCH ON mode on the college campus. If any
student is found in possession of camera cell phone, it will be seized by the college and will not be returned.

6. CODE OF CONDUCT

6.1 RAGGING
Ragging is a cognizable and punishable offence.Any student found indulging in ragging will be dealt with
severely as per the existing orders. It is to be noted that ragging in professional colleges has been banned
within or outside the college by the Government of AP, vide Act 26 1997. An extract of the Act is given below.
Ragging includes words either spoken or written, signs, sounds, gestures and visible representation meant to
harass and torture. Ragging is an act which causes or is likely to cause insult/annoyance or fear/apprehension/
threat/ intimidation/outrage of modesty/injury to a student.The full text of Act 26 is placed in the college library.

PENALTY FOR RAGGING

S No Nature of Ragging Punishment


Imprisonment upto 6 months or fine upto
1 Teasing, embarrassing and humiliating
Rs.1000/- or both.
Impriso nment upto 1 year or fine upto
Assaulting or using criminal force or
2 Rs.2000/-
criminal intimidation or both
Impriso nment upto 2 years o r fine up to
Wrongful restraining or confining or
3 Rs.5000/-
causing hurt
Causing grievous hurt, kidnapping or Imprisonment upto 5 years and fine upto
4
raping or committing unnatural offence Rs.10000/-
Impriso nment upto 10 years and fine upto
5 Causing death or abetting suicide Rs.50,000/

1. Students convicted of an offence under section 4 of this Act and punished with imprisonment for a term
shall be dismissed from the educational institution.
2. Any student convicted and punished under this Act for more than six months shall not be admitted in
any other educational institution.
3. Any student dismissed from a college for ragging will be debarred from seeking admission in any other
course of study in any college / university in the state.
4. A student against whom there is prima facie evidence of ragging in any form will be suspended from the
college immediately.

6.2 DISCIPLINE
Discipline is a priority for the success of any venture. Be it related to matters of general conduct, attendance,
punctuality, dress, body language or academic performance, discipline has a bearing on all aspects of a
student’s personality. At Aurora, discipline is valued and promoted, both among the staff and students.
Students are expected to abide by the rules of the college and refrain from any activity that harms the dignity
of the individual or casts a slur on the image of the institution. Any violation of the college norms shall be dealt
with strictly and the student will be penalized accordingly. Cooperation of parents/guardians is essential in
this regard.

1. Consumption of alcoholic beverages, narcotics and other addictive substances on the college premises,
or coming to college having consumed elsewhere, will entail dismissal from the college and conduct
certificate will not be issued.
2. Smoking on the college campus is strictly prohibited and the student will be suspended from the college
with immediate effect and recommended for punishment as per Section 4 of the “Cigarettes and Other
Tobacco Products Act 2003”.

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3. Ragging is a legal offence as per “Act 26 of the AP Legislative Assembly 1997”. Students are cautioned
against indulging in any activity that may be classified as “ragging” in and around the college campus,
in student buses or at boarding/alighting points. Those found aiding and abetting are also equally
accountable for their actions. Ragging entails suspension, dismissal, heavy fines, and imprisonment.
4. Adherence to the Dress Code laid down by the college is a must.
5. Entry shall not be given if a student is late to college. Students are supposed to be present in the college
by 9:00 AM. The entry of latecomers will be regulated and monitored by the college authorities.
6. The kind of language we use is a reflection of our personality and our home environment. Use of slang
and abusive language, whistling in the college premises, are strictly discouraged and liable to be penalized.
7. Not attending classes while being on the premises and en masse absenteeism are both viewed with
displeasure.
8. Students are advised to mind their body language. It communicates more than words. Slouching in
corridors or sitting on the parapet walls or on the steps at the entrance are discouraged.
9. Any damage to college property, scribbling on walls, tables, drawing boards, is seriously viewed.
10. Rising to greet when a teacher enters the classroom adds value to one’s own personality Conduct
towards faculty and peer group should be impeccable.
6.3 LAB CODE
1. Students should report to the scheduled labs as per the time table.
2. Students who turn up late to the labs will in no case be permitted to perform the experiment scheduled for
the day.
3. After completion of the programs, certification of the staff in-charge in the observation book is necessary.
4. Students should bring a notebook of about 100 pages and should write the programs before entering the
Lab.
5. Any damage to the compuler or burn-out of components will be viewed seriously and is punishable
by penalty or the dismissal the student from the lab for the semester/year.
6. Students should be present in the labs for the total scheduled duration.
7. Requisition of Systems for extra practice should be done 24 hrs. prior to the practice.

6.4 PUNCTUALITY
1. All students shall strictly observe the college time. If any student comes late to college, he/she will not
be allowed to the class and attendance will not be marked for that hour.
2. If anyone is found to be regularly late, administrative action, including suspension from classes shall be
initiated.
3. All the students should strictly adhere to the deadlines specified for the submission of assignments,
laboratory reports, seminar and project reports, failing which students will be given academic punishment(s).
6.5 ACADEMIC PUNISHMENTS
A novel method of correcting acts of misconduct has been devised. Instead of monetary penalization, students
will be given academic punishments for a range of undesirable acts, like giving proxy attendance, not attending
classes regularly, cutting classes while on campus, not observing the dress code, scribbling on college property,
littering the classroom and many more such acts.
1. Make a power point presentation on a specified topic.
2. Give a seminar to junior students on a relevant topic.
3. Come to college on holidays or during vacation to take an examination based on previous question
papers.
4. Student may lose attendance for 5 days.
5. Prepare notes for all the subjects.
6. If found guilty of littering the campus, the student may have to conduct sanitation week in the college
premises.
7. If a student loses a library book, he/she has to replace the book with a new copy and write a brief on
library management.
8. Present a seminar on an issue related to environmental science.
9. Present a seminar on the topic covered in the class and clarify peer doubts.
10. Take notes of the hour and answer students’ queries on that topic in the next class.
11. Gather information on a topic that is not discussed in the prescribed textbook.
12. Write an appropriate program and submit along with updated observation book.
13. Student must give an apology letter stating that he/she will lose 2 days’ attendance if the action is
repeated.
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14. Must answer a previous exam paper.
15. Prepare 20 objective-type questions from one unit and submit it in two days’ time.
16. Collect 5 communication protocols and explain them in detail.
17. In the event of harassing a junior, the student offers a detailed apology in the junior’s class.
18. Give a seminar on the subject that is a pre-requisite for the course under study.
19. Give a detailed list of the subjects studied so far.
20. Attempt not less than 3 lab exercises.
21. Type chapter notes. This will:
i. increase notemaking speed
ii. the student will learn something about what is being typed
iii. spellings of some key words will be known
iv. notes can be verified by the teacher and circulated to others in the class.
22. Download at least 1MB of tutorials from the Internet on a specified subject.
23. Record his/her reading voice on a cassette for a chapter or part, and submit to the teacher.
24. Do a “SWOT” (Strength, Weakness, Opportunities & Threats) analysis chart in a creative fashion under
the direction of one of the disciplinary committee members.
25. Do a “role play” in English on the topic given by the teacher for at least 7 minutes.
26. Prepare a mind map on the entire topic and present it to the class.
27. Give an extempore for at least 5 minutes on the topic being dealt with in the next class.
28. Solve a problem in the presence of the teacher from the syllabus covered.
29. Solve five problems related to the topic of the day.
30. Present the topic under discussion to the class in the next period itself.
31. Learn ten words given by the teacher. Student should write the synonyms, antonyms, and the different
forms of those words.
32. Write a composition (250-300 words) on a theme suggested by the teacher.
33. Answer essay type questions pertaining to the unit under discussion.
34. Derive all the equations present in the entire syllabus
35. Present a seminar on any topic in the presence of the Principal and the HOD.
36. Prepare a brief on a mathematician who has made significant contribution to the field.
37. Write five or more derivations pertaining to any subject and circulate copies in the class.
38. Repeat the same topic next day and engage the class for the full hour.
39. Prepare charts of difficult circuits, computer programs etc., for display in class.
40. Collect 50-100 jokes related to science & technology.
41. Draw cartoons for any magazine related to science & technology.
42. Suggest two books which are not available in the library. The title, author, publisher, cost, and the name
of the book shop where they are available should also be mentioned.
43. Download the literature on current trends pertaining to the subject under discussion.
44. Write an assignment three times on the topic of the day.
45. Give a seminar on discipline and respect.
46. Submit a write-up on discipline in public places.
47. Write a board stating, “Smoking is injurious to health”.
48. Write a board stating, “Tobacco is injurious to health”.
49. If a student is found scribbling on college property, he/she has to clean up the scribbled space.
50. Draw all circuit diagrams in the lab once.
51. Collect the profile of the faculty holding the session.
52. Submit wall posters for the lab.
53. Submit a write-up on the history of the college.
54. Collect information on advancements related to his/her field.
55. Collect related news from various journals.
56. Write a paper.

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7. FACILITIES
7.1 ACADEMIC FACILITIES
7.1.1 LIBRARY
Our library is truly a learning centre with reading space for more than 100 students at a time. The library
stocks textbooks, reference books, journals, magazines and newspapers. It also has an archive of
editorial clippings on interesting subjects.The library subscribes to a large number of national and
international journals and also has a very large collection of reference books on advanced disciplines. In
all, the college library has more than 15,000 volumes and around 6000 titles covering various advanced
topics pertaining to the subjects offered by the college. A dynamic CD library presents data and information
in bytes. Furthermore, information is compiled for the students from various international websites and
is collated topic-wise in the form of printouts. All this is made available free to the students. Supporting
this excellent library facility is the computer-enabled digital library giving access to various international
journals. The college library also offers reprographic facilities like photocopying, lamination, spiral binding,
etc.The library provides facility for the borrowing of books, magazines, freeware and CDs. There is a
separate Book Bank facility supported by the Social Welfare Department of the Governmet of Andhra
Pradesh for SC/ST students.

7.1.2 ISSUE OF LIBRARY CARDS


Every MCA student will be issued three library cards. The student is entitled to borrow a book, CD or
bound journal. MCA students should produce the fee receipt and three stamp-size and one pass-port
size colour photos. Students who secure the first rank in their class or have attendance of more than
85% will be issued an additional library card. A student can keep the book for a maximum period of 10
daysand CD for a maximum period of 2 days.Bound journals should be returned within seven days. A fine
of Rs. 5/- per day on each book will be charged for late returns. A lost book has to be replaced with the
same title or an amount two times the cost of the book should be paid.

7.1.3 LABORATORY FACILITIES – MCA DEPARTMENT

7.1.3.1 LANGUAGES LABORATORY


The MCA department has established a networked laboratory with 270 computer systems (90 systems
in Lab-1, 50 Systems in Lab-2 & 120 Systems in Lab -3). The lab has facilities for learning and enhancing
skills in all the necessary programming languages like C/C++, MS-Office, Oracle, OS (Unix), Java,
Rational Rose etc. The college has in its possession legal versions of all the above programming
languages. Efforts are afoot to enhance the facilities in the laboratory in order to encourage projects
and research work in the area of computer science.

7.1.3.2 DBMS AND APPLICATIONS LABORATORY


This lab, with 140 networked systems, is the hub of all database-related activities. It is equipped with
legal versions of Oracle 8i, Data Warehousing and Data Mining tools and other related software. The
lab is also equipped with all the necessary aids and tools to facilitate training and applications
development in the areas of Multimedia and Web-based applications. Students can also develop
projects relating to Data Mining and Warehousing. In addition, the lab has Microsoft development
tools on different platforms.

7.1.3.3 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING LABORATORY


The lab has state-of-the-art hardware and software facilities with 60 computers in network for necessary
skill upgradation and development work in software engineering. Supported by specialized software
tools like Designer2000 and Rational Rose, this lab has enabled the development of the online
examination software. Developed by a team of experts in the college itself, this software has been in
use for the past three years in the college for internal assessment.

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7.1.3.4 OS AND NETWORKS LABORATORY
This is a lab with 60 networked state-of- the-art computing facilities. The lab has all the popular
operating systems like all the variants of Microsoft OS products, SCO Unix, and Linux. A core group
of faculty has been active in the Linux club that is proactively promoting and popularizing the concept
of Open Source Technologies. The group also conducts adjunct courses regularly in OST for students
who have undergone a course in at least one operating system. The team is also working towards
developing some projects in this area. The lab is equipped with suitable software for application and
reasearch work in networking technologies such as protocols and cryptographic implementations.

7.1.4 LABORATORY FACILITIES - MBA DEPARTMENT

7.1.4.1 LANGUAGES LABORATORY


The MBA department has established a networked laboratory with 120 computer systems (90 systems
in Lab-1 & 30 Systems in Lab-2). The lab has facilities for learning and enhancing skills in all the
necessary programming languages like MS-Office, Visual Foxpro, SPSS, MSDN etc. The college has
in its possession legal versions of all the above software.

7.1.4.2 DBMS AND APPLICATIONS LABORATORY


This lab, with 120 networked systems, is the hub of all database-related activities. It is equipped with
legal versions of softwares. The lab is also equipped with all the necessary aids and tools to facilitate
training and applications development in the areas of multimedia and web-based applications. Students
can also develop projects relating to Client Server Applications. In addition, the lab has Microsoft
development tools.

7.2 GENERAL FACILITIES


7.2.1 INTERNET
The college has broadband internet connectivity through optical fibre line, enabling students to have
access to online resources. This will establish an essentially electronic and digital virtual private network
for continuous communication. Internet connectivity is especially important for the library as it provides
access to the libraries worldwide. Moreover, all the computer systems are being brought under an
intranet, which helps in effective and paperless communication for the entire college.

7.2.2 WIFI Facility


The entire college campus is WIFI enabled and one can browse internet from any place on the campus.

8. SUPPORT SYSTEMS

8.1 PLACEMENTS
1. The Placement Cell of Aurora works in tandem with the students to compile information about each and
every student under an exhaustive portfolio titled ‘All About You’.
2. Interaction with companies and organizations in the form of emailing, phone calls, mailing brochures,
hospitality and scheduling placement activities is done weeks in advance by the placement cell.
3. The placement cell coordinates with the Centre for Career Counselling, where the students are educated
about the difference between a job and a career. The Centre for Career Counselling strives to provide
information and counselling to students, which will enable them to identify not only their strengths but
also the areas that need further improvement.
4. The cell is also assisted by the Centre for Communication. This centre does the preliminary job of
scouting and grooming students who are potentially employable. The confidence and self-esteem of
students is enhanced through SWOT sessions, group discussions, mock interviews and sessions on
bodylanguage, etiquette etc.
5. All the final year students undergo interaction with the placement officer. During these interactive
sessions, the officer acquaints them with the activities of the placement cell and helps them to prioritize
their future plans.
6. Student placement coordinators are selected from final years in the months of July or August. Coordinators
are given the necessary orientation for helping their team members.
7. Students are categorized on the basis of their performance in an aptitude test conducted by the cell and

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the centre for communication in the month of June. Based on the results, the students are groomed to
evolve into confident young professionals ready for recruitment.
8. An e-mail club has been established to facilitate communication with the students.
9. A placement fete is organized by the students. Distinguished personalities from the industry are invited
to address and motivate them about the prospects of early career placements. This fete also includes
several competitions like best resume competition, mock interviews, group discussions, JAM sessions,
interview-based dressing, etc.
10. The alumni of Aurora working in reputed organizations are invited to interact with students and explain
their strategies and share their hands-on experiences with them.
11. Students are encouraged to collect and display placement-related literature on the notice board.
The best contribution is duly rewarded.

Based on the observations made in the last few years with regard to the attitude of students
towards placements, the placement cell has come out with a Placement Charter, which sets guidelines
for the system to be effective and to maximize results. An extract from the charter is given below.

8.1.1 ACADEMIC REQUIREMENT


It is mandatory for a student to have a consistent academic record which would be measured in
terms of their percentage of marks. Aggregate must be 65% and above. Also, he / she should not
have any backlogs.

8.1.2 ATTENDANCE
A student with more than 75% attendance in each and every subject can get the benefit of registering
for placements.

8.1.3 LIMITED OPPORTUNITY


In order to provide a fair chance to each student, a maximum of 3 opportunities for placements will
be given. The students are advised to take this seriously and prepare themselves to ensure their
selection.

8.1.4 PENALIZATION FOR NON-ACCEPTANCE


A student once selected in a particular company is required to take up the appointment, failing
which he may not be allowed to participate in the placement process.

8.1.5 COMMITMENT
Recruiting companies generally have a stipulation that an employee should hold the job at least for
a period of two years. The placement cell expects this commitment to be present in all the selected
students.

8.1.6 ALL ABOUT YOU


To facilitate the employer to have an insight into all the aspects of the prospective employee, the
placement cell makes available a copy of ‘All About You’ directly to the prospective employers.

8.2 WEBSITE
Our website www.aurora.ac.in is a mine of information. Provided in the most interactive manner, it helps
in establishing a virtual family of students, faculty and parents.

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9. STUDENT MATTERS
9.1 ADMISSION PROCEDURE
Students should have completed their study upto Degree level, and appeared for the ICET examination
Integrated Common Entrance Test (ICET) for Admission into M.B.A. / M.C.A. Courses of all Universities in
the Andhra Pradesh and their Affiliated Colleges (conducted on behalf of APSCHE).

9.1.1ELIGIBILITY
1. The candidates should be Indian Nationals and should satisfy local/non-local status requirements
laid down in the Andhra Pradesh Educational Institutions (Regulations of Admission) order, 1974 as
amended upto date (As per G.O. Ms No : 108, Higher Education Dept., dated 30-7-2005).
2. The candidates other than Indian nationals should satisfy the rules of the Universities concerned.
3. A pass (or) appeared at the final year examination of Bachelor’s Degree (except BOL and BFA) of any
University in Andhra Pradesh or any other university recognized as equivalent thereto.
4. The candidates seeking admission into MBA course should have passed a Bachelor’s Degree
Examination of not less than three years duration from any recognized University or equivalent
thereof besides passing SSC or equivalent examination with Mathematics as one of the subjects.
5. The candidates seeking admission into MCA course should have passed Bachelor’s Degree
Examination of not less than 3 years duration in any discipline with Mathematics at 10+2 level (OR)
should have passed Bachelor’s Degree Examination of not less than 3 years duration in any discipline
with Mathematics as one of the subjects.
6 The candidates who are appearing for the final year degree examination shall also be eligible to
appear for ICET- 2010.

9.1.2 FILLING IN THE FORM


The candidates are required to fill up an application form in their own handwriting giving all their
personal and academic details. This will enable proper communication between the college and the
students.

9.1.3 DOCUMENTS FOR ADMISSION


Candidates should submit their admission forms with the allotment letter either issued by the
convener or the management, along with one set of photocopies of the following certificates:
1. Transfer Certificate from the Institution where the candidate last studied
2. Date of Birth Certificate & SSC Memorandum of Marks
3. Migration Certificate by students coming from other than Osmania University
4. Bonafide Certificate for classes I to XII
5. Income Certificate of the parent/guardian (if necessary)
6. Nativity Certificate from the Mandal Revenue Officer (if necessary)
7. Caste/Community Certificate from an officer, not below the rank of Mandal Revenue Officer (if
necessary)

Note: The college reserves the right to cancel the admission of a candidate at any stage if it is
detected that the admission is against the rules and regulations of the University.

9.2 FEES
Convener’s Quota Management Quota
I Year
Tuition Fee As per norms As per norms
Student Expenses Rs. 8,500 Rs. 8,500

II Year
Tuition Fee Rs.27,000 Rs.78,000
Student Expenses Rs. 2,500 Rs. 2,500

III Year
Tuition Fee Rs.26,700 Rs.73,100
Student Expenses Rs. 2,500 Rs. 2,500
9.2.1MODE OF PAYMENT
Two separate crossed Demand Drafts/Bankers Cheques for Rs. 27,000 and Rs. 8,500 drawn on any
nationalized bank favouring the Principal, Aurora’s PG College, and payable at Hyderabad, need
to be submitted along with registration.Those who fail to make the payment before the last date will
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have to pay fine as detailed below, in addition to the tuition and other fees.
Period : 10 Days -- Rs.100
Next 20 days @ Rs.10 per day
The fine amounts may be added to the student expenses and consolidated Demand Drafts/Bankers
Cheques may be taken as outlined above.Tuition fees will not be accepted beyond 20 days and
admission of defaulters will be cancelled.
Registration
After payment of the fee, the student shall have to register for Odd Semester and shall attend the
counseling as per the schedule.

MCA - II year : 10th October


MCA - III year : 11th October

The following are to be produced at the time of registration:


1. Fee payment receipt
2. 6 stamp-size photographs
3. 6 window envelopes with postage worth Rs 5 affixed on each, and 4 envelopes with postage
worth Rs 25 affixed on each.
NOTE
1.Parents are requested to accompany their wards for registration on the scheduled dates.
2. For students of SC and ST communities, fee is not collected from the eligible students,
inanticipation of sanction of schlorship from the government. (Please contact the office for
details.) SC/ST/BC students who are not sanctioned scholarships should clear all fee dues
before obtaining their certificates.

9.3 EXAMINATION SYSTEM


The examination system consists of internal exams and end exams. Internal exams are conducted by the
college on behalf of the Osmania Unversity . The end examination will be conducted by Osmania University.
The performance of a student in each semester shall be evaluated subject-wise with a maximum of 100
marks for theory and 50 marks for practical subject. In addition, industry-oriented mini project, seminar
and project work shall be evaluated for 25 marks.
For theory & practical subjects , the distribution shall be 20 marks & 25 marks for internal evaluation and
80 marks for theory and 50 marks for practical end examination.

9.3.1 INTERNAL EVALUATION - MCA


9.3.1.1 THEORY
The classes which shall be on a semester basis, shall have two tests which includes two internal
tests for 20 marks. All the tests are of one hour duration. The performance in the best two
internal tests will be considered. The distribution of syllabus for conducting the tests shall be as
follows : -
1 - 2 Units - I Internals
3 - 4 Units - II Internals

9.3.1.2 PRACTICALS
For Practical subjects, there shall be a continuous evaluation during the semester for 25 sessional
marks and 50 end examination marks. Of the 25 marks for Internals, 12.5 marks shall be awarded
for I Lab Internals and 12.5 marks for the II Lab Internals.

9.3.2 EXTERNAL EVALUATION

9.3.2.1 THEORY
The performance of a student in each semester shall be evaluated subject-wise with a maximum
of 100 marks . In addition, industry-oriented mini project, seminar and project work shall be
evaluated for Grading for MBA and 25 marks for MCA respectively.
For theory subjects, the distribution shall be 20 marks for internal evaluation and 80 marks for
the term end examination.

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9.3.2.2 PRACTICALS
The end examination shall be conducted at the concerned colleges by the external examiner from
other college. The external examiner is appointed by the Osmania University. The evaluation of
papers is for 50.

Note: A student has to carry the hall ticket and identity card to the examination centre , else the
student may not be permitted to write the exam. Students are instructed not to carry any
objectionable material to the exam hall. All the students have to produce their hall tickets to the
invigilators and should be present in the examination hall at least 15 minutes before the
commencement of the examination.Any student found guilty of malpractice/improper conduct is
liable to disciplinary action as per the Osmania University Malpractice Rules. All such cases
are referred to the College Malpractice Prevention Committee, which, after going through the
reports, submits its recommendations to the Osmania Unversity Malpractice Committee
(Controller of Examinations) that has the final authority to decide the case.
9.3.3 EVALUATION OF PROJECT
Students will have to take up an industry-oriented mini project, in collaboration with an industry of
their specialization, during the academic year for MBA - II year and MCA - III year. The Major
Project is done in II Semester, MCA III year.

9.4 PROMOTION / DETENTION RULES


The student is required to put in a minimum of 75% of attendance for promotion from I semester as well
as II semester as per the Osmania University rules. The promotion of the student from I year to II year
is required to pass 75%of subjects for both the semesters ( I Sem & II Sem ) for MBA Course and 50%
of subjects is required to pass for the both semesters ( I Sem & II Sem ) for MCA Course, after I year and
75% of subjects by the end of II year.

9.5 ELIGIBILITY FOR DEGREE

9.5.1 AWARD OF DIVISION


All the students who have fulfilled the academic requirements as per the OU rules are awarded
division in the following four classes:

1. First Class with distinction – 70% and above


2. First Class – Below 70% but not less than 60%
3. Second Class – Below 60% but not less than 50%
4. Pass – Below 50% but not less than 40%

9.5.2 AWARD OF MCA DEGREE


A student will be declared eligible for the award of MCA Degree provided he/she fulfills the
following academic regulations:
i. The student who has pursued a course of study for not less than three academic years for
MCA and completes the same in not more than double the academic years.

ii. A student who fails to fulfill all the academic requirements for the award of the degree within
3/3 years (regular student) from the time of admission, shall forfeit the seat in the course and
the seat shall stand cancelled.

9.6 RE-ADMISSION RULES

9.6.1 DETAINED FOR SHORTAGE OF ATTENDANCE


A student detained for shortage of attendance has to seek re-admission in the same semester/

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class, and should register at the beginning of the semester/year only. Attendance is considered
from day one onwards.

9.7 ISSUE OF DOCUMENTS

9.7.1 BUS PASSES AND BONAFIDES


Students are required to submit their applications for bus passes and bonafides in schedule time
and collect the same day. This work has to be done only during a free period. A student found
irregular to college may be denied the pass.

9. 7.2 ORIGINALS
The original certificates and memoranda of marks submitted by the student will not be returned
during the study period. They can be issued to the student for valid reasons, after seeking approval
from the Principal. Students should submit an application to the Principal requesting for the same.
The documents have to be returned to the college at the earliest.

9.7.3 MEMORANDUM OF MARKS


The examination cell at the college will give the memoranda of marks after they have been issued by
the university.

9.8 SCHOLARSHIPS
All the SC, ST, and BC students can apply for scholarships, subject to fulfillment of annual income
criteria. Fresh applications for scholarships have to be submitted at the College office.
The documents to be enclosed with the application are:
1. Caste & Income certificates issued by the MRO
2. Photocopies of SSC, intermediate marks memo
3. Transfer certificate
4. Photocopy of parents’ electoral card/ration card

The following are the rules and regulations pertaining to scholarships:


1. Candidates seeking fee exemption have to submit their application form within the stipulated
time failing which will not be eligible for exemption.
2. Students with less than 75% attendance are not eligible for maintenance allowance.
3. Students applying for scholarships have to open a savings bank account with any nationalized
bank before submitting the application form.
4. The renewal of scholarships will be recommended to the authorities concerned only if the
candidate secures 75% attendance and gets promoted to the next class/semester.

Note : On scrutiny, if any student is found producing wrong evidence or information he/she will
be rusticated from the college.

9.9 VIOLATION OF ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


9.9.1 BACKLOGS
It has been observed that students do not take the end semester/year exams seriously and
consequently perform poorly. This not only puts unnecessary pressure on the students but also
projects a negative image of the college. In order to discourage students from accumulating backlogs,
the college has decided to impose the academic punishment.
9.9.2 ASSIGNMENTS
The students should submit their assignments as per the schedule given in the student handbook.
The defaulters will not be allowed to write the corresponding unit test.

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9.9.3 SEMINARS
The students should submit their synopsis one week before the scheduled date. The synopsis
should mention the books referred to. Students who fail to give the seminar on the prescribed date
and time will have to give the seminar on another day approved by the coordinator for twice the
time of the normal seminar.
9.10 CHANGE OF ADDRESS
In case of change in permanent/contact address, students are required to incorporate the same in the
registration cards to be filled by them at the beginning of every semester. If there is a change in the
middle of any semester, students can forward an application for change of address to the college office
through the Administrative Officer.
9.11 TRANSFER OFADMISSION

9.11.1 FROM COLLEGE TO COLLEGE


The transfer of admissions from one college to another college will be considered on grounds of ill health
for students of second year only. Students who desire a transfer from one college to another shall submit
their applications to the Commissioner, Technical Education, Government of Andhra Pradesh, along with
the following documents:
1.No objection certificates from both the colleges
2.Medical certificate from a Civil Assistant Surgeon working in a government hospital.
Note: Transfer of students of the III year MCA,may be considered on very serious health grounds.

10. STUDENT CLUBS


The Aurora ethos believes that true education can be accomplished not through imposition but through
aspiration. Nothing can accomplish this better than the club activities that are by the students, of the students
and for the students.
10.1 LITERARY CLUB
The literary club organizes activities like debate, education, essay writing, and general quiz during the academic
year. Competitions are organized on special days like August 15 and the Annual Day. Students with talent and
inclination are motivated to participate. The club also provides a forum for developing communication skills
and cultivating a creative outlook towards their profession.

10.2 CULTURAL CLUB


Under the umbrella of the cultural club, students are encouraged to organize dramas, music, painting, singing
& dance competitions, etc. These activities tap the creativity of students and go a long way in making them
successful as creative professionals. Such activities hone their personalities and allow them to be in sync with
other aspects of their being.

10.3 NATURE CLUB


This club promisses to rediscover man as part of the wonderful creation called Nature. Students here are
involved in photo exhibitions, nature protection activities and awarenes-building programs especially on
sustainable development.

10.4 IT CLUB
This club is a reflection of new ideas in the field of information technology. It shares the latest information on
emerging trends, events and personalities involved in designing and working of technologies.

11. TEACHING-LEARNING PROCESS


The college is making all attempts in right earnest to fulfil its mandate of becoming a world class institution
of higher learning. The new teaching methodology is a major step in this direction. The salient feature of
the methodology is that it synthesizes conventional mechanisms of learning such as lectures, lab

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sessions and projects, with interactive teaching-learning aids like seminars, guest lectures, expert sessions,
industrial visits, and assignments.

11.1 CONVENTIONAL LEARNING METHODOLOGY

11.1.1 LECTURES
Lectures are designed to provide the framework of a subject. They normally last for an hour and are given
by expert faculty. Students are expected to note the main points. Handouts summarizing the important
points or explaining complex concepts are frequently given. OHPs, LCDs, smart classrooms and other
such advanced teaching aids are used to enrich the lectures.

11.1.2 LABORATORIES
Laboratory work is essential to science and engineering. It provides students with an opportunity to
apply their knowledge and develop appropriate practical skills. Both group and individual project work is
undertaken in the scheduled laboratory sessions.In addition to the programs prescribed in the syllabi,
students are expected to carry out application-oriented and advanced experiments in the laboratories.

11.1.3 PROJECTS
The knowledge acquired by the students during the course of their studies is reflected in the project work
undertaken. The project delineates not only the knowledge of students in various theoretical courses,
but also shows the applicational skills of the candidate. Needless to say that the project report submitted
by the student would be referred to a group of experts for assessment. The serious involvement of staff
members in the student’s project work will go a long way in increasing their rapport with the students and
the department also benefits by way of infrastructure and development.

11.2 NEW TEACHING METHODOLOGY (INTERACTIVE LEARNING)


The interactive learning methodology was introduced in the academic year 2004-05. After observing the
workings of the new methodology on a pilot basis during the last four years and the benefits it yielded, it was
felt necessary to implement the concept more rigorously in order to derive maximum advantage of this concept.
It aims at giving the students experience in the practical implementation of theoretical concepts and stimulates
their interest in changing technologies.

11.2.1 LEARNING GROUPS


An innovative concept of learning groups has been introduced to make learning truly interactive
and creative. The students in each class are facilitated to form learning groups of three each. Each
learning group is named after a scientist. It is mandatory for the students to know the contributions
of the scientist after whom the group is named. The group is also expected to submit a profile of the
scientist to the organizer. The idea behind learning groups is to enhance interaction and teamwork
among the students. Separate learning groups are formed for various activities. Each learning
group is guided by a faculty organizer and is ranked based on performance.

11.2.2 GUEST LECTURES


In addition to the curriculum designed by the university, the students need to be exposed to the
latest developments in the field. In view of this, the college invites experts from the industry and
centres of higher learning for giving lectures on topics of current interest. Guest lectures inculcate
rich insights and inspire students to identify the thrust areas for individual and collective excellence.
They go a long way in providing a thorough understanding of concepts, new application areas and
developments which a student may not get exposed to otherwise.

11.2.3 STUDENT ASSIGNMENTS


The submission of assignments is mandatory for all the learning groups. The learning group is
given a set of assignments normally from the question bank on each subject. The handbook provides

19
a question bank for each unit (minimum of 30 questions) with questions drawn from the Osmania
University Examinations. These assignments will enable the students to prepare well for the final
examinations. Each learning group has to submit 5 assignments in all from every subject.

11.2.4 STUDENT SEMINARS


The faculty and all the students are conscious of the importance of student seminars, which form
an important aspect of the new teaching methodology. The seminars are meant to instill confidence
in students and to motivate them constantly to improve both their domain knowledge and
communicative competence. The student seminars have been introduced to hone presentation
skills of the students in order to give them the confidence to aspire for better career opportunities.
11.2.5 INDUSTRY-INSTITUTE INTERACTION
A continuous and healthy interaction with industries is essential for any post graduate college to
retain its dynamism. This will go a long way in upgrading the skills of the staff and the students.
With this objective, Aurora’s P.G. College is on the verge of signing MOUs with industries. This
is an important step in identifying the common working areas for mutual benefit.

11.2.6 MINI PROJECTS


The goal of the mini projects is to get the student to explore research and development initiatives
in a specific area. The mini projects commence in summer. The projects are undertaken in an
industry or research lab or other academic institutions, as decided by the project advisor. It may,
in some cases, result in a student continuing the work for the final project also, with the concurrence
of the department.

11.2.7 INDUSTRIAL / EDUCATIONAL TOURS


It is important for students of technical education to keep themselves abreast of changes taking
place in the industry. Towards this end, the college regularly organizes industrial tours. Every
semester, students are expected to visit at least one industry or company, either Indian or
multinational. They must prepare in advance a detailed note on the industry to be visited. Information
could be collected from the website of the company or any other source. The students, guided by
the faculty, shall conduct a survey/interview of the people and the place visited and then prepare
a detailed report of the tour for a class presentation.

11.2.8 ADJUNCT COURSES


The adjunct instructor integrates academic content from the lecture with study strategies/ techniques
in order to improve problem-solving skills. Every year during the intervening period of I & II
semesters, each department conducts at least one adjunct course in the areas not covered by the
university curriculum. A minimum of three adjunct courses are to be conducted based on the
response, availability of resource persons and the necessary inputs for conducting the courses.

11.2.9 STUDENT COUNSELLING


For the creation of a healthy academic atmosphere in the college, interaction between the students
and the staff is essential. Staff members are required to counsel the students for academic and
cocurricular activities. Students are also free to discuss personal problems that affect their work
and day-to-day functioning with the staff and seek their counsel.
11.2.10 ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
Aurora is proud to have its students in key positions at several prestigious organizations in India and
abroad. This gives importance to the activities of the Alumni Association. The Association helps its

20
members and also the students currently studying in the College in various activities.

11.2.11 IT MEETS
The students of the college organise an IT Meet entitled ‘Abhyasa’every year inviting participation and
delegations from different colleges. It has various competitive events like programming contest, IT Quiz,
Brain Compiler etc., to stimulate interactive learning.

11.3 GUIDELINES FOR FINAL YEAR PROJECT WORK


The final year project work reflects the knowledge acquired by the students during the course of their study.
The project, an essential ingredient of the PG programme, draws upon the theoretical knowledge and applicational
skills of the student. Needless to say that the project developed by the student would be evaluated by experts

to assess the skills of the candidate. Students are advised to follow meticulously the guidelines given. The
serious involvement of staff members in the projects will go a long way in increasing their rapport with the
students. The department also reaps benefits in terms of infrastructure and development.
Final Year Project is the most important component of MCA program, which paves the way for the student’s
career choices and placement opportunities. This program is intended to focus on application of skills of
young and aspiring software professionals to lead and pursue IT Carreer by bridging the gap between the
campus and corporate worlds.

OBJECTIVE OF THE PROGRAM


Final Year Project inducts the students into organizational real-life situations, which cannot be replicated or
taught in the classrooms. In order that Final Year Project becomes meaningful for both the students and the
host organizations it is imperative that the project necessarily focus on areas which are of direct interest and
concern to the host organizations. All the students are advised to follow meticulously the following guidelines
in this regard.

1. Every student of Final Year Project is expected to be in regular contact with the Faculty, for seeking
guidance and reporting on his/her progress from time-to-time.
2. Students must get an overview of the host organization for understanding their requirements. They
should prepare the software requirement specification, physical and logical design, user interfaces
accordingly using the desired high-level language and test within the stipulated period of 15 weeks.
3. Student should always observes formal dress code.
4. Students are expected to be courteous and polite in their interactions with host organization, maintaining
strict confidentiality of company information and cordial relationships with Company Managers and
Executives.
5. Students should never criticize the host organization’s Executives or policies and should desist from
making adverse comments about college and/or Faculty guide.
6. The tasks and assignments allotted to individual students by the host organization should always be
completed on time.
7. The students are expected to be punctual to their duties and are not expected to leave the office without
prior permission of external guide at the host organization.
8. Students should desist from inviting their friends to visit their work area at the host organization.
9. All the equipment/material/accessories provided by the host organization on returnable basis to the
student, must be returned and never held back by the student.
10. Students must facilitate the meeting of Faculty guide and the external guide regularly.
11. Students should strictly adhere to the deadlines for submission of weekly reports and making seminar
presentations.

21
11.4 GUIDELINES FOR INTERACTIVE LEARNING METHODOLOGY

11.4.1 GUEST LECTURES


The college organizes one guest lecture for each subject in every semester. Learning groups will be
involved in conducting the guest lectures. The procedure to be followed is as follows:
1. Arrangement for guest lecture : The faculty concerned, in coordination with the guest lecture
coordinator, will arrange the guest lecture keeping in view the speaker’s availability on the planned
date for the lecture.
2. Briefing the Principal / HOD : The faculty will brief the Principal / HOD one week in advance about
the speaker invited to deliver the guest lecture. The biodata will also be obtained.
3. Bringing the guest speaker to the college: One of the learning groups will be responsible for
arranging the vehicle and escorting the guest speaker to the college.
4. On arrival, the guest speaker must be introduced to the HOD and the Principal by the coordinator,
and hospitality must be extended to the guest.
5. Seating Arrangement: The students should be seated as per the learning groups.
6. Attendance: Attendance will be taken before the commencement of the session.
7. Introducing the expert (5 min): A student will be entrusted with the responsibility of preparing the
guest speaker’s profile based on the biodata, and also introduce the speaker to the audience.
8. A student will be delegated the responsibility of arranging for the LCD, OHP, collar microphone,
and other necessary equipment, in consultation with the guest lecture coordinator.
9. Recording the guest lecture: The guest lecture should be recorded on an audio system and one of
the learning groups is to be entrusted with the responsibility of handing over the recorded lecture
to the coordinator.
10. Question and Answer session will be allocated 20 minutes.
11. Vote of thanks (2 min): The vote of thanks will be given by a student of the learning group who will
also announce the date for the next guest lecture.
12. Lecture material: All the material brought by the guest speaker has to be filed by the coordinator.
13. Photographs: Photographs should be taken, developed, printed and filed in a photo album.
14. If the coordinator has a class during the guest lecture slot, he/she should depute another lecturer
to take care of the arrangements and reception of the speaker.
15. It is mandatory for all the faculty members of the department who are free during the guest lecture
slot to attend the talk.
16. Feedback forms will be distributed to each learning group before the start of the guest lecture, and
later, at the end of the lecture, will be collected and filed by the staff in-charge.
17. Each learning group must submit a synopsis of the guest lecture topic within two days to the
faculty coordinator.
11.4.2 STUDENT ASSIGNMENTS
The following are the guidelines for the submission of assignments.
1. On completion of a unit, each learning group has to submit assignments on 2 questions,
which are listed in the assignment learning group table.
2. The learning group must adhere to the dates given in the assignment submission table for
submitting the assignments.
3. Students are supposed to collect the corrected assignments from the staff members.
4. In addition to the prescribed assignments, the students are advised to collect the assignments
from other learning groups and prepare answers to the questions.
5. If the learning group fails to submit the assignment on or before the deadline given, they will
be asked to do double the number of the prescribed assignments, and may not be allowed to
write the mid-examinations.
22
11.4.3 STUDENT SEMINARS
The college conducts student seminars from the first semester of the Ist year. A minimum of twenty
seminars are given for each class in all the six subjects prescribed. Students of each class are
grouped into batches of three to form a learning group.
Two learning groups are to present a seminar on the given topic in each of the scheduled session.
The following is the procedure to be adopted:
1. Prior Information: To enable the students to have the information in advance, the seminar
topics along with the schedule are included in the student handbook.
2. Preparation of the synopsis and presentation material: The learning groups will submit the
text and the synopsis of the seminar material along with the profile of the scientist one week
in advance to the department coordinator.
3. Editing of synopsis: The subject faculty edits the synopsis and returns the same to the
student within three days.
4. Scrutiny of presentation material: The subject faculty will scrutinize the presentation material to
ensure that it contains relevant and sufficient matter to sustain each student for twenty minutes.
5. Physical arrangements: The essential arrangements for the seminars will be completed a half-
hour before the scheduled time by the learning groups in consultation with the coordinator.
6. Soft copy: The presentation material should be on a CD and loaded onto the computer
earmarked for the purpose, one day in advance.
7. Publicity: The synopsis is to be displayed prominently on the notice board in the seminar hall
or classroom, as the case may be, before the commencement of the seminar.
8. Seating arrangement: Students shall be seated according to the learning groups in the seminar hall.
9. Faculty watch: Three faculty members of the department who are free during the seminar slot
may watch the proceedings.
10. Blank evaluation papers will be distributed to all the learning groups before the commencement
of the seminar and the filled-in papers will be collected at the end.
11. Time break-up:
3 minutes - Introducing the scientist
2 minutes - Introducing group members and the flow of the presentation
20 min (20 x 3 = 60 min.) - Each member for his presentation
10 minutes - Q & A session
12. Student attendance: Attendance of the students shall be marked similar to that for classwork.
13. Q & A session: Members of the learning groups will pose questions on the seminar topic
which will be answered by the presenters.
14. Summing up: At the end of the seminar, the faculty in-charge of the programme presents the
gist of the seminar, and also conveys to the students the observations made by the faculty on
the presentation. The assessment of the faculty and their final grading of the performance in
the seminar will be announced after the last seminar.
15. The programme concludes with a vote of thanks by the seminar presenting group.
16. Result reporting : After the completion of the programme, the faculty presents a report to the
college seminar coordinator -- whether successful or to be rescheduled. If the seminar has
been successfully conducted, a complete assessment performance of the seminar is to be
submitted. If the seminar has to be rescheduled, the date will be decided by the department
coordinator in consultation with the principal.
17. Record of the programme: Soon after the programme, the faculty in-charge will submit a copy
[both soft and hard] of the material presented to the head of the department.
18. Responsibility for the equipment: The seminar group will be held responsible for the equipment
used for the seminar, and they are required to hand over the equipment intact to the stores in-
charge on conclusion of the seminar.

23
Note :
1. Once proposed and approved, no further changes in the schedule of presentation or in the
seminar topics would be entertained.
2. a. If any student in the presentation group is absent for the seminar, he/she has to give a
seminar for 30 minutes on a new topic in the presence of their parents, if so warranted.
b. Students of the class, other than the presenting group, who absent themselves from the
seminar without taking prior permission from the coordinator are liable for severe academic
punishments, besides their parents being summoned and briefed about it, if considered
necessary.

11.4.4 INDUSTRY-INSTITUTE INTERACTION


The college has established contact with industries with the primary intention of:
1. Developing consultancy activity
2. Giving the staff hands-on experience by allowing them to work in the industry for at least two
months in a year
3. Conducting industrial tours for students
4. Arranging mini projects in the summer
5. Catering to industrial requirements by encouraging students to work on projects that will
directly benefit the industry
6. Assisting the placement cell in identifying positions for students in the industry.

11.4.5 MINI PROJECTS


Guidelines to students for carrying out mini/summer projects
Summer projects are due to be carried out by the 2nd and 3rd year MCA students in collge lab /
various Industries.
Students are required to note the following:
1. To start with the student should have a clear idea of the nature of the mini project viz.
observation of process, participation and development of any process.
2. Students must wear their identity cards.
3. On a daily basis, the students should write down the significant points of learning and the
activities carried out.
4. Students must report to the industry/organization on all working days till the completion of
the project and make proper use of the time allocated.
5. Students are required to obtain a list of specialized books/manuals available in the lab along
with the information on the author, publishers, date of publication, etc. This will facilitate our
library to procure them.
6. A project report is to be prepared in the prescribed format. The project report must contain
the following:
a. Profile of the organization where the project is being carried out. This may include an
outline of the areas of activity, important personnel with their addresses (both official
and residential), and the outline of the future plans of the company, if available.
b. Any special processes and procedures followed in the use of this may also be mentioned.

7. The format of the project report is as follows:


a. Title Page
b. Certificate of Completion (signed by both the external and the internal guides)
c. Contents
d. Abstract (limited to one page)
e. Main Report
f. Conclusion and Scope for Further Research
g. Appendix
h. Bibliography
24
11.4.6 ADJUNCT COURSES
1. 100% attendance is compulsory during the entire period of the course.
2. Depending upon the nature of the adjunct course, students may be asked to pay a nominal
fee.
3. The adjunct course may be conducted in association with a technical society or an institution
of learning institution.
4. Students have to follow meticulously the training schedule prepared by the department by
way of practicals, assignments, etc.
5. At the end of the course, students may be asked to write an examination for evaluation
purpose.
6. Only those students who satisfy the above criteria will be awarded a certificate.

11.4.7 STUDENT COUNSELING


The following are the guidelines for student counseling:
1. Each staff member is assigned two learning groups (20 students) -- one from each class.
2. Staff members are required to continuously monitor the academic progress of the students.
3. Staff should be aware of the marks of the students in internal and external examinations.
4. Staff members should note the backlogs of the students.
5. Staff members should try to find the reasons for poor performance in various subjects.
6. Staff members are to continuously monitor the attendance of the students and ensure that the
students attend the classes regularly.
7. Staff members may try to arrange extra coaching as needed by the student or a set of students.
8. Staff members should have the personal details of the students -- address, contact numbers,
parents, etc.
9. Staff members are advised to post the information regarding the progress of the students to
their parents.
10. The counseling staff are also responsible for the behavior of the students on the campus.
11. Students are advised to continuously interact with their counselors and follow the guidelines
given below:
Students are supposed to intimate the counselors regarding the difficulties they may face in
understanding any subject/s.
Students have to seek the guidance of staff members in academic, cocurricular and
extracurricular activities.
Students have to meticulously follow the advice given by the counselor from time to time.
Students have to voluntarily disclose their address, parents’ name, and contact numbers.

11.4.8 ALUMNI ASSOCIATION


The following are the activities conducted by the alumni association:
1. Holding mock interviews, mock screening tests and group discussions for members as well as
for the existing final year students
2. Providing career assistance to help members shape their careers through career counseling
and identification of appropriate agencies in the area of career counseling
3. Upgrading mailing lists of alumni to facilitate contact with them for events such as joining
professional clubs, homecoming, and reunions
4. Collecting information on the nature of jobs of alumni for publication in magazine/newsletter
This helps in identifying the experts generated by the institution working in various
organizations and also to create knowledge centres.
5. Creating and updating the database of the alumni [class-wise & year-wise].

25
12. CENTRES OF EXCELLENCE
The centres for excellence developed in various departments based on the expertise available help in
motivating the student community in cocurricular and extracurricular activities. Each department has
identified centres of excellence in a specific area, based on the research work being done by the faculty,
the industry-institute interaction in that specific area and the infrastructure facilities being developed
by the department. This enables the students to conduct their projects in an effective manner. These
centres not only guide the students in their project work but also motivate them to go for higher studies.

The following are the centres of excellence existing at Aurora’s P.G. College:

12.1 CENTRE FOR COMMUNICATION AND PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT


This centre enhances the language and communication skills of the students. The importance of good
communication skills cannot be overemphasized in a globalized world. Aurora imparts special training to
students to be efficient communicators by conducting group discussions, simulations, and mock-interview
sessions, debates, extempore speaking, etc. This will ensure that every Auroran is well equipped to
carve a niche for him/herself in the challenging global scenario.

12.2 CENTRE FOR CAREER COUNSELING


This centre, run by committed faculty coordinators, aims to increase students’ awareness about courses,
alternatives and job opportunities available after graduation in various fields and disciplines. The centre
collates relevant information from over 500 brochures of universities/institutes across the world, and
presents them as easy-to-understand posters displayed in the college premises. The college also invites
professional counselors and experts to interact with the students and to advise them on the myriad
career challenges that they are likely to encounter.

13. IMPORTANT RELIGIOUS FESTIVALS

Saturday, 14th January 2012 - Bhogi


Sunday, 15th January 2012 - Sankranti
Thursday, 26th January 2012 - Republic Day
Sunday, 5th February 2012 - Milad-U-Nabi
Monday, 20th February 2012 - Maha Sivaratri
Thursday, 8th March 2012 - Holi
Friday, 23rd March 2012 - Ugadi
Sunday, 1st April 2012 - Sri Rama Navami
Thursday, 5th April 2012 - Babu Jagjivan Ram’s Birthday
Friday, 6th April 2012 - Good Friday
Saturday, 14th April 2012 - Dr.B.R.Ambedkar’s Birthday
Friday 10th August 2012 - Sri Krishna Ashtami
Wednesday 15th August 2012 - Independence Day
Monday 20th August 2012 - Ramzan
Wednesday 19th September 2012 - Vinayaka Chavithi
Tuesday 2nd October 2012 - Gandhi Jayanthi
Monday 22nd October 2012 - Durga Ashtami
Wednesday 24th October 2012 - Vijaya Dasami
Saturday 27th October 2012 - Bakrid
Tuesday 13th November 2012 - Deepavali
Sunday 25th November 2012 - Muharram
Tuesday 25th December 2012 - Christmas

26
MCA III Year, Semester I

DEPARTMENT PROFILE

27
MCA III Year, Semester I

1. DEPARTMENT PROFILE
The Department of Computer Science has been in existence since 1992. The present intake of the Department
is 180
Fifteen batches of students have successfully completed their MCA Programme.
The pass percentage in 2004 was 96.67% with 27 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2005 was 94.6% with 38 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2006 was 96.42% with 36 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2007 was 94.80% with 53 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2008 was 97.88% with 52 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2009 was 98.18% with 65 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2010 was 100.00% with 57 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2011 was 100.00% with 106 first classes.
The pass percentage in 2012 was 98.00% with 130 first classes.

The Department has 20 strong Computer Science Faculty including 1 Statistics Faculty. The Department is
manned by dedicated teachers, devoted students, committed supporting staff and experienced technical
staff.
1.1 STAFF
A total of 20 faculty members and 4 technical staff are committed to the development of the department. In
addition to the departmental load of 35 theory courses and 28 lab courses, the department offers 2 theory
courses and 2 lab courses on an average per semester as service subjects.
1.2 STUDENTS
The students of MCA department are devoted to studies and the most technically competent.
They have conducted participated Formal events and Informal events like Quiz Mania/ Accumulating your
programming/ Proscenium/Script Mania/Fabricate PC/ Observation Test/Text Singing/Mind Switching and
Lan Gaming organized by other colleges as detailed below.
FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2011-2012

Event Name Final Winner /


S.No Students Names Organization
Runner up
Mr. Ravi Shankar
Final Winner Avanthi PG College
Mr. Krishnarayana
1. Quiz Mania Bhoji Reddy PG
Ms. Reshma Runner Up
Ms. Swathi College
Mr. Chandra Sekhar Reddy Accumulating Final Winner JNTU,SIT
2. Mr. Vijay Krishna your
Mr. A.Ashok kumar Mr. Runner Up
programming CBIT
Jagadeshwar

Mr. K.Naga Swetha Final Winner AMS


3. Proscenium
Ms. B.Swetha Runner Up Badruka PG College

Mr. S.Sandeep Kumar Final Winner CVSR


4. Script Mania
Ms. Sandhya Runner Up AMRI

Mr. B.Sravan Kumar Final Winner CVSR


5. Fabricate PC
Mr. R.Siva Krishna Runner Up Pragathi PG College

28
MCA III Year, Semester I

Final Winner /
S.No Students Names Event Name Organization
Runner up

Mr. G.Sudasham Observation Final Winner CVSR


6
Mr. Bhaskar Reddy Test Runner Up Bhoji Reddy
Mr. Jagadesh Final Winner Mahaveer
7 Text Singing
Mr. Srilatha Runner Up Avanthi Pg College

Mr. Swankar Final Winner CBIT


Mind
8
Mr. Md.Rahimuddin Switching Runner Up CVSR

Mr. Chaitanya Final Winner MIPGS


9 Lan Gaming
Mr. D.Hemanth Runner Up Sri Indu Pg College

FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2010-2011

Event Name Final Winner /


S.No Students Names Organization
Runner up
Mr.Sridhar Chary
Final Winner A T R I , Parvatahpur
Mr.B.Vijay Kumar Brain
1.
Mr.K.Rajasekhar Reddy Compiler Runner Up JBIET
Mr.Chakri Rama Rao
Mr.G.Sudheer Kumar Final Winner JBIET
Mr.Praveen Power
2.
Mr.T.Laxmi Narayana Whiz Vivekananda School
Runner Up
Mr.Srinivas of PG Studies
Final Winner Aurora School
Mr.G.Santosh IT Tricky
3. of C & R
Track AMRI College,
Mr.S.Karthik Runner Up
Moosarambagh
Final Winner A S T R A College,
Mr.S.Sharath Chandra
4. Fabricate PC Bandlaguda

Mr.G.Sudheer Kumar Runner Up JBIET

Final Winner Univ. College for


Ms.D.Kranthi Reddy Paper
5. Womens,Koti
Presentation Univ. College for
Ms.M.Sowmya Runner Up
Womens,Koti

29
MCA III Year, Semester I

1.2.1 MCA STUDENTS PLACED FOR THE YEAR 2012

S.No Name of the Student Company

1 G. Santhosh Kumar Infosys


2 K. Subbarayudu CGI Group
3 Raju Nalluri CGI Group
4 Sri Ramya Sri NESS Technologies
5 Vishwesh Agility Services
6 B.Harikrishna Anu Solar
7 G. Nagaraju Anu Solar
8 Manisha Anu Solar
9 B.Pavani Anu Solar
10 M.Srikanth Anu Solar
11 C.Shanthi Anu Solar
12 M.Sudheer Anu Solar
13 D.Satish Kumar Antellio
14 RITESH BAJAJ Sigma Software Solutions Pvt Ltd.,
15 S. Satish DLF
16 Md. Akram Nawaz Saudi Arabia
17 A. Anand Value Labs
18 O. Anil Kumar DCCB
19 G. Ravi Krishna Police Dept., (SI)
20 T. Anjanna PHP Developer
21 B. Mahesh Intense Technologies
22 T.V. Naidu EL Soft
23 K. Gunashekar Reddy EL Soft
24 S.K. Mahesh Appollo Infrastructure
25 G. Purushotham Reddy Reliance Global Services

Placements are ongoing.......

30
MCA III Year, Semester I

1.2.1 MCA STUDENTS PLACED FOR THE YEAR 2011

S.No Name of the Student Company

1 B. Harish Kumar Infosys


2 K. Bipin Chandrapal Infosys
3 C.Ramesh Infosys
4 A.Prashanth Infosys
5 K. Harini Infosys
6 B. Mounika Infosys
7 V.Pavani Infosys
8 A.Mamatha Infosys
9 Indu Bala Mahindra Satyam
10 Padmini Mahindra Satyam
11 Ch. Swathi Mahindra Satyam
12 Bhanu Prasad Mahindra Satyam
13 Satyanarayana Mahindra Satyam
14 Surya Bhanu Pindi Postal Department
15 K. Swetha Postal Department
16 R. Srivani Choice Solutions
17 G. Sravan Kumar Choice Solutions
18 A. Prabhakar Choice Solutions
19 V. Usha Rani Choice Solutions
20 B. Mahesh Choice Solutions
21 N.Srinivas Choice Solutions
22 P.Vishal Globerina
23 T.Ramya Globerina (Hold)
24 K. Aruna Value Labs (Short Listed)
25 Y.Naresh Reddy Arijasoft
26 D. Saritha CSS Corporation
27 Surendar CSS Corporation
28 T. Mahesh ARTE Soft
29 Santhosh Kumar ICICI
30 Usha Rani Vudata ZS Assocation India Pvt.Ltd.,

31
MCA III Year, Semester I

S.No Name of the Student Company

31 B. Mahesh Intense
32 V.Pardasarathi A to Z Pharmacy
33 M. Harish NCR Corporation
34 T. Mahesh Sum Total Systems
35 M. Santhosh Kumar Sum Total Systems
36 K. Uday Kumar Wipro
37 A. Pradeep Kumar Wipro
38 Santhosh Wipro
39 Kishore Archiees IT Pvt.Ltd.,
40 Srivani Muthoot Finance
41 Jyothi Apex
42 Uday Kumar Sum Total Systems
43 Vidya Sagar Sum Total Systems
44 Satyanarayana Verizon
45 G. Karunakar TCS
46 T.Anil Kumar Reddy Trigeo Tech
47 K. Satyanarayana Trigeo Tech
48 N.Srinivas Incessant Technology
49 A.Prabhakar USM Global System
50 P.Hemanth Kumar IBM

32
MCA III Year, Semester I

1.2.1 MCA STUDENTS PLACED FOR THE YEAR 2010

S.No Name of the Student Company

1 Murali Aetukuri Mahindra Satyam


2 Mahipal Cherukupalli Mahindra Satyam
3 Burgu Sravanthi Mahindra Satyam
4 Ruchi K Parekh Mahindra Satyam
5 Ravi Kumar Oleti Mahindra Satyam
6 Gopikrishna N Purapu Mahindra Satyam
7 Modupalli Aruna Mahindra Satyam
8 C. Mahipal Mahindra Satyam
9 Indu Bala Mahendra Satyam
10 Padmini Mahendra Satyam
11 Ch. Swathi Mahendra Satyam
12 Bhanu Prasad Mahendra Satyam
13 Satyanarayana Mahendra Satyam
14 Gurram Venkatesh Value Labs
15 Gaddam Maharaju Value Labs
16 D.Mohan Value Labs
17 Venkatesh Value Labs
18 Suman Value Labs
19 G. Rama Raju Value Labs
20 Mangunuri Satish Value Labs
21 Ranjith Kumar Value Labs
22 Madhavi Dasari Bloom Soft
23 B Rana Prathap Bloom Soft
24 Peddi Naresh Bloom Soft
25 Suroju Prashanthi Bloom Soft
26 Md Abdul Sami Bloom Soft
27 Bukka Navitha Bloom Soft
28 Sarangi Parvathi Bloom Soft
29 Shaik Nasreensultana Bloom Soft
30 M.Sreedhar Bloom Soft
31 M. Swarna Latha Bloom Soft
32 Shaga Sunitha Bloom Soft

33
MCA III Year, Semester I

S.No Name of the Student Company


33 B. Veeraiah Naidu Bloom Soft
34 K. Vijaya Lakshmi Bloom Soft
35 S. Praveen Bloom Soft
36 Deva Ramanjaneyulu Bloom Soft
37 Kishan Kumar Sakala Leisux
38 V. Shiva Shree Leisux
39 K. Vijaya Lakshmi Mallepalli Tech.
40 Sobhan Babu ING Vysya
41 Ravinder CapGemini
42 Ramesh CapGemini
43 K.Rajendra Kumar Data Monitor
44 E.Ravi Kumar Zeta Interactive
45 G.Santhosh Sierra Atlantic
46 G.Venkateswarulu Sierra Atlantic
47 Sasupalti Sierra Atlantic
48 B.Sandeep Sierra Atlantic
49 P.Mani Kumar Grarim Industries Ltd.
50 M.Ramesh iGate Global Services
51 K. Bhagya Laxmi Deloitte
52 B.Sravan Kumar Deloitte
53 V.Pavan Kumar Globe Web Soft
54 K.V.N.Raju Globe Web Soft
55 T.V.Madhavi Accenture
56 Kalyan Chakravarthi Accenture
57 Nasreen sulthana shaik Accenture
58 Krishna Sampath T ISRO
59 K.Phani Kumar Amazon.com
60 Padmavathi Google
61 Rajesh NCR
62 Sandeep Reddy R NCR
63 Manoj NCR

34
MCA III Year, Semester I

S.No. Name of the Student Company


64 Saritha NCR
65 Narsing Amdocs
66 Buchayya Guptha Amdocs
67 Naveen Amdocs
68 Manohar Raju LGS (Lanco)
69 Janardhan LGS (Lanco)
70 Bharath ADP
71 Karthik Missam Technologies
72 Venkata Vijay Kumar Nysa Animation Studio
73 Ch. Vamsidhar Andhara Bank
74 P. Naresh SBI
75 A. Raju SBI
76 M. Rama Rao SBI
77 A. Murali IDBI Bank
78 Md Jareed Shareef Pawaniy Co (Sudi Arabia)
79 S. Suresh Kumar Canara Bank
80 I. Rajith Kumar Prima Imapact Informatics Solutions
81 Naga Dath Ajit APCTP
82 Raj Kumar Polaris
83 CH. Pranitha Aurora's Engg College, Bhongir
84 M. Niranjan Zeta Interactive
85 K Bhagyalaxmi HCL
86 Vijaya Kumar Jinnga ICICI Bank
87 Pavan Kumar Joshi Met Iom IT Solution
88 Parvathi Choice Solutions
89 B. Harish Kumar Infosys
90 K.Bipin Chandrapal Infosys
91 C.Ramesh Infosys
92 A.Prashanth Infosys
93 K. Harini Infosys
94 B. Mounika Infosys
95 V.Pavani Infosys
96 A.Mamatha Infosys

35
MCA III Year, Semester I

1.3 EVENTS & ACTIVITIES REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT


1. Parents day meeting-26th February 2012
2. Alaap - 2011
3. Abhyasa IT - Meet -2011
4. CRT - 2011 (Campus Recruitment Training)
5. Twelve-day faculty development program - 21st to 3rd September 2012
6. Faculty development seminars
7. Meeting of two professional bodies.
8. Two day Workshop - CISCO
9. Three day Workshop on Computer Networks.

1.3.1 PARENTS' DAY MEETING - 26th FEBRUARY 2012.


As part of the Aurora’s culture to bridge the gap between the students and their parents and to update the
later with their ward's performance as also to take feedback to improve the facilities provided by the
college. The college organises parents meets from time to time. This year also Aurora’s PG College, MCA
dept. organized Parents' Meet on 26TH Feb 2012. About 40-45 parents' attended the meeting. Parents were
englightened about the current intitatives of the college, to improve the overall standards of their wards.
Parents were also detailed about the MOU with various IT giants.

1.3.2 ALAAP -2011 (Induction day Programme) 19-11-201I


As a part of Aurora's culture it is a freshers party given to the new commers by the mangement of Aurora.
It is a One Day schedule programme . we invited the guests from placement and industry orientation by
Shri Sitaramaiah garu. The agenda started registration, orientation to college,orientation to mca/
mba,information on specializations professional orientation,lecture on personality development, and on
soft skills, self introduction,faculty introduction,library orientation,lab orientation ,placement orientation,
dress code information, hand book details, alumini orientation, industry orientation, information on informals
,pledge,networking,fungames.

1.3.3 ABHYASA-2011(An Information Technology Meet)


Date of Event = 23rrd December, 2011.
Total number of colleges participated = 70.
Total number of students registered = 450.
Pre-Event Registration = 300.
On-Spot New Registration = 150.
The whole formal events focused on the General IT awareness, aptitude, reasoning, communication skills,
H/Wknowledge and the programming skills, which wise categorized into five major events viz., Power
Whiz, Brain Compiler, IT Tricky Track, Fabricate PC and Paper presentation which were divided into
various levels of rounds. To make the participants well acquainted with various placements related activi-
ties, a different kind of event was organized under “Preplacement Event”. 450 students from different
colleges had participated. The event focused on the various rounds conducted as part of any placement
drive by different companies.

1.3.4 CRT - 2011 (Campus Recruitment Training)


The College is organizing a pre-placement training program for the MCA final students to prepare them
and to take on and off compus placement drive. We have called up various faculties to train the students
in various subjects like Aptitude, Reasoning, English and Arithematic from various reputed institutes
(TIME Hyderabad, Made Easy, Delhi, RBI Visiting Faculty, BSC Hyderabad, IMS Hyderabad) and industries
like Sierra Atlantic, Virtusa, Infosys, Mahendra Satyam for technical and HR rounds. Apart from this,
college internal faculties have taken classes on Aptitude, reasoing and technical skills.

36
MCA III Year, Semester I

1.3.5 A THREE-DAY FACULTY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM - AUGUST 2012.


As part of the culture of Aurora, to expose the faculty to the latest happenings in the IT world, the
department of MCA had organized a twelve-day seminar, under the banner of “FDP 2012”.
Number of Faculty Participated – 15.

S.No Faculty Name Subject Date


01 Mr Mallikarjun Rao DAA 21-08-2012
02 Mr.A Srinivas Rao OS 21-08-2012
03 Ms.Subhashini P&S 21-08-2012
04 Mr.Parikshit ST 21-08-2012
05 Mr.Devender Rao SE 22-08-2012
06 Ms.Swetha MWT 22-08-2012
07 Ms.Srivalli DAA 22-08-2012
08 Ms,Vikranthi DBMS 23-08-2012
09 Ms.Vandana OR 23-08-2012
10 Ms.Saritha DBMS 23-08-2012
11. Ms.Swapna OS 23-08-2012
12 Ms.Shalini E-Com 24-08-2012
13 Ms.Nausheen OS 24-08-2012

14 Mr Vamshi Krishna DBMS 24-08-2012

15 Mr.B Srinivasulu MWT 25-08-2012


16 Mr Vamshi Krishna DBMS 25-08-2012
17 Ms.Vandana OR 25-08-2012
18 Mr. Devender Rao BPR 27-08-2012
19 Ms. Saritha DBMS 28-08-2012
20 Ms. Subhashini P&S 29-08-2012
21 Ms. Nausheen OS 30-08-2012
Performance
22 Prof. G.V.K.Reddy 31-08-2012
Analysis
23 Mr. B.Srinivasulu MWT 1-09-2012
24 Mr. Mallikarjuna Rao DAA 03-09-2012
25 Mr. Parikshith ST 03-09-2012

37
MCA III Year, Semester I

1.3.6. LIST OF PUBLICATIONS OF FACULTY DEVELOPMENT - INTERNATIONAL


1. Two international publications by Mr.Pradosh Chandra Pattnaik,HOD,MCA in “International Journal for
Computer Science and Networks".
2. Two international publications by Mr.E.Devender Rao, in “International Journal for Computer Science and
Network Security.
3. One international publications by Mr.Md.Ismail in “International Journal for Computer Science".
4. One international publications by Mr.Saradhi Seshagiri in “International Journal for Computer Science".

1.3.7. PROFESSIONAL BODIES REPORT


1. All the MCA 2nd year Students are registered for the student membership of "Computer Society of India".
(CSI).
2. Details of Section-wise student's Registration.
Section II A 51 Section II B & C 82
Total = 133
3. Registration fee per student : Rs.200/-

1.4 LABORATORIES
The department has 4 fully equipped laboratories with material worth about Rs.1.15 crores.

We have Licensed Software of Rational Rose 2003, Borland C++ and Microsoft Campus Agreement and
Corporate edition of Symantec Norton Antivirus 10.5.

Computer Operating System


Sl No. Applications
Systems
1 LAB-1 Windows XP, Windows 2003 Office-2003, Edit Plus, Turbo C++
Server, Borland C++; Rational Rose 2003,
90 PCs Redhat Linux. Oracle 8i; MS Visual Studio, Tomcat
Server; JDK 1.5, D2K

2 LAB- II Windows XP, Redhat Linux Office-2003, Edit Plus, Turbo C++
50 PCs Borland C++, Oracle 8i, JDK 1.5,
CA, D2K

3 LAB – III Windows XP Office-2003, Edit Plus, Turbo C++


60 PCs JDK 1.5, McAfee

4 LAB – IV Windows XP Office-2003, Edit Plus, Turbo C++


60 PCs JDK 1.5, McAfee

38
MCA III Year, Semester I

1.5 TEACHING-LEARNING PROCESS


The department has adopted a novel method of teaching to improve the standards of students academically.
Hence, the following events were conducted during the semester.

GUEST LECTURES

Name of the Guest


S.No. Course Topic Date
Faculty
1 Prof. B.Seetharamaiah MCA II How To Face Interviews 06.06.2012
2 Mrs. Vijaya Rani MCA II .NET FRAME WORK & Share Point 07.06.2012
3 Mrs. Vijaya Rani MCA I Importance Of OOPs 13.06.2012
4 Mr. Md. Nizamuddin MCA I Concepts Of Data Bases 20.06.2012
5 Dr. Y.V.Subrahmanyam MCA II Data Warehousing and Mining 23.06.2012
6 Mr. Feroz MCA III Cloud Computing 21-12-2011
7 Mr. B. R. Chakravarthy MCA II .Net 13-12-2011
Mr. Anil Reddy & Mr. MCA II
8 IT Trends 03-12-2011
Hema Raju & III
Mr.Banuprakash Reddy&
9 MCA I Java Technologies 10-06-2011
Mr Murthy
Mr.Suman Chakraverthy
10 MCA II Data ware Housing 04-06-2011
Mr. .Suman Chakraverthy
11 MCA II Testing & Data Ware Housing 04-06-2011

Student Seminars
Each student in a class gave a minimum of two seminars – one Technical and one General.
Based on assigned learning groups students should give seminars in seminar sessions.
Student Project
A group of 6 students of each II Year and III year MCA are given a Project – either Application or System,
to analyze and implement in a semester.
Student Assignment
Previous question papers of in University exams and Campus recruitment are given to students’ groups
as assignments. The assignments are corrected and thereby students are given guidance in attempting
typical questions.
Student Tutorials
The students are given programs in sessions monitored by faculties by the respective field of expertise.
The students in small groups are assisted to prepare themselves and to write logical and application
oriented programs.
Future Plans
1. Steps will be taken to improve the pass percentage by identifying the weak students. Accordingly, special
classes will be conducted on the subjects in which they required special coaching.
2. Attendance is strict with periodic warning given to those falling short of 75%.
3. A state level conference on latest trends is planned by the department in the next semester.
4. Adjunct courses will have to be conducted to make students aware of the new technologies.
5. Students are given mini projects to be supervised carefully by the faculty.
6. At least one technical visit has to be arranged for each batch in the entering semester.
7. Staff members have to be encouraged to pursue higher education.
8. Staff members will be deputed to National & International conferences to enhance their technical skills.

39
MCA III Year, Semester I

2. Tree View - Theory

40
MCA III Year, Semester I

2.1 Tree View - Practice

TREE VIEW - PRACTISE

PRACTICE
BEYOND CLASS COMMUNICATION PERSONALITY
ROOM & SKILLS DEVELOPMENT
SYLLABUS

C++ LAB
WEB  LOCAL  STUDENTS  SPORTS
EIT LAB
PROGRMMING INDUSTRIAL SEMINARS  DEBATTING
LAB VISIT  PROJECT  ESSAY WRITING
 SUMMER MINI REPORTS  PROFESSIONAL
PROJECTS  REPORTS ON STUDENTS
 ADJUNCT GUEST FORUMS
DS LAB COURSES LECTURES  SYMPOSIUMS
 INDUSTRIAL  LOCAL VISITS
TOURS  INDUSTRIAL
UNIX –SYSTEM  VISITS TO TOURS
PROGRMMING LAB INSTITUTES OF
DBMS & EXCELLENCE
LAB NETWORK
PROGRMMING LAB

CORE
JAVA
LAB

ADVANCED
JAVA LAB

UML LAB

3. ALMANAC I SEMESTER

Commencement of classes : 17-09-2012


Last date of Instructions (15 weeks) : 29-12-2012
Theory examinations I/I, (main) : 07-01-2013 to 19-01-2013
Practical Exams : 21-01-2013 to 04-02-2013

II SEMESTER

Commencement of classes :
Last date of Instructions :
Theory Examinations I/I, Supplementary) :
Theory examinations (I/II Main) :
Practical Exams (Main & Supplementary) :

41
MCA III Year, Semester I

4. COURSE STRUCTURE

Sub. code Subject T P


CS 801 Software Reuse Techniques 4
CS 802 Middleware Technologies 4
CS 803 Object Oriented System Development 4
Elective - 1
CS 804 E -C o m m e r c e 3
CS 805 H u m a n C o mp u te r I nt e ra c t i o n 3
CS 806 S o ft w a re R e u se T e c hn iq u e s 3
CS 807 S o ft C o m p uti n g 3
CS 808 X M L a nd W e b S e r v ic e s 3
Elective - 2
CS 809 Mobile Computing 3
CS 810 In fo r m a tio n S e c uri t y 3
CS 811 S ys te m A d m i n i str a tio n 3
CS 812 R ic h I n te r ne t A p p l ic a tio n 3
CS 813 S o ft w a re P ro j e c t M a n a ge m e n t 3
Practicals
CS 831 Object Oriented System Development 3
CS 832 Middleware technologies 3
CS 833 Seminar 3

Note: All term end Examinations (theory and Practical) are of three hours duration

T : Theory P : Practicals

42
MCA III Year I Semster

5. SUBJECT DETAILS

5. 1 SOFTWARE TESTING

5.1.1 Objectives and Relevance

5.1.2 Scope

5.1.3 Prerequisites

5.1.4 Syllabus - O.U.

5.1.5 Suggested Books

5.1.6 Websites

5.1.7 Experts’ Details

5.1.8 Journals

5.1.9 Findings and Developments

5.1.10 Student Seminar Topics

5.1.11 Session Plan

5.1.12 Tutorial Plan

5.1.13 Question Bank

43
MCA III Year I Semster

5.1.1 OBJECTIVES & RELEVANCE

The main objectives of Software Testing are as follows:


To explain the benefits of software Testing
To discuss different types of software testing
To discuss various object oriented testing methods.

5.1.2 SCOPE

Software testing can also provide an objective, independent view of the software to allow the business to
appreciate and understand the risks of software implementation

5.1.3 PREREQUISITES

Students should have knowledge of fundamentals of computer science and Software Development Life
Cycle.

5.1.4 SYLLABUS – O.U

UNIT I
OBJECTIVE
It describes about the functional testing.
The unit introduces the subject by illustration the diversity of application areas and explore the basic feature of
SYLLABUS
A Mathematical Context: A perspectiveonTesting,Examples
Functional Testing : Boundary Value Testing, Equivalance Class Testing, Decision Table - Based Testing,
Retrospective on Functional Testing.

UNIT II
OBJECTIVE
It gives the clear concepts of different strictural testings.

SYLLABUS
Structural Testing: Path Testing, Dataflow testing, Retrospective on Structural Testing

UNIT -III
OBJECTIVE
This unit deals with various integration and system testing methods.

SYLLABUS
Integration and System Testing: Levels of Testing,Integration Testing, System Testing, Interaction Testing.
UNIT - IV
OBJECTIVE
This Unit discuss the various issues in object oriented testing

SYLLABUS
Object Oriented testing: Issues in Object-Oriented Testing, Class testing, Object-Oriented Integration
Testing, GUI Testing, Object-Oriented System Testing

44
MCA III Year I Semster

UNIT V
OBJECTIVE
This Unit discusses issues related to Millennium testing

SYLLABUS
Millennium Testing: Exploratory Testing, Model-Based Testing, Test-Driven Development, All-Pairs testing,
Software testing excellence.

5.1.5 SUGGESTED BOOKS

TEXT BOOKS
T1 Paul C. Jorgensen, Software Testing: A Craftsman’s Approach, 3 rd Edition, CRC Press,2007
T2 Boris Beizer, Software Testing Techniques,DReamTech,2009

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Software Testing (2nd Edition) by Ron Patton
R2 Testing Computer Software, 2nd Edition by Cem Kaner, Jack Falk and Hung Q
R3 Lessons Learned in Software Testing by Cem Kaner, James Bach and Bret Pettichord

5.1.6 WEBSITES

1. http://www.softwaretestinghelp.com/category/web-testing
2. http://www.softwaretestinghelp.com/web-application-testing/
3. http://www.testinggeek.com
4. http://www.softwaretestingmentor.com/links/links.php

5.1.7 EXPERTS’ DETAILS


INTERNATIONAL

1. Mr. James Basch’s


Managing Director Dialectic Capital
Newyork, Oswego

2. Dr. James A. Whitaker


PROF. OF CS AT FLORIDA INSTITUTE OF TECH.

NATIONAL

1. Dr Harinath Pudippedi
Bangalore, Sr. Practice Manager at Cerner Corp.

2. Mr. Deepak B. Phatak


IIT Bangalore

3. Prof. Srinivasan Desikan


IIIT, Gachibowli, Hyderabad
Email: pkredy ET iit.ac.in
Ph : 91-40-23001967/9 Ext: 131/322

45
MCA III Year I Semster

REGIONAL
1. Dr. Manoj Kumar Chaganpipati
Pin: 500072

2. Mrs. Katya
Miyapur, Hyderabad

5.1.8 JOURNALS

INTERNATIONAL
1. Software Testing, Verification and Reliability
2. STVR editorial information - George Mason University
3. International Journal of Software Engineering

NATIONAL
1. NJEducationExperts
2. Journal of Information, Information Technology, and organization.

5.1.9 STUDENTS SEMINAR TOPICS

1. Functional Testing
2. Structural testing
3. Integration and System Testing
4. Object-oriented testing
5. Millennium testing

46
MCA III Year I Semster

5.1.11 SESSION PLAN

Sl. Topics in OU Books


Modules and Sub modules Lecture No. Remarks
No. Syllabus Referred
UNIT – I

A Mathematical A Perspective on Testing L1,L2, T1


Context
Examples L3,L4 T1
Boundary Value Analysis L5,L6 T1
1
Equivalence Class Testing L7,L8 T1
Functional
Testing Decision Table-Based Testing L9,L10 T1
Retrospective on Functional
L11,L12 T1
Testing
UNIT-II
L13,L14,
Path Testing T1
L16,L17
Structural
2 Dataflow Testing L18,L19,L20,L21 T1
Testing
Retrospective on Structural
L22,L23 T1
Testing
UNIT-III
Levels of Testing L24 T1
Integration & Integration Testing L25,L26 T1
3
System Testing System Testing L27,L28 T1
Interaction Testing L29,L30 T1
UNIT-IV
Issues in Object-Oriented
L31,L32 T1
Testing
Class Testing L33,L34,L35 T1
Object Oriented Object-Oriented Integration
4 L36,L37 T1
Testing Testing
GUI Testing L38, L39 T1
Object-Oriented System Testing L40, L41,L42 T1
UNIT-V
Exploratory Testing L43,L44 T1
Model Based Testing L45, L46 T1
Millennium Test-Driven Development L47, L48
5 T1
Testing
All Pairs Testing L49, L50 T1
Software Testing Excellence L51, L52 T1

47
MCA III Year I Semster

5.1.12 Tutorial Plan

Tutorial Unit Topic Salient topics to be discussed


No. No.
T1 Mathematical context Test cases and identifying Test Cases.
The NextDate Function problem statement and
T2 Examples
Discussion
I
Boundary value Analysis and special value
T3 Functional Testing
testing, examples
Decision Table-Based
T4 Decision tables and various test cases.
Testing
T5
Path Testing Basis Path Testing

T6
Data Flow testing Discuss various du-paths
II
T7
Data Flow testing Slice Based Testing

Retrospective on
T8 Metrics for Method Evaluation
Structural Testing

Integration and System


T9 Various levels of testing
Testing
Graph Based Integration and Path based
T10 III Integration Testing
integration
T11 System Testing Threads and finding Threads
T12 Interaction Testing Client /server testing
Implementation of Inheritance and
T13 Object-Oriented Testing
Polymorphism
T14 Class Testing Pseudo code for o-o- calendar
IV Objected Oriented
T15 Gui testing
Integration testing
Objected Oriented
T16 o-o system testing
Integration testing
T17 Exploratory testing Exploring a Familiar Example
T18 Model Based testing Use case Based Testing
V Test Driven
T19 Pros, Cons and Open Questions of TDD
Development
Software Testing
T20 Mapping Best Practices to Diverse Projects
Excellence

48
MCA III Year I Semster

5.1.13 QUESTION BANK

UNIT - I

1. What is the role of testing in SDLC. (July 2012)

2. Explain about decision table based testing. (July 2012)

3. Write the Venn diagram for specified implemented and tested behavior.

4. Write the terms error, fault, failure and defect.


5. Write the triangle problem with data flow diagram.
6. Compare contrast the single/multiple fault assumption with boundaries value and equivalence class
testing.
7. Discuss how well decision table testing deals with multiple fault assumption.

UNIT - II

1. Explain Structural testing as white box testing technique (July 2012)

2. Illustrate with an example about structural testing (July 2012)

3. What is parts testing? Write the cnclomatic complexity of graph.

4. Write MC cube’s basis pattern method.

5. Defined slice based testing.

6. Write the redemdancs analysis for triangle problem using the structured implementation?

UNIT - III

1. Explain in detail levels of testing. (July 2012)

2. What is interaction testing? Explain with example. (July 2012)

3. What are the various levels of testing?

4. Write about water fall life cycle model.

5. What is specification based life cycle method?

6. What is decomposed based integration?

7. Write test coverage metrics in conjunction with operational profiles.

8. Write about client/server testing.

49
MCA III Year I Semster

UNIT IV

1. What is the importance of Object Oriented Testing? How Object Oriented Testing plays a vital role in
current software development? (July 2012)
2. What is the importance of GUI testing? Explain. (July 2012)
3. What are the levels of object-oriented testing? Write the state chart for currency contdier application.
4. What is class testing?
5. Write briefly about object-oriented integration testing.
6. What is GUI testing? What is system for currency conversion program.

UNIT - V

1. What is the importance of test automation and how testing tools can speed up the testing process?
(July 2012)

2. Explain in detail “All pairs of testing”? (July 2012)


3. Write briefly about explorations testing.

4. Explain the concept of model based testing.

5. What is configuration management? Write briefly about Gramula

6. Write the best practices of software testing.

50
MCA III Year, I Semester

5. SUBJECT DETAILS

5.2 MIDDLEWARE TECHNOLOGIES

5.2.1 Objectives and Relevance

5.2.2 Scope

5.2.3 Prerequisites

5.2.4 Syllabus - O.U.

5.2.5 Suggested Books

5.2.6 Websites

5.2.7 Expert’s Details

5.2.8 Journals

5.2.9 Findings andDevelopments

5.2.10 Students Seminar Topics

5.2.11 Session Plan

5.2.12 Tutorial Plan

5.2.13 Question Bank

51
MCA III Yearm I Semester

52
MCA III Year, I Semester

5.2.1 OBJECTIVESAND RELEVANCE

The objective is to make students to learn about Client Server communication using middleware
technologies like Remote Method Invocation (RMI), Common Object Request Broker Architecture(CORBA)
,Enterprise java beans(EJB) and .NET

5.2.2 SCOPE

The syllabus is designed in such a way that students take up advanced courses on J2EE and C#.NET
to develop middleware applications

5.2.3 PRE-REQUISITES

Students should have the basic knowledge of Core Java ,HTML,C#.NET

5.2.4 SYLLABUS - O.U.

UNIT - I
OBJECTIVE
This Chapter discus the basic concepts of client and server communications using middleware technolo-
gies. The students will acquire knowledge of database communication and server programming

SYLLABUS
Client Server File Server , Database Server , Group server Object server web server Middleware Service
specific Middleware .Client/Server Building Blocks ,RPC Message Peer to peer, Web services SOA SOAP
WSDL REST Services

UNIT - II
OBJECTIVE
This Chapter deals with the Architecture of EJB .This chapter further discusses of EJB Conversation
Building and Deploying EJB Roles of EJB

SYLLABUS
EJB Architecher Overview of EJB software architecture View of EJB Conversation Building and Deploying
EJB Roles of EJB

UNIT - III
OBJECTIVE
This Chapter highlights implementation of EJB Session beans like Stateless and state full beans and EJB
entity beans

SYLLABUS
EJB Session beans, EJB entity beans, EJB client, EJB Deployment
Building an application with EJB

UNIT - IV
OBJECTIVE
This chapter discusses CORBA Distributed Systems and Architecture overview of CORBA and Net-
working model . This chapter further discusses IDL ORB Building an application with CORBA

53
MCA III Yearm I Semester

SYLLABUS
CORBA - Distributed Systems, Purpose, Exploring CORBA alternatives, Architecture overview, CORBA
and Networking model, CORBA Object model, IDL, ORB, Building an application with CORBA.

UNIT - V
OBJECTIVE
This chapter deals with COM Data types and Stub Marshalling for implementing Server/Client interface
. This chapter further discusses the Introduction and overview to .NET

SYLLABUS
COM - Data types interfaces Proxy and Stub, Marshalling, Implementing Server /Client interface Pointers,
Object Creation, Invocation, Destuction Comparision of COM and CORBA.Introduction to .NET Overview
of .NET Architecture, Marshalling and Remoting.

5.2.5. SUGGESTED BOOKS

TEXT BOOKS
T1. Robert Orfali,Dan Harkey and Jeri Edwards ,The Essential Client/Server Survival Guide” Galgotia
Publications Pvt Ltd ..2002.(Unit 1)
T2. Tom Valesky .”Enterprise Java Beans “, Pearson Educations ,2002 (Unit2&3).
T3. Jason Pritchard,”COM”,CORBA side by side”, Addison Wesley , (Unit 4&5)
T4. Jesse Liberty ,”Programming C# “, 2ed Edition ,O,Reilly Press ,2002(Unit 5)
T5. Arno Puder ,Kay Romer and Frank Pilhofer ,Distributed System Architecher Morgan Kaufman 2006.

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Mowbray ,”Inside CORBA “, Pearson Edition ,2002
R2. Jeremy Rosenberger, “Teach yourself CORBA in 14 days”
R3. Programming with java and CORBA
R4. Java Server Programming - Black Book

5.2.6 WEBSITES

1. http://www.omg.org/gettingstarted/corbafaq.htm
2. http://www.freewarejava.com
3. http://www.cafeaulait.org/books.html
4. www.developer.com/java
5. www.j2eebrain.com
6. www.rmitechnologies.com

5.2.7 EXPERTS’ DETAIL


INTERNATIONAL
1. Dr. Theo Chiasson
Faculty of Computer Science
Dalhousie University
Phone: 902-494-3446
Email: theo@cs.dal.ca

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MCA III Year, I Semester

2. Dr. Philip T. Cox


Faculty of Computer Science
Dalhousie University
Phone: 902-494-6460
Email: pcox@cs.dal.ca

3. Michael Franklin
Professor
687 Soda Hall
Tel: 510-642-1662
fax: 642-1042
Email franklin@cs

NATIONAL
1. Dr Syed Mansoor Sarware
PhD Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, USA, 1988
MS Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, USA 1985
BSc Electrical Engineering, UET Lahore, 1981
Operating Systems, Data Structures, Programming Languages
principal@pucit.edu.pk

2. Mr. Ashwin Gumaste


IIT Bombay
Ph: 91-22-2576-7911
Email: ashwin@cse.iitb.ac.in

3. Timothy A. Gonsalves
mothy A. Professor
Ph.D., Stanford, 1986

4. D. Janakiram Professor
Department of Computer Science and Engineering
Indian Institute of Technology Madras
Chennai - 600 036, INDIA
Email: djram@iitm.ac.in

REGIONAL
1. PROF. M. SURENDRA PRASAD BABU
Professor & Head of the Department
Department Of Computer Science & Systems Engineering
College of Engineering (Autonomous)
Andhra University, Visakhapatnam - 530 003
drmsprasadbabu@yahoo.co.in

2. S. Ramachandram, M.Tech.(O.U)
Systems Software and Distributed computing
(Co-coordinator, SSS) (Chairman, BoS, UCE)

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MCA III Yearm I Semester

5.2.8 JOURNALS

INTERNATIONAL
1. G Canfora, A Cimitile, A De Lucia, GA Di Lucca - The Journal of Systems & Software, 2000– Elsevier
2. A Gokhale, DC Schmidt, B Natarajan, J Gray, N Wang - Middleware for Communications
3. R Prodan, T Fahringer - Journal of Parallel and Distributed Computing, 2004 - portal.acm.org

NATIONAL
1. The National Student Research Center. E-Journal of Student Research
2. AITP National Collegiate Conference 2008 - Post-thoughts ... Java
3. Java Web Services, Suan Dusit Rajabhat University, April 25-29, 2005 .... National Journals. o. P. Lekasapon
and K. Runapongsa
4. JH Gennari, H Cheng, RB Altman, MA Musen - International Journal of Human-Computers Studies, 1998
- smi-web.stanford.edu

5.2.9 FINDINGS AND DEVELOPMENTS

1. Measuring and optimizing CORBA latency and scalability over high -speed networks
Building reliable distributed systems with CORBA
2. Data Redistribution and Remote Method Invocation in Parallel Component Architectures

5.2.10 STUDENTS SEMINAR TOPICS

1. Web servers
2. EJB – Architecture
3. Difference between CORBA and RMI
4. Comparsion of CORBA and COM
5. Distributed systems and client/server

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MCA III Year, I Semester

5.2.11 SESSION PLAN

Topics of OU Letter Books


S.No. M odules & Sub Modules Remarks
Syllabus No. Referred
UNIT – I
1. Client/Server Client L1,L2 T1-Ch.2
Concepts Server
File Server
DataBase Server, L3, L4 T1-Ch.2
Group server,
Object server L5, L6 T1-Ch.2
web server
Middleware--General L7, L8 T1-Ch.1.3
middleware Service specific
Middleware
Client/Server Building Blocks L9 T1-Ch.1.4
RPC Message Peer to peer L10, L11, T1-Ch.8
L12
Web services SOA SOAP L13, L14 R4 Ch 15
WSDL REST Services
UNIT – II
2. EJB Architecture: EJB ,EJB Architecture L15 T2-Ch.1
Overview of EJB software L16, L17 T2-Ch.2
architecture T2-Ch.2
View of EJB L18 T2-Ch.2

Conversation L19, L20 T2-Ch2


Building and Deploying EJB
Roles of EJB L21 T2-Ch2
UNIT – III
3 EJB Applications EJB Session beans L22 T2-Ch.4
L23 T2-Ch.5
EJB entity beans L24, L25 T2-Ch.6
EJB client L26 T2-Ch.6
EJB Deployment L27 T2-Ch.7
Building an application with
EJB
UNIT – IV
4 CORBA CORBA, Distributed Systems L28, L29 R3-Ch1 T3
Purpose
Exploring CORBA L30, L31 R3-Ch2 T3
alternatives

Architecture overview L32, L33 R3-Ch1 T3


CORBA and Networking L34 T1-Ch4, Ch5
model
CORBA Object model IDL L35, L36 R3-Ch2 T3
ORB
Building an application with L37, L38 R3-Ch3 T3
CORBA

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MCA III Yearm I Semester

S.No Topics of OU Letter Books


Modules & Sub Modules Remarks
Syllabus No. Referred
UNIT – V
5 COM COM Data types interfaces L39 T3
Proxy and Stub Marshing L40,L41 T3
Implementing Server /Client L42,L43 T3
interface Pointers, Object Creation L46,L47 T3
Invocation
Destuction L48, L49 T3
Comparision COM and CORBA L50
Introduction to .NET L51, L52 T4 Ch.1
Overview of .NET
Architecture Marshalling Remoting L53, L54 T4 Ch22

5.2.12 TUTORIAL PLAN

Tutorial Unit
Topic Salient topics to be discussed
No. No.
T1 I Database Server Different servers to develop an application
using database
T2 Web server Tomcat ,web logic , jboss to deploy the
web applications
T3 RPC Remote method invocation ,Protocols
T4 Web services Web services,SOAP,WSDL REST
Services
T5 II Introduction to EJB Where we are using EJBS

T6 Architecture
EJB Architecture
T7 Roles in EJB Different Roles, ACID Properties,
Transactions
T8 Building and Deploy EJB s
T9 III EJB Session Beans Stateless Session beans , Stateful Session
beans
T10 EJB Entity Beans Bean Managed Persistence ,Container
Managed Persistence
T11 EJB Client
T12 EJB Deployment About Deployment in different, Server
T13 IV CORBA Distributed Introduction to CORBA , Distributed
Systems Systems
T14 CORBA Architecture Architecture
T15 CORBA and Networking CORBA and Networking Model
Model
T16 CORBA IDL IDL Architecture
T17 V COM COM
T18 Proxy and Stub Proxy and Stub
T19 .NET Architecture NET Architecture
T20 Marshalling and Remoting Marshalling and Remoting

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MCA III Year, I Semester

5.2.13 QUESTION BANK

UNIT - I

1. i. Define Middleware. Explain in detail about the standardization of a middleware.


ii. Explain about general and service - specific middleware (July 12)

2. i. Define webservice. What are the benefits in using webservices?


ii. Explain the role of webservices in SOA (July 12)

3 i. What is Service Oriented Architecture? How SOA works?


ii. Differentiate between the following:
(a) General middleware and service specific middleware.
(b) File server and object server. (Feb 12)

4. Write short note on the following: (Feb 12)


(a) RPC (b) WSDL.

5. Compare and contrast between general middleware and service specific middleware with suitable examples.
Write about WSDL. (Aug 11)

6. i. Discuss about different client/server building blocks.


ii. Explain about Service Oriented Architecture. (Aug 11)

7. i. Describe about different servers.


ii. What is service-oriented architecture? Explain how it works. (May 11)

8. Explain about the following in detail: a). WSDL and RIST b). RPC (May 11)

9. i. Explain different types of servers.


ii. Explain importance of middleware. (Jan 11)

10. i Write about working mechanism of RPC.


ii. Describe about webservice Architecture. (Jan 11)

11. i What is service oriented architecture?How SOA works and what is the need of SOA?
ii. Explain different types of servers. (Dec 10)

12. Write short notes on: (Dec 10)


i. Web services Vs Rest services.
ii. RPC working mechanism.

13. i. Differentiate between general middleware and service specific middleware with suitable example.
ii. What is service oriented architecture? How SOA works and what is the need of SOA? (July 10)

14. Explain the following in-detail: (July 10)


(a) RPC (b) Web services Vs REST services.

15. Explain different servers with suitable example for each. Explain client-server building blocks. (Nov 09)

16. Explain the following with suitable example: (Nov 09)


(a) Messaging (b) Web services Vs REST services.

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MCA III Yearm I Semester

17. i. Draw the block diagram of Client Server software infrastructure and explain each component.8M.
ii. What is Message Oriented Middleware (MCM)? Describe the different ways of exchangomg messages
between clients & servers using MCM. (July 09)

18. i. Differentiate between message oriented middleware & RPC. 6M


ii. Explain i) Service specific middleware ii) WSDL iii) SOAP iv)Fat Client. (July 09)

UNIT - II
1. i. What are the tasks that clients undertake in EJB architecture? Explain in detail? (July 12)
ii. Write about various clients in EJB

2. i. What are the various roles in EJBs? (July 12)


ii. Explain about writing, deploying and connecting to EJB’s.

3. i. Explain in detail about software architecture of EJB. (Feb 12)


ii. Briefly discuss about high-level view of EJB conversation.

4. i. Write and explain steps in building and deployment of EJB. (Feb 12)
ii. Briefly describe about different types of beans.

5. i. Explain high-level view of an EJB conversation. (Aug 11)


ii. Describe about EJB architecture.

6. Explain in detail about diffrent types of Beans in EJB, give suitable examples for each. (Aug 11)

7. i. Describe about EJB software architecture. (May 11)


ii. Explain about roles in EJB.

8. i. Write complete steps for building and for building and deploying EJBs. (May 11)
ii. Whst are the different types of EJBs? What are its applications?

9. i. Discuss in detail about EJB Software Architecture. (Jan 11)


ii. Explain about EJB home, EJB Object interfaces.

10. Explain in detail about different types of Beans in EJB, give suitable examples for each. (Jan 11)

11. i. Explain in detail about EJB architecture. (Dec 10)


ii. Write short notes on benefits and limitations of Enterprise Beans.
12. i. How to build EJB application? (Dec 10)
ii. Briefly explain about high level view of an EJB conversation.

13 i. Explain the overview of EJB software architecture (July 10)


ii. Explain high-level view of an EJB conversation.

14. Explain in-detail about different types of Beans in Enterprise Beans. Give an suitable example for each.
(July 10)
15. Draw a neat diagram of a high-level sketch of the EJB architecture and explain each component in it.
(Nov 09)

16. i. Explain different roles in EJB (Nov 09)


ii. Explain in detail about different types of Beans in enterprise bean. Give suitable example for each.

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MCA III Year, I Semester

17. i. Describe the two approaches that lets clients to locate a bean. 8M (July 09)
ii. Describe the various services offered by EJB containers. 8M

18. i. Explain the different models of EJB’s transaction management. 8M


ii. Explain how EJB supports management of multiple instances. 8M (July 09)

19. i. What is an Enterprise Bean?Explain different types of EJBs. (DEC-08)


ii. Describe the different roles in EJB.

20. i. Explain how EJB supports management of Multiple Instances. (DEC-08)


ii. Explain: i) Instance Passivation (ii) Database Connection Pooling

UNIT - III

1. i. What are the session beans? Explain.


ii. Draw and explain the life cycles of stateless and stateful session beans. (July 12)

2. i. Develop a stateful session bean that provides addition and substraction of given two numbers.
ii. Discuss in detail about the deployment descriptor class. (July 12)

3. i. Discuss about lifecycle of Entity Bean. (Feb 12)


ii. Differentiate between stateful and stateless session beans.

4. i. Write program for stateful session bean. (Feb 12)


ii. Discuss about lifecycle of stateless session bean.

5. Write a program for Entity bean. (Aug 11)

6. i. Explain about stateful session bean lifecycle. (Aug 11)


ii. Differentiate between stateful and stateless session beans.

7. Write program for stateless session bean. (May 11)

8. i Explain about stateful session bean lifecycle.


ii. Differentiate between Bean Managed Persistant Bean BMP and contain of Manager persiatant bean(CMP).
(May 11)

9. i What are the activities that take place during the lifecycle of entity bean?
ii Write a program for stateless session bean. (Jan 11)

10 i. Write different steps to building and deploying EJB applications.


ii Write short note on EJB clients. (Jan 11)

11. i. Explain about message driven bean life cycle. (Dec 10)
ii. Differentiate between session and entity beans.

12. Differentiate between Bean Managed Persistant Bean BMP and contain of Manager persiatant bean(CMP)
with example programs. (Dec10)

13. Write a program for state full session bean. (July-10)

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MCA III Yearm I Semester

14 i. Explain entity bean life cycle. (July-10)


ii. Differentiate between stateless session bean and state full session bean with example

15. i. Explain life cycle ofstate fullsession bean. (Nov-09)


ii. Explain about stateless session bean with the help of sample code.

16. Explain how different EJB clients can access the bean. Give example. (Nov-09)

17. i. What are advantages of servlets over CGI programs. 8M (July-09)


ii. Write a HTML code to make a call to the servlet. 8M

18. i. Write the steps needed for building an EJB application. 8M (July-09)
ii. Write a program for the implementation of remote interface of stateless session bean. 8M

19. i. With the help of an example explain the life cycle of Stateful Session Bean (DEC-08)
ii. Write a program to implement EJB for Banking Transaction

20. Describe the process of implementing and deploying an EJB Application (DEC-08)

UNIT - IV

1. i. Discuss the methods used for developing distributed applications. (July 12)
ii. What are the goals of distributed systems? Explain.

2. i. Define CORBA and explain its services. (July 12)


ii. Explain the processing of marshalling and unmarshalling in CORBA ORB’s.

3. Explain in-detail about CORBA Architecture. (Feb 12)

4. Write short note on the following : (a) POA (b) IIOP. (Feb 12/ Aug 11)

5. Explain in-detail about CORBA Architecture. (Aug 11)

6. Explain in-detail about CORBA Architecture. (May 11)

7. Write short note on the following : a). IDL B). different CORBA services. (May 11)

8. Explain in-detail about CORBA Architecture. (Jan 11)

9. i. Briefly explain about CORBA communication model. (Jan 11)


ii. Write shor note on IDL.

10. Explain in-detail about CORBA Architecture. (Dec 10)

11. Write short notes on : a). IDL interface b). ORB. (Dec 10)
12. Explain in-detail about CORBA Architecture. (July 10)
13. i. What does IIOP Stands for and what is its significance? (July 10)
ii. Explain the CORBA object model.

14. i. What is a client stub? (Nov 09)


ii. Explain about CORBA object model.

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MCA III Year, I Semester

15. Write a CORBA application which accesses the remote palindrome service (Nov 09)

16. i Write CORBA application where server has a C++ program and Java has a client program for student result
calculation with respective IDL
ii. Discuss about CORBA initialization protocol. 6M (July 09)

17. i What are features of CORBA? Write a sample client-server program using CORBA. 8M
ii. Explain architecture & working of CORBA. 8M (July 09)

18. i. Explain the features of IDL. (Dec 08)


ii. Write a CORBA Application where server as a java programme and client as a c++ Programe for student
marks application with respect to IDL

19. i. Discuss the role of ORB in distributed computing (Dec 08)


ii. Write any CORBA application where server as a c++ Programe and client as web applicatuion(Applet).

UNIT - V

1. i. Explain briefly ;about proxies and stubs in COM. (July 12)


ii. How to implement COM servers and clients?

2. i. What are the differences between COM and CORRA? (July 12)
ii. Give an overview of .NET framework?

3. i. Differentiate between CORBA and COM.


ii. Write short note on COM interfaces. (Feb 12)

4. i. Discuss in detail about .NET architecture.


ii. Explain about remoting and marshaling. (Feb 12)

5. i. Write about COM technology.


ii. Compare and contrast between COM and CORBA. (Aug 11)

6. i. Explain sample code in .NET technology.


ii. Explain about marshalling in .NET. (Aug 11)

7. i. Write short note on COM interfaces.


ii. Marshaling in .NET (May 11)

8. i. Diffrentiate between COM and CORBA.


ii. Explain about .NET architecture. (May 11)

9. i. Discuss about COM IDL and type libraries.


ii. Explain about COM type library marshalling. (Jan 11)

10. i. Diffrentiate between COM and CORBA.


ii. Explain about .NET architecture. (jan 11)

11. i. Explain about proxies and stubs in COM.


ii. Explain about dominant component architecture. (Dec 10)

12 i. Explain about .NET architecture.


ii. Explain about marshalling and remoting. (Dec 10)

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MCA III Yearm I Semester

13. i. Write short note on COM


ii. Explain about Marshalling in .NET. (July 10)

14. i. Compare and contrast between COM & CORBA. (July 10)
ii. Give advantages and disadvantages with .NET . Give sample code in .Net language.

15. i. Compare and contrast COM and CORBA (Nov 09)


ii. Briefly explain about remoting in .NET architecture.

16. Explain the components of .NET architecture. (Nov 09)

17. i Differentiate between COM and CORBA. 8M


ii. Explain the creation, invocation and destruction of COM object. 8M (July 09)

18. i Explain the .Net framework in detail. 8M


ii. Write short notes on i) Marshalling ii) Remoting. 8M (July 09)

19. i. Write short notes on ( i ) Remoting ( ii ) Marshalling (DEC-08)


ii. Differentiate between COM & CORBA

20. i. Explain Net Framework in detail (DEC-08)


ii. Explain How do you create ,invoke and destroy COM Object.

64
MCA III Year, I Semester

5. SUBJECT DETAILS

5. 3 OBJECT ORIENTED SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

5.3.1 Objectives and Relevance

5.3.2 Scope

5.3.3 Prerequisites

5.3.4 Syllabus - O.U.

5.3.5 Suggested Books

5.3.6 Websites

5.3.7 Expert Details

5.3.8 Journals

5.3.9 Findings & Developments

5.3.10 Students Seminar Topics

5.3.11 Session Plan

5.3.12 Tutorial Plan

5.3.13 Question Bank

65
MCA III Year, I Semester

66
MCA III Year, I Semester

5.3.1 OBJECTIVES AND RELEVANCE

The study of UML provides a standard way to write a systems blue print, covering conceptual things as
well as concern things. UML is a graphical language for visualizing, specifying, constructing and
documenting the artifacts of software intensive systems.The subject is useful to students in pursing career
in software development.

5.3.2 SCOPE

The subject presents the UML as a tool to visualized, specified and design the artifacts of a software
system.

5.3.3 PRE-REQUISITES

The student is required to have knowledge of object oriented programming concepts and as well as
alignment with client, server and web, server technology.

5.3.4 SYLLABUS - O.U.

UNIT - I
OBJECTIVE
It introduces modeling concept that is central part of all activities that lead to a good software. Basic
building blocks of UML are examined. Focus is on structural modeling that includes class diagram and their
relationships.

SYLLABUS
UML Introduction: Why we Model, Introducing the UML, Hello World,
Bacic Structural Modeling: Classes, Relationships, Common Mechanisms, Diagrams, Class diagrams.
Advanced Structural Modeling: Advanced Classes, Advaned Relationships, Interfaces, Types and Roles,
Packages, Instances, Object Diagrams, Components.

UNIT - II
OBJECTIVE
The behavioral modeling concepts like use case, interaction and activity diagrams are examined, which
represents behavior over time and space.

SYLLABUS
Basic Behavioral modeling: interactions, use cases, use case diagrams, interaction diagrams, activity dia-
gram, Advanced Bechavioral Modeling: events and signals, state machines processes and threads, time
and space, state chart diagrams.

UNIT - III
OBJECTIVE
The unit introduces architectural modeling concepts with in detail explanation of components diagrams
and deployment diagrams. It is very important as it controls the incremental development of a system
throughout its life cycle.

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MCA III Year, I Semester

SYLLABUS
Architectural modeling: Artifacts, deployment, collaborations, patterns and frame works, Artifacts dia-
grams, deployment diagrams, systems, and models

UNIT - IV
OBJECTIVE
It describes the Unified Software Development Process in a nut-shell, emphasizing that it is use-case driven
architecture centric, iterative and incremental. The process uses UML.

SYLLABUS
Unified software process: The unified process, The four Ps, A Use-Case-Driven Process. An Architecture-
Centric Process, An Iterative and Incremental Process.

UNIT - V
OBJECTIVE
It discuss the core workflows which includes requirements capture including usecases, analysis, design,
impentation and test.
.
SYLLABUS
Core Workflows: Requirements Capture, Capturing Requirements as Use Case, Analysis, Design,
Implementation, Test.

5.3.5 SUGGESTED BOOKS

TEXT BOOKS
T1 Grady Booch, James Rumbaugh, Ivor Jacobson, “the unified modeling language user guide”, pearson
education India, 1999.
T2 Ivor Jacbson, Grady Booch, James Rumbaugh “the unified software development “
T3 Pierre Alain Muller “Instand UML”

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Harman & Graig, Pearson Education, Applying UML & Patters : An Introduction to object oriented
analysis and design and the unified prorest.
R2 Broum & David William, John Wiley & sons, An Introduction to object oriented analysis: object and UML
in plain English,
R3 Emits & Pauel,A UML Pattern language, BPB publications

5.3.6 WEBSITES

1. www.uml.org
2. www.cetuslinks.org
3. www.umltutorials.trireme.com
4. www.omg.org
5. www.tlas.kennesan.edu

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MCA III Year, I Semester

5.3.7 EXPERTS’ DETAILS


INTERNATIONAL
1. Mr. Douglas Lea
Professor of Computer Science
State University of Newyork, Oswego
Email : dl@oswego.edu
Ph : 315-312-2688
2. Dr. Jeff Sutherland
Chief Technology officer, pattienkeeper, inc
Email : jeff.sutherland@computer.org
Phone : 617-987-0394

NATIONAL
1. Mr. Deepak B. Phatak
IIT Bangalore
Ph: 91-22-2576-7747
Email: dbp@it.iitb.ac.in

2. Prof. P.Krishna Reddy


IIIT, Gachibowli, Hyderabad
Email: pkredy ET iit.ac.in
Ph : 91-40-23001967/9 Ext: 131/322

3. Mr. R.K. Joshi


IIT Bangalore
Email: vkj@cse.iitb.ac.in
Ph: 91-22-2576-7730

REGIONAL

1. Dr. M.S. Prasad Babu


Andhra University
Email: dramsprasadbabu@yahoo.co.in
Ph: 91-891-2844862. 91-891-2755898.

2. Mr. CH. Satyananda Reddy


Dept. of CS and System Engg.
Email: satyanand99@yahoo.com
Ph: 9866031661.

5.3.8 JOURNALS

INTERNATIONAL
1. IBM Application System/400 Technology Journal
2. Journal for Advances in Engineering Software
3. IBM Journal of R & D
4. International Journal of Document Analysis and Recognition

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MCA III Year, I Semester

NATIONAL
1. An Object-Oriented systems modeling method based on the Jackson Approach.
2. Theory and Practice of object system

5.3.9 FINDINGS AND DEVELOPMENTS


1. Kim Walden & Jean-Mark Person,Seamless object oriented software architecture: analysis and design of
resemble system, Prentice Hall, 1995, Vol. 3.
2. Open source in UML, which provides all UML Diagram , obstructing, Prentice Hall, 1999
3. UML for real, design at embedded real-time systems lavagno, Luciano. Volume-2,
ISBN-978-1-4020-7501-8
4 “Using UML to enhance frame work development” A case study in the coae sear heuristics domain” , IBM
almaden Research center, cyberspace Technology Department, 1998.

5.3.10 STUDENTS SEMINAR TOPICS

1 Testing as part of the system development life cycle


2 Object oriented modeling
3. Object oriented data management
4 Advanced topics in end user computing
5. Advanced Information systems Engineering
6. Modular specification & Verification of Object-Oriented Programs.

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MCA III Year, I Semester

5.3.11 SESSION PLAN

Sl. Topics in OU Lecturer Books


M odules and sub M odules
No. Syllabus No. Referred Remarks
UNIT-I
1 Introduction to History of Modeling L1 T1-Ch.1
Modeling T3-Ch.1
Concept The Importance of Modeling L2 T1-Ch.1
T3-Ch.1
Principles of Modeling L3 T1-Ch.1
T3-Ch.2
Introducing The UML Language, Building L4 T1-Ch.2
UML Blocks of the UML T3-Ch.2
Relationships and Diagrams in L5 T1-Ch.2
the UML L5 T3-Ch.2
Rules of the UML & Common L6 T1-Ch.2
Mechanisms T3-Ch.3
Architecture & Software L7 T1-Ch.2,3
Development Life Cycle T3-Ch.2
Hello World Mechanisms and Complements L8 T1-Ch.3

Basic Structural Classes and their properties L9 T1-Ch.4


Modelling T3-Ch.2
Contd…., Forward and Reverse L10 T1-Ch.4
Engineering T3-Ch.2
Relationships L11 T1-Ch.5
T3-Ch.2
Common Mechanisms & L12 T1-Ch.6
Stereotypes, Tagged Values, etc. T3-Ch.3
Class Diagrams with Common L13 T1-Ch.8
Properties T3-Ch.3
Advanced Advanced classes, Relationships L14 T1-Ch.9, 10
Structural T3-Ch.3
Modelling
Interfaces, Types and roles, L15 T1-Ch.11, 12
packages T3 -Ch.3
Instances object diagrams L16 T1-Ch.13, 14
T3-Ch.3
UNIT-II
2 Basic Behavioral Interactions, Links, Message, L17 T1-Ch.15
Modeling T3 -Ch.3
Use Cases, Actors, Flow of L18 T1-Ch.16
Events. T3-Ch.3
Use Case Components of use case and L19 T1-Ch.17
Diagrams their relationships T3-Ch.3
Interaction Terms and concepts, Properties, L20 T1-Ch.18
Diagram Sequence Diagram T3-Ch.3
Collaboration Diagrams. L21 T1-Ch.18
T3-Ch.3

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MCA III Year, I Semester

Sl. Topics in OU Modules and sub Lecturer Books


Remarks
No. Syllabus Modules No. Referred
Activity Concepts, types of L22 T1-Ch.19
Diagram States, Branching, T3-Ch.3
Forking & Joining,
Swimlanes, Object L23 T1-Ch.19
Flow T3-Ch.3
Advanced Events and Signals, L24 T1-Ch.20
Behavioral Kinds of events, T3-Ch.3
Modeling State Machines, History L 25, L26 T1-Ch.21
of States. Sub states T3-Ch.3
Process and Threads L27 T1-Ch.22
T3-Ch.3
Time And Space L28 T1-Ch.23
T3-Ch.3
State Chart Diagrams L29 T1-Ch.24
and components T3-Ch.3
UNIT-III
3 Architectural Artifacts, Kinds of L30 T1-Ch.25
Modeling Artifacts, Diagram T3 -Ch.3
Deployments, Nodes, L31 T1-Ch.26
Organizing Nodes, T3-Ch.3
Diagram
Collaborations L32 T1-Ch.27
T3-Ch.3
Patterns and L33 T1-Ch.28
Frameworks, T3-Ch.3,4
Mechanisms
Component Diagram L34 T1-Ch.29
T3-Ch.3
Deployment Diagram L35 T1-Ch.30
T3-Ch.3
System and Modules, L36, L37 T1-Ch.31
Views, Trace. T3-Ch.3
UNIT-IV
4 Unified Software Unified Process is Use L38 T2-Ch.1
Development Case Driven, T3-Ch.3,5
Process Architecture Centric,
Iterative and
Incremental
The life of the unified L39 T2-Ch.1
process, Phases and T3-Ch.4
cycle
People, Project, Product L40 T2-Ch.2
and process in software T3-Ch.4
Development
Product and his models L41 T2-Ch.2
T3-Ch.4
Process Directs Projects L42 T2-Ch.2
and workflow T3-Ch.4

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MCA III Year, I Semester

Topics in
Sl. Lecturer Books
OU Modules and sub Modules Remarks
No. No. Referred
Syllabus
Use Cases Driven Process, L 43, L44 T2-Ch.3
Capture the value Adding T3-Ch.4
Requirements, Analysis
Model.
Architecture Centric Process L45 T2-Ch.4
– Need, Steps to an T3-Ch.4
Architecture and
Description
Iterative and incremental L46 T2-Ch.5
process T3-Ch.4
UNIT-V
5 The Core Requirements Capture L 47 T2-Ch.6
Workflows T3-Ch.4,5
Capturing the requirements L48 T2-Ch.7
as use case. T3-Ch.4
Analysis and Design, L49 T2-Ch.8
Analysis in the software T3-Ch.5
Life Cycle
Artifacts, Workers and L 50 T2-Ch.8
workflow analysis T3-Ch.5
Role of Design Software L51 T2-Ch.9
Life Cycle and workflow, T3-Ch.5
Artifacts
Implementation, the role of L52 T2-Ch.10
implementation in the T3-Ch.5
software life cycle.
Testing in the software life L53 T2-Ch.11
cycle. T3-Ch.5

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MCA III Year, I Semester

5.3.12 TUTORIAL PLAN

Tutorial Unit Topic Salient topics to be discussed


No. No.
T1 I Class Diagrams Modeling simple Collaborations and logical
database schema
T2 Relationships Modeling Simple Dependencies and
Structural Relationships

T3 Interfaces Modeling the Seams in a system and Static


and Dynamic Types
T4 Packages Modeling Groups of Elements and
Architectural Views
T5 II Use Case Diagrams Modeling the context and Requirements of
a System, Forward and Reverse
Engineering
T6 Interaction Diagrams Modeling Flows of Control by Time
Ordering and Organization
T7 Activity Diagrams Modeling a Workflow and Operation
T8 State chart Diagrams Modeling reactive objects
T9 III Component Diagrams Modeling Source Code , Executable
Release, Physical Database and Adaptable
Systems
T10 Deployment Diagrams Modeling an embedded System, Cient /
Server System, Fully Distributed System.
T11 Collaborations Modeling the Realization of a Use Case and
Realization of an Operation
T12 Components Modeling Executables and Libraries,
Modeling Tables, Files and Documents and
an API.
T13 IV Four Ps People , Project, Product and Process
T14 Requirements Workflow of capturing the requirements as
use cases.
T15 Architecture Centric Steps to an architecture and architecture
Process description.
T16 Iterative an Need for iterative and incremental
incremental process development
T17 V Activity Workflow Analysis, Design, Implementation, Test
T18 Analysis and Design Role, Artifacts, Workers, Workflow
T19 Implementation Implementation model, Component
,Subsystem, Interfaces, Architecture
Description, Integration Build Plan.
T20 Test Test Model, Test Case, Test Procedure, Test
Component, Plan Test, Defect, Evaluate
Test

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MCA III Year, I Semester

5.3.13 QUESTION BANK

UNIT -I

1. i. Describe the building blocks of UML. (July 12)


ii. Briefly explain the four principles of modeling.

2. i. Explain about interfaces in UML. (July 12)


ii. What is an instance? Describe how prototypical instances and concrete instances are modeled.

3. i. Discuss about modeling and its principles. (Feb 12)


ii. What is dependency relationship? Briefly describe the various stereotypes that apply to dependency
relationships among classes and objects in class diagram?

4. i. Discuss 9 kinds of diagrams in UML? (Feb 12)


ii. Draw a class diagram to model the following
A university consists of a number of colleges.
A college offers number of courses.
Each course consists of number of students.
A college also has teaching staff and non-teaching staff

5. i. What is a model explain importance of modeling. (May 11)


ii. Describe the various kinds of building blocks of uml?

6. i. Briefly explain the following relationships with uml notational. (May 11)
(i) Dependency (ii) Generalization (iii) Association (iv) Aggregations
ii. Discuss in detail about interfaces, roles, packages

7. i. Explain the THINGS in the building blocks of UML. (Dec 10)


ii. list and explain the various types of relationships.

8. Explain in detail about interfaces their types and roles with suitable examples (Dec 10)

9. Discuss in detail about the structural and behavioural diagrams in the UML. (July 10)

10. i Write otes on Classifiers,Visibility and Scope with suitable examples.


ii Explain the stereotypes in a Generalization Relationship. (July 10)

11. i Briefly explain about Modeling.


ii Discuss about Interfaces,Types and Roles. (Dec 09)

12. i Explain about Packages and instances.


ii Discuss about class diagrams and Objectdiagrams with examples. (Dec 09)

13. Explain the building blocks of the uml with example. (May 09)

14. i. Discuss in detail about interfaces,roles ad packages. (May 09)


ii. With the help of example, explain various advanced relationships I uml?

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MCA III Year, I Semester

15. i. What is modeling? Discuss any four principles of modeling


ii. Discuss the following concepts of unit of:
(a) interface (b) collaboration (c) Active classes.
iii. Define the following terms.
(a) Multiplicity (b) Role (c) Aggregation. (Dec 08)

16. i. Discuss the concept of stereotypes and tagged values with the help of an example.
ii. Explain in brief the following dependency relationships. ((())
(a) bind (b) desire (c) friend. (Dec 08)

UNIT - II

1. i. Draw usecase diagram for a library information system of a college.state your assumptions. (July 12)
ii. Explain the steps involved in modeling the requirements of system?

2. i. Explain about interaction diagrams with examples. (July 12)


ii. Write short notes on activity diagrams and state machines.

3. i. Explain the concept of use cases and use case diagrams in detail with suitable examples? (Feb 12)
ii. List of differences between the 2 kinds of interaction diagrams?

4. i. What are events? Discuss various types of events? (Feb 12)


ii. What are active classes? Briefly describe the standard stereotypes that apply to active classes?

5. i. How to model a context of a system. (May 11)


ii. Explain about interaction diagrams with example.

6. i. What is transition? Explain the parts of of transition with an example. (May 11)
ii. Explain how to model IPC using processes and threads.

7. Discuss the concepts of use cases and use case diagrams in detail. (Dec 10)

8. i. Define and explain various types of events. (Dec 10)


ii. Explain the concepts of activity diagrams.

9. Give a detailed analysis of Bak ATM System through use case diagrams. (July 10)

10. i. Describe the Modeling of Flow of cotrol by Time Orderig with a example.
ii. Explain the Modeling of Iterprocess Commuication. (July 10)

11. i Discuss about State Machines.


ii. Explain about Active classes,Processes and Threads. (Dec 09)

12. i Discuss about Interaction diagrams with suitable examples. (Dec 09)
ii. Write notes on events and signals.

13. i. Describe the steps invovled in modellinng and interaction diagra. (May 09)
ii. Explain the steps invoved in forward and reverse egineering.

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MCA III Year, I Semester

14. i. Define an event Describe various types of events.


ii. What is tratition.explain the parts of transition. (May 09)

15. Discuss the contents and common uses of use case diagrams. (Dec 08)

16. What is an activity diagram? Discuss the following concepts related to them
(a) Activity states (b) Branching (c) Swim lanes (d) Object flow. (Dec 08)

UNIT – III

1. i. Explain about the structural and behavioural aspects of collaborations. (July 12)
ii. Explain about deployment diagrams.

2. i. Write short notes on patterns and frameworks. (July 12)


ii. Explain about systems and sub systems with suitable examples.

3. i. What are component diagrams and briefly describe the common uses of component diagram? (Feb 12)
ii. Explain about deployment diagrams with examples?

4. i. Describe the modeling of realization of use case? (Feb 12)


ii. How to model design patterns?

5. i. Write about different componetnts and explain std stereotyped that apply to components. (May 11)
ii. Explain how to model desing patterns using patterns.

6. i. Discuss mechanisms and frame works in detail. (May 11)


ii. Explain about deployment diagrams

7. i. Write short notes on component diagams. (Dec 10)


ii. Define collabration and discuss the structural and behaviourail aspects.

8. i. Explain about systems and subsystems. (Dec 10)


ii. Write short notes on patterns,mechanisms and frame works.

9. i. Dicuss the types of componenets and the standad stereotypes correspoding to componets.
ii. Explian about the deployment diagrams. (Jul-10)

10. i. Decribe the Modeling of Realization of a use case.


ii. Explai about the structural and behavioural aspects of collaborations. (Jul-10)

11. What are Collaborations?Discuss the structural and behavioural aspects in detail. (Dec-09)

12. i. Discuss about Patterns and Frameworks.


ii. Write notes on Systems and Models. (Dec-09)

13. i. Compare compoents and interfaces. (May 09)


ii. Explain the steps invovled in modelling the realisation of usecase.

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MCA III Year, I Semester

14. i. Give the techniques of modelling design patterns. ( May 09)


ii. discuss the contents ad uses of deployment diagram

15. i. Prepare a class diagram for the object diagram given below: (Dec 08)

India:Country India:Country Pakistan:Country


Name=”India” Name=”India” Name=”Pakistan”
ii. Consider the following example of writing a book. Author writes a book chapter by chapter. Reviewer
reviews the chapters and gives the feedback. Author modifies the chapter based on the feedback. The
typesetter does the formatting etc. and the printer prints the book.
Draw an activity diagram using swim lanes.

16. i. List and explain the two common uses of interaction diagrams.
ii. Write a state machine in unit? Discuss the various parts of a state and transition. (Dec 08)

UNIT - IV

1. i. Explain the structure of unified software process. (July 12)


ii. Distinguish between activity and workflow.

2. i. Explain about ‘Use case driven process”. (July 12)


ii. Why iterative and incremental development?

3. Explain about the unified software process in detail? (Feb 12)

4. Explain the four P’s:people,project,product and process in detail? (Feb 12)

5. Discuss in detail the concept of unified softwared development process with help of diagrams. (May 11)

6. Explain the use case driven development in detail. (May 11)

7. i. Discuss about usecase driven process. (Dec 10)


ii. How the unified process is iterative ad incremenntal.

8. i. Explain about the concepts of work flows. (Dec 10)


ii. what is business modellling

9. Discuss in detail about the Uified software development process. (Jul-10)

10. i. Explain the activities of the Business Workflow.


ii. Discuss the work flow of Project Management. (Jul-10)

11. i Write notes on Four P’s in the software development.


ii. Explain the Architecture Centric Concept of the Unified Process. (Dec-09)

12. Discuss the Unified Software Development Process(USDP) in detail wih a neat diagram (Dec-09)

78
MCA III Year, I Semester

13. i. explain the structure of unified software process. (May 09)


ii. Discuss the conntents and uses of deployment diagrams.

14. i. explain the business modelling for undestanding the system context. (May 09)
ii. give the overview of requirements captue.

15. Discuss in detail the concept of Unified Software Development Process(USDP) with the help of a diagram.
(Dec 08)
16. What is a Use case driven process”? How is it different from “Architecture-centric process?
(Dec 08)

UNIT - V

1. i. How business model is suseful to understand system context, explain. (July 12)
ii. Give the artifacts involved when capturing requirements as usecases.

2. i. Differentiate between usecase model and the analysis model. (July 12)
ii. Briefly describe the responsibilities of a test designer in the testing workflow.

3. i. Explain hoe to capture the requirements as usecases? (Feb 12)


ii. What is design in unified process?Explain the mechanisms of design with an examples?

4. i. Discuss the workflow in implementation, including the participating workers and their activities.(Feb 12)
ii. What is the importance of testing?

5. i. Write about how requirements are captured as use case. (May 11)
ii. Explain in detail artifcts and workers of analysis model.

6. i. Write about differences between usecase model and analysis model. (May 11)
ii. Explain in detail workers and artifacts involved in testing.

7. i. Discuss the artifacts of analysis workflow. (Dec 10)


ii. Write notes on the workers I design workflow.

8. i. Write note on artifact of implementation workflow. (Dec 10)


ii. Discuss the activity of workes of test workflow

9. i. Discuss the Artifacts of the Desig Workflow.


ii. Write note on the worker in the Analysis Workflow. (Jul-10)

10. i. Discuss about the Artifacts of the Test Workflow.


ii. Explai the activities of the Implementation Workflow. (Jul-10)

11. Explin the workflow of Requirements Capture in detail. (Dec-09)

12. i. Explain the activities of the Implementation workflow.


ii. What is purpose of Design Work flow ? (Dec-09)

79
MCA III Year, I Semester

13. i. Explain about the activity of analysing a class in analysis workflow.


ii. Give the structure of implementation model. (May 09)

14. i. Explain about the artificats invovled in test phase.


ii Discuss about change management. (May 09)

15. i. Discuss with examples the unit facts associated with testing. (Dec 08)
ii. Explain the participating workers and their activities in the analysis phase.

16. Write short notes on the following:


i. Requirements capture. ii.Responsibilities of workers in design phase (Dec 08)

80
MCA III Year, I Semester

5. SUBJECT DETAILS

5.4 ELECTRONIC COMMERCE

5.4.1 Objectives and Relevance

5.4.2 Scope

5.4.3 Prerequisites

5.4.4 Syllabus - O.U.

5.4.5 Suggested Books

5.4.6 Websites

5.4.7 Experts’ Details

5.4.8 Journals

5.4.9 Findings and Developments

5.4.10 Students Seminar Topics

5.4.11 Session Plan

5.4.12 Tutorial Plan

5.4.13 Question Bank

81
MCA III Year, I Semester

5.4.1 OBJECTIVESAND RELEVANCE


Business E-Commerce Program is offered to focus on the deployment of Internet Technology to enhance
the business capabilities of the organizations. It will educate with (a) A broad understanding of business
and (b) A thorough understanding of the deployment of IT to create business opportunities.
5.4.2 SCOPE
The syllabus is designed in such a way that students can prepare for E-commerce careers, such as E-
commerce developers, E-Commerce analyst and consultant with E-Commerce happening in every industry
graduates will have a wide selection of employment.
5.4.3 PRE-REQUISITES
One should have:
1. Awareness of Internet technologies
2. Significant access to the web and e-mail
3. Knowledge of basic business process.
5.4.4 SYLLABUS - O.U.
UNIT - I
OBJECTIVE
We begin by introducing the concept of E-commerce and its various consumer and organizational applica-
tions.
SYLLABUS
Electronic commerce- frame-work, E-com and media Convergemces, anatomy of E-commerce applications,
E-commerce consumer applications, E-commerce organization applications.
Consumer oriented electronic commerce- mercantile process models, Mercantile Process Models, Cercantile
Models from the Consumres’s Persperctive, Mercantile Models from the Merchants’s Perspective.
UNIT - I I
OBJECTIVE
We now look at one of the application of E-commerce ie, consumer – oriented E-commerce and to implement
this we require online electronic payment systems.

SYLLABUS
Electronic payment systems, digital token-based, smart cards, credit cards, risks in electronic payment
systems Digital Token Based Electronic paymen systems, credit card based electronic payment systems,
risk and electronic payment systems, Designing Electronic Payment Systems

UNIT - I I I
OBJECTIVE
Here we will discuss another broad applications of E-commerce.
1. Inter-Organizational E-commerce whose implementation is based on the technology, protocols and stan-
dards related to Electronic Data Interchange.
2. Intra – Organizational E-commerce
SYLLABUS
Consumer Inter organizational commerce- EDI, Electronic data interchange, EDI applications in business,
EDI ;ega;. security and privacy issues, EDI and Electronic commerce
EDI Implementation MIME, value added networks.Standardization and EDI EDI s/w implementation, EDI
envolope for message transport, value-added netwroks, internet-based EDI
Inter organizational commerce- work flow automation, customization and internal commerce, supply chain
management

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MCA III Year, I Semester

UNIT - IV
OBJECTIVE
Here we learn about the corporate digital libraries and data warehouse which help us to implement the Intra-
organizational E-commerce, also examine the emerging changes in marketing and advertising that have
been facilitated by technology.
SYLLABUS
Corporate digital library-Dimensions of Internal electronic commerce systems, types of digital documents.
Issue ;behind Document infrastructure, corporate data warehouse.
Advertising and marketing on the internet-Information based ;marketing, advertising on interne, on-line
marketing process, market research.

UNIT - V
OBJECTIVE
This unit discusses the development and implementation of E-commerce interfaces, namely interactive
catalogs, directories and information search and retrieval methods.

SYLLABUS
Consumer search and resource discovery-Search and resource discovery paradigms, information search
;and retrieval, electronic commerce catalogues or directories, information filtering, consumer-data interface3:
Emerging tools.
Multimedia and Digial Video-Key multimedia concepts, digital video and electronic commerce, Desktop
video processing, Desktop video conferencing.

5.4.5. SUGGESTED BOOKS

TEXT BOOKS
T1. Ravi Kalakota & A.B. Whintson – “Frontiers of Electronic Commerce” Pearson Education, India 1999.
T2. Daniel Minoli,Emma Minoli: “Web Commerce Technology Handbook” Tata McGraw Hill 2007.

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1. Electronic Commerce, Greenstein and Feinmas
R2. Electronic Commerce – A Managerial Perspective, Efraim Turban, Jae Lee, David king and H. Michael Ching

5.4.6 WEBSITES
1. www.cyberwebglobal.com
2. www.techtutorials.com
3. www.online-commerce.com
4. www.dci.in
5. www.the webbrains.com
6. www.indianinfo.com

5.4.7 EXPERTS’ DETAILS

INTERNATIONAL
1. Prof. Grammati Pantziou,
Development of Informatics,
Technological Educational Institution of Athens Ag.
Spyridonos St.12210, Athens, Greece.
Email : Pantziou@teiath.gr

83
MCA III Year, I Semester

2. Dr. Damianos Gavalas,


Depatarment of Cultural Technology and Communication University of Aegean,
Trikoupi and Faibis St, M81100, Mytilene, Greece
Email : Dgavalas @aegean.gr

3. Dr. Charalampos Konstantopoulos,


Research Academic Computer Technology Institute,
10 Dabaki St, 11526, Athens, Greece
Email : constant @ct.gr

NATIONAL
1. Mr. S.V. Raghuram
IIT Madras,
Ph: 91-44-2257-4359
Email:svr@cs.iitm.ernet.in

2. Mr. Ashwin Gumaste


IIT Bombay
Ph: 91-22-2576-7911
Email: ashwin@cse.iitb.ac.in

3. Mr. Sridhar Iyer


IIT Bombay
Ph: 91-22-2576-7905
Email: sri@it.iitb.ac.in

4. Mr. Bernard Memezes


IIT Bombay
Ph: 91-22-2576-7906
Email: Bernard@it.iitb.ac.in

REGIONAL
1. Dr.(Smt) Valli Kumari
Professor, Dept of CS & System Engineering
Andhra University
Email : valli_kumari @rediffmail.com
Ph : +91 9440065256

2. Prof. Allam Appa Rao


Pricipal of AU College of Engineering
Andhra University
Email : allamapparao@hotmail.com
Ph : +0891-2844858

5.4.8 JOURNALS

INTERNATIONAL
1. International Journal of E.C – American Marketing (IJEC)
2. HCI Research Issues in E-Commerce.

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MCA III Year, I Semester

NATIONAL
1. Journal of Electronic Commerce
2. Journal of Electronic Commerce Research and Current issue
3. National Journal Group Resources on BNET
4. IKO- Electronics Commerce

5.4.9 FINDINGS AND DEVELOPMENTS

1. “ Electronic Commerce In Pervasive Environments” , Research Academic Computer Technology Institute,


1999
2. “Electronic Commerce: Structure and issues” , Vladimir Zwass, Volume 1,Fall on 1996. www.gvsu.edu

5.4.10 STUDENTS SEMINAR TOPICS

1. Model for the application serving system.


2. Application – TIER workload characterization
3. Server Provisioning
4. Determining on optional number of servers to deploy.
5. Electronic Commerce and Emerging Technologies
6. Quality Management in E-Commerce

5.4.11 SESSION PLAN

Sl. Topics of OU Letter Books


Modules & Sub Modules Remarks
No. Syllabus No. Referred
UNIT - I
1. Electronic Introduction to Electronic Commerce L1 T1-Ch.1.1
Commerce T2-Ch.1
Pillars of E-commerce L2 T2-Ch.1
Anatomy of E-Commerce L3 T1-Ch.1.3
Applications L4 T1-Ch.1.3
Frame-work L5 T1-Ch.1.4
E-Commerce Consumer application L6 T1-Ch.1.4
E-Commerce organization L7,L8 T1-Ch.1.5
application
Consumer Oriented E-Commerce L9,L10 T1-Ch.7.1
Merchantile process models L11 T1-Ch.7.2

UNIT - II
2. Electronic Introduction to Electronic payment L12 T1-Ch.8.1
Payment systems T2-Ch.8.1
System : Types of Electronic payment systems L13 T1-Ch.8.1
T2-Ch.8.1

85
MCA III Year, I Semester

Sl. Topics of OU Letter


Modules and Sub Modules Books Referred Remarks
No. Syllabus No.
Digit-token based Electronic L14,L15 T1-Ch.8.3
payment systems T2-Ch.8.6
Smart cards and Electronic L16 T1-Ch.8.3
payment systems T2-Ch.8.6
e-cash in Electronic payment L17 T1-Ch.8.3
systems T2-Ch.8.6
Credit cards L18 T1-Ch.8.4
Charge Cards, Debit Cards L19 T1-Ch.8.4
Risks in Electronic payment L20,L21 T1-Ch.8.5
UNIT-III
3 Electronic Data Interchange L22 T1-Ch.9.1
Inter EDI Applications in Business L23 R2-Ch.8
organizational EDI : Legal, Security and L24 T1-Ch.9.3
Commerce & EDI Privacy Issues
EDI and Electronic Commerce L25 T1-Ch.9.4
Standardization and EDI L26 T1-Ch.10.1
R1-Ch.4
EDI EDI software Implementation L27 T1-Ch.10.2
Implementation R1-Ch.4
EDI Envelop for Message L28 T1-Ch.10.3
Transport R1-Ch.4
Value-Added Networks (VANs) L29,30 T1-Ch.10.4
Intra Work flow automation L31 T1-Ch.11.3
Organizational Customizations Internal L32 T1-Ch.11.4
Commerce Commerce
Supply chain management L33,34 T1-Ch.11.5
UNIT-IV
4 Corporate digital Document library L35 T1-Ch.12.2
library Digital document types L36,37 T1-Ch.12.3
Corporate data warehouses L38,39 T1-Ch.12.5
Information based marketing L40 T1-Ch.13.1
R2-Ch.13
Advertising & Advertising on L41 T1-Ch.13.2
Marketing Internet R1-Ch.12
T2-Ch.4.3
On-line marketing L42 T1-Ch.13.3
Process market R1-Ch.12
Research R2-Ch.16
UNIT-V
5 Consumer Search Information search and retrieval L43 T1-Ch.14.2
and Resource Commerce catalogues L44, 45 T1-Ch.14.3
discovery Information filtering L46 T1-Ch.14.4
Key multimedia concepts L47 T1-Ch.18.1
T3-Ch.13
Multimedia Digital Video and Electronic L48 T1-Ch.18.2
commerce
Desktop video processing L49 T1-Ch.18.3
Desktop Video conferencing L50,51 T1-Ch.18.4

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MCA III Year, I Semester

5.4.12 TUTORIAL PLAN

Tutorial Unit Topic Salient topics to be discussed


No. No.
T1 I E-commerce frame work Consumer applications

T2 E-commerce frame work Organizational applications

T3 Consumer oriented E-commerce Mercantile process model

T4 E-commerce frame work Development of E-commerce

T5 II E-Payment Systems History & development of E-payment


System
T6 E-Payment Systems Real time operations of bank payment
systems
T7 E-Payment Systems E-trading and stock market payment
system
T8 E-Payment Systems Smart cards

T9 III EDI Details of standards of EDI using


examples
T10 EDI Automated clearing house

T11 EDI Message transfer

T12 EDI Value added networks

T13 IV Inter organizational commerce OLAP & multidimensional database

T14 Inter organizational commerce Digital documents

T15 Inter organizational commerce Data ware housing

T16 Inter organizational commerce Advertising and marketing

T17 V Data resource Electronic directories real time examples


T18 Data resource Search engines, spiders, wanderers.

T19 Multimedia Disk array, MPEG, JPEG

T20 Multimedia Video conferencing

87
MCA III Year, I Semester

5.4.13 QUESTION BANK

UNIT - I

1. Explain generic framework for e-commerce with neat diagram. (July 12)

2. explain mercantile models from the consumers perspective. (July 12)

3. i Explain in detail about E-commerce framework (Feb 12)


ii Explain about E-commerce consumer applications

4. i Discuss various stages in commerce oriented Merchantail process model (Feb 12)
ii Explain inventory management and organizational applications in E-commerce

5. Explain Mercantile process models from Merchants perspective (Aug 11)

6. i. Discuss about the pressures influencing business. (Aug 11)


ii. Explain about the video servers and electronic commerce

7. Define E-commerce. Explain the E-Commerce framework (May 11)

8. Explain Mercantile process model from Consumer Perspective. (May 11)

9. Explain the anatomy of E-Commerce application (Jan 11)

10. Explain Mercantile Process models from Merchants perspective (Jan 11)

11. i. Discuss about the pressures influencing business.


ii. Explain about the Video Servers and Electronic Commerce. (July 10)

12. i. Describe the desirable characteristics of an electronic market place.


ii. Explain the simplified on-line mercantile model. (July 10)

13. i. Write about Client-ServerArchitecture in Electronic Commerce.


ii. Discribe the functions of Supply Chain Management. (Dec 09)

14. i. Explain about Mercantile Transactions using credit cards.


ii. Describe the Order Management Cycle(OMC) in e-commerce. (Dec 09)

15. i. Describe the E-commerce frame work.


ii. Discuss various E-commerce Applications. (May 09)

16. i. Explain about consumer oriented E-commerce.


ii. Discuss merchantile process models. (May 09)

17. i. Explain the role of Internet in E-commerce.


ii. What is video on demand. (Dec 08)

18 i. Discuss the various stages in Consumer-Oriented mercantile Process model.


ii. What is post sales service? (Dec 08)

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UNIT - II

1. Define smart card.how many types of smart cards do we have.explain them. (July 12)

2. Explain the working of e-cheque.give its advantages. (July 12)

3. Discuss Digital Token based electronic payment system (Feb 12)

4. i Explain Smart cards and electronic payment systems


ii How are Credit cards useful in e-commerce (Feb 12)

5. Write about (Aug 11)


i. Electronic purse and debit cards
ii Relationship-Based smart cards

6. i. List and Explain 3 basic categories of credit card payment in online Network. (Aug 11)
ii Discuss about risks in Electronic payment system.

7. Explain the following Electronic payment system (May 11)


i. Smart cards
ii Credit cards

8. Explain he advantages and disadvantages of Electronic payment systems (May 11)

9. What is e-cash? Give the properties of e-cash. Explain the working of e-cash (Jan 11)

10. What is e-chaque? Explain the working of e-cheque and give its advantages (Jan 11)

11. i. Explain about digital token-based electronic payment systems.


ii. Briefly explain about electronic checks. (July 10)

12. i. List and explain the 3 basic categories of credit card payment on on-line networks.
ii. Discuss the 6-step process of OTPPs. (July 10)
13. i. List and explain the types of electronic tokens.
ii. Write notes on electronic cash(e-cash). (Dec 09)

14. i. Describe the processing of payments using encrypted credit cards. (Dec 09)
ii. Describe the factors that must be addressed before designing a new electronic payment system.

15. Explain in detail about different Electronic payment systems. (May 09)

16. i. Describe the risks in Electronic payment systems.


ii. Discuss the security measures in Electronic payment systems. (May 09)

17. i. What are digital tokens?Give a classification of digital tokens.


ii. How are Credit cards useful in e-commerce? (Dec 08)

18. i. Discuss the various risks involved in electronic payment systems.


ii. What is an e-purse? (Dec 08)

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UNIT - III

1. Define electronic data interchange.explain EDI layered architecture. (July 12)

2. i. What is MIME?give its advantages and disadvantages. (July 12)


ii. What factors make internet useful for EDI.

3. Define EDI . Discuss about EDI software implementation (Feb 12)

4. Explain about work flow automation and coordination (Feb 12)

5. i. Differentiate between EDI and E-mail


ii Explain EDI in action (Aug 11)

6. i Write about Supply Chain Managemen


ii Discuss in detail VAN (Aug 11)

7. Define EDI. Give the EDI architecture and differentiate between EDI and EFT (May 11)

8. Explain the supply chain management? (May 11)

9. What is VAN? Give function of Third party VAN along with neat diagram (Jan 11)

10. Explain supply chain management? (Jan 11)

11. i. Describe the layered architecture of EDI.


ii. Explain the tangible benefits of EDI. (July 10)

12. Discuss in detail about Value Added Networks (VANS) and VAN service providers. (July 10)

13 i. Discuss about the information flow with EDI.


ii. Write notes on Internet-Based EDI with the factors that make the internet useful for EDI. (Dec 09)

14 i. Discuss in detail about push-based supply chain and pull-based supply chain. (Dec 09)
ii. Write notes on efficient Customer Response (ECR)

15 i. Explain the EDI Architecture and its implementation.


ii. Discuss about Internet based EDI. (May 09)

16. i. Explain about workflow and its Automation?


ii. Write notes on supply chain management? (May 09)

17. i. Define an EDI.Explain the role of EDI in International trade.


ii. Differentiate between EDI and E-mail. (Dec 08)

18. i. What is Intra-organization commerce?Discuss the various issues concerned here.


ii. What is e-SCM? (Dec 08)

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UNIT - IV

1. Define digital documents and explain the types of digital documents. (July 12)

2. Explain the following online-advertising paradigms. (July 12)


(a)push-based advertising. (b)pull based advertising.

3. i Discuss about Document library. (Feb 12)


ii List Different Digital Document types and their applications

4. Explain bout advertising on internet. (Feb 12)

5. Explain in detail about the issues behind Document infrastructure. (Aug 11)

6. i. Write about Active or pushband advertising. (Aug 11)


ii Write about Passive or pullbased advertising.

7. Explain the types of Digital Document (May 11)

8. Explain the data warhouse architecture with diagram. (May 11)

9. Explain the Active or pushband advertising (Jan 11)

10. Explain Market Research in 3 phases (Jan 11)

11. Explain in detail about the issues behind Document Infrastructure. (July 10)

12. Explain about advertising on the internet in detail. (July 10)

13. Explain the types of digital documents in detail. (Dec 09)

14. Discuss about the new age of Information-Based marketing in detail. (Dec 09)

15. i. Write about Advertising on Internet?


ii. Discuss about Digital Document types? (May 09)

16. i. What is a corporate Data Warehouse?Discuss.


ii. Discuss about Information based marketing? May 09)

17. i. Discuss various on line advertising paradigms.


ii. Define e-marketing. (Dec 08)

18. i. Explain the role of Corporate Data Warehouses in Organisations.


ii. What is a Digital Document?What are the various types of Digital Documents? (Dec 08)

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UNIT - V

1. Explain information filtering and information search and retrieval. (July 12)

2. Explain digital video or a core element with the help of neat diagram. (July 12)

3. Explain about information Search and retrieval (Feb 12)

4. Explain Digital video and E-commerce (Feb 12)

5. i Briefly discuss about WAIS. (Aug 11)


ii Briefly discuss mail filtering agents and news filtering agents

6. i. Write about (Aug 11)


i. Desktop Video processing
ii Desktop Video Conferencing

7. Write about (May 11)


i. Compression techniques
ii. Digital Video as a Cou element

8. Explain two information Search and resource discovery Paradigms (May 11)

9. Explain any two Search and Resource Discovery Paradigms. (Jan 11)

10. Write about (Jan 11)


i. Desktop Video Processing
ii. Desktop Video Conferencing

11. i. Briefly discuss about WAIS.


ii. Discuss about white pages through X.500 and the features offered by X.500. (July 10)

12 i. Write note on Multimedia Data Compression.


ii. List and explain the types of Desktop Video Conferencing. (July 10)

13. i. Write notes on search and resource discovery paradigms.


ii. Briefly discuss about electronic yellow pages. (Dec 09)

14. i. Explain about symmetric multiprocessing.


ii. Discuss about Desktop Video Conferencing. (Dec 09)

15. i. Write notes on Information filtering


ii. Explain about commerce catalogues. (May 09)
16. i. Discuss the key multimedia concepts.
ii. Write notes on Desktop Video conferencing. (May 09)
17. i. Discuss about Wide Area Information Service Engine(WAIS).
ii. What is information filtering? (Dec 08)
18. i. Explain Digital Video.
ii. Discuss about Desktop Video Conference and its uses. (Dec 08)

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5. SUBJECT DETAILS

5. 5 SOFTWARE REUSE TECHNIQUES

5.5.1 Objectives and Relevance

5.5.2 Scope

5.5.3 Prerequisites

5.5.4 Syllabus - O.U.

5.5.5 Suggested Books

5.5.6 Websites

5.5.7 Experts’ Details

5.5.8 Journals

5.5.9 Findings and Developments

5.5.10 Student Seminar Topics

5.5.11 Session Plan

5.5.12 Tutorial Plan

5.5.13 Question Bank

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5.5.1 OBJECTIVES & RELEVANCE

The main objectives of Software Reuse Techniques are as follows:


To explain the benefits of software reuse and some reuse problems
To discuss different ways of implementing software reuse
To explain how reusable concepts can be represented as patterns embedded in program generators
To discuss the development of software product lines

5.5.2 SCOPE

The reuse of good practices and well proven techniques has always been central to the various disciplines
of engineering. In fact it is no surprise that reuse is one of the core ideas in software engineering.

5.5.3 PREREQUISITES

Students should have knowledge of fundamentals of computer science and Software Engineering concepts
in general and unified modeling language and Java in particular.

5.5.4 SYLLABUS – O.U

UNIT I
OBJECTIVE
It describes about the introductory concepts of the reuse driven Software Engineering Business and
various UML Components like use case ,object etc.
The unit introduces the subject by illustration the diversity of application areas and explore the basic feature of
SYLLABUS
Software reuse sucess factors, Reuse driven software engineering business, Object oriented software
engineering, Applications and Component subsystems, Use case components and Object components.

UNIT II
OBJECTIVE
It gives the clear concepts of different design patterns which focus more on reuse of recurring architectural
design themes, while frameworks focus on detailed design and implementation.

SYLLABUS
Design Patterns-Introduction.
Creational Patterns-Factory, Factory method, Abstract factory, Singleton, Builder Prototype.

UNIT -III
OBJECTIVE
It describes about the structural patterns which explains how classes and objects can be combined to
form larger structures
Behavioral Patterns are those patterns that are most specifically concerned with communication between
objects.

SYLLABUS
Structural Patterns-Adapter, Bridge, Composite, Decorator, Facasde, Flyweight, Proxy.
Behavioral Patterns-Chain of Responsibility, Command, Interpreter,

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MCA III Year I Semster

UNIT - IV
OBJECTIVE
This Unit discuss some more Behavioral patterns like Iterator, mediator etc as well as other Design patterns
like wholepart,master-slave etc.

SYLLABUS
Behavioral Patterns Iterator, Mediator, Memento, Observer, State, Strategy, Template, Visitor
Other design patterns-Wholepart, Masterslave, View handler, Forwarder-receiver, Client-dispatcher-server,
Publisher-subscriber.

UNIT V
OBJECTIVE
This Unit discusses various Architectural Patterns which express fundamental structural organization
schemas for software systems. They provide a set of predefined subsystems, specify their responsibilities,
and include rules and guidelines for organizing the relationships between them.

SYLLABUS
Architectural Patterns-Layers, Pipes and Filters, Blackboard, Broker, Model-view controller, Presentation-
abstraction-control, Micro kernel, Reflection.

5.5.5 SUGGESTED BOOKS

TEXT BOOKS
T1 Ivar Jacobson, Martin Griss, Patrick Jonsson-Software Reuse: Architecture, Process and Organization for
Business Success, Pearson Education, 2007.
T2 Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson, John Vissides-Design Patterns Elements in Reusable Object
Oriented Software, Pearson Education 2007.
T3 Frank Buchmann et al. – Pattern Oriented Software Architecture – Volume 1, Wiley, 2001.
T4 James W Cooper - Java Design Patterns, a tutotial , Addison 2000, Pearson Education

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Carma McClure Software Reuse Techniques: Adding Reuse to the System Development Process by
(Hardcover - Jan 1997)
R2 Eric Freeman, Head First Design Patterns.
R3 Eric Freeman, Elisabeth Freeman, and Bert Bates, First Edition October, 2004 : Software Reuse Techniques

5.5.6 WEBSITES

1. http://www.fluffycat.com/Java-Design-Patterns
2. http://www.allapplabs.com/java_design_patterns/structural_patterns.htm
3. www.exforsys.com/tutorials/csharp/structural-and-behavioral-design-patterns
4. www.vincehuston.org/dp/structural_rules.html
5. www.dcl.hpi.uni-potsdam.de/LV/Components04/VL4/03_Patterns-Structural.pdf

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5.5.7 EXPERTS’ DETAILS


INTERNATIONAL
1. Mr. Douglas Lea
Professor of Computer Science
State University of Newyork, Oswego
Email : dl@oswego.edu
Ph : 315-312-2688
2. Dr. Jeff Sutherland
Chief Technology officer, pattienkeeper, inc
Email : jeff.sutherland@computer.org
Phone : 617-987-0394

NATIONAL

1. Dr Philip T. Cox
Professor
Faculty of Computer Science
Dalhousie University
Email: pcox@cs.dal.ca
Phone: 902-494-6460
Website: http://users.cs.dal.ca/~pcox/

Address
Dr Philip T. Cox
Faculty of Computer Science
Dalhousie University
6050 University Avenue
Halifax, Nova Scotia
Canada B3H 1W5

2. Mr. Deepak B. Phatak


IIT Bangalore
Ph: 91-22-2576-7747
Email: dbp@it.iitb.ac.in

3. Prof. P.Krishna Reddy


IIIT, Gachibowli, Hyderabad
Email: pkredy ET iit.ac.in
Ph : 91-40-23001967/9 Ext: 131/322

4. Mr. R.K. Joshi


IIT Bangalore
Email: vkj@cse.iitb.ac.in
Ph: 91-22-2576-7730

REGIONAL
1. Dr. M.S. Prasad Babu
Andhra University
Email: dramsprasadbabu@yahoo.co.in
Ph: 91-891-2844862. 91-891-2755898.

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2. Mr. CH. Satyananda Reddy


Dept. of CS & System Engg.
Email: satyanand99@yahoo.com
Ph: 9866031661.

5.5.8 JOURNALS

INTERNATIONAL
1. IBM Application System/400 Technology Journal
2. Journal for Advances in Engineering Software
3. IBM Journal of R & D
4. International Journal of Document Analysis and Recognition

NATIONAL
1. An Object-oriented systems modeling method based on the Jackson Approach.
2. Theory and practice of object system

5.5.9 FINDINGS AND DEVELOPMENTS

1. A tangent subdivision scheme”, Evelyne Aanvaes, Adhemar Bultheel, PP: 340-355. ACM transactions on
Graphics. Vol-25, issue 2, April 2006.
2. “Forward Rasteriztion”, Voicu popeson, Paul Rosen PP: 375-411. ACM transaction on Graphics Vol.25,
issue2, April 2006.
3. “Accurate detection of symmetries in 3D shapes”, Aurelien Nertinet, lyril soler, Nicolas Holzschuch, Francois
X. Sillion – PP: 439-464.
4. “Salient geometric features for partial shape matching and similarity”, Ran Gal, Daniel Colen , PP130-150,
ACM transaction on Graphics Vol.25, issue 1, Jan 2006.

5.5.10 STUDENTS SEMINAR TOPICS

1. Role of Computer Graphics Designers: Past and Feature


2. Interactive Data visualization
3. 2D and 3D Animations
4. Graphics Design and Modern Technology
5. Algorithm Basic, Designing and Data Structures

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5.5.11 SESSION PLAN


Sl. Topics in OU Lecture Books
Modules and Sub modules Remarks
No. Syllabus No. Referred
UNIT – I
Software reuse is a simple idea. T1
A systematic approach makes T1
pragmatic reuse work L1
Software Reuse
1. Reuse requires changes in process T1
success factors
Reuse requires changes in organization T1
Adopt reuse systematically and T1
incrementally L2
It takes a set of principles T1
A reuse Business has business T1
Reuse-Driven characteristics
Software Architect components and Applications L3 T1
Engineering
2. Software engineering processes T1
Software Engineering is a team
T1
process
Software engineering is systematic
T1
model building L4
Objects unify the modeling process T1
Object-Oriented The Use Case model captures system
T1
Software requirements
3. Engineering T1
The analysis model shapes system
architecture
The design model defines the L5
T1
implementation
The implementation model is the code T1
4. Applications and Application developers can reuse T1
Component OOSE model components
subsystems Application families allow significant
T1
reuse
Group components into component L6
T1
system
Facades control access to component
T1
system internals
Facades and component systems are
T1
special kinds of packages
Component systems export components
T1
via facades
L7
Variability occurs at variation points T1
Use several kinds of variability
T1
mechanisms

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Topics in
Sl. Lecture Books
OU Modules and Sub modules Remarks
No. No. Referred
Syllabus
1 Structure the use case model to
T1
ensure component reuse L8
The use case model shapes the rest of
T1
the system
Use Case Reusing concrete or abstract actor T1
components and use case components
L9 T1
Expressing use case variability
Packaging and documenting use case T1
components
Object models define system T1
architecture and design
Reusing analysis and design T1
components L10
Object
components Expressing variability in object T1
model
components
Reusable analysis components T1

Sub system components group T1


Reusable design and implementation T1
Components. L11 T1
Packaging and documenting object
components and variants.
UNIT - II
2 Design Introduction
L12 T2
Patterns Creational Patterns
& Creational Factory Method L13 T2
Patterns Abstract Factory method L14 T2
Singleton & Builder L15 T2
Prototype L16 T2
UNIT – III
3 Adapters L17 T2
Bridges L18 T2
Composite L19 T2
Structural L20 T2
Patterns Decorator
Facets L21 T2

Fly-weight L22 T2
Proxy L23 T2
Behavioural Chain of responsibility ,Command L22 T2
Patterns Interpreter pattern L23 T2

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Sl. Topics in OU Books


Modules and Sub modules Lecturer No. Remarks
No. Syllabus Referred
UNIT - IV
T2
Iterator pattern L25
T2
Mediator, Memento L26
Behavioral
T2
Patterns Observer, State patterns L27
T2
Strategy pattern L28

T2
Template, Visitor patterns L29

4 Other Design T3
Whole part L30
Patterns
T3
Master-slave L31
T3
View handler L32
T3
Forwarder-receiver L33,L34
T3
Client-dispatcher-server L35,L36
T3
Publisher-subscriber L37
UNIT – V
5 Architectural
Layers L38,L39 T3
Patterns
Pipes & Filters L40,L41,L42 T3
Black board L43 T3
L44
Broker T3

Model-view controller L45 T3


T3
Presentation-control L46,L47
T3
Abstraction-Control L48
T3
Micro kernel L49
T3
Reflection L50

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5.5.12 Tutorial Plan

Tutorial Unit Topic Salient topics to be discussed


No. No.
T1 I Software Reuse success Components are fueling a revolution in
factors application development
T2 Reuse-Driven Software A reuse Business has business characteristics
Engineering is a
Business
T3 Object-Oriented Objects unify the modeling process
Software
Engineering
T4 Applications and Use several kinds of variability Mechanisms.
Component subsystems And Reuse variable components to build
application systems
T5 II Factory Method, Factory Method motivation, structure,
consequences, Implementation.
T6 Abstract Factory motivation, Structure,
Abstract Factory method Consequences, Implementation
T7 Builder Builder method intent ,motivation, Structure,
Consequences
T8 Builder Builder method Consequences

T9 III Implementation. Interpreter method intent,


interpreter motivation, Structure, Collaboration,
Consequences

T10 Adapter, Bridge Adapter method motivation, structure,


Consequences, Implementation
Bridge method intent ,motivation, Structure,
Consequences, Implementation
T11 Flyweight, Proxy Flyweight and Proxy motivation, Structure,
Consequences, Implementation
T12 Command ,Iterator Command method motivation, structure,
Consequences, Implementation
Iterator method Intent, motivation, structure,
Consequences, Implementation
T13 IV Observer Observer and Proxy motivation, Structure,
Consequences, Implementation
T14 Whole part Whole Part Example, Context, Problem,
Solution, Structure, Implementation
T15 Master-slave Master-slave Example, Context, Problem,
Solution , Structure, Implementation
T16 Master-slave Solution , Structure, Implementation of master-
slave
T17 V Layers Layers Example, Context, Problem, Solution ,
Structure, Implementation
T18 Pipes and Filters Pipes and Filters Example, Context, Problem,
Solution , Structure, Implementation
T19 Model-view controller Model-view controller Example, Context,
Problem, Solution , Structure, Implementation,
Dynamics
T20 Micro kernel Micro kernel Example, Context, Problem,
Solution , Structure, Implementation, Dynamics

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5.5.13 QUESTION BANK

UNIT - I

1 i. What are the management functions, approaches in establishing and managing a reuse business
ii. “Application system reuse components” explain the statement with simple example. (July 12)

2. i. Explain the incremental adoption of reuse in an organization with the benefits obtained with increment in
investments, experience and time. (July 12)
ii. What is a facate ? how is it.

3. i. What are the business characteristics of a reuse business. how can reuse be made cost effective
ii. “Application families allow significant reuse” Explain with suitable example (Feb 12)

4. i. What are the concurrent process involved in systametic reuse? (Feb 12)
ii. What are variation points and variability mechanisms when using components for building system?Explain.

5. i. What are software reuse factors ? Explain. (April 11)


ii. Discuss about reuse driven software engineering business.

6. i. Describe object oriented software engineering. (April 11)


ii. Discuss the applications of components sub systems

7. i. Describe briefly about usecase components and object components. (Aug 11)
ii. Explain about software reuse factors

8. Describe reuse driven software engineering business. (Aug 11)

9. i. Describe the concurrent process model of systematic reuse. (July 10)


ii. What are variation points?Explain tracing use case variability in object models.

10. i. Charecterize use-case components with respect to reusability. (July 10)


ii. Describe the incremental model of systematic reuse.

11. i. Describe reusable design and implemetation components. (Dec 09)


ii. Identify the reusable components in the given scenario and justify-
“A buyer may use the application system to pay invoices within this application system,pay and schedule
invoices use case lets the buyer pay invoices electronically by deducting money from the buyers account.”

12. i. Explain : (Dec 09)


(a) Application systems engineering (b) Component systems engineering
ii. “Facades control access to component system intervels”.Justify.

13. i. What are the various principles that an organization should follow in order to achieve systematic software
reuse.
ii. Explain how concrete components and abstract components can be reused in application systems.
(May 09)

14. i. Why does the management of a reuse business have responsibility above the management of individual
projects and processes? Explain the overall management functions of a reuse software engineering business.

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ii. What is “Variability mechanism’? Explain the typical variability mechanisms and state how they can besend
with one another. (May 09)

15. i. Explain the process involvd in systematic Reuse. ( Nov 08)


ii. Explain the following terms : component, component systems, role of Facades in component systems.
16. “Software Engineering is a systematic model building process”. Explain. (Nov 08)

UNIT - II

1. i. What are desing patterns? how are they different from frameworks. (July 12)
ii. What are the participents and benefits of a singleton pattern

2. i. How can we use a design pattern ? Give a simple approach to applying a design pattern effectively
ii. Explain the applicability , structure and benefits of the prototype pattern (July 12)

3. i. What is a design pattern ? What kind of template is normally used to describe it? (Feb 12)
ii When can a factory method pattern be used? Explain its structure, participants and consequences.

4. i. There are several design patterns in the cataloge to choose from ? What are the different approaches to
find a suitable design pattern (Feb 12)
ii. Explain about the builder pattern by using its structure, participants, collaborations, concequences

5. i. What is meant by design pattern? Write intent motivation and implementation factory and single for
patterns? (April 11)
ii. Discuss intent applicability structure of prototype pattern

6. Explain about decorator and facade patterns with suitable examples. (April 11)

7. i. Define design pattern ? Discuss the characteristics of design pattern. (Aug 11)
ii. Explain about intent, structure and participants of factory and prototype pattern.

8. What are structural patterns ? Explain about adaptor and lyweight pattern with the help of an example.
(Aug 11)

9. What is a design pattern? Explain the characteristics of design patterns. (July 10)

10. Describe the intent and structure of abstract factory pattern with the help of an example. (July 10)

11. Explain the motivation, applicability and consequences of using these patterns:
Factory methods. (May 09)

12. Describe the structure, partcipants and implementation of following patterns:


Singleton pattern. (May 09)

13 Explain the applicability, collaborations and implementaion of the builder pattern (Dec 08)

14. Discuss the motivation, participants and consequences of Abstract Factory. (Dec 08)

15. Explain about Singleton pattern. How does a singleton pattern ensure single instance. (Nov 08)

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16. Write short notes on the following creational patterns: (Nov 08)
i. Factory Method pattern.
ii. Abstract Factory pattern.

UNIT - III

1. Discuss about any two structural patterns explaining their motivation, structure and consequences.
(July 12)
2. Discuss about any two of these behavioural patterns
(a) Chain of responsibility (b) Command pattern (c) interpretor pattern (July 12)

3. What are structural patterns? Explain any two with structure, motivation, consequences and implementation.
(Feb 12)

4. Differentiate between the command pattern and interpretor pattern with structure, motivation, consequences
and implementation. (Feb 12)

5. i. Differentiate between the client dispatcher server and publish subscriber patterns. (April 11)
ii. Write the motivation, application and implementation of Chain of responsibility and stratergy.

6. Describe motivation, application, structure and implementation of mediator and memento patterns.
(April 11)
7. i. Describe motivation, application and implementation of template pattern
ii. Write the intent, structure, participants and implementation of observer pattern (Aug 11)

8. i. Explain the difference between whole part and master-slave patterns. (Aug 11)
ii. Explain in detail about visitor pattern

9. i. Describe the intent and structure of momento pattern. (July 10)


ii. What are the advantages of observer pattern over other behavioural patterns?

10. i. Differentiate between whole-part and master-slave patterns.


ii. Describe the structure and participants of mediator pattern. (July 10)

11. i. Differentiate between structural and behavioural patterns.


ii. Explain: (a) Command Pattern (Dec 09)

12. Describe the intent,structure and participants of chain of responsibility pattern. (Dec 09)

13. Explain the motivation, applicability and consequences of using these patterns: (May 09)
(i) Composite pattern. (ii) Proxy pattern.

14. Explain the consequences and implementation of Chain of responsibility. (May 09)

15. Explain the applicability, collaborations and implementaion of the adapter pattern. (Dec 08)

16. .Discuss the motivation, participants and consequences of Facade pattern. (Dec 08)

17. Write short notes on:


(i) Adapter pattern (ii) Bridge pattern. (iii) Proxy pattern. (Nov 08)

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MCA III Year I Semster

18. Explain the Intent, Motivation, Applicability, Structure of Chain of Responsibility pattern. (Nov 08)

UNIT - IV

1. i. Compare and contrast between the benefits and liabilities of mediator and observer patterns. (July 12)
ii. Explain the applications of Publisher-Subscriber pattern

2. i. the “State pattern” is an important behavioural pattern. Explain its applicability, consequences and
implementation issues of this pattern.
ii. What is the important of the “master-slave “ pattern ? Explain with suitable example. (July 12)

3. i. Where is the use of “strategy pattern ”important? What are the primary benefits and drawbacks of this
pattern? Explain?
ii. To manage multiple views tht a software system provides, how is the view-handler design pattern useful?
Explain? (Feb 12)

4. Briefly explain about the following design patterns.


(i) Mediator and template pattern (ii) Forwarder-receiver pattern (Feb 12)

5. Write short notes on the following


(i) Blackboard (ii) Model-view-controller (April 11)

6. Explain about intent applicability and implementation of micro kernel and broker patterns (April 11)

7. Explain about filter and kernel patterns with examples (Aug 11)

8. i. Discribel structure participents and implementation of reflection


ii. Write the intent motivation and structure of broker pettern (Aug 11)

9. i. Differentiate between whole-part and master-slave patterns. (July 10)


ii. Describe the structure and participants of mediator pattern.

10. i. Describe the intent and structure of momento pattern. (July 10)
ii. What are the advantages of observer pattern over other behavioural patterns?

11. Describe the intent,structure and participants of forwarder-receiver patterns. (Dec 09)

12. Explain the consequences and implementation of Observer pattern. (May 09)

13. Explain the implementation and consequences of:


(i) Forward - Receiver (ii) Client-Dispatcher-Server (May 09)

14. Explain the participants, consequences and implemenations of:


(i) Iterator pattern (ii) Momento pattern. (Dec 08)

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15. Explain about the use of:


(i) Master-slave design pattern (ii) Publisher-subscriber desihn pattern. (Dec 08)

16. Discuss any four sections of Observer Behavioural pattern. (Nov 08)

17. Explain in detail about Publish-Subscriber pattern. (Nov 08)

UNIT - V

1. i. Explain about the use and benefits of layers pattern and broker pattern.
ii. Bring out the implementation steps of micro kernel archetectural pattern. (July 12)

2. Write short notes on any two.


(a) pipes and filters pattern (b) model view controller (c) reflection pattern (July 12)

3. i. Explain about the importance and implementation steps of black board archetectural pattern.
ii. Explain thebenefits and liabilities of reflection patterns. (Feb 12)

4. Write short notes on any two


(a) pipes and filters pattern (b) model view controller
(c) presentation - abtraction control pattern (Feb 12)

5. Write short notes on


(a) responsibility pattern (b) construction patten (Aug 11)

6. Describe structure participants and responsibilities of presentation tier pattern and business patterns.
(Aug 11)

7. i. Explain five tier model for logical seperation of concerns which of their tiers addresses J2EE pattern
cataloge ? Jusify
ii. Explain about responsibility pattern (April 11)

8. i. Describe structure participants and responsibilities of intercepting filters


ii. Explain about Java extension patterns (April 11)

9. Explain the following architectural patterns with the help of one example each: (July 10)
i. Broker
ii. Reflection

10. Describe presentation-abstraction-control pattern. (Dec 09)

11. Explain the use of Model-View-Controller pattern with its structure, suitable Scenarios and implementatio
steps. (May 09)

12 Discuss the importance of Layers pattern along with their benefits and liabilities. (Nov 08)

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13. Discuss the uses and steps to impement a Presentation-Abstract -Control architecture.What are its benefits
and liabilities. (May 09)

14. Discuss the implementation and consequences steps of:


i. Pipes and filters architecture.
ii. Model-View-Controller architecture. (Dec 08)

15. Explain the structure and consequences of :


(a) Black board architecture. (b) Micro kernel architecture. (c) Reflection architecture. (Dec 08)

16. Write short notes on:


(a) Model View Controller. (b) Reflection pattern. (Nov 08)

17. What are some presentation Tier patterns? Expllain with their structure, sequence diagram and strategies.
(Dec 08)

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5. SUBJECT DETAILS

5.6 XMLAND WEB SERVICES

5.6.1 Objectives and Relevance

5.6.2 Scope

5.6.3 Prerequisites

5.6.4 Syllabus - O.U.

5.6.5 Suggested Books

5.6.6 Websites

5.6.7 Expert’s Details

5.6.8 Journals

5.6.9 Findings andDevelopments

5.6.10 Students Seminar Topics

5.6.11 Session Plan

5.6.12 Tutorial Plan

5.6.13 Question Bank

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5.6.1 OBJECTIVES & RELEVANCE

The main objectives of system administration are as follows:


To explain XML and web servies and its service oriented architecture
To discuss the xml technologies its name spaces,schemas and DTD’S.
To explain .SOAP and its architecture
To discuss XML security with digital signatures.

5.6.2 SCOPE

The primary goal of XML and web servies is to design and build the web pages using an advanced
architectures like SOAPAnd discuss the XML security features.

5.6.3 PREREQUISITES

Students should have knowledge of fundamentals of computer science and HTML concepts in general .

5.6.4 SYLLABUS – O.U

UNIT I
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this unit is to discuss the basic concepts of XML with its architecture
The unit introduces the subject by illustration the diversity of application areas and explore the basic feature of
SYLLABUS
Introduction: Role Of XML-XML and The Web-XML Language Basics-SOAP-Web Services-Revolution
of XML-Service Oriented Architecture

UNIT II
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this unit is dealing with the XML name spaces and DTD techniques and transformations.

SYLLABUS
XML Technology: XML Technology,XML-Name Spaces-Structuring With Schemas and DTD-Presentation
Techinques-Transformation-XML Infrastructure.

UNIT -III
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this unit is the detailed explanation of SOAP.

SYLLABUS
SOAP: Overview Of SOAP-HTTP-XML-RPC-SOAP:Protocol-Message Structure-Intermediaries-Actors-
Design Patterns and Faults-SOAP With Attachments.

UNIT - IV
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this unit is the explanation of UDDI-WSDL concepts.

SYLLABUS
WEB Services: Overview-Architecture-Key Technologies-UDDI-WSDL-ebXML-SOAP And Web Services
in E-com-Overview of .NET and J2EE

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UNIT V
OBJECTIVE
The objective of this unit is dealing with the XML security features.

SYLLABUS
XML Security: Security overview-Canonicalization-XML Security Framework-XML Encryption-XML
Digital Signature-XKMS Structure-Guidelines For signing XML Documents-XML in Practice.

5.6.5 SUGGESTED BOOKS

TEXT BOOKS
T1 Ramesh Nagappan, Robert Skoczylas and Rima Patel Sriganesh,Developing Java Web services, Wiley
publishing Inc,.2004.
T2 Sandeep Chatterjee,James Webber, Developing Enterprise Web Services, Pearson Education,2004.
T3 McGOvern,et al., Java Web Services Architecture, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers,2005. Gustavo A,Fabio
C, Harumi K, Vijay M.Web Services: Concepts, Architecture and Applications. Springer, 2004.
T4 Frank.P.Coyle, XML, Web Services And The Data Revolution, Pearson Education,2002.

5.6.6 WEBSITES

1. www.w3schools.com
2. www.zvon.org
3. www.wdvl.com

5.6.7 EXPERTS’ DETAILS


INTERNATIONAL

1. Sandeep Chattarjee, Cofounder,


Chief Technical Officer and Vice President
Source Trace Systems, Inc. USA.

NATIONAL

1. Ramesh R Nagappan,
MS, CISSP, CISA, Technologist at Sun Microsys.
IIT, Chennia
email: nramesh@brandies.edu
Email: vkj@cse.iitb.ac.in
Ph: 91-22-2576-7730

5.6.8 JOURNALS

INTERNATIONAL
1. acm sigcse:computer science education.
2. IEEE Conforence publications (bridging two biomedical journal databases with XML)
3. IBM Journals and Magazines (Technical Context and Cultural Consequences of XML)

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NATIONAL
1. Journal of computer science and applications.
2. Applying XML for Designing and interchanging information for multi-dimentional model.

5.6.9 FINDINGS AND DEVELOPMENTS

1. A method of decomposing and query xml document under the circumstances of uncertain data computer
science and information technology (ICCSIT), 2010, 3rd, Author J.Wang, Aug 2010, Vol:18, Issue:6.
2. Using XML to build efficent transaction time temporal database systems on relational database. data
engineering 2006, AApril 2006
3. Towards effective XML keyword search, knowledge and data engineering IEEE transaction August 2010,
Author Zhifeng Bao, National University of Singapore, Volume 22, Issue 8.

5.6.10 STUDENTS SEMINAR TOPICS

1. SOAP
2. Name spaces and DTD techniques
3. UDDI-WSDL concepts.
4. Web Services in E-com-Overview of .NET and J2EE

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5.6.11 SESSION PLAN

Topics in
Sl Lecture Books
O.U. Modules and Sub-modules Remarks
.No. Number Referred
Syllabus
Unit - I
1 Introduction Introduction to XML L1 T1-Ch.1
XML : Extending the Enterprise L2 T1-Ch.1
Role of XML L3 T1-Ch.1
XML and the Web L4 T1-Ch.1
SOAP, Web Services L5 T1-Ch.1
Revolutions of XML L6, L7 T1-Ch.1
SOA L8, L9 T1-Ch.1
Unit – II
2 XML XML Technologies L10 T1-Ch.2
Technology XML Namespaces L11 T1-Ch.2
Structuring with Schemas : DTD L12 T1-Ch.2
Structuring with Schemas : XML L13 T1-Ch.2
Schema
Structuring with Schemas : XML L14 T1-Ch.2
Processing, DOM, SAX
Presentation Technologies L15, L16 T1-Ch.2
Transformation L17, L18 T1-Ch.2
XML Infrastructure L19, L20 T1-Ch.2
Unit – III
3 SOAP Overview of SOAP L21 T1-Ch.4
HTTP L22 T1-Ch.4
RPC L23 T1-Ch.4
SOAP: Protocol L24 T1-Ch.4
SOAP: Message Structure L25 T1-Ch.4
SOAP: Intermediaries, Actors, L26, L27 T1-Ch.4
Design Patterns and Faults
SOAP with Attachments L28, L29 T1-Ch.4
Unit – IV
4 Web Overview, Architecture L30 T1-Ch.5
Services Key Technologies L31 T1-Ch.5
UDDI L32 T1-Ch.5
WSDL L33 T1-Ch.5
ebXML L34 T1-Ch.5
SOAP and Web Services in E-Com L35, L36 T1-Ch.6
.NET L37, L38 T1-Ch.6
J2EE L39, L40 T1-Ch.6
Unit – V
5 XML Security Overview L41, L42 T1-Ch.7
Security Canonicalization L43 T1-Ch.7
XML Security Framework L44, L45 T1-Ch.7
Xml Encryption L46 T1-Ch.7
XML Digital Signature L47 T1-Ch.7
XKMS Structure L48 T1-Ch.7
Guidelines for Signing XML L49, L50 T1-Ch.7
Documents

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5.6.12 TUTORIAL PLAN

Tutorial Unit
Topic Salient topics to be discussed
No. No.
T1 I Introduction Introduction to XML
T2 XML : Extending the Enterprise
T3 Role of XML
T4 XML and the Web
T5 SOAP, Web Services
T6 Revolutions of XML, SOA

T7 II Xml Technology XML Technologies and name espaces

T8 Structuring with schemas:DTD & XML schema


And XML Processing , DOM,SAX
T9 Presentation Technologies, Transformation
T10 XML Infrastructure
T11 III SOAP Overview of SOAP
HTTP,RPC
T12 SOAP: Protocol , Message Structure
SOAP: Intermediaries, Actors, Design Patterens
and Faults
SOAP with Attachments
T13 IV Web Services Overview, Architecture
T14 Key Technologies
T15 UDDL, WSDL, ebXML
T16 NET,J2EE
T17 V XML Security Security Overview
T18 Canonicalization
T19 XML Security frame work, excrytion
T20 XKMS Structure
Guidelinesfor signing XML Documents

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5.6.13 QUESTION PAPERS

UNIT - I

1. i. Explain the difference between valid and well formed XML documents. (July 12)
ii. Discuss the role of xml.

2. i. Write the role of XML in web technology. (July 12)


ii. Explain about XML web services.

3. i. Explain the role of XML in Web services. (Feb 12)


ii. Describe about service oriented architecture.

4. i. Write about the revolutions of XML. (Feb 12)


ii. Differentiate between valid and well formed XML documents.

5. Explain service oriented architecture with example. (Aug 11)

6. Define web service. How and on what platforms webservices are build. (Aug 11)

7. i. Explain about the role and revolutions of XML (May 11)


ii. Discuss about service oriented architecture

8. Write briefly about web services. (May 11)

9. i. Explain the role of XML in Web services. (Jan 11)


ii. Differentiate between valid and well formed XML documents.

10. Explain about the revolutions of XML. (Jan 11)

11. i. Write syntax rules for writing an XML document. (July 10)
ii. Differentiate between valid and well formed XML documents

12. Discuss about service oriented architecture (July 10)

13. i. Write syntax rules for writing an XML document. (April 09)
ii. Explain how SOAP is used enable communications across the web

14. i. Explain the role of XML in providing Web services. (April 09)
ii. Explain about the 3 revolutions of XML.

15 i. Explain about the 3 revolutions of XML .(Dec 08)


ii. Write syntax rules for writing an XML document.

16 i. Explain the role of XML in providing Web services. (Dec 08)


ii. Explain how SOAP is used enable communications across the web.

UNIT - II

1. i. Describe how XML name space is implemented. (July 12)


ii. explain about DTD and XML. Schemes.

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2. By taking one ex discuss about XML transformation. (July 12)

3. i. What is XML schema? Explain about name spaces (Feb 12)


ii. Discuss about presentation techniques in XML

4. Explain in detail about XML transformation and infrastructure. (Feb 12)

5. Describe how XML data and documents are to be formatted by using XSL. (Aug 11)

6. Explain different technologies to transform XML. (Aug 11)

7. i. What is meant by XML name spaces Discuss about XML schema? (May 11)
ii. Discuss about presentation techniques in XML.

8. i. Explain about XML transformation ? Discuss about XSLT in detail. (May 11)
ii. Explain about XML infrastructure.

9. i. Write syntax rules for specifying the attributes of an XML document using DTD. (Jan 11)
ii. Explain about Remote Procedure Call.

10. Write an XML document that contains Breakfast menu having item name, calories, price and convert into
a HTML table using XSLT. (Jan 11)

11. i. Explain about name spaces.


ii. Explain the need of Structuring an XML document. (July 10)

12. Write an XML document that contains CD catalog having title, author, and price and convert into a HTML
table using XSLT. (July 10)

13. Explain about name spaces? What are the rule for writing document type definition give an example.
(May 09)

14 Write an XML Document to contain the information of a CD catalog (CD name, author and price ) write an
XSL to transform the above XML doc. In the form a HTML table. (May 09)

15 What is meant by XML name spaces Discuss about XML schema. Give an Example. (Dec 08)

16 Write an XML Document to contain the information of a CD catalog (CD name, author and price ) write
an XSL to transform the above XML doc. In the form a HTML table. (Dec 08)

UNIT - III

1. i. Explain about SOAP with attachments. (July 12)


ii. Give the overview of SOAP vs HTTP.

2. Explain about architecture and implementation of SOAP. (July 12)

3. i. Explain about XML-RPC with suitable example.

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MCA III Year, I Semester

ii. Describe message structure of SOAP. (Feb 12)

4. i. Explain the role of actress in soap. (Feb 12)


ii. Differentiate between HTTP and SOAP.

5. i. What is SOAP? Why it is important. (Aug 11)


ii. Explain SOAP Protocol.

6. Explain, SOAP design patterns and tools. (Aug 11)

7. Explain about XML-RPC? Explain about working XML-RPC. (May 11)

8. Write short notes on following. (May 11)


(i) SOAP (ii) HTTP

9. i. Explain, XML design patterns (Jan 11)


ii. Explain HTTP

10. i. Explain about WSDL (Jan 11)


ii. Write the syntax for structuring a SOAP message.

11. Explain about working of XML-RPC. (July 10)

12. Discuss about SOAP and its implementation. (July 10)

13. What is SOAP? Explain its importance in extending the enterprise. (May 09)

14. Explain about the working of XML-RPC. (May 09/ Dec 08)

15. What is the format for writing a SOAP message? Explain how a SOAP message can reference an
attachment. (Dec 08)

UNIT-IV

1. i. Give the key technologies of web services. (July 12)


ii. Discuss the web services in ecom.

2. i. Describe .net vs JZEE. (July 12)


ii. Explain about WSDL in detail.
3. i. Give the detailed architecture of Web services. (Feb 12)
ii. Discuss the role of web services in E-Com.

4. i. Give the Overview of J2EE. (Feb 12)


ii. Discuss about WSDL in detail.

5. Explain WSDL along with a simple example. (Aug 11)

6. i. List out pro’s and con’s of web services. (Aug 11)


ii. Describe UDDI and its importance.

7. Define and explain about UDDI and discuss its implementation. (May 11)

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MCA III Year, I Semester

8. Give the Overview of J2EE and its application. (May 11)

9. i. Explain about UDDI. (Jan 11)


ii. Explain about the role of web services in E-com.

10. Explain the features of .NET. (Jan 11)

11. Explain the features of J2EE. (July 10)

12. Explain about XKMS Structure. (July 10)

13. Give an overview of .NET and J2EE technologies. (May 09)

14. Explain about WSDL protocol. (May 09)

15. Explain how UDDI protocol is used for communicating with registries. (Dec 08)

16. Write about electronic business XML. (Dec 08)

UNIT-V

1. i. Write about XML security Framework. (July 12)


ii. What is an encryption?explain about XML encryption.

2. i. Outline the guidelines for signing XML documents. (July 12)


ii. Discuss about digital signature.

3. i. Discuss about XML Security Framework. (Feb 12)


ii. What is meant by XKMS Structure?

4. i. What are the guide lines for signing XML document? Explain? (Feb 12)
ii. Discuss the importance of XML digital signature in XML security?

5. i. List out guide lines for signing XML document. (Aug 11)
ii. Explain briefly XKMS, X-KRSS

6. i. Discuss XML document security issues. (Aug 11)


ii. Discuss SOAP security issues.
iii. Discuss XML canonicalization.

7 i. Discuss about XML Security Framework. (May 11)


ii. What are the guide lines for signing XML document? Explain?

8 i. Discuss about XML digital signature. (May 11)


ii. Discuss about XKMS signature.

9 i. Discuss XML canonicalization.


ii. Mention the guide lines for signing XML document. (Jan 11)

10 Write about XML security Framework (Jan 11)

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MCA III Year, I Semester

11 Explain about encryption in XML . (July 10)

12 Explain how to implement about digital signature in XML. (July 10)

13 i. What is canonicalization. (May 09)


ii. Give the guide lines for signing XML document

14 Write about XML digital signature (May 09)

15 i. What is canonicalization. (Dec 08)


ii. Give the guide lines for signing XML document

16 Describe the XML security Framework (Dec 08)

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5. SUBJECT DETAILS

5. 7 MOBILE COMPUTING

5.7.1 Objectives and Relevance

5.7.2 Scope

5.7.3 Prerequisites

5.7.4 Syllabus - O.U.

5.7.5 Suggested Books

5.7.6 Websites

5.7.7 Expert Details

5.7.8 Journals

5.7.9 Findings & Developments

5.7.10 Students Seminar Topics

5.7.11 Session Plan

5.7.12 Tutorial Plan

5.7.13 Question Bank

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MCA III Year, I Semester

5.7.1 OBJECTIVESAND RELEVANCE


The main objective to have mobile computing is that it equips the students to have knowledge about
wirelsess and mobile technology. The different types of mobile accessing, the basic knowledge of data
frequency, how signal are transmitted using digital technology, the coverage area and so on. since the
students have already studied basic data communication of wired networks, and now wireless is th etrend
this subject is relevant to study in this semester.

5.7.2 SCOPE
This subject makes the students capable of understanding the type of mobile network that is used.
Makes them understend the capabilities of wirelss networks.
To undestand the applications and usage of wirless and mobile devices.

5.7.3 PREREQUISITIES

1. The students can have a basic knowledge about mobile communication. of a high level Programming
Language.
2. Its better to have an idea of Networks, Distributed COMputing and Web Programming.

5.7.4 SYLLABUS – O.U

UNIT I
OBJECTIVE
To give an overview of what is mobilty and wireless.
To understand the basic techniques of medium access control and to find out which is suitable for them.
Spread spectrum techniques involves spreading the band width needed to transmit the data.

SYLLABUS
Introduction and applications of mobile computing, Wireless transmission: Frequencies, Signals,
Antennas, Signal Propagation, Multiplexing,Modulation, Spread spectrum, Cellular system. Medium
access control, SDMA, FDMA,TDMA, CDMA, Comparisons.

UNIT II
OBJECTIVE
To understand the basic telecommunication system.
The history of the basic communication system and the comparision of various systems.
To understand how broadcasting is done using different types of signals.

SYLLABUS
Telecommunication system, GSM, DECT, TETRA, UMTS & IMT-2000, Satellite systems: Applications,
Basics, routing, localization,Handover. Broadcast systems: Cyclic representation of data, Digital Audio
Broadcasting. Digital video broadcasting,Convergence of Broadcasting and Mobile Communications.
UNIT III
OBJECTIVE
To understand the diiferent schemes that are used to form a wireless lan.
To analyse how exactly they differ.
To study about the special layer which is used for wirelss lans.

SYLLABUS
Wireless LAN: Infrared Vs Radio transmission,Infrastructure and Adhoc Networks, IEEE 802. 11,
HIPERLAN, Bluetooth.

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MCA III Year, I Semester

UNIT IV
OBJECTIVE
To study and understand how internet can be efficiently accessed through mobile and wireless device.
To understand what is the mobile IP and TCP to make the internet wireless.
To understand the detailed study about mobile internet.
SYLLABUS
Mobile IP, Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol, Mobile Adhoc Networks, Mobile Transport Layer
Traditional TCP , Classical TCP improvements , TCP over 2.5/3G ,Wireless Networks,Performance Enhancing
Proxies.
UNIT V
OBJECTIVE
To understand about the operating systems for Mobile devices
To understand how file system is supported foe mobile network.
To understand what protocol is used for accessing world wide web.
To know about WML.

SYLLABUS
Operating Systems for Mobile Devices: Features of Windows CE, Palm OS, Symbian OS, Java Card
Support for Mobility: File systems, World Wide Web, Wireless Application Protocol.

5.7.5 SUGGESTED BOOKS (AS PER SYLLABUS)

TEXT BOOKS
T1 Jochen,M.Schiller, Mobile Communication,2nd Edition Pearson Education, India 2003
T2 Frank Adelstein, Sandeep K.S. Gupta “Fundamentals of Mobile and Pervasive Computing”,Tata MCGraw-
Hill 2005.
T3 Dharma P.Agarwal,Qing An Zeng:”Introduction to wireless and Mobile Systems” 2nd Edition , Thomson
India-2007
T4 Hansmann, Merk,Nicklous,Stober,Principles of Mobile Computing,@nd Edition, Springer International
Edition,2003.
T5 Ivan Stojmenovic: “Handbook of Wireless and Mobile Computing” , Wiley India 2006.

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Andrew S. Tenenbaum “ComputerNetworks” Prentice Hall

5.7.6 WEBSITES
1. www.mobilecomputing.com
2. www.oncemartclick.com
3. www.internetnews.com
4. www.wap-forum.org.
5. www.wapfourrn.org

5.7.7 EXPERTS’ DETAILS

INTERNATIONAL
1. Charles Colbourn
Arizona State University,
Phone : 480.727.6631,
E-mail: charles.colbourn.asu.edu.

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2. Yann Hang lee


Arizona State University
Phone:480.727.7507,
e-mail: yhlee@asu.edu

3. Bill Hooper
Bellmont University.

NATIONAL
1. A.Kakkar
Amity University,Noida,Delhi
E-mail:akakkar@aiit.amity.edu

2. Dr. Prof. C.Chellapan.


Anna University, Chennai
Phone:(044) 24422032.
E-mail: drcc@annauniv.edu

3. Dr.Prof. P.Narayanasamy,
Anna University,Chennai
Phone:(044) 24474475.
E-mail:sam@annauniv.edu

REGIONAL
1. Dr. Prof. I.V.Ramana,
JNTU,Hyderabad.

2. Dr. V.VijayaKumar,
Assistant Professor,
JNTU,Hyderabad.

5.7.8 JOURNALS

INTERNATIONAL
1. Networking IEEE Trans on
2. Network Society
3. IEEE Trans on Communications
4. Computer Networks (Previously “& ISDN Networks”)
5. IEE Proc. – Communications
6. International Journal of Communication Systems
7. The International Journal on the Development and Application of Standards for
8. Computers, Data Communications and Interfaces

NATIONAL
1. Data Communication Principles
2. Mobility Aware Technology and Application
3. Journal of Network and Computer Applications
4. Speech Communications
5. Wireless communications and mobile computing

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5.7.9 FINDINGSAND DEVELOPMENTS


1. Online Data Gathering for maximizing network lifetime in sensor networks”, W.hiang and Y.hill, IEEE
Transactions on mobile computing, vol.6, issue 1, pp: 2-11, Jan 2007.
2. “New Architecture for intra-domain network security issues” Dijiang Huang, ring cao, Amit Sinha, Marc
J. Schniederjaus, Cory beard, lein harn, deep medhi, pp: 64-72, communications of the ACM, Vol.49, issue
12, December 2006.
3. “How sensitive are online gamers to network quality?” kuan-Ta chen, polly huang, chin-haung hei, pp: 34-
38, Communications of the ACM, vol.49. issue 11, November 2006.

5.7.10 STUDENT SEMINAR TOPICS

1. Market for Mobile Communications


2. CDMA, GSM Technologies
3. Broadcasting
4. Blue Tooth
5. TCP
6. WWW
7. Wireless Application Protocol
8. Operating Systems for Mobile devices

5.7.11 SESSION PLAN

Sl Topics in Lecture Books


Modules and Sub-modules Remarks
.No. O.U. Syllabus No Referred
UNIT - I
1 Applications Introduction, Applications L1 T1-Ch.1.1
of mobile T2-Ch.1.1, 1.2
computing History of wireless connection L2 T1-Ch.1.2
Market for mobile radio transmission L3 T1-Ch.1.3, 1.4
communication, open research topics
A Simplified reference model L4 T1-Ch.1.5
Frequencies for radio transmission L5 T1-Ch.2.1
R1-Ch 2.3.2
Signals L6 T1-Ch.2.2, 2.4
T3-Ch.3.8
Multiplexing L7 T1-Ch.2.5
R1-Ch 6.2.5
Modulation L8 T1-Ch.2.6
T3-Ch.7.2.4
R1-Ch 2.5.3
Spread Spectrum L9 T1-Ch.2.7
T2-Ch.13.5.3
T3-Ch.7.2.3
R1-Ch 4.4.2
Cellular Systems L10 T1-Ch.2.8
T3-Ch.1.1
T5-Ch 3.2

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Sl Topics in O.U. Lecture Books


Modules and Sub-modules Remarks
No. Syllabus No Referred
SDMA, FDMA L11 T1-Ch.3.2
T2-Ch.10.1.3
T3-Ch.7.2.1,
7.2.5
T4-Ch 14.1.1.2
R1-Ch 2.5.4
TDMA L12 T1-Ch.3.3
T2-Ch.10.1.3
T3-Ch.7.2.2
T4-Ch 14.1.1.2
R1-Ch 2.5.4
CDMA and Comparisons L13 T1-Ch.3.4, 3.6
T2-Ch.17.2
T3-Ch.7.2.3
T4-Ch 14.1.1.2
R1-Ch 2.6.3

UNIT – II
2 Telecommunication GSM Introduction L14 T1-Ch.4.1
Satellite and T2-Ch.17.3
Broadcast Systems T3-Ch.10.4
R1-Ch 2.6
System Architecture and L15, T1-Ch.4.1.2,
Security L16 4.1.7
T2-Ch.17.4
DECT and TETRA L17 T1-Ch.4.2, 4.3
T3-Ch.10.5
T4-Ch.14.2.1
UMTS L18 T1-Ch.4.4
T3-Ch.10.7.5
T5-Ch 7.4
IMT – 2000 L19 T1-Ch.4.4
T3-Ch.10.7
T5-Ch 7.4
T4-Ch.14.1.3.2
T5-Ch 7.4
Satellite system History and L20 T1-Ch.5.1, 5.2
Applications T3-Ch.11.1
Basics, Routing L21 T1-Ch.5.3
T3-Ch.13.4
Broadcast System overview L22 T1-Ch.6.1, 6.2
And cyclic rep of data T2-Ch.3.4.3
Digital audio and video broad L23, 24 T1-Ch.6.3, 6.4
Casting T4-Ch.5.1.2
T5-Ch.12.1
Convergence of Broadcasting L25 T1-Ch.6.5
and Mobile communication

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Sl Topics in O.U. Lecture Books


Modules and Sub-modules Remarks
No. Syllabus No Referred
UNIT – III
3 Wireless LAN Wireless LAN L26 T1-Ch.7.1, 7.2
T2-Ch.15.1
T5-Ch.7.1
R1-Ch 4.4
IEEE 802.11 L27, T1-Ch.7.3
L28 T2-Ch.15.2
T3-Ch.14.3.1
T5-Ch 7.3
R1-Ch 4.4.2
HYPERLAN L29, T1-Ch.7.4
L30 T3-Ch.14.3.2
BLUETOOTH Architecture L31 T1-Ch.7.5
T3-Ch.14.4.2
T4-Ch.14.2.2
T5-Ch.7.2
R1-Ch 4.6
BLUETOOTH Link L32 T1-Ch.7.5.5,
manager protocol 7.5.7
T2-Ch.14
T4-Ch.14.2.2
R1-Ch 4.6
BLUETOOTH Security and L33 T2-Ch.14.6
limitations T3-Ch.15.13
R1-Ch 4.6
UNIT – IV
4 Mobile Network Mobile IP L34, T1-Ch.8.1
Layer and Mobile L35 T2-Ch.2.3.2
transport Layer T3-Ch.9.6
T5-Ch.2.5.3
R1-Ch 5.6.7
Dynamic host configuration L36 T1-Ch.8.2
Protocol T2-Ch.15.6.5
T3-Ch.12.3
R1-Ch 5.6.3
Mobile ad-hoc N/W L37 T1-Ch.8.3
T2-Ch.3.1
T5-Ch 15.1
R1-Ch 5.2.10
Properties of ad-hoc N/W L38 T1-Ch.8.3
T2-Ch.8.2
Traditional TCP L39 T1-Ch.9.1
Classical TCP L40, T1-Ch.9.2
Improvements L41 T3-Ch.12.4
TCP over 2.5/3G Wireless L42 T1-Ch.9.3, 9.4
Networks Performance T3-Ch.12.4
Enhancing Proxies. R1-Ch 6.5.11

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Sl Topics in O.U. Lecture Books


Modules and Sub-modules Remarks
No. Syllabus No Referred
UNIT - V
5 Support for Mobility File systems L43, L44 T1-Ch.10.1.2
and Operating WWW (HTML, HTTP) L45 T1-Ch.10.2
Systems for Mobile T3-Ch.15.3.3
Devices R1-Ch 7.3
System Architecture L46 T1-Ch.10.2.4
Wireless application L47 T1-Ch.10.3
protocol Architecture T4-Ch 11.1
R1-Ch 7.3.6
Wireless datagram protocol L48 T1-Ch.10.3.2
R1-Ch 7.3.6
Features of windows CE L49 T4 Ch 7.1
Palm OS L50 T4 Ch 7.2
Symbian OS L51 T4 Ch 7.3
Java Card L52 T4 Ch 7.4

5.7.12 TUTORIAL PLAN

Tutorial Unit Topic Salient topics to be discussed


No. No.
T1 I History of wireless connection Mobile device development in various
continents
T2 Market for mobile radio transmission Open research topics
T3 Signals, Multiplexing Different types of signals and
multiplexing them
T4 Spread Spectrum, SDMA, FDMA How narrow band is converted into
Comparisons broadband
T5 II GSM History of GSM and frequencies used

T6 Digital audio & video broad casting Audio and video signal processing
T7 Satellite system History & applications History of satellite system.
T8 Convergence of Broadcasting & Broadcasting and mobility combined
Mobile communication
T9 III IEEE 802.11 Different standards of wireless lans,
T10 Hyperlan Development of hiperlan
T11 BLUETOOTH Development of bluetooth
T12 BLUETOOTH Recent applications of bluetooth
T13 IV Mobile IP Internet protocol for mobile device
T14 Mobile transport layer Traditional & classical TCP
T15 TCP over 2.5/3G Wireless networks and performance
enhancing proxies.
T16 Mobile ad-hoc N/W Types of mobile networks
T17 V File systems Electronic directories real time
examples
T18 WWW Mobile www., how protocols used
T19 Operating Systems for Mobile Devices Features of Windows CE, Palm OS,
Symbian OS.
T20 Wireless application protocol Web details

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5.7.13 QUESTION BANK

UNIT - I

1. i. Define device portability and explain different types of frequencies and antennas. (Aug 12)
ii. Define multiplexing and write about FDM and TDM.

2. i. Define MACA and explain how it can avoid the problem of hidden and exposed terminal. (Aug 12)
ii. Write short notes on: (a) Spread Spectrum (b) CDMA.

3. i. Define mobility and explain application of mobile computing. (Feb 12)


ii. Write short notes on: (a) Frequency (b) Modulation.

4. i. Explain the problem of near and far terminal and give a solution to solve it. (Feb 12)
ii. Write a short notes on: (a) CSMA/CD (b) CDMA
iii. What are advantages of small cell size.

5. i. Discuss the applications of Wireless networks and Mobile Communications. (Aug 11)
ii. What is Multiplexing? Explain the four dimentions in which it can be achieved.

6. i. Specify the range of frequencies used in wireless networks for C-band, Ku-band and Ka-band. (Aug 11)
ii. Distinguish between hidden and exposed terminal.
iii. Explain how MACA solves hidden and exposed terminal problem.

7. i. Explain about modulation with ASK,FSK and PSK. (Jan 11)


ii. Discuss in detail about FHSS.

8. i. Write short notes on signals and antennas. (Jan 11)


ii. What is hidden terminal and exposed terminal problem and explain how MACA can avoid those problems.

9. i. Write note on signal propagation. (July 10)


ii. Explain about ASK,FSK and PSK.

10. i. Discuss about spread spectrum. (July 10)


ii. Discuss in detail about FDMA and CDMA.

11. i. Define Hidden and Exposed and Near and Far terminals. (Dec 09)
ii. Explain about FDMA CDMA.

12. i. Discuss about spread spectrum. (Dec 09)


ii. Explain about DSSS and FHSS in detail.

13. Discuss the application of mobile computing. (May 09 old)

14. Explain anout SDMA and CDMA. (May 09 old)

15. i. Explain the concept of signal propagation. (May 09)


ii. Explain the concept of multiplexing.

16. i. Explain the concept of TDMA? (May 09)


ii. Explain the comparisions of S / T / F / CDMA?

17. i. Explain the concept of Multiplexing. (Dec 08)


ii. Explain the concept of modulation.

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MCA III Year, I Semester

18. i. Explain the concept of spread spectrum (Dec 08)


ii. Explain the concept of CDMA

UNIT - II

1. i Define ISL and how it helps in satellite routings.


ii. Write a short notes on : a). TETRA b) UMTS.
iii. List different types of handover in satellite systems. (Aug 12)

2. i With a neat diagram explain the three subsystems of GSM.


ii. Write a short note on :a). DAB b). DVB (Aug 12).

3. i. Write about services and architecture of GSM.


ii. Explain digital audiobroadcasting. (Feb 12)

4. i. Explain DECT architecture. (Feb 12)


ii. Explain the application of satellite system and write short notes on routing in satellite systems.

5. i. What are the security services provided by GSM. (Aug 11)


ii. Explain about GPRS.

6. i. What is cyclic repitation of data. (Aug 11)


ii. What are the different types of orbits in a satellite systems.
iii. Discuss about video broadcasting.

7. Describe the mobile service offered by GSM and its system architecture. (May 11)

8. i. List and explain the four possible hand over scenario in GSM.
ii. Discuss about video broadcasting. (May 11)

9. i Discribe the system architecture and protocol architecture of DECT.


ii Explain how routing, localisation and hand-over is done in satellite systems. (Jan 11)

10. With a neat diagram describe the system architecture of GSM and explain about RSS, NSSand OSS.
(Jan 11)
11. i. Discuss about DAB.
ii. Write note on satellite Systems (July 10)

12. Describe the GSM Architecture in detail. (July 10)

13. Explain the various services provided by GSM. (Dec 09)

14. Discuss about the protocol layers of DECT in detail. (Dec 09)

15. Write about Satellite systems. (May 09 old)

16. Explain cyclic representation of data digital audio broadcasting. (May 09 old)

17. Explain the concept of GSM? (May 09)

18. Explain the concept of Broadcast systems? ((May 09)

19. Explain the cencept of QSM. (Dec 08)

20. Explain the concept of UMTS and IMT -2000. (Dec 08)

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UNIT - III

1. i. Define access point (AP) and its use in infrastructure network with a neat diagram.
ii. Explain IEEE 802.11standard with its architecture (Aug 12)

2. i. Define ad-hoc networks and explain HIperLan 2.


ii With a diagram explain the various bluetooth states
iii Give the limitation of Infrared transmission (Aug 12)

3. i. Define WLAN and its advantages and disadvantage of WLAN compare to LAN.
ii. Explain the need of ADHOC networks and explain in detail about bluetooth. (Feb 12)

4. i. Write difference between infrared and radio transmision.


ii. Define hiperLan and explain the services provided by WATM. (Feb 12)

5. i. Explain the two different transmission technologies used to set up WLANS.


ii. Explain how MAC layer performs power management in IEEE802.11 WLAN? (Aug 11)

6. i. Explain the Medium access scheme used in HIPERLAN.


ii. What is piconet ? Explain the different states of a bluetooth device? (Aug 11)

7. i. Differentiate between infrared and radio transmission.


ii. Describe the system architecture and protocolarchitecture of IEEE802.11. (May 11)

8. i. Write short notes on infrastructure and adhoc networks.


ii. Discuss in detail abourt bluetooth. (May11)

9. i. Briefly discuss about hiperLan.


ii. Describe the architecture of bluetooth. (Jan 11)

10. i. Compare and contrast between infrastructure Networks and Adhoc Networks.
ii. Discuss briefly about IEEE 802.11 and its protocol. (Jan 11)

11. i. Differntiate between Infrastructured and Adhoc Networks. (July 10)


ii. Explain about the protocol architecture of wireless LAN.
12. Discuss in detail about HYPERLAN , its layers, data services and protocols. (July 10)

13. i. Differntiate between Infrared transmission and Radio transmission. (Dec 09)
ii. Briefly discuss about infrastructured networks and adhoc networks.

14. Discuss about HYPERLAN and Bluetooth (Dec 09/ May 09 Old)

15. Discuss about addressing mobile quality of services. (May 09 old)


16. Explain the concept of IEEE 802.11? (May 09)
17. Explain the concept of HIPERLAN? (May 09/ Dec 08)
18. Explain the concept of Mobile IP. (Dec 08)

UNIT - IV

1. i Define topological correct address and write about quick solution for mobile IP.
ii. Explain DHCP and write about mobile Adhoc Networks. (Aug 12)

2. i. Write a short note on :


(a)I-TCP (b) Snooping TCP
ii. Explain the features of Mobile transport Layer. (Aug 12)

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MCA III Year, I Semester

3. i. List the entities and terminology used in mobile IP.


ii. Write short notes on:
(a) Indirect TCP. (b) Selective reject. (c) Registration in mobile IP. (Feb 12)

4. i. Explain DHCP.
ii. Write about: (a) Performance enhancing proxies (b) IP-in-IP encapsulation. (Feb 12)

5. i. Explain the need for agent advertisement messages.


ii. What is triangular routing? Explain how it can be optimized. (Aug 11)

6. i Explain the packet delivery in Mobile in Mobile IP.


ii. What is snooping TCP? Explain its advandategs and disadvandategs. (Aug 11)

7. Discuss in detail about Agent Discovery, Registration ,Tunneling and Encapsulation in Mobile IP.
(May 11)

8. Explain about congestion control, slow start and fast transmit/ fast Recovery in traditional. (May 11)

9. i. Explain about Tunnelling and Encapsulation in Mobile IP.


ii. Write short note on DHCP. (Jan 11)

10. i. Discuss in detailabout DSDV and DSR protocols in mobile Adhoc networks .
ii. Write note on Indirect TCP. (May 11)

11. Discuss in detail about Tunnelling and Encapsulation. (July 10)

12. Explain about fast retransmit,fast recovery,transmission and time-out freezing


with respect to Mobile TCP. (July 10)

13. Explain about snooping TCP and indirect TCP. (Dec 09)

14. Discuss in detail about DHCP with its advantages and disadvantages. (Dec 09)

15. Explain the concept of : (a) Indirect TCP (b) Snooping TCP (May 09)

16. Explain the concept of Ad hoc networks? (May 09)

17. Explain the concept of Mobile IP. (Dec 08)

18. Explain the concept of Traditional TCP. (Dec 08)


UNIT - V

1. i. Explain the WAP architecture.


ii. Explain the features of palm OS. (Aug 12)
2. i. Explain any two file systems.
ii. Write about WWW (Aug 12)

3. i. Discuss the features of Windows CE. (Feb 12)


ii Explain about WWW.

4. i. Explain WAP architecture with neat diagram. (Feb 12)


ii. Explain: CODA file system.

5. i. Explain system architecture of WAP.


ii. Discuss about the features of windows CE. (Aug 11)

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MCA III Year, I Semester

6. i. What is WML? What are the features of WML.


ii. Explain about WWW. (Aug 11)

7. i. Explain CODA file system.


ii. Explain about WWW. (May 11)

8. Discuss about WAP, its architecture and protocols in detail


(May 11)
9. i. Discribe the coda and littlework file systems.
ii. Briefly discuss about WWW. (Jan 11)
10. i. Explain about WAP and its architecture
ii. Discuss briefly about push architecture and push/pull services. (Jan 11)
11. i. Write note on Symbian OS. (July 10)
ii Discuss the features of Windows CE
12. i. Write note on Java card support for mobility. (July 10)
ii Discuss briefly about WAP.

13. i. Discuss the features of Windows CE. (Dec 09)


ii Explain about WWW
14. i. Discuss about WAP in detail with its protocol architecture. (Dec 09)
ii. Briefly discuss about Symbian OS.
15. Write about file system. (old May 09)
16. Explain about wireless application protocol. (old May 09)
17. Explain the concept of file systems. (May 09)
18. Explain the concept of world wide web (May 09/ Dec 08)

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5. SUBJECT DETAILS

5. 8 INFORMATION SECURITY

5.8.1 Objectives and Relevance

5.8.2 Scope

5.8.3 Prerequisites

5.8.4 Syllabus - O.U.

5.8.5 Suggested Books

5.8.6 Websites

5.8.7 Experts’ Details

5.8.8 Journals

5.8.9 Findings and Developments

5.8.10 Student Seminar Topics

5.8.11 Session Plan

5.8.12 Tutorial Plan

5.8.13 Question Bank

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MCA III Year I Semster

5.8.1 OBJECTIVES & RELEVANCE

The main objectives of Software Reuse Techniques are as follows:


To explain the benefits of software reuse and some reuse problems
To discuss different ways of implementing software reuse
To explain how reusable concepts can be represented as patterns embedded in program generators
To discuss the development of software product lines

5.8.2 SCOPE

The reuse of good practices and well proven techniques has always been central to the various disciplines
of engineering. In fact it is no surprise that reuse is one of the core ideas in software engineering.

5.8..3 PREREQUISITES

Students should have knowledge of fundamentals of computer science and Software Engineering concepts
in general and unified modeling language and Java in particular.

5.8.4 SYLLABUS – O.U


UNIT I
OBJECTIVE
It describes about the introductory concepts of the system administration, files and process devices,admin
tools etc.,
The unit introduces subject by illustration the diversity of application areas and explore the basic feature of
SYLLABUS
History, Critical Characteristics of Information,NSTISSC security Model, Components of an Information
System, Securing The Components,Balancing Security and access,The SDLC, The security SDLC,
Business Needs,Threads,Secure,Software Development

UNIT II
OBJECTIVE
It gives the clear concepts of security and managing

SYLLABUS
Law and ethics in Information Security,International laws and Legal Bodies,Ethics and Information
Security,Overview,Risk Identification,Risk Assessment,Risk Control Strategies and selecting a risk control
strategy,Quantitive Versus qualitative Risk Control Practices,Risk Management Discussion
points,Recommended risk control practices.

UNIT -III
OBJECTIVE
This unit deals with various policies of the government and their standards.,

SYLLABUS
Security Policy,Standards and Practices,Security Blue Print,Security Education,Continuity
Strategies,Physical Deign,Firewalls, Protecting Remote Connections

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UNIT - IV
OBJECTIVE
This Unit discuss the concepts of Cryptography Algorithms

SYLLABUS
Intrusion Detection,Access Control and other security tools,Intrusion Detection and Prevention Sys-
tem ,Scanning and Analysis Tools,Access Control Devices ,Foundations of Cryptography,Cipher
Methods,Cryptographic Algorithms ,Cryptographic Tools,Protocols for secure Communication, At-
tacks on cryptosystems.

UNIT V
OBJECTIVE
This Unit discusses about the implementation of security

SYLLABUS
Implementing Security Project Management,Technical Topics of Implementation,Non Technical Aspects
of Implementation,Security Certification and accreditation,Positioning and staffing security function,
Employment Policies and Practices,Internal Control Strategies,Security Management Models,The
Maintenance Model,Digital Forensics.

5.8..5 SUGGESTED BOOKS

TEXT BOOKS
T1 Principle and Practices of Information Security

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Fundamentals Of Cryptology
R2 Introduction to Modern Cryptography
R3 IT Security Cookbook

5.8.6 WEBSITES

1. www.searchsecurity.techtarget.com
2. www.scmagazine.com
3. www.infoseccorp.com
4. www.digital-library.theiet.org/IET-IFS

5.8.7 EXPERTS’ DETAILS


INTERNATIONAL

1. Mr. Douglas Lea


Professor of Computer Science
State University of Newyork, Oswego
Email : dl@oswego.edu
Ph : 315-312-2688

2. Dr. Jeff Sutherland


Chief Technology officer, pattienkeeper, inc
Email : jeff.sutherland@computer.org
Phone : 617-987-0394

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MCA III Year I Semster

NATIONAL

1. Dr Philip T. Cox
Professor
Faculty of Computer Science
Dalhousie University
Email: pcox@cs.dal.ca
Phone: 902-494-6460
Website: http://users.cs.dal.ca/~pcox/
Address
Dr Philip T. Cox
Faculty of Computer Science
Dalhousie University
6050 University Avenue
Halifax, Nova Scotia
Canada B3H 1W5
2. Mr. Deepak B. Phatak
IIT Bangalore
Ph: 91-22-2576-7747
Email: dbp@it.iitb.ac.in

3. Prof. P.Krishna Reddy


IIIT, Gachibowli, Hyderabad
Email: pkredy ET iit.ac.in
Ph : 91-40-23001967/9 Ext: 131/322

4. Mr. R.K. Joshi


IIT Bangalore
Email: vkj@cse.iitb.ac.in
Ph: 91-22-2576-7730

REGIONAL
1. Dr. M.S. Prasad Babu
Andhra University
Email: dramsprasadbabu@yahoo.co.in
Ph: 91-891-2844862. 91-891-2755898.

2. Mr. CH. Satyananda Reddy


Dept. of CS & System Engg.
Email: satyanand99@yahoo.com
Ph: 9866031661.

5.8.8 JOURNALS

INTERNATIONAL
1. International Journal of Information Security
2. The Application of Mixed Method in Developing a Cyber Terrorism Framework

NATIONAL
1. A New Steganography Method Based on the Complex Pixels

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5.8.9 FINDINGS AND DEVELOPMENTS

1. A tangent subdivision scheme”, Evelyne Aanvaes, Adhemar Bultheel, PP: 340-355. ACM transactions on
Graphics. Vol-25, issue 2, April 2006.
2. “Forward Rasteriztion”, Voicu popeson, Paul Rosen PP: 375-411. ACM transaction on Graphics Vol.25,
issue2, April 2006.
3. “Accurate detection of symmetries in 3D shapes”, Aurelien Nertinet, lyril soler, Nicolas Holzschuch, Francois
X. Sillion – PP: 439-464.
4. “Salient geometric features for partial shape matching and similarity”, Ran Gal, Daniel Colen , PP130-150,
ACM transaction on Graphics Vol.25, issue 1, Jan 2006.

5.8.10 STUDENTS SEMINAR TOPICS

1. Automatic Data Extraction


2. Security and Privacy In Computing Systems
3. Future of IT outsourcing

5.8.11 SESSION PLAN

Sl. Topics in OU Lecture Books


Modules and Sub modules Remarks
No. Syllabus No. Referred
UNIT – I
History L1 T1-Ch1.1

Critical Characteristics of Information L2 T1-Ch1.3

Introduction NSTISSC security Model L3 T1-Ch1.5


Components of an Information System L4 T1-CH1.6
Securing The Components L5 T1-CH1.7
Balancing Security and access L6 T1-CH1.9
The SDLC L7
1 The security SDLC L8
Need For Business Needs L9 T1-CH2.1
Security
Threads L10 T1-CH2.2
Secure L11 T1-Ch3.1

Attacks
Software Development T1-Ch3.2
L12

UNIT – II
Legal, Ethical T2-Ch1
and Professional Law and ethics in Information Security L13 T2-Ch3
Issues
2 L14 T2-Ch4
Relevant U.S International laws and Legal Bodies
Laws
L15 T2-Ch4
Ethics and Information Security

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MCA III Year I Semster

Sl. Topics in OU Lecturer Books


Modules and Sub modules Remarks
No. Syllabus No. Referred
Risk T2-Ch4
Overview L16
Management
T2-Ch4
Risk Identification L17
T2-Ch4
2 Risk Assessment L18

Risk Control Strategies and selecting a T2-Ch4


L19
risk control strategy
Quantitive Versus qualitative Risk L20 T2-Ch4
Control Practices
T2-Ch4
Risk Management Discussion points L21

Recommended risk control practices L22 T2-Ch4


UNIT – III
3 Planning For T2-Ch5
Security Policy L23
Security
T2-Ch5
Standards and Practices L24
T2-Ch5
Security Blue Print L25
T2-Ch5
Security Education L26

Continuity Strategies L27, L28 T2-Ch5

Security T3-Ch3.3
Physical Deign L29
Technology
T3-Ch3.5
Firewalls L30
T3-Ch3.6
Protecting Remote Connections L31

UNIT – IV
4 Security L32
Intrusion Detection T3-Ch2.2
Technology
L33
Access Control and other security tools T3-Ch2.2

Intrusion Detection and Prevention L34


T3-Ch2.2
System
L35
Scanning and Analysis Tools T3-Ch2.3
L36
Access Control Devices T3-Ch2.4

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Sl. Topics in OU Lecturer Books


Modules and Sub modules Remarks
No. Syllabus No. Referred
UNIT - IV
Foundations of Cryptography L37 T3-Ch2.2
Cipher Methods L38 T3-Ch2.2
Cryptographic Algorithms L39 T3-Ch2.2
Cryptography
Cryptographic Tools L40 T3-Ch2.3
Protocols for secure Communication L41 T3-Ch2.4
Attacks on cryptosystems L42 T3-Ch2.4
UNIT - V
5 Implementing Implementing Security Project L43 T2-Ch5
Information Management
Security
Technical Topics of Implementation L44 T2-Ch5
Non Technical Aspects of
L45 T2-Ch5
Implementation
Security Certification and accreditation L46, L47 T2-Ch5
Positioning and staffing security function L48 T3-Ch3.5
Security and Employment Policies and Practices L49 T3-Ch3.6
Personnel
Internal Control Strategies L50 T3-Ch3.6
Information Security Management Models L51 T2-Ch5
Security
Maintenance The Maintenance Model L52 T2-Ch5
Digital Forensics L53 T2-Ch5

5.8.12 Tutorial Plan

Tutorial Unit
Topic Salient topics to be discussed
No. No.
T1 I History History
T2 Critical Characteristics of Information Information
T3 NSTISSC security Model security Model
T4 Components of an Information System Components
T5 II Law and ethics in Information Security ethics in Information Security
T6 International laws and Legal Bodies Legal Bodies
T7 Ethics and Information Security Ethics of IS
T8 Overview Overview
T9 III Security Policy Policy
T10 Standards and Practices Standards

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Tutorial Unit
Topic Salient topics to be discussed
No. No.
T11 III Security Blue Print Security
T12 Security Education Security Education
T13 IV Intrusion Detection Detection
T14 Access Control and other security tools Access To Security Tools
T15 Intrusion Detection and Prevention System Detection and Prevention
T16 Scanning and Analysis Tools Scanning
T17 V Implementing Security, Project Management Implementing Security
T18 Technical Topics of Implementation Implementation
T19 Non Technical Aspects of Implementation Non Technical Aspects
T20 Security Certification and accreditation Security Certification

5.8.13 QUESTION BANK

UNIT - I

1. i. Explain the critical characteristics of information. (July 12)


ii. What are the components of an IS? Explain.

2. i. List out and briefly explain the various types of Threats. (July 12)
ii. What are the software development security problems?

3. i. What are the components of an Information System? Explain. (Feb 12)


ii. Explain the Secuity SDLC.

4. i. Briefly explain the various types iof attacks. (Feb 12)


ii. List out and briefly explain the various types of threads.

UNIT - II

1. i. Discuss about: (July 12)


(a) Intellectural Property Rights (b) Digital Millennium Copyright Act
ii. Discuss about Ethical Decision Evaluation.

2. i. What is Information Asset Valuation? Discuss. (July 12)


ii. How do select a Risk Control Strategy?

3. i. Discuss about Freedom of Information Act (Feb 12)


ii. Discuss about Export and Espionage Laws

4. i. Explain Risk Control Stratgies (Feb 12)


ii. What is Risk Assessment? Explain.

UNIT - III

1. Explain: (i) EISP (ii) ISSP (iii) Policy Management (July 12)

2. Discuss about selecting and configuring firewalls. (July 12)

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MCA III Year I Semster

3. i. Discuss about NIST security Models. (Feb 12)


ii. What should be done about Security Education, Training and Awareness Program?

4. i. Explain Fire wall architectures. (Feb 12)


ii. What is a Virtual Private Networks? Explain.

UNIT - IV

1. i. What is and IDPS? Explain different types of IDPS. (July 12)


ii. What are the strengths and limitations of IDPS?

2. Explain briefly different types of Cipher Methods. (July 12)

3. Discuss about scanning and analysis tools (Feb 12)

4. i. What is the importance of Digital Signature and Digital Certificates? (Feb 12)
ii. How to secure a wireless networks with WEP and WPA?

UNIT - V

1. i. Explain the Bull’s Eye Model. (July 12)


ii. Differentiate between certification versus accrediation.

2. i. Write about: (i) GIAC (ii) SCP (iii) CCE (iv) ISACA (July 12)
ii. Explain briefly the internal control strategies.

3. i. Discuss the considerations of organizational change. (Feb 12)


ii. What is NIACAP? Explain.

4. i. Discuss about Backgroung Checks (Feb 12)


ii. Discuss Digital Forensics methods

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5. SUBJECT DETAILS

5. 9 SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION

5.9.1 Objectives and Relevance

5.9.2 Scope

5.9.3 Prerequisites

5.9.4 Syllabus - O.U.

5.9.5 Suggested Books

5.9.6 Websites

5.9.7 Experts’ Details

5.9.8 Journals

5.9.9 Findings and Developments

5.9.10 Student Seminar Topics

5.9.11 Session Plan

5.9.12 Tutorial Plan

5.9.13 Question Bank

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5.9.1 OBJECTIVES & RELEVANCE


The main objective of system administration are as follows:
To understand the functions of system administration.
To discuss the user security.
To explain the file system and disk functioning.
To understand the complete system configuaration

5.9.2 SCOPE

The primary goal of system administration is to to provide the basic knowledge of sytem hardware and
configuaration to the students.

5.9.3 PREREQUISITES

Students should have knowledge of fundamentals of different types of operating system specially a unix
operating system and network related concepts.

5.9.4 SYLLABUS – O.U


UNIT I
OBJECTIVE
It describes about the introductory concepts of unix file system with its basic commands.
The unit introduces subject by illustration the diversity of application areas and explore the basic feature of
SYLLABUS
Functions of system administration,unix-files,processes devices,file system,essential administrative tools-
grep,awk,files and directory commands,starting and shut down process.

UNIT II
OBJECTIVE
It deals with how to provide complete security to the users of the system.

SYLLABUS
User accounts,security,managing system resources-system performace,managing cpu usage memory,disk
i/o automatings task with scripts.
UNIT -III
OBJECTIVE
This unit deals with the maintenance of hardware components and takking the back-ups.

SYLLABUS
Files system annd disk-mounting addding disk,cd rom device and backup and restore terminals,modems
and printers

UNIT - IV
OBJECTIVE
This Unit discusses how to do the network management .

SYLLABUS
TCP/IP network mgmt-tcp/ip networking,adding a new host,NFS/NIS,monitoring the
network,email,configurig and building kernel for LINUX.

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UNIT - V
OBJECTIVE
It describes the windows 2003 server and its basic processes of how to start and shut down the system.

SYLLABUS
Windows 2003 server-startup,shutdown server configuration user accounts,managing processes,disk
and files system security.

5.9.5 SUGGESTED BOOKS

TEXT BOOKS
T1. Aeleon frisch,Essential system administration,O’Reilly,1995,2nd edition.
T2. Aeleon frisch,Essential system administration,O’Reilly,1998,1st edition.
T3. Nemeth,Unix system administration,Pearson education,2000.

5.9.6 WEBSITES

1. www.wikipedia.org/system administration.
2 www.wikipedia.org/system/unix.

5.9.7 EXPERTS’ DETAILS


INTERNATIONAL
1. ”Design & Simulation of Multicast Based Fast Handoff Scheme for HMIPv6,” with Chiranjeev Kumar,
Neeraj Tyagi & Rajeev Tripathi Published in the International Journal of Advanced Computer Engineering
(IJACE), Vol. 1, No. 2, December 2008.

2. ”Improving Throughput of Starved TCP Flow by Sidestepping Bottleneck Nodes Using Concurrent
Transmission,” with Rajesh Verma, Arun Prakash, and Rajeev Tripathi Published in International Journal
of Mobile Computing and Multimedia Communications (IJMCMC), pages 68-83, vol. 2, issue 1, 2010

3. ”Energy Efficient Wireless Networks” with Awadhesh Kumar, Ajeet Kumar, Rati Agrawal Accepted for
publication in IJCNS May issue (Vol.2 No.5), 2010

4. ”Performance Evaluation of Spider Mobility Model using AODV for VANET” with Ravi Shakar Shukla
Accepted for publication in Journal of International Academy of Physical Science volume 14, no.2 2010

NATIONAL

1. Accepted for publication “ Cell Range and Capability Analysis of WiMax and LTE Network with Sandeep
Singh Sengar in International Conference on Parallel, Distributed Computing technologies and Applications
(PDCTA-2011) to be held on September 23 – 25, 2011, at Tirunelveli, India.
2. “Performance Evaluation of Mobility Model and Routing Protocols for Inter Vehicular Communication
System.” With Ravi S Shukla in International Conference on Networks and Computer Communications
(ETNCC2011) April 22 – 24 2011, at Udaipur, India

3. “Cross Layer Self OrganizedRouting Protocol for MANET.” With Awadhesh Kumar in International
Conference on Computer Communication and Management ( ICCCM 2011) held on May 2-4 2011, Sydney,
Australia.

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REGIONAL
1. “Performance enhancement of multi-hop Ad-hoc Networks through Concurrent Transmission” with Rajesh
Verma and Rajeev Tripathi in proceedings of the national seminar on Recent Advances on Information
Technology (RAIT-2009), Feb 6-7, 2009 ISM Dhanbad, India, pp 25-29.
2. “Multicast based Fast Hand0ff in Hierarchical Mobile IPv6”, with P. Thejeswara Reddy, published in the
first National Seminar on Emerging Wireless Technology, I2IIT, Pune, India February 2005.

5.9.8 JOURNALS

INTERNATIONAL
1. IEEE-Trans on Networking
2. IEEE-Trans on Computers

NATIONAL
1. Journal of High Performance Comm. System & Networking.
2. Indian Journal of Computer Science & Information Technology.

5.9.9 FINDINGS AND DEVELOPMENTS

1. System administrator at giltedge infotech services pvt ltd.


2. Hyderabad Area, India | Capital Markets.
3. Sr Reaserch Analyst. at FactSet Research Systems.
4. System Admin at giltedge infotech services pvt ltd.

5.9.10 STUDENTS SEMINAR TOPICS

1. Unix File System


2. Basic Commands in Unix
3. TCP/IP Networking
4. Windows 2000 server.

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5.9.11 SESSION PLAN


Sl. Lecture Books
Topics in OU Syllabus Modules and Sub modules Remarks
No. No. Referred
UNIT – I
1 Functions of System
administration L1 T1-Ch1.1
Files T1-CH2
Unix Processes L2,L3, T1-CH2
L4
Devices T1-CH2
T1-Ch
File Systems L5 T1-Ch3.7
T1-Ch3.8
Essential administrative Grep T1-Ch4.1
tools L6,L7,
awk T1-Ch4.2
Files and directory commands L8,L9 T1-Ch4.4
Staerting and shutdown process
UNIT – II
2 User accounts L10 T1-Ch1.1
T1-CH2
security L11,L12 T1-CH2
T1-CH2
System performance T1-Ch
Managing cpu usage L13,L14, T1-Ch3.7
Managing system L15,L16, T1-Ch3.8
resources Memory
Disk I/Oautomating task with L17 T1-Ch4.1
scripts
UNIT – III
3 File system and disk L18,L19 T1-Ch1.1
mounting L20,L21
Adding disk L22,L23 T1-CH2
cd-rom devices L24,L25 T1-CH2
Back up and restore
terminals modems and L26,L27 T1-CH2
printers
UNIT – IV
4 TCP/IP network Tcp/ip networking L28,L29 T1-Ch1.1
management Adding new host L30,L31
NFS/NIS L32,L33 T1-CH2
Monitoring the network L34,L35 T1-CH2
e-mail L36,L37 T1-CH2
Configuring and building kernel L38,L39
for linux
UNIT – V
5 Windows 2003 server Start up,shut down L40 T1-Ch1.1
Server configuaration L41,L42 T1-CH2
User accounts L43,L44 T1-CH2
Managing processes L45,L46 T1-CH2
Disk and file system security L47,L48 T1-CH2

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5.9.12 Tutorial Plan

Tutorial Unit
Topic Salient topics to be discussed
No. No.
T1 I Functions of System
administration
T2 Unix Files, processes ,devices
T3 File Systems
T4 Essential administrative Grep,awk, files and directory commands,
tools starting and shut down process
T5 II User accounts
T6 securit
T7 Managing system System performance, managing cpu usage,
resources memory, disk I/O automating
T8 III File system and disk
T9 mounting
T10 Adding disk
T11 cd-rom devices
T12 Back up and restore
terminals modems and
printers
T13 IV TCP/IP network NFS/NIS
management
T14 Monitoring the network
T15 Tcp/ip networking
T16 Adding new host
e-mail
Configuring and building kernel for linux
T17 V Windows 2003 server Start up, shut down
T18 Server configuaration
T19 User accounts
T20 Managing processes
Disk and file system security

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5.9.13 QUESTION BANK

UNIT - I
1. i. Explain unix file system in detail? (Aug 11)
ii. Briefly describe the starting and shutdown process in unix?
2. i. List out the various functions of system dministrator? (Aug 11)
ii. What is grep?Discuss about the grep in detail?

3 . i. Explain the essential functions of System Administrator? (May 11)


ii. Explain the process of shutting down on unix system?

4. i. List unix files and directory commands? (May 11)


ii. Write about Cron facility?

5. i. What are steps unix follows in starting of its operating system? (Jan 11)
ii. What is GREP command?write its usage with all the options?

6. What are essential unix administrative tools?Explain the functions of these tools? (Jan 11)

7. i. What are essential functions of System Administrator? (May 09)


ii. Explain system activities during the process of booting of Unix?

8. i. What are the basic classes of access to file? Give examples. (May 09)
ii. How to find files? What are different find matching criteria?

9. i. Under manual booking environment of a Unix system what is a role played by a system Administrator.
ii. Describe five typical startup scripts under Unix. (Nov 08)
10. i. Under Unix file system explain file permissions and I nodes
ii. Explain in detail the need for a super user? (Nov 08)

UNIT - II

1. i. Explain how do you define a ew user account? (Aug 11)


ii. Explain about testing and debugging scripts?

2. i. Briefly explain how user tacking activities are performed? (Aug 11)
ii. Write about smart cards?

3. i. Write short notes on unix users and groups? (May 11)


ii. Expalin how disk can be managed in UNIX system with the help of scripting?

4. i. What is role-based access control?Explain? (May 11)


ii. Write about system resource control mechanisms?

5. i. Explain how disk can be managed in unix system with the help of scripting? (Jan 11)
ii. What are the techniques you follow in knowing the system performance in unix?Explain?

6. i. How unix supports security to user accounts.Explain it? (Jan 11)


ii. Explain the purpose of each step an administrator follows in creation o user accounts?

7. i. Explain how to add a new user? (May 09)


ii. What is shadow file and password aging?

8 i. What are the issues of security plan? (May 09)


ii. Write about nice number and process priorities?
iii. What are process that won’t die?

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9. i. What is the role of an Administrator while adding a new user to a system (Nov 08)
ii. How can an administrator manage the cpu usage.
10. Explain in deatail the performance factor in UNIX system.How to tune them. (Nov 08)

UNIT - III

1. i. Briefly describe the functions of FSCK utility. (Aug 11)


ii. Explain how a new printer is added to a BSD system.
2. i. List out the various backup storage considerations? (Aug 11)
ii. Explain briefly about CD-ROM devices?
3. i. Explain the following (May 11)
(i) mount and unmount commands (ii)remote printing (iii)test command
4. i. What are the factors to be considered in developing a backup plan? (May 11)
ii. How do you obtain printer status information? Explain?
5. i. Explain the following: (Jan 11)
(i) modern installation steps on UNIX ( ii)printer installation steps on Unix
6. i. How do you restore files from backup? (Jan 11)
ii. How do you install secondary storage devices on UNIX. List the basic installation steps required to install
these devices?

7 i. Write about mount and unmount commands? (May 09)


ii. What are file systems types supported by Unix?
iii. What are the special files for CD_ROM devices?

8 i. What are the factors to be considered in developing backup plan? (May 09)
ii. Write about dump command and its options?

9. i. Explain the standard serial and parallel I/O devices used in a system. (Nov 08)
ii. What is a SCSI device. how it is different from IDE system

10. Explain in detail the process of adding an extra disk in UNIX environment. (Nov 08)

UNIT - IV

1. i. Define daemon? List out the various important daemon? (Aug 11)
ii. Briefly describe the various Linux kernel networking options?

2. i. Define NIS? Explain about NIS? (Aug 11)


ii. Explain how a new host is added to the network?

3. Explain the process of building kernel for Linux? (May 11

4. i. Explain the problems arise during TCP/IP networking under Linux system. (May 11)
ii. How to configure local mail system and relay host?

5. i. What is kernel? Explain the functions of kernel? (Jan 11)


ii. How do you configure kernel of Linux?

6. i. List the problems with NFS-NIS .Briefly explain the solution of each problem? (Jan 11)
ii. List the checklist of items to help better secure your NFS implementation?

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7 i. What are the commands provided by TCP/IP? (May 09)


ii. How to add a new host? Explain.
iii. What are the options for configuring routing within a local network?
8 i. Write about NFS and NIS in detail? (May 09)
ii. How to configure mail system?
9. i. What is a host. Explain the significance of it with an IP address. (Nov 08)
ii. Discuss in detail the significance of DNS in networking environment.
10. i. Explain in detail how NFS is different from stand alone system. (Nov 08)
ii. What are the differences between a hub and a switch.

UNIT - V

1. i. Explain the boot process on alpha systems? (Aug 11)


ii. Discuss about user accounts in windows NT in detail?

2. i. What are different file system types supported by windows NT? (Aug 11)
ii. What are the security plans in windows NT?

3. i. Explain the common booting problems and remedies? (May 11)


ii. Write short notes on passwords and its policies?

4. i. Explain the important characteristics of NTFS file system type? (May 11)
ii. How does windows NT manages various processes? Explain?

5. Explain the steps involved in windows NT server configuration? (Jan 11)


6. What are the files windows NT loads in system startup and explain the purpose of each file? (Jan 11)

7. i. Write about the administrative tools in Windows NT? (May 09)


ii. Write about Windows NT file system?
8 i. How to create and modify user accounts with user manager? (May 09)
ii. Write about distributed file system in detail.
9. i. Explain the process of creating a user under windows NT. (Nov 08)
ii. how a specific users startup information space is maintained in windows NT.
10. i. Under windows NT how can a user be prevented from accessing certain directories in a disk. (Nov 08)
ii. What are the process management tools under the windows NT.

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5. SUBJECT DETAILS

5.10 RICH INTERNETAPPLICATIONS

5.10.1 Objectives and Relevance

5.10.2 Scope

5.10.3 Prerequisites

5.10.4 Syllabus - O.U.

5.10.5 Suggested Books

5.10.6 Websites

5.10.7 Expert’s Details

5.10.8 Journals

5.10.9 Findings andDevelopments

5.10.10 Students Seminar Topics

5.10.11 Session Plan

5.10.12 Question Bank

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5.10.1 OBJECTIVESAND RELEVANCE


The objective is to make students to learn about Web 2.0,client side programming,Web services,building
RIA.

5.10.2 SCOPE

The syllabus is designed in such a way that students take up advanced courses in DHTML,
JavaScript,Perl,CGI.

5.10.3 PRE-REQUISITES
Students should have the basic knowledge of HTML.

5.10.4 SYLLABUS - O.U.

UNIT - I
OBJECTIVE
This Chapter discus the basic concepts of social networking and web 2.0

SYLLABUS
Web 2.o folksonomies and web 2.0,software as a service,multile delivery channels(voice VOXML,and
ANT(HTML).social networking.

UNIT - II
OBJECTIVE
This Chapter deals with client side programming

SYLLABUS
Client side programming-overview of javascript,objects of javascript,regular expressions,overview of
XML,DTD and XML schema,DOM and SAX parsers,CSS,XSLT.

UNIT - III
OBJECTIVE
This Chapter deals with web services and JSON format.

SYLLABUS

Web services-SOA,SOAP,WSDL,REST Servies.


JSON format-Ajax introduction,XML,HTTP,object comparision with I-Frames.

UNIT - IV
OBJECTIVE
This chapter deals with building RIA.

SYLLABUS
Building Rich Internet Application-Flash player,Flex frame work,MXML Introduction,action script
introduction,working with action script,flex data binding,common UI components with data grids,Tree
controls,Pop up controls etc.

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UNIT - V
OBJECTIVE
This chapter deals with web services in Flex, Resource Description Framework and OWL.

SYLLABUS
Mash-up using Flex and Ajax.Web services in Flex,Semantic Web(Web 3.0) Resource Descripton Frame
Work,Use an example,ontologies,Web ontology language(OWL).

5.10.5. SUGGESTED BOOKS

TEXT BOOKS
T1. Ivan Bayross,Web Enabled Commercial Application Development using HTML,DHTML,Javascript,perl
CGI,BPB publications,2007.
T2. Colin Moock,Essential Action script 3.0,O’Reilly publications,2007.
T3. Steven Holzner,Ajax Bible Wiley India Edition,2007.
T4. Justin Gehtland et al, A Web 2.0 Primer Pragmatic Ajax,SPD Publications,2006.

REFERENCE BOOKS

R1. Pro JavaScript RIA Techniques: Best Practices, Performance by Dennis Odell
R2. WCF RIA Services by Brain Noves.
R3. Data Visualization with Flash Builder: Designing RIA Applications with Remote Data Sources (Visualizing
the Web) by Cesare Rocchi

5.10.6 WEBSITES

1. www.adobe.com/resources/business/rich_internet_apps.
2. www.wakeuplater.com/website-building/introduction-to-rich-internet-applications.aspx.
3. www.theserverside.com/news/1365070/Web-201-a-Rich-Internet-Application-Example.

5.10.7 EXPERTS’ DETAIL

INTERNATIONAL
1. Ivan Bayross
Chairman and MD at Silicon Chip Tech,
New-York,USA.

2. Steven Holzner
PHD, Ithaca, New-York.

NATIONAL
1. Ivan Bayross
Chairman and MD at Silicon Chip Tech,
Mumbai,India.
2. Dr.Sukhendu Das,
Dept. of CSE,
IIT, Madras,India.

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REGIONAL
1. PROF.Dr.B.Sashidar Rao(O.U)
Professor in IT,Osmania University.

2. S. Ramachandram, M.Tech.(O.U)
Rich Internet Applications
(Co-coordinator, SSS) (Chairman, BoS, UCE)

5.10.8 JOURNALS

INTERNATIONAL
1. Luca Mainetti, Roberto Paiano - International Journal of Web Information Systems
2. Nooralisa MohdTuah and Dg. Senandong Ajor - The Emerging of Rich Internet Applications in Web
Applications: Their Usability towards Good User Experience

NATIONAL
1. Stefan P. Albaum, Heiko Neuweger - Qupe—a Rich Internet Application to take a step forward in the
analysis of mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics experiments

5.10.9 FINDINGS AND DEVELOPMENTS

1. Measuring and optimizing RIA latency and scalability

5.10.10 STUDENTS SEMINAR TOPICS

1. Web 2.0
2. XML Schema and parsers, SAX Parsers.
3. Web services,AJAX.
4. Building RIA
5. Flex

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5.10.11 SESSION PLAN

Topics of OU Letter Books


S.No. Modules & Sub Modules Remarks
Syllabus No. Referred
UNIT – I
1. Web 2.0 Folksonomies and Web 2.0 L1,L2 T1

Software as a service, L3, L4 T1


Multiple delivery channels L5, L6 T1
VOXML L7, L8 T1
ANT L9 T1
Social Networking L10, L11, T1
L12

UNIT – II
2. Client side Overview of JavaScript L15 T1
programming:
Objects in JavaScript L16, L17 T1

Regular Expressions L18 T1

Overview of XML, L19, L20 T1

DTD and XML schemas L21 T1


DOM and SAX parsers L22 T1
CSS L23 T1
XSLT L24 T1
UNIT – III
3 Web Services, SOA, L25 T2
JSON Format SOAP
WSDL,REST services L26 T2
Ajax introduction L27 T3

XML HTTP object L28 T3


comparison with I frames

UNIT – IV
4 Building RIA Flash Player, Flex Framework L29 T2
MXML introduction L30, L31 T2

Action Script introduction, L32, L33 T2


working with Action Script
Flex Data Binding L34 T2
Common UI components L35, L36 T2
using data grids
Tree controls, pop-up controls L37, L38 T2

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S.No Topics of OU Letter Books


Modules & Sub Modules Remarks
Syllabus No. Referred
UNIT – V
5 Mash Up using Web services in flex L39 T4
Flex and Ajax Semantic web L40,L41 T4
Resource description framework L42,L43 T4
Uses and examples L46,L47 T4

Ontologies L48, L49 T4


L50
OWL L51, L52 T4

5.10.12 QUESTION BANK

UNIT - I

1. i. Describe the importance of software as a services. (July 12)


ii Explain about features of ANT.
2. i. Explain about social networking. (July 12)
ii What are the multiple delivery channels.explain.

UNIT - II
1. i. Discuss about control structures in java script. (July 12)
ii Write a java script program to print fibonocci series upto a given no.
2. i. Describe various types of cascading style sheets. (July 12)
ii Give the overview of XML.
UNIT - III
1. i. What are the REST services.? Explain. (July 12)
ii Describe about JSON format with an example.
2. Write short notes on the following: (a) WSDL (b)AJAX (July 12)
UNIT - IV

1. i. Explain the role of flash player in building rich internet application. (July 12)
ii Describe briefly about MXML
2. i. What are pop up controls? Explain with ex. (July 12)
ii What is meant by flex data binding.

UNIT - V

1. Explain how mashup is related with flex and ajax. Differentiate between web 2.0 and web 3.0. (July 12)

2. i. Write detail about the web services in flex. (July 12)


ii Describe briefly about web outlog language.

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5. SUBJECT DETAILS

5. 11 SOFTWARE PROJECT MANAGEMENT

5.11.1 Objectives and Relevance

5.11.2 Scope

5.11.3 Prerequisites

5.11.4 Syllabus - O.U.

5.11.5 Suggested Books

5.11.6 Websites

5.11.7 Experts’ Details

5.11.8 Journals

5.11.9 Findings and Developments

5.11.10 Student Seminar Topics

5.11.11 Session Plan

5.11.12 Tutorial Plan

5.11.13 Question Bank

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5.11.1 OBJECTIVES & RELEVANCE

The main objectives of system administration are as follows:


To discuss how to evaluate, manage and plan a project.
To explain selection of project approch and estimation cost.
To explain how to handle resources, moniter and control a project.
To discuss about software quality and PRINCE 2.

5.11.2 SCOPE

The primary goal of Software Project Management is to increase awareness of the need to set project
management in the context of programme management.

5.11.3 PREREQUISITES

Students should have knowledge of fundamentals of computer science and different phases of System
Development Life Cycle.

5.11.4 SYLLABUS – O.U


UNIT I
OBJECTIVE
It describes about the introductory concepts of the project management, different steps in project planning
, project evaluation, etc.,
The unit introduces subject by illustration the diversity of application areas and explore the basic feature of
SYLLABUS
Introduction to Software Project Management, Project Evaluation and Programme Management, An
Overview of Project Planning

UNIT II
OBJECTIVE
It gives the clear concepts of selection of a project approch and software effort estimation.

SYLLABUS
Selection of an Appropriate Project Approach, Software Effort Estimation, Activity Planning

UNIT -III
OBJECTIVE
This unit deals with the Risk Management, Resource Allocation, etc..

SYLLABUS
Risk Management, Resource Allocation, Monitoring & Control

UNIT - IV
OBJECTIVE
This Unit discuss how to manage contracts, people in software environments.

SYLLABUS
Managing Contracts, Managing people in Software Environments, Working in Teams

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UNIT V
OBJECTIVE
This Unit discusses about the PRINCE 2 concepts
SYLLABUS
Software Quality, An Overview of PRINCE 2
5.11.5 SUGGESTED BOOKS
TEXT BOOKS
T1 Bob Hughes and Mike Cotterell, Software Project Management, Tata McGraw Hill, 5th Edition-2010
T2 Walker Royce, Software Project Management: A Unified Framework Addison Wesely,1998

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Fundamentals of s/w engineering project Management
R2 The Project Management Book, by MikeHarding Roberts.
R3 A Project Management Primer, by Nick Jenkins
R4 The Project Management Life Cycle by Jason Westland
R5 Powerful Project Leadership by Wayne Strider

5.11.6 WEBSITES
1. http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/sofware_project_management
2. http://www.une.edu.au/courses/units/comp393
3. http://www.softwareprojects.org/software-project-management.html
4. http://www.forum.jntuworld.com
5. http://www.comp.glam.ac.uk

5.11.7 EXPERTS’ DETAILS


INTERNATIONAL
1. Dr. Bob Hughes
Principal Lecturer, Computing Engineering & Mathematics
Mouse Coomb,Brighton, UK
Email : R.THughes@brighton.ac.uk

2. Mike Cotterell
Programreader, School of computing mathematical & info.
University of Brighton,UK

3. Johan Gouws
B.Eng. & M.Eng.(Elec.)(Rand Afrikaans University, South Africa)
MRA (Heriot-Watt University, Scotland)
Ph.D.(Wageningen, the Netherlands)

NATIONAL
1. Leonie E.Gouws
B.Eng.(Mech.)(Rand Afrikaans University, South Africa)
M.Eng. (Engineering Management) (Rand Afrikaans University, South Africa)

2. Mr. Deepak B. Phatak


IIT Bangalore
Ph: 91-22-2576-7747
Email: dbp@it.iitb.ac.in

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3. Prof. P.Krishna Reddy


IIIT, Gachibowli, Hyderabad
Email: pkredy ET iit.ac.in
Ph : 91-40-23001967/9 Ext: 131/322

4. Mr. R.K. Joshi


IIT Bangalore
Email: vkj@cse.iitb.ac.in
Ph: 91-22-2576-7730

REGIONAL
1. Dr. M.S. Prasad Babu
Andhra University
Email: dramsprasadbabu@yahoo.co.in
Ph: 91-891-2844862. 91-891-2755898.

2. Mr. CH. Satyananda Reddy


Dept. of CS & System Engg.
Email: satyanand99@yahoo.com
Ph: 9866031661.

5.11.8 JOURNALS

INTERNATIONAL
1. International Journal of software and usability engineering
2. International Journal of software engineering and its application

NATIONAL
1. Journal of software project management and quality assurance published by international Science Press
2. Journal for Advances in Engineering Software

5.11.9 FINDINGS AND DEVELOPMENTS

1. “Using agents for distributed software project management”, Johan Gouws and Leonie E.Gouws , IEEE
paper on SPM,Vol.49, issue 12, December 2006

2. “Enhanced software project management by application of metrics & cost estimation techniques”, Dr Philip
T. Coxpp and Dr Philip T. Cox , IEEE paper on SPM, vol.29. issue 21, November 2006.

3. Impact of cost estimation on software project management”, W.hiang and Y.hill, IEEE Transactions on
software project management , vol.6, issue 1, pp: 2-11, Jan 2007.

5.11.10 STUDENTS SEMINAR TOPICS

1. Role of Software Project Management


2. Project Planning and Evaluation
3. Software effort Estimation
4. Risk Management
5. Resource Allocation

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5.11.11 SESSION PLAN

Sl. Topics in OU Lecture


Modules and Sub modules Books Referred Remarks
No. Syllabus No.
UNIT – I
Project, Software project vs. other T1Ch1.2,1.2,1.3
project
Contract Management and technical T1-Ch1.4
project management L1
Activities covered by SPM T1-Ch1.5
Plans, methods and methodologies T1-CH1.6
Introduction Ways to categorize software projects T1-CH1.7
to Software L2
1. Project What is Management? T1-CH1.8
Management Problems with s/w projects T1-CH1.9
Stakeholders, Management control T1-CH1.11,1.14
Setting Objectives L3 T1-CH1.10

Business case, Requirement T1-CH1.12,1.13


specification
L4
Introduction to Step Wise project
T1-Ch2.1
Project planning
Planning and Firs 5 steps T1-Ch2.2…2.6
Programe
Last 5 steps L5, L6,L7 T1-Ch2.7…2.11
Management

Conclusions T1-Ch2.12

Introduction to Project evaluation T1-Ch3.1

Project Strategic Assessment T1-Ch3.2


evaluation Technical Assessment L8,L9,L10 T1-Ch3.3
Cost-benefit analysis and evaluation
T1-Ch3.4,3.6
techniques
Cash flow forecasting T1-Ch3.5
Risk evaluation T1-Ch3.7
UNIT - II
2 Selection of an T1-Ch4
Choosing technologies & process
Appropriate L10
model
Project
Approach T1-Ch4
Waterfall model, V-process model L11
T1-Ch4
Spiral madel, Software Prototyping L12
Dynami systems development T1-Ch4
L13
Method
Managing iterative processes and T1-Ch4
L14
selecting appropriate process model

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Sl. Topics in OU Lecture Books


Modules and Sub modules Remarks
No. Syllabus No. Referred
Software Where estimation is done, problems with L15 T1-Ch5
Effort over and under estimation
Estimation L16 T1-Ch5
Software estimating techniques
Estimating by analogy, Albrecht function L17 T1-Ch5
point analysis
L18 T1-Ch5
Function points mark II
A procedural code-oriented approach, L19 T1-Ch5
COCOMO
Activity Projects schedules and activities T1-Ch6
L20
Planning
Network planning model and formulating T1-Ch6
L21
models
Forward pass and backward pass T1-Ch6
L22
Shortening the project duration T1-Ch6
L23
Identifying critical activities T1-Ch6
L24

Activity oa arrow networks T1-Ch6


L26

UNIT – III
3 Risk T1-Ch7
Nature and Type of Risk L25
Management
T1-Ch7
Hazard identification and analysis L26
T1-Ch7
Evaluating, planning and controlling risk L27
Resource T1-Ch8
Identifying and scheduling recourses L28
Allocation
T1-Ch8
Creating critical paths and counting costs L29
Being specific and publishing recourse T1-Ch8
L30
schedule
T1-Ch8
Cost schedules and scheduling sequences L31
Monitoring T1-Ch9
Creating framework and collecting data L32
and control
T1-Ch9
Cost monitoring and prioritizing L33
Getting project back to target, Change T1-Ch9
L34
control

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Sl. Topics in OU Lecturer Books


Modules and Sub modules Remarks
No. Syllabus No. Referred
UNIT - IV
4 L35
Introduction, Types of contract T1-Ch10
Managing L36
Stages in contract placement T1-Ch10
Contracts
L37
Contract management and acceptance T1-Ch10
Managing Understanding behavior - Organizational
L38 T1-Ch11
people in behavior
Software Selecting right person for the job L39 T1-Ch11
Environments, Motivation, The Oldham-Hack man job
Working in L40 T1-Ch11
characteristics model
Teams Working in groups, Becoming a leader,
L41 T1-Ch11
Decision Making, Leadership
Stress, Health and safety L42 T1-Ch11
UNIT-V
5 Software Place and importance of Software Quality L43 T1-Ch12
Quality ISO 9126 L44 T1-Ch12
Practical software quality measures,
L45 T1-Ch12
External standards
Product versus process quality
L46 T1-Ch12
management
Techniques to help enhance software
L47 T1-Ch12
quality, Quality plans
PRINCE 2 L48, L49, Appendix
Overview
L50 es

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5.11.12 Tutorial Plan

Tutorial Unit Topic Salient topics to be discussed


No. No.
T1 I Introduction to Project, Software project vs. other project, Contract
Software Project Management and technical project management,
Management Activities covered by SPM, Plans, methods and
methodologies, Ways to categorize software projects ,
What is Management?, Problems with s/w projects,
Stakeholders, Management control, Setting Objectives,
Business case, Requirement specification
T2 Project Planning and Introduction to Step Wise project planning, Firs 5 steps,
Program Management Last 5 steps
T3 Project evaluation Strategic Assessment, Technical Assessment , Cost-
benefit analysis and evaluation techniques , Cash flow
forecasting , Risk evaluation
T4 II Selection of an Choosing technologies & process model, Waterfall
Appropriate Project model, V-process model , Spiral model, Software
Approach Prototyping , Dynamic systems development Method,
Managing iterative processes and selecting appropriate
process model
T5 Where estimation is done, problems with over and under
estimation, Software estimating techniques, Estimating
Software Effort
by analogy, Albrecht function point analysis, Function
Estimation
points mark II, A procedural code-oriented approach,
COCOMO
T6 Activity Planning Projects schedules and activities, Network planning
model and formulating models, Forward pass and
backward pass, Shortening the project duration,
Identifying critical activities, Activity arrow networks
T7 III Risk Management Nature and Type of Risk, Hazard identification and
analysis, Evaluating, planning and controlling risk
T8 Resource Allocation Identifying and scheduling recourses, Creating critical
paths and counting costs, Being specific and publishing
recourse schedule, Cost schedules and scheduling
sequences
T9 Monitoring and control Creating framework and collecting data, Cost
monitoring and prioritizing, Getting project back to
target, Change control
T10 IV Managing Contracts Introduction, Types of contract, Stages in contract
placement, Contract management and acceptance
T11 Managing people in Understanding behavior - Organizational behavior,
Software Environments, Selecting right person for the job, Motivation, The
Working in Teams Oldham-Hack man job characteristics model, Working in
groups, Becoming a leader, Decision Making,
Leadership, Stress, Health and safety
T12 V Software Quality Place and importance of Software Quality, ISO 9126,
Practical software quality measures, External standards,
Product versus process quality management, Techniques
to help enhance software quality, Quality plans
T13 PRINCE 2 Overview

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5.11.13 QUESTION BANK

UNIT - I

1. i. Briefly explain the problems with software projects. (Feb 12)


ii. Briefly explain project control cycle.

2. i. Explain about analyse project characteristics step in step wise Planning. (Feb 12)
ii. Discuss about Programme Management.

3. Explain the difference between software projects and other projects in detail.

4. Explain contract management and technical project management.

5. Explain activities covered by the software project management.

6. What is management? Explain the problems with software projects.

7. Explain stakeholders and business case.

8. Explain management control in detail.

9. Explain the step-wise project planning in detail.

10. How to analyze the project character tics?

11. Explain the steps involved in to identify activity risks.

12. Explain the steps in project planning with case studies example.

UNIT - II

1. i. Explain V-Process model and Software Prototyping. (Feb 12)


ii. What is dynamic Systems Development Method.

2. Explain any two approaches to identifying the activities or tasks that make up a Project. (Feb 12)

3. What are the steps involved in project evolution?

4. Write in detail for project management with strategic programme.

5. How to manage the allocation of resources within programmes with examples.

6. Explain in detail strategic programme management.

7. What re the steps involves in creating a programme?

8. Explain the benefits of management.

9. Explain cost-benefit evaluation techniques.

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10. Explain decision trees with examples.

11. Explain risk evaluation.

12. What is meant by cash flow forecasting? Explain with example

UNIT - III

1. i. What is risk framework (Feb 12)


ii. Discuss about risk Planning

2. i. What factors are considered when allocating individuals to tasks? (Feb 12)
ii. What is Cost monitoring?
iii. What is Earned Value analysis.?

3. What are the objectives of activity planning?

4. W rite the steps involved in projectschedule.

5. Explain the approachesforidentifying the activities.

6. Explain in detailform ulating a network m odel.

7. W hatisthe difference forward passand backw ard passexplain with exam ple.

8. Explain activity-on-arrow networks.

9. Explain thecategoriesofrisk.

10. W hatare the approaches in risk identification?

11. Explain therisk planning.

12. H ow to evaluate the perttechniques.

UNIT - IV

1. Explain acquisition and supply process. (Feb 12)

2. i. Discuss about Oldham-Hackman job charectersitics model. (Feb 12)


ii. What are the methods of improving motivation?

3. Explain project control cycle in detail.

4. How to prepare activity assessment sheet?

5. Explain the method Earned value Analysis.

6. Explain the change in control procedures.

7. What is meant by contract? Explain the supply process in detail.

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8. Explain the different types of contract in detail.

9. Explain fixed price contracts with advantages and disadvantages.

10. Explain time and material contract with advantages and disadvantages

11. What are the stages in contract management?

12. What are the typical terms of a contract? Explain with examples.

UNIT - V

1. i. Explain software quality and its importance. (Feb 12)


ii. What is product and process quality management?

2. What is PRINCE 2 ? Explain PRINCE2 approach to planning. (Feb 12)

3. Explain the stepwise framework where staffing concerns are important.

4. Explain X theory and Y –theory. In detail.

5. Explain the recruitment process.

6. Define motivation. Explain maslow’s hierarchy of needs.

7. Explain the expectancy theory of motivation.

8. What the methods involved in motivation?

9. What are the steps needed to become a team?

10. Explain the leadership style in detail.

11. Explain the organizational structures.

12. Explain the stress and healthy and safety in detail.

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6. LAB DETAILS

6. 1 OBJECT ORIENTED SYSTEM DESIGN LAB

6.1.1 Objectives and Relevance

6.1.2 Prerequisites

6.1.3 Syllabus - O.U.

6.1.4 Suggested Books

6.1.5 Websites

6.1.6 Expert Details

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6.1.1 OBJECTIVESAND RELEVANCE

The main objective of this lab course is to gain practical hands on experience by exposing the concepts of
object oriented Analysis and Design, Designing tool,Rational Rose.Using designing tool we can provide
the graphical representation of any Application before developing.This tool will give the over all idea
about your project in a blue print
6.1.2 PREREQUISITES

The student should have the knowledge of object oriented concepts,object oriented designinig steps and
usage of Rational Rose tool.

PREAMBLE

This lab covers experiments in UML(Rational Rose) subject.The students have to perform OOAD Steps
on a given case study.

6.1.3 SYLLABUS – OU
EXPERIMENT NO.1
Overview of UML
OBJECTIVE
To Understand the elements of UML
PREREQUISITE
Knowledge on Modelling
DESCRIPTION
To understand each element of UML to model a software project
APPLICATION
In Drawing UMl diagrams.
TEXT BOOKS
T1 Grady Booch,James Rumbaugh,Ivor Jacobson,”The Unified Modelling Language User Guide”
T2 Pierre Alain Muller “Instand UML”

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Harman and Graig, Pearson Education, Applying UML and Patterns : An Introduction To Object Oriented
Analysis and Design ,
R2 Emits and Pauel BPB Publications, A UML Pattern Language.
EXPERIMENT NO.2
Use Case Modelling
OBJECTIVE
To Identify all the classes and relationships between them for a given case study
PREREQUISITE
Knowledge on use cases
DESCRIPTION
The students will identify use cases,actors and relationships for a given case study.

APPLICATION
In designing the project.

TEXT BOOKS
T1 Grady Booch,James Rumbaugh,Ivor Jacobson,”The Unified Modelling Language User Guide”
T2 Pierre Alain Muller “Instand UML”

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MCA III Year, I Semester

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Harman and Graig, Pearson Education, Applying UML and Patterns : An Introduction To Object Oriented
Analysis and Design ,
R2 Emits and Pauel BPB Publications, A UML Pattern Language.

EXPERIMENT NO.3
Structural Modelling - Class Diagrams
OBJECTIVE
To Identify all the classes and relationships between them for a given case study
PREREQUISITE
Knowledge on object oriented concepts
DESCRIPTION
The students will identify classes and relationships between them for a given case study.
APPLICATION
In designing the project.
TEXT BOOKS
T1 Grady Booch,James Rumbaugh,Ivor Jacobson,”The Unified Modelling Language User Guide”
T2: Pierre Alain Muller “Instand UML”

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Harman and Graig, Pearson Education, Applying UML and Patterns : An Introduction To Object Oriented
Analysis and Design ,
R2 Emits and Pauel BPB Publications, A UML Pattern Language.

EXPERIMENT NO.4
Structural Modelling - Object Diagram

OBJECTIVE
To Identify all the objects and their relationships at a point in time

PREREQUISITE
Knowledge on object oriented concepts

DESCRIPTION
The students will identify an instance of class and draw the object diagram

APPLICATION
In designing the project.

TEXT BOOKS
T1 Grady Booch,James Rumbaugh,Ivor Jacobson,”The Unified Modelling Language User Guide”
T2 Pierre Alain Muller “Instand UML”

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Harman and Graig, Pearson Education, Applying UML and Patterns : An Introduction To Object Oriented
Analysis and Design ,
R2 Emits and Pauel BPB Publications, A UML Pattern Language.

EXPERIMENT NO.5
Behavioural Modelling - Sequence Diagram

OBJECTIVE
To Visualise time ordering of messages

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MCA III Year, I Semester

PREREQUISITE
Knowledge of a particular scenario of the project

DESCRIPTION
The students will Identify a particular instance of the class andmessages passed between them and draw
the sequence diagram
APPLICATION
In describing the project.
TEXT BOOKS
T1 Grady Booch,James Rumbaugh,Ivor Jacobson,”The Unified Modelling Language User Guide”
T2 Pierre Alain Muller “Instand UML”

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Harman and Graig, Pearson Education, Applying UML and Patterns : An Introduction To Object Oriented
Analysis and Design ,
R2 Emits and Pauel BPB Publications, A UML Pattern Language.

EXPERIMENT NO.6
Collaboration Diagram
OBJECTIVE
To Visualise the organization of the objects that participate in an interaction
PREREQUISITE
Knowledge of a particular scenario of the project
DESCRIPTION
The students will draw collaboration diagram by placing the objects that participate in the interaction and
adorn the links with the links messages that objects send and recieve

APPLICATION
In describing the project.

TEXT BOOKS
T1 Grady Booch,James Rumbaugh,Ivor Jacobson,”The Unified Modelling Language User Guide”
T2 Pierre Alain Muller “Instand UML”

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Harman and Graig, Pearson Education, Applying UML and Patterns : An Introduction To Object Oriented
Analysis and Design ,
R2 Emits and Pauel BPB Publications, A UML Pattern Language.

EXPERIMENT NO.7
State chart diagram

OBJECTIVE
To show the changing states of an object using state chart diagram

PREREQUISITE
Knowledge of particular scenario of an project

DESCRIPTION
The students will draw state chart diagram that shows a state machine emphasizing the flow of control
from state to state .

APPLICATION
In describing the project.

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MCA III Year, I Semester

TEXT BOOKS
T1 Grady Booch,James Rumbaugh,Ivor Jacobson,”The Unified Modelling Language User Guide”
T2 Pierre Alain Muller “Instand UML”

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Harman and Graig, Pearson Education, Applying UML and Patterns : An Introduction To Object Oriented
Analysis and Design ,
R2 Emits and Pauel BPB Publications, A UML Pattern Language.

EXPERIMENT NO.8
Activity Diagram

OBJECTIVE
Modelling the sequencial steps in a computational process

PREREQUISITE
Knowledge of flow charts and functionality of an object
DESCRIPTION
The students will draw activity diagram that emphasizes the flow of an object as it moves from state to
state at different points in the flow of control

APPLICATION
In describing the project.

TEXT BOOKS
T1 Grady Booch,James Rumbaugh,Ivor Jacobson,”The Unified Modelling Language User Guide”
T2 Pierre Alain Muller “Instand UML”

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Harman and Graig, Pearson Education, Applying UML and Patterns : An Introduction To Object Oriented
Analysis and Design ,
R2 Emits and Pauel BPB Publications, A UML Pattern Language.

EXPERIMENT NO.9
Architectural Modelling - Component Diagram

OBJECTIVE
To model the physical aspects of object oriented system

PREREQUISITE
Knowledge on components and dependencies between them for the project

DESCRIPTION
The students will be able to draw component diagrams which is used to model the static implementation
view of a system.
APPLICATION
In describing the project.
TEXT BOOKS
T1 Grady Booch,James Rumbaugh,Ivor Jacobson,”The Unified Modelling Language User Guide”
T2 Pierre Alain Muller “Instand UML”

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Harman and Graig, Pearson Education, Applying UML and Patterns : An Introduction To Object Oriented
Analysis and Design ,
R2 Emits and Pauel BPB Publications, A UML Pattern Language.

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MCA III Year, I Semester

EXPERIMENT NO.10
Deployment Diagram

OBJECTIVE
To model the physical aspects of Object Oriented system

PREREQUISITE
Knowledge of systems configuration used in the project

DESCRIPTION
The students will draw Deployment diagram that shows the configuration of runtime processing nodes
and the components that live on them
APPLICATION
In describing the project.
TEXT BOOKS
T1 Grady Booch,James Rumbaugh,Ivor Jacobson,”The Unified Modelling Language User Guide”
T2 Pierre Alain Muller “Instand UML”

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Harman and Graig, Pearson Education, Applying UML and Patterns : An Introduction To Object Oriented
Analysis and Design ,
R2 Emits and Pauel BPB Publications, A UML Pattern Language.

6.1.4 SUGGESTED BOOKS


TEXT BOOKS
T1 Grady Booch,James Rumbaugh,Ivor Jacobson,”The Unified Modelling Language User Guide”
T2 Pierre Alain Muller “Instand UML”

REFERENCE BOOKS
R1 Harman and Graig, Pearson Education, Applying UML and Patterns : An Introduction To Object Oriented
Analysis and Design ,
R2 Emits and Pauel BPB Publications, A UML Pattern Language.
6.1.5 WEBSITES

1. www.uml.org
2. www.cetuslinks.org
3. www.umltutorials.trireme.com
4. www.omg.org
5. www.tlas.kennesan.edu

6.1.6 EXPERTS’ DETAILS


INTERNATIONAL
1. Mr. Douglas Lea
Professor of Computer Science
State University of Newyork, Oswego
Email : dl@oswego.edu
Ph : 315-312-2688

2. Dr. Jeff Sutherland


Chief Technology officer, pattienkeeper, inc
Email : jeff.sutherland@computer.org
Phone : 617-987-0394

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MCA III
III Year,
Year, II Semester
Semester

NATIONAL
1. Mr. Deepak B. Phatak
IIT Bangalore
Ph: 91-22-2576-7747
Email: dbp@it.iitb.ac.in
2. Prof. P.Krishna Reddy
IIIT, Gachibowli, Hyderabad
Email: pkredy ET iit.ac.in
Ph : 91-40-23001967/9 Ext: 131/322

3. Mr. R.K. Joshi


IIT Bangalore
Ph: 91-22-2576-7730
Email: vkj@cse.iitb.ac.in

REGIONAL
1. Dr. M.S. Prasad Babu
Andhra University
Ph: 91-891-2844862. 91-891-2755898.
Email: dramsprasadbabu@yahoo.co.in

2. Mr. CH. Satyananda Reddy


Dept. of CS & System Engg.
Ph: 9866031661
Email: satyanand99@yahoo.com

180
MCA III Year, I Semester

6. LAB DETAILS

6. 2 MIDDLE WARE TECHNOLOGY LAB

6.2.1 Objectives and Relevance

6.2.2 Prerequisites

6.2.3 Syllabus - O.U.

6.2.4 Suggested Books

6.2.5 Websites

6.2.6 Expert Details

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MCA III Year, I Semester

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MCA III Year, I Semester

6.2.1 OBJECTIVESAND RELEVANCE

The main objective of this lab course is to gain practical hands on experience by exposing the concepts of
Middleware Technologies. Using this technology we can develop a distributed applications using RMI,
CORBA, EJB and C#.NET.

6.2.2 PREREQUISITES

The student should have the knowledge of Core Java, EJB Basics and Deployment in different servers.

PREAMBLE

This lab covers experiments in RMI, EJB, CORBA, C#.NET. The students have to perform Different types
of steps in middleware technologies.

6.2.3 SYLLABUS – OU

EXPERIMENT NO.1
Create a distributed name server (like DNS) RMI

OBJECTIVE
The object of this programming is to develop a client and server communication using RMI

PREREQUISITE
Students should know the concept of JNDI and functionalities in programming

DESCRIPTION
In the program stub and skeleton will generate for each client and server . How the client and server
communicate will be explained with implementation

APPLICATION
Server service according to client request

TEXT BOOKS
T1 The complete reference j2ee

EXPERIMENT NO.2
Create a java bean to draw various graphical shapes and display it using or without using BDK.

OBJECTIVE
The objective of this program is to draw various graphical shapes using BDK.

PREREQUISITE
Students should know the AWT package

DESCRIPTION
Using java beans or BDK ,we can develop application for drawing different shapes.

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MCA III Year, I Semester

APPLICATION
Used fro drawing different graphical shapes using java beans or bdk

TEXT BOOKS
T1 The complete reference java

EXPERIMENT NO.3
Develop on enterprise java bean for student information system.

OBJECTIVE
Using this program we can develop a distributed application for student information using enterprise java
bean.

PREREQUISITE
Knowledge on object oriented concepts

DESCRIPTION
This programs works on different services like jboss, web logic ,websphere.We can understand how to
deploy in web logic server using back end servers like sql ,MS Excel.

APPLICATION
Using enterprise java beans we develop a student information system,likecreation,updates,insert,retriving.

TEXT BOOKS
T1 Enterprise java beans
T2 Java server programming -Black Book

EXPERIMENT NO.4
Develop on enterprise java bean for library operations.

OBJECTIVE
Using this program we can develop a distributed application for library operations.

PREREQUISITE
Students should know EJB programming on statefull, stateless, entity beans.

DESCRIPTION
In this program EJB s works on web logic server .We should know to display application how we get
different operations.

APPLICATION
Using EJB ’s we can develop a distributed applications. In this we develop a application for library
operation. Like inserting books information and check weather it is available or not.

TEXT BOOKS
T1 Enterprise java beans, Java server programming -BlackBook

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MCA III Year, I Semester

EXPERIMENT NO.5
Create an Active-x control for time table.

OBJECTIVE
The objective of this program is to develop application for time table using Active-x control and Active x
components.

PREREQUISITE
Students should know the c#.net environment.

DESCRIPTION
Using this Active-x control we can develop different application

APPLICATION
Using Active-x control we can develop any time table.

TEXT BOOKS
T1 C# Black Book
T2 O’ Reilly Programming C#

EXPERIMENT NO.6
Develop a component for converting the currency values usingcom/.Net

OBJECTIVE
Using this we can develop a .Net application a component for converting currency values.

PREREQUISITE
Student should know the c#.net

DESCRIPTION
This program explains different currency values by inserting one currency value.

APPLICATION
This program is for converting the different currency into rupee

TEXT BOOKS
T1 C# Black Book
T2 O’ Reilly, Programming C#.

EXPERIMENT NO.7
Develop a component for developing CD- catalog using c# or VB.Net.

OBJECTIVE
By using this program we can find different CD’s and the contents i.e. software name etc.

PREREQUISITE
Student should know the C# .Net

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MCA III Year, I Semester

DESCRIPTION
This component or application displays a user interface which takes one input as a identification by this
displays deals of CD’s available regarding topic.

APPLICATION
Using c# and .Net features we build a UI it contains details of cds availability.

TEXT BOOKS
T1 C# Black Book
T2 O’ Reilly, Programming C#

EXPERIMENT NO.8
Develop a component for retrieving information from message box using DCOM or .Net.

OBJECTIVE
By using we can retrieve information from component.

PREREQUISITE
Student should know C#.Net.

DESCRIPTION
This component contains some links or buttons when a event generated appropriate information is
displayed in one message box.

APPLICATION
Using C# and VB.Net feature we can build UI it contains the information in the form of buttons or
components.

TEXT BOOKS
T1 C# Black Book
T2 O’ Reilly, Programming C#.

EXPERIMENT NO.9
Develop a middle ware component for retrieving stock market exchange information using CORBA.

OBJECTIVE
The objective of this program is to develop a component for retrieving stock market exchange information
using common object request brokers architecture.

PREREQUISITE
Student should know the static and dynamic implementation of CORBA programming.

DESCRIPTION
Students can understand the information about the stack market what is the trading for single stack, we
can know.

APPLICATION
Using this application we can develop middleware component for stack market by using static CORBA.

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MCA III Year, I Semester

TEXT BOOKS
T1 Teach yourself CORBA in 14 days
T2 Programming with Java and CORBA

EXPERIMENT NO.10
Develop a middleware component for retriving bank balance using CORBA.

OBJECTIVE
The objective of this program is to draw develop a component for retriving bank balance using dynamic
common object request brokes architecture.

PRE-REQUISITES
Student should know implementation with dynamic, static CORBA, compiling and running with CORBA.

DESCRIPTION
This program work in visibrokes software or jdk1.4.we should get the difference.

APPLICATION
Using this application we develop a dynamic application for retrieving the information of balance of
particular person account.

TEXT BOOKS
T1 Teach yourself CORBA in 14 days
T2 Programming with Java and CORBA

6.2.4 SUGGESTED BOOKS

TEXT BOOKS
T1 Teach yourself CORBA in 14 days
T2 Programming with Java and CORBA

6.2.5 WEBSITES

1. www.java.sun.com
2. www.roseindia.com
3. www.de.laliluna.com
4. http://www.omg.org/gettingstarted/corbafaq.htm
5. http://www.cafeaulait.org/books.html

6.2.6 EXPERTS’ DETAILS


INTERNATIONAL
1. Dr. Theo Chiasson
Faculty of Computer Science
Dalhousie University
Phone: 902-494-3446
Email: theo@cs.dal.ca

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MCA
MCA III
III Year,
Year, II Semester
Semester

2. Dr. Philip T. Cox


Faculty of Computer Science
Dalhousie University
Phone: 902-494-6460
Email: pcox@cs.dal.ca

NATIONAL
1. Mr. Ashwin Gumaste
IIT Bombay
Ph: 91-22-2576-7911
Email: ashwin@cse.iitb.ac.in
2. D. Janakiram Professor
Department of Computer Science and Engineering
Indian Institute of Technology Madras
Chennai - 600 036, INDIA
Email: djram@iitm.ac.in

REGIONAL
1. Prof. M. Surendra Prasad Babu
Professor & Head of the Department
Department Of Computer Science & Systems Engineering
College of Engineering (Autonomous)
Andhra University, Visakhapatnam - 530 003
drmsprasadbabu@yahoo.co.in

2. S. Ramachandram, M.Tech.(O.U)
Systems Software and Distributed computing
(Co-coordinator, SSS) (Chairman, BoS, UCE)

188
www.aurora.edu.in

AURORA’S PG COLLEGE
RAMANTHAPUR, HYDERABAD - 500013.
PH: 040-27030787 Fax: +9140 27036468
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