Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 83

Chapter 19 Linear Programming

1. Linear programming techniques will always produce an optimal solution to an LP problem. 
True    False

2. LP problems must have a single goal or objective specified. 
True    False

3. Constraints limit the alternatives available to a decision­maker, removing constraints adds viable alternative 
solutions. 
True    False

4. An example of a decision variable in an LP problem is profit maximization. 
True    False

5. The feasible solution space only contains points that satisfy all constraints. 
True    False

6. The equation 5x + 7y = 10 is linear. 
True    False

7. The equation 3xy = 9 is linear. 
True    False

1
8. Graphical linear programming can handle problems that involve any number of decision variables. 
True    False

9. An objective function represents a family of parallel lines. 
True    False

10. The term "iso­profit" line means that all points on the line will yield the same profit. 
True    False

11. The feasible solution space is the set of all feasible combinations of decision variables as defined by only 
binding constraints. 
True    False

12. The value of an objective function decreases as it is moved away from the origin. 
True    False

13. A linear programming problem can have multiple optimal solutions. 
True    False

14. A maximization problem may be characterized by all greater than or equal to constraints. 
True    False

15. If a single optimal solution exists to a graphical LP problem, it will exist at a corner point. 
True    False

2
16. The simplex method is a general­purpose LP algorithm that can be used for solving only problems with 
more than six variables. 
True    False

17. A change in the value of an objective function coefficient does not change the optimal solution. 
True    False

18. The term "range of optimality" refers to a constraint's right­hand side quantity. 
True    False

19. A shadow price indicates how much a one­unit decrease/increase in the right­hand side value of a constraint 
will decrease/increase the optimal value of the objective function. 
True    False

20. The term "range of feasibility" refers to coefficients of the objective function. 
True    False

21. Non­zero slack or surplus is associated with a binding constraint. 
True    False

22. In the range of feasibility, the value of the shadow price remains constant. 
True    False

23. Every change in the value of an objective function coefficient will lead to changes in the optimal solution. 
True    False

3
24. Non­binding constraints are not associated with the feasible solution space; i.e., they are redundant and can 
be eliminated from the matrix. 
True    False

25. When a change in the value of an objective function coefficient remains within the range of optimality, the 
optimal solution would also remain the same. 
True    False

26. Using the enumeration approach, optimality is obtained by evaluating every coordinate. 
True    False

27. The linear optimization technique for allocating constrained resources among different products is: 
A. linear regression analysis
B. linear disaggregation
C. linear decomposition
D. linear programming
E. linear tracking analysis

28. Which of the following is not a component of the structure of a linear programming model? 
A. Constraints
B. Decision variables
C. Parameters
D. A goal or objective
E. Environmental uncertainty

4
29. Coordinates of all corner points are substituted into the objective function when we use the approach called: 
A. Least Squares
B. Regression
C. Enumeration
D. Graphical Linear Programming
E. Constraint Assignment

30. Which of the following could not be a linear programming problem constraint? 
A. 1A + 2B  3
B. 1A + 2B  3
C. 1A + 2B = 3
D. 1A + 2B + 3C + 4D  5
E. 1 A + 2B

31. For the products A, B, C and D, which of the following could be a linear programming objective function? 
A. Z = 1A + 2B + 3C + 4D
B. Z = 1A + 2BC + 3D
C. Z = 1A + 2AB + 3ABC + 4ABCD
D. Z = 1A + 2B/C + 3D
E. all of the above

32. The logical approach, from beginning to end, for assembling a linear programming model begins with: 
A. identifying the decision variables
B. identifying the objective function
C. specifying the objective function parameters
D. identifying the constraints
E. specifying the constraint parameters

5
33. The region which satisfies all of the constraints in graphical linear programming is called the: 
A. optimum solution space
B. region of optimality
C. lower left hand quadrant
D. region of non­negativity
E. feasible solution space

34. In graphical linear programming the objective function is: 
A. linear
B. a family of parallel lines
C. a family of iso­profit lines
D. all of the above
E. none of the above

35. Which objective function has the same slope as this one: $4x + $2y = $20? 
A. $4x + $2y = $10
B. $2x + $4y = $20
C. $2x ­ $4y = $20
D. $4x ­ $2y = $20
E. $8x + $8y = $20

36. For the constraints given below, which point is in the feasible solution space of this maximization problem?

    
A. x = 1, y = 5
B. x = ­1, y = 1
C. x = 4, y = 4
D. x = 2, y = 1
E. x = 2, y = 8

6
37. Which of the choices below constitutes a simultaneous solution to these equations?
    
A. x = 2, y = .5
B. x = 4, y = ­.5
C. x = 2, y = 1
D. x = y
E. y = 2x

38. Which of the choices below constitutes a simultaneous solution to these equations?     
A. x = 1, y = 1.5
B. x = .5, y = 2
C. x = 0, y = 3
D. x = 2, y = 0
E. x = 0, y = 0

39. What combination of x and y will yield the optimum for this problem?

    
A. x = 2, y = 0
B. x = 0, y = 0
C. x = 0, y = 3
D. x = 1, y = 5
E. none of the above

40. In graphical linear programming, when the objective function is parallel to one of the binding constraints, 
then: 
A. the solution is sub­optimal
B. multiple optimal solutions exist
C. a single corner point solution exists
D. no feasible solution exists
E. the constraint must be changed or eliminated

7
41. For the constraints given below, which point is in the feasible solution space of this minimization problem?

    
A. x = 0.5, y = 5.0
B. x = 0.0, y = 4.0
C. x = 2.0, y = 5.0
D. x = 1.0, y = 2.0
E. x = 2.0, y = 1.0

42. What combination of x and y will provide a minimum for this problem?

    
A. x = 0, y = 0
B. x = 0, y = 3
C. x = 0, y = 5
D. x = 1, y = 2.5
E. x = 6, y = 0

43. The theoretical limit on the number of decision variables that can be handled by the simplex method in a 
single problem is: 
A. 1
B. 2
C. 3
D. 4
E. unlimited

44. The theoretical limit on the number of constraints that can be handled by the simplex method in a single 
problem is: 
A. 1
B. 2
C. 3
D. 4
E. unlimited

 
8
45. A shadow price reflects which of the following in a maximization problem? 
A. marginal cost of adding additional resources
B. marginal gain in the objective that would be realized by adding one unit of a resource
C. net gain in the objective that would be realized by adding one unit of a resource
D. marginal gain in the objective that would be realized by subtracting one unit of a resource
E. expected value of perfect information

46. In linear programming, a non­zero reduced cost is associated with a: 
A. decision variable in the solution
B. decision variable not in the solution
C. constraint for which there is slack
D. constraint for which there is surplus
E. constraint for which there is no slack or surplus

47. A constraint that does not form a unique boundary of the feasible solution space is a: 
A. redundant constraint
B. binding constraint
C. non­binding constraint
D. feasible solution constraint
E. constraint that equals zero

48. In linear programming, sensitivity analysis is associated with:
(I) objective function coefficient
(II) right­hand side values of constraints
(III) constraint coefficient 
A. I and II
B. II and III
C. I, II and III
D. I and III
E. none of the above

9
49. Consider the following linear programming problem:

   
Solve the values of x and y that will maximize revenue. What revenue will result? 

 
 

50. A manager must decide on the mix of products to produce for the coming week. Product A requires three 
minutes per unit for molding, two minutes per unit for painting, and one minute per unit for packing. Product B 
requires two minutes per unit for molding, four minutes per unit for painting, and three minutes per unit for 
packing. There will be 600 minutes available for molding, 600 minutes for painting, and 420 minutes for 
packing. Both products have profits of $1.50 per unit.
(A) What combination of A and B will maximize profit?
(B) What is the maximum possible profit?
(C) How much of each resource will be unused for your solution? 

 
 

10
51. Given this problem:

   
(A) Solve for the quantities of x and y which will maximize Z.
(B) What is the maximum value of Z? 

 
 

52. Solve the following linear programming problem:

    

 
 

53. Consider the linear programming problem below:

   
Determine the optimum amounts of x and y in terms of cost minimization. What is the minimum cost? 

 
 

11
54. A small firm makes three products, which all follow the same three step process, which consists of milling, 
inspection, and drilling. Product A requires 6 minutes of milling, 5 minutes of inspection, and 4 minutes of 
drilling; product B requires 2.5 minutes of milling, 2 minutes of inspection, and 2 minutes of drilling; and 
product C requires 5 minutes of milling, 4 minutes of inspection, and 8 minutes of drilling. The department has 
20 hours available during the next period for milling, 15 hours for inspection, and 24 hours for drilling. Product 
A contributes $6.00 per unit to profit, product B contributes $4.00 per unit, and product C contributes $10.00 
per unit.
Use the following computer output to find the optimum mix of products in terms of maximizing contributions to
profits for the next period.
PROBLEM TITLE: LINEAR PROGRAMMING
PROBLEM IS A MAX WITH 3 VARIABLES AND 3 CONSTRAINTS.

   

   

   
NUMBER OF ITERATIONS: 2
OPTIMAL SOLUTION:
OBJECTIVE FUNCTION VALUE =2,070
DECISION VARIABLE SECTION:

   
SLACK VARIABLES SECTION:

    

 
 

12
 The production planner for Fine Coffees, Inc. produces two coffee blends: American (A) and British (B). Two 
of his resources are constrained: Columbia beans, of which he can get at most 300 pounds (4,800 ounces) per 
week; and Dominican beans, of which he can get at most 200 pounds (3,200 ounces) per week. Each pound of 
American blend coffee requires 12 ounces of Colombian beans and 4 ounces of Dominican beans, while a 
pound of British blend coffee uses 8 ounces of each type of bean. Profits for the American blend are $2.00 per 
pound, and profits for the British blend are $1.00 per pound.

55. What is the objective function? 
A. $1 A + $2 B = Z
B. $12 A + $8 B = Z
C. $2 A + $1 B = Z
D. $8 A + $12 B = Z
E. $4 A + $8 B = Z

56. What is the Columbia bean constraint? 
A. 1 A + 2 B  4,800
B. 12 A + 8 B  4,800
C. 2 A + 1 B  4,800
D. 8 A + 12 B  4,800
E. 4 A + 8 B  4,800

57. What is the Dominican bean constraint? 
A. 12A + 8B  4,800
B. 8A + 12B  4,800
C. 4A + 8B  3,200
D. 8A + 4B  3,200
E. 4A + 8B  4,800

13
58. Which of the following is not a feasible production combination? 
A. 0 A & 0 B
B. 0 A & 400 B
C. 200 A & 300 B
D. 400 A & 0 B
E. 400 A & 400 B

59. What are optimal weekly profits? 
A. $0
B. $400
C. $700
D. $800
E. $900

60. For the production combination of 0 American and 400 British, which resource is "slack" (not fully used)? 
A. Colombian beans (only)
B. Dominican beans (only)
C. both Colombian beans and Dominican beans
D. neither Colombian beans nor Dominican beans
E. cannot be determined exactly

 The operations manager for the Blue Moon Brewing Co. produces two beers: Lite (L) and Dark (D). Two of his
resources are constrained: production time, which is limited to 8 hours (480 minutes) per day; and malt extract 
(one of his ingredients), of which he can get only 675 gallons each day. To produce a keg of Lite beer requires 2
minutes of time and 5 gallons of malt extract, while each keg of Dark beer needs 4 minutes of time and 3 
gallons of malt extract. Profits for Lite beer are $3.00 per keg, and profits for Dark beer are $2.00 per keg.

14
61. What is the objective function? 
A. $2 L + $3 D = Z
B. $2 L + $4 D = Z
C. $3 L + $2 D = Z
D. $4 L + $2 D = Z
E. $5 L + $3 D = Z

62. What is the time constraint? 
A. 2 L + 3 D  480
B. 2 L + 4 D  480
C. 3 L + 2 D  480
D. 4 L + 2 D  480
E. 5 L + 3 D  480

63. Which of the following is not a feasible production combination? 
A. 0 L & 0 D
B. 0 L & 120 D
C. 90 L & 75 D
D. 135 L & 0 D
E. 135 L & 120 D

64. What are optimal daily profits? 
A. $0
B. $240
C. $420
D. $405
E. $505

15
65. For the production combination of 135 Lite and 0 Dark which resource is "slack" (not fully used)? 
A. time (only)
B. malt extract (only)
C. both time and malt extract
D. neither time nor malt extract
E. cannot be determined exactly

 The production planner for a private label soft drink maker is planning the production of two soft drinks: root 
beer (R) and sassafras soda (S). Two resources are constrained: production time (T), of which she has at most 
12 hours per day; and carbonated water (W), of which she can get at most 1500 gallons per day. A case of root 
beer requires 2 minutes of time and 5 gallons of water to produce, while a case of sassafras soda requires 3 
minutes of time and 5 gallons of water. Profits for the root beer are $6.00 per case, and profits for the sassafras 
soda are $4.00 per case.

66. What is the objective function? 
A. $4 R + $6 S = Z
B. $2 R + $3 S = Z
C. $6 R + $4 S = Z
D. $3 R + $2 S = Z
E. $5 R + $5 S = Z

67. What is the production time constraint (in minutes)? 
A. 2 R + 3 S  720
B. 2 R + 5 S  720
C. 3 R + 2 S  720
D. 3 R + 5 S  720
E. 5 R + 5 S  720

16
68. Which of the following is not a feasible production combination? 
A. 0 R & 0 S
B. 0 R & 240 S
C. 180 R & 120 S
D. 300 R & 0 S
E. 180 R & 240 S

69. What are optimal daily profits? 
A. $960
B. $1,560
C. $1,800
D. $1,900
E. $2,520

70. For the production combination of 180 Root beer and 0 Sassafras soda, which resource is "slack" (not fully 
used)? 
A. production time (only)
B. carbonated water (only)
C. both production time and carbonated water
D. neither production time and carbonated water
E. cannot be determined exactly

 An electronics firm produces two models of pocket calculators: the A­100 (A), which is an inexpensive four­
function calculator, and the B­200 (B), which also features square root and percent functions. Each model uses 
one (the same) circuit board, of which there are only 2,500 available for this week's production. Also, the 
company has allocated a maximum of 800 hours of assembly time this week for producing these calculators, of 
which the A­100 requires 15 minutes (.25 hours) each, and the B­200 requires 30 minutes (.5 hours) each to 
produce. The firm forecasts that it could sell a maximum of 4,000 A­100's this week and a maximum of 1,000 
B­200's. Profits for the A­100 are $1.00 each, and profits for the B­200 are $4.00 each.

17
71. What is the objective function? 
A. $4.00 A + $1.00 B = Z
B. $0.25 A + $1.00 B = Z
C. $1.00 A + $4.00 B = Z
D. $1.00 A + $1.00 B = Z
E. $0.25 A + $0.50 B = Z

72. What is the assembly time constraint (in hours)? 
A. 1 A + 1 B  800
B. 0.25 A + 0.5 B  800
C. 0.5 A + 0.25 B  800
D. 1 A + 0.5 B  800
E. 0.25 A + 1 B  800

73. Which of the following is not a feasible production/sales combination? 
A. 0 A & 0 B
B. 0 A & 1,000 B
C. 1,800 A & 700 B
D. 2,500 A & 0 B
E. 100 A & 1,600 B

74. What are optimal weekly profits? 
A. $10,000
B. $4,600
C. $2,500
D. $5,200
E. $6,400

18
75. For the production combination of 1,400 A­100's and 900 B­200's which resource is "slack" (not fully 
used)? 
A. circuit boards (only)
B. assembly time (only)
C. both circuit boards and assembly time
D. neither circuit boards nor assembly time
E. cannot be determined exactly

 A local bagel shop produces two products: bagels (B) and croissants (C). Each bagel requires 6 ounces of flour,
1 gram of yeast, and 2 tablespoons of sugar. A croissant requires 3 ounces of flour, 1 gram of yeast, and 4 
tablespoons of sugar. The company has 6,600 ounces of flour, 1,400 grams of yeast, and 4,800 tablespoons of 
sugar available for today's production run. Bagel profits are 20 cents each, and croissant profits are 30 cents 
each.

76. What is the objective function? 
A. $0.30 B + $0.20 C = Z
B. $0.60 B + $0.30 C = Z
C. $0.20 B + $0.30 C = Z
D. $0.20 B + $0.40 C = Z
E. $0.10 B + $0.10 C = Z

77. What is the sugar constraint (in tablespoons)? 
A. 6 B + 3 C  4,800
B. 1 B + 1 C  4,800
C. 2 B + 4 C  4,800
D. 4 B + 2 C  4,800
E. 2 B + 3 C  4,800

19
78. Which of the following is not a feasible production combination? 
A. 0 B & 0 C
B. 0 B & 1,100 C
C. 800 B & 600 C
D. 1,100 B & 0 C
E. 0 B & 1,400 C

79. What are optimal profits for today's production run? 
A. $580
B. $340
C. $220
D. $380
E. $420

80. For the production combination of 600 bagels and 800 croissants, which resource is "slack" (not fully 
used)? 
A. flour (only)
B. sugar (only)
C. flour and yeast
D. flour and sugar
E. yeast and sugar

 The owner of Crackers, Inc. produces two kinds of crackers: Deluxe (D) and Classic (C). She has a limited 
amount of the three ingredients used to produce these crackers available for her next production run: 4,800 
ounces of sugar; 9,600 ounces of flour, and 2,000 ounces of salt. A box of Deluxe crackers requires 2 ounces of 
sugar, 6 ounces of flour, and 1 ounce of salt to produce; while a box of Classic crackers requires 3 ounces of 
sugar, 8 ounces of flour, and 2 ounces of salt. Profits for a box of Deluxe crackers are $0.40; and for a box of 
Classic crackers, $0.50.

20
81. What is the objective function? 
A. $0.50 D + $0.40 C = Z
B. $0.20 D + $0.30 C = Z
C. $0.40 D + $0.50 C = Z
D. $0.10 D + $0.20 C = Z
E. $0.60 D + $0.80 C = Z

82. What is the constraint for sugar? 
A. 2 D + 3 C  4,800
B. 6 D + 8 C  4,800
C. 1 D + 2 C  4,800
D. 3 D + 2 C  4,800
E. 4 D + 5 C  4,800

83. Which of the following is not a feasible production combination? 
A. 0 D & 0 C
B. 0 D & 1,000 C
C. 800 D & 600 C
D. 1,600 D & 0 C
E. 0 D & 1,200 C

84. What are profits for the optimal production combination? 
A. $800
B. $500
C. $640
D. $620
E. $600

21
85. For the production combination of 800 boxes of Deluxe and 600 boxes of Classic, which resource is slack 
(not fully used)? 
A. sugar (only)
B. flour (only)
C. salt (only)
D. sugar and flour
E. sugar and salt

 The logistics/operations manager of a mail order house purchases two products for resale: King Beds (K) and 
Queen Beds (Q). Each King Bed costs $500 and requires 100 cubic feet of storage space, and each Queen Bed 
costs $300 and requires 90 cubic feet of storage space. The manager has $75,000 to invest in beds this week, 
and her warehouse has 18,000 cubic feet available for storage. Profit for each King Bed is $300, and for each 
Queen Bed is $150.

86. What is the objective function? 
A. Z = $150K + $300Q
B. Z = $500K + $300Q
C. Z = $300K + $150Q
D. Z = $300K + $500Q
E. Z = $100K + $90Q

87. What is the storage space constraint? 
A. 200K + 100Q  18,000
B. 200K + 90Q  18,000
C. 300K + 90Q  18,000
D. 500K + 100Q  18,000
E. 100K + 90Q  18,000

22
88. Which of the following is not a feasible purchase combination? 
A. 0 King Beds and 0 Queen Beds
B. 0 King Beds and 250 Queen Beds
C. 150 King Beds and 0 Queen Beds
D. 90 King Beds and 100 Queen Beds
E. 0 King Beds and 200 Queen Beds

89. What is the maximum profit? 
A. $0
B. $30,000
C. $42,000
D. $45,000
E. $54,000

90. For the purchase combination 0 King Beds and 200 Queen Beds, which resource is "slack" (not fully used)? 
A. investment money (only)
B. storage space (only)
C. both investment money and storage space
D. neither investment money nor storage space
E. cannot be determined exactly

23
91. Wood Specialties Company produces wall shelves, bookends, and shadow boxes. It is necessary to plan the 
production schedule for next week. The wall shelves, bookends, and shadow boxes are made of oak, of which 
the company has 600 board feet. A wall shelf requires 4 board feet, bookends require 2 board feet, and a 
shadow box requires 3 board feet. The company has a power saw for cutting the oak boards into the appropriate 
pieces; a wall shelf requires 30 minutes, bookends require 15 minutes, and a shadow box requires 15 minutes. 
The power saw is expected to be available for 36 hours next week. After cutting, the pieces of work in process 
are hand finished in the finishing department, which consists of 4 skilled and experienced craftsmen, each of 
whom can complete any of the products. A wall shelf requires 60 minutes of finishing, bookends require 30 
minutes, and a shadow box requires 90 minutes. The finishing department is expected to operate for 40 hours 
next week. Wall shelves sell for $29.95 and have a unit variable cost of $17.95; bookends sell for $11.95 and 
have a unit variable cost of $4.95; a shadow box sells for $16.95 and has a unit variable cost of $8.95.
(A) Is this a problem in maximization or minimization?
(B) What are the decision variables? Suggest symbols for them.
(C) What is the objective function?
(D) What are the constraints? 

 
 

 A company produces two products (A and B) using three resources (I, II, and III). Each product A requires 1 
unit of resource I and 3 units of resource II; and has a profit of $1. Each product B requires 2 units of resource I,
3 units of resource II, and 4 units of resource III; and has a profit of $3. Resource I is constrained to 40 units 
maximum per day; resource II, 90 units; and resource III, 60 units.

92. What is the objective function? 

 
 

24
93. What is the constraint for resource I? 

 
 

94. What is the constraint for resource II? 

 
 

95. What is the constraint for resource III? 

 
 

96. What are the corner points of the feasible solution space? 

 
 

25
97. Is the production combination 10 A's and 10 B's feasible? 

 
 

98. Is the production combination 15 A's and 15 B's feasible? 

 
 

99. What is the optimum production combination and its profits? 

 
 

100. What is the slack (unused amount) for each resource for the optimum production combination? 

 
 

26
101. A novice linear programmer is dealing with a three decision­variable problem. To compare the 
attractiveness of various feasible decision­variable combinations, values of the objective function at corners are 
calculated. This is an example of _________. 
A. empiritation
B. explicitation
C. evaluation
D. enumeration
E. elicitation

102. When we use less of a resource than was available, in linear programming that resource would be called 
non­ __________. 
A. binding
B. feasible
C. reduced cost
D. linear
E. enumerated

103. Once we go beyond two decision variables, typically the ___________ method of linear programming 
must be used. 
A. simplicit
B. unidimensional
C. simplex
D. dynamic
E. exponential

104. _________________ is a means of assessing the impact of changing parameters in a linear programming 
model. 
A. simulplex
B. simplex
C. slack
D. surplus
E. sensitivity

27
105. It has been determined that, with respect to resource X, a one­unit increase in availability of X would lead 
to a $3.50 increase in the value of the objective function. This value would be X's _______. 
A. range of optimality
B. shadow price
C. range of feasibility
D. slack
E. surplus

28
19 Key
 

1. Linear programming techniques will always produce an optimal solution to an LP problem. 
FALSE

Some problems do not have optimal solutions.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­01 Describe the type of problem that would lend itself to solution using linear programming.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #1
Topic Area: Introduction
 

2. LP problems must have a single goal or objective specified. 
TRUE

An LP problem must have a specified objection function.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Easy
Learning Objective: 19­01 Describe the type of problem that would lend itself to solution using linear programming.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #2
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

1
3. Constraints limit the alternatives available to a decision­maker, removing constraints adds viable alternative 
solutions. 
TRUE

Increasing constraints narrows the feasible alternatives.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­01 Describe the type of problem that would lend itself to solution using linear programming.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #3
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

4. An example of a decision variable in an LP problem is profit maximization. 
FALSE

Cost minimization would be another LP decision variable.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­01 Describe the type of problem that would lend itself to solution using linear programming.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #4
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

5. The feasible solution space only contains points that satisfy all constraints. 
TRUE

A solution is only feasible if it satisfies all constraints.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Easy
Learning Objective: 19­01 Describe the type of problem that would lend itself to solution using linear programming.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #5
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

2
6. The equation 5x + 7y = 10 is linear. 
TRUE

This is a linear equation.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Easy
Learning Objective: 19­01 Describe the type of problem that would lend itself to solution using linear programming.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #6
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

7. The equation 3xy = 9 is linear. 
FALSE

This is a non­linear equation.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Understand
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­01 Describe the type of problem that would lend itself to solution using linear programming.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #7
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

8. Graphical linear programming can handle problems that involve any number of decision variables. 
FALSE

Graphical solutions typically can only handle two decision variables.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Easy
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #8
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

3
9. An objective function represents a family of parallel lines. 
TRUE

These lines intersect with solution space corners defined by the constraints.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #9
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

10. The term "iso­profit" line means that all points on the line will yield the same profit. 
TRUE

Iso­profit means equal profit.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Easy
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #10
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

11. The feasible solution space is the set of all feasible combinations of decision variables as defined by only 
binding constraints. 
FALSE

Even non­binding constraints shape the solution space.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Hard
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #11
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

4
12. The value of an objective function decreases as it is moved away from the origin. 
FALSE

The value increases as the function moves away from the origin.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #12
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

13. A linear programming problem can have multiple optimal solutions. 
TRUE

This can happen if the objective function has the same slope as a binding constraint.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­01 Describe the type of problem that would lend itself to solution using linear programming.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #13
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

14. A maximization problem may be characterized by all greater than or equal to constraints. 
FALSE

Greater than or equal to constraints are more frequently seen in minimization problems.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Understand
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­01 Describe the type of problem that would lend itself to solution using linear programming.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #14
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

5
15. If a single optimal solution exists to a graphical LP problem, it will exist at a corner point. 
TRUE

The corners of the feasible space are where optimal solutions tend to reside.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Easy
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #15
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

16. The simplex method is a general­purpose LP algorithm that can be used for solving only problems with 
more than six variables. 
FALSE

The simplex method can handle virtually unlimited numbers of decision variables.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Understand
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­04 Interpret computer solutions of linear programming problems.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #16
Topic Area: The Simplex Method
 

17. A change in the value of an objective function coefficient does not change the optimal solution. 
FALSE

There are limits as to how much objective function coefficients can change without affecting the optimal 
solution.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­05 Do sensitivity analysis on the solution of a linear programming problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #17
Topic Area: Sensitivity Analysis
 

6
18. The term "range of optimality" refers to a constraint's right­hand side quantity. 
TRUE

This is range over which the right­hand side quantity can change without affecting the optimal solution.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Easy
Learning Objective: 19­05 Do sensitivity analysis on the solution of a linear programming problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #18
Topic Area: Sensitivity Analysis
 

19. A shadow price indicates how much a one­unit decrease/increase in the right­hand side value of a constraint 
will decrease/increase the optimal value of the objective function. 
TRUE

The shadow price represents the marginal value of an additional unit of the constrained resource.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­05 Do sensitivity analysis on the solution of a linear programming problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #19
Topic Area: Sensitivity Analysis
 

20. The term "range of feasibility" refers to coefficients of the objective function. 
FALSE

The range of feasibility deals with how much the right­hand side values can change without affecting the 
optimal solution.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Hard
Learning Objective: 19­05 Do sensitivity analysis on the solution of a linear programming problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #20
Topic Area: Sensitivity Analysis
 

7
21. Non­zero slack or surplus is associated with a binding constraint. 
FALSE

This would be associated with non­binding constraints.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #21
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

22. In the range of feasibility, the value of the shadow price remains constant. 
TRUE

This would be because the optimal values for the decision variables remain constant.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Hard
Learning Objective: 19­05 Do sensitivity analysis on the solution of a linear programming problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #22
Topic Area: Sensitivity Analysis
 

23. Every change in the value of an objective function coefficient will lead to changes in the optimal solution. 
FALSE

Objective function coefficient changes do not necessarily lead to changes in the optimal solution.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­05 Do sensitivity analysis on the solution of a linear programming problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #23
Topic Area: Sensitivity Analysis
 

8
24. Non­binding constraints are not associated with the feasible solution space; i.e., they are redundant and can 
be eliminated from the matrix. 
FALSE

Non­binding constraints do shape the feasible solution space.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #24
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

25. When a change in the value of an objective function coefficient remains within the range of optimality, the 
optimal solution would also remain the same. 
TRUE

The range of optimality specifies how much the value can change.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­05 Do sensitivity analysis on the solution of a linear programming problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #25
Topic Area: Sensitivity Analysis
 

26. Using the enumeration approach, optimality is obtained by evaluating every coordinate. 
FALSE

In the enumeration approach every corner of the feasible space is evaluated.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #26
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

9
27. The linear optimization technique for allocating constrained resources among different products is: 
A. linear regression analysis
B. linear disaggregation
C. linear decomposition
D. linear programming
E. linear tracking analysis

Allocating resources is a common use of linear programming.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Easy
Learning Objective: 19­01 Describe the type of problem that would lend itself to solution using linear programming.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #27
Topic Area: Introduction
 

28. Which of the following is not a component of the structure of a linear programming model? 
A. Constraints
B. Decision variables
C. Parameters
D. A goal or objective
E. Environmental uncertainty

Facets of the environment are assumed to be known with certainty.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #28
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

10
29. Coordinates of all corner points are substituted into the objective function when we use the approach called: 
A. Least Squares
B. Regression
C. Enumeration
D. Graphical Linear Programming
E. Constraint Assignment

We compare all of these solutions to find the optimal one.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #29
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

30. Which of the following could not be a linear programming problem constraint? 
A. 1A + 2B  3
B. 1A + 2B  3
C. 1A + 2B = 3
D. 1A + 2B + 3C + 4D  5
E. 1 A + 2B

There is no right­hand value.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #30
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

11
31. For the products A, B, C and D, which of the following could be a linear programming objective function? 
A. Z = 1A + 2B + 3C + 4D
B. Z = 1A + 2BC + 3D
C. Z = 1A + 2AB + 3ABC + 4ABCD
D. Z = 1A + 2B/C + 3D
E. all of the above

This is the only linear function among all of these functions.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Understand
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #31
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

32. The logical approach, from beginning to end, for assembling a linear programming model begins with: 
A. identifying the decision variables
B. identifying the objective function
C. specifying the objective function parameters
D. identifying the constraints
E. specifying the constraint parameters

These are the variables whose value we are trying to determine.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #32
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

12
33. The region which satisfies all of the constraints in graphical linear programming is called the: 
A. optimum solution space
B. region of optimality
C. lower left hand quadrant
D. region of non­negativity
E. feasible solution space

This is the feasible region.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Easy
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #33
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

34. In graphical linear programming the objective function is: 
A. linear
B. a family of parallel lines
C. a family of iso­profit lines
D. all of the above
E. none of the above

All of these are valid.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #34
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

13
35. Which objective function has the same slope as this one: $4x + $2y = $20? 
A. $4x + $2y = $10
B. $2x + $4y = $20
C. $2x ­ $4y = $20
D. $4x ­ $2y = $20
E. $8x + $8y = $20

Although the right­hand side is different, the slope is the same.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Understand
Difficulty: Easy
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #35
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

36. For the constraints given below, which point is in the feasible solution space of this maximization problem?

    
A. x = 1, y = 5
B. x = ­1, y = 1
C. x = 4, y = 4
D. x = 2, y = 1
E. x = 2, y = 8

These points are in the feasible solution space.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #36
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

14
37. Which of the choices below constitutes a simultaneous solution to these equations?
    
A. x = 2, y = .5
B. x = 4, y = ­.5
C. x = 2, y = 1
D. x = y
E. y = 2x

These points satisfy both equations.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #37
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

38. Which of the choices below constitutes a simultaneous solution to these equations?     
A. x = 1, y = 1.5
B. x = .5, y = 2
C. x = 0, y = 3
D. x = 2, y = 0
E. x = 0, y = 0

These points satisfy both equations.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #38
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

15
39. What combination of x and y will yield the optimum for this problem?

    
A. x = 2, y = 0
B. x = 0, y = 0
C. x = 0, y = 3
D. x = 1, y = 5
E. none of the above

This is the optimum solution.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Hard
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #39
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

40. In graphical linear programming, when the objective function is parallel to one of the binding constraints, 
then: 
A. the solution is sub­optimal
B. multiple optimal solutions exist
C. a single corner point solution exists
D. no feasible solution exists
E. the constraint must be changed or eliminated

Multiple optima exist when the objective function parallels a binding constraint.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Understand
Difficulty: Hard
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #40
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

16
41. For the constraints given below, which point is in the feasible solution space of this minimization problem?

    
A. x = 0.5, y = 5.0
B. x = 0.0, y = 4.0
C. x = 2.0, y = 5.0
D. x = 1.0, y = 2.0
E. x = 2.0, y = 1.0

This point satisfies both inequalities.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Hard
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #41
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

42. What combination of x and y will provide a minimum for this problem?

    
A. x = 0, y = 0
B. x = 0, y = 3
C. x = 0, y = 5
D. x = 1, y = 2.5
E. x = 6, y = 0

This is a feasible and optimal solution for this problem.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Hard
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #42
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

17
43. The theoretical limit on the number of decision variables that can be handled by the simplex method in a 
single problem is: 
A. 1
B. 2
C. 3
D. 4
E. unlimited

The simplex method can handle almost any number of decision variables.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Easy
Learning Objective: 19­01 Describe the type of problem that would lend itself to solution using linear programming.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #43
Topic Area: The Simplex Method
 

44. The theoretical limit on the number of constraints that can be handled by the simplex method in a single 
problem is: 
A. 1
B. 2
C. 3
D. 4
E. unlimited

The simplex method can handle almost any number of constraints.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Easy
Learning Objective: 19­01 Describe the type of problem that would lend itself to solution using linear programming.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #44
Topic Area: The Simplex Method
 

18
45. A shadow price reflects which of the following in a maximization problem? 
A. marginal cost of adding additional resources
B. marginal gain in the objective that would be realized by adding one unit of a resource
C. net gain in the objective that would be realized by adding one unit of a resource
D. marginal gain in the objective that would be realized by subtracting one unit of a resource
E. expected value of perfect information

A constraint's shadow price represents the increase in the objective that would accompany a one­unit increase in
that constraint.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Hard
Learning Objective: 19­05 Do sensitivity analysis on the solution of a linear programming problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #45
Topic Area: Sensitivity Analysis
 

46. In linear programming, a non­zero reduced cost is associated with a: 
A. decision variable in the solution
B. decision variable not in the solution
C. constraint for which there is slack
D. constraint for which there is surplus
E. constraint for which there is no slack or surplus

Unless the objective coefficient increases by more than the reduced cost, that decision variable will remain 
outside the solution.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Understand
Difficulty: Hard
Learning Objective: 19­05 Do sensitivity analysis on the solution of a linear programming problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #46
Topic Area: Sensitivity Analysis
 

19
47. A constraint that does not form a unique boundary of the feasible solution space is a: 
A. redundant constraint
B. binding constraint
C. non­binding constraint
D. feasible solution constraint
E. constraint that equals zero

It is redundant because another constraint already forms the same boundary.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #47
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

48. In linear programming, sensitivity analysis is associated with:
(I) objective function coefficient
(II) right­hand side values of constraints
(III) constraint coefficient 
A. I and II
B. II and III
C. I, II and III
D. I and III
E. none of the above

All of these are evaluated through sensitivity analysis.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­05 Do sensitivity analysis on the solution of a linear programming problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #48
Topic Area: Sensitivity Analysis
 

20
49. Consider the following linear programming problem:

   
Solve the values of x and y that will maximize revenue. What revenue will result? 

x = 0, y = 8, Revenue = $160

Feedback: Use the graphical approach to linear programming.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #49
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

21
50. A manager must decide on the mix of products to produce for the coming week. Product A requires three 
minutes per unit for molding, two minutes per unit for painting, and one minute per unit for packing. Product B 
requires two minutes per unit for molding, four minutes per unit for painting, and three minutes per unit for 
packing. There will be 600 minutes available for molding, 600 minutes for painting, and 420 minutes for 
packing. Both products have profits of $1.50 per unit.
(A) What combination of A and B will maximize profit?
(B) What is the maximum possible profit?
(C) How much of each resource will be unused for your solution? 

   

   
(A) A = 150, B = 175
(B) $1.50(150) + $1.50(75) = $337.50
(C) Molding and painting: 0; packing 45 minutes

Feedback: Use the graphical approach to linear programming.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #50
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

22
51. Given this problem:

   
(A) Solve for the quantities of x and y which will maximize Z.
(B) What is the maximum value of Z? 

   

Feedback: Use the graphical approach to linear programming.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #51
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

23
52. Solve the following linear programming problem:

    

   

Feedback: Use the graphical approach to linear programming.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #52
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

24
53. Consider the linear programming problem below:

   
Determine the optimum amounts of x and y in terms of cost minimization. What is the minimum cost? 

   

Feedback: Use the graphical approach to linear programming.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #53
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

25
54. A small firm makes three products, which all follow the same three step process, which consists of milling, 
inspection, and drilling. Product A requires 6 minutes of milling, 5 minutes of inspection, and 4 minutes of 
drilling; product B requires 2.5 minutes of milling, 2 minutes of inspection, and 2 minutes of drilling; and 
product C requires 5 minutes of milling, 4 minutes of inspection, and 8 minutes of drilling. The department has 
20 hours available during the next period for milling, 15 hours for inspection, and 24 hours for drilling. Product 
A contributes $6.00 per unit to profit, product B contributes $4.00 per unit, and product C contributes $10.00 
per unit.
Use the following computer output to find the optimum mix of products in terms of maximizing contributions to
profits for the next period.
PROBLEM TITLE: LINEAR PROGRAMMING
PROBLEM IS A MAX WITH 3 VARIABLES AND 3 CONSTRAINTS.

   

   

   
NUMBER OF ITERATIONS: 2
OPTIMAL SOLUTION:
OBJECTIVE FUNCTION VALUE =2,070
DECISION VARIABLE SECTION:

   
SLACK VARIABLES SECTION:

    

The optimum product mix is 180 units of X2 and 135 units of X3, with an objective function value of 2,070.

Feedback: Interpret the computer program output.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­04 Interpret computer solutions of linear programming problems.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #54
Topic Area: Computer Solutions
 

26
 The production planner for Fine Coffees, Inc. produces two coffee blends: American (A) and British (B). Two 
of his resources are constrained: Columbia beans, of which he can get at most 300 pounds (4,800 ounces) per 
week; and Dominican beans, of which he can get at most 200 pounds (3,200 ounces) per week. Each pound of 
American blend coffee requires 12 ounces of Colombian beans and 4 ounces of Dominican beans, while a 
pound of British blend coffee uses 8 ounces of each type of bean. Profits for the American blend are $2.00 per 
pound, and profits for the British blend are $1.00 per pound.

Stevenson ­ Chapter 19
 

55. What is the objective function? 
A. $1 A + $2 B = Z
B. $12 A + $8 B = Z
C. $2 A + $1 B = Z
D. $8 A + $12 B = Z
E. $4 A + $8 B = Z

This represents how much profit changes by increases in the decision variables.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #55
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

27
56. What is the Columbia bean constraint? 
A. 1 A + 2 B  4,800
B. 12 A + 8 B  4,800
C. 2 A + 1 B  4,800
D. 8 A + 12 B  4,800
E. 4 A + 8 B  4,800

This summarizes limitations with respect to this resource.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #56
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

57. What is the Dominican bean constraint? 
A. 12A + 8B  4,800
B. 8A + 12B  4,800
C. 4A + 8B  3,200
D. 8A + 4B  3,200
E. 4A + 8B  4,800

This summarizes limitations with respect to this resource.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #57
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

28
58. Which of the following is not a feasible production combination? 
A. 0 A & 0 B
B. 0 A & 400 B
C. 200 A & 300 B
D. 400 A & 0 B
E. 400 A & 400 B

This is not feasible.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #58
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

59. What are optimal weekly profits? 
A. $0
B. $400
C. $700
D. $800
E. $900

Use the graphical approach to linear programming.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #59
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

29
60. For the production combination of 0 American and 400 British, which resource is "slack" (not fully used)? 
A. Colombian beans (only)
B. Dominican beans (only)
C. both Colombian beans and Dominican beans
D. neither Colombian beans nor Dominican beans
E. cannot be determined exactly

Enter the appropriate values for the decision variables and interpret the results.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #60
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

 The operations manager for the Blue Moon Brewing Co. produces two beers: Lite (L) and Dark (D). Two of his
resources are constrained: production time, which is limited to 8 hours (480 minutes) per day; and malt extract 
(one of his ingredients), of which he can get only 675 gallons each day. To produce a keg of Lite beer requires 2
minutes of time and 5 gallons of malt extract, while each keg of Dark beer needs 4 minutes of time and 3 
gallons of malt extract. Profits for Lite beer are $3.00 per keg, and profits for Dark beer are $2.00 per keg.

Stevenson ­ Chapter 19
 

30
61. What is the objective function? 
A. $2 L + $3 D = Z
B. $2 L + $4 D = Z
C. $3 L + $2 D = Z
D. $4 L + $2 D = Z
E. $5 L + $3 D = Z

This is the objective function.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #61
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

62. What is the time constraint? 
A. 2 L + 3 D  480
B. 2 L + 4 D  480
C. 3 L + 2 D  480
D. 4 L + 2 D  480
E. 5 L + 3 D  480

This summarizes the usage limits for this resource in this situation.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #62
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

31
63. Which of the following is not a feasible production combination? 
A. 0 L & 0 D
B. 0 L & 120 D
C. 90 L & 75 D
D. 135 L & 0 D
E. 135 L & 120 D

Enter the appropriate values for the decision variables and interpret the results.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #63
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

64. What are optimal daily profits? 
A. $0
B. $240
C. $420
D. $405
E. $505

Use the graphical approach to linear programming.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #64
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

32
65. For the production combination of 135 Lite and 0 Dark which resource is "slack" (not fully used)? 
A. time (only)
B. malt extract (only)
C. both time and malt extract
D. neither time nor malt extract
E. cannot be determined exactly

Enter the appropriate values for the decision variables and interpret the results.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #65
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

 The production planner for a private label soft drink maker is planning the production of two soft drinks: root 
beer (R) and sassafras soda (S). Two resources are constrained: production time (T), of which she has at most 
12 hours per day; and carbonated water (W), of which she can get at most 1500 gallons per day. A case of root 
beer requires 2 minutes of time and 5 gallons of water to produce, while a case of sassafras soda requires 3 
minutes of time and 5 gallons of water. Profits for the root beer are $6.00 per case, and profits for the sassafras 
soda are $4.00 per case.

Stevenson ­ Chapter 19
 

33
66. What is the objective function? 
A. $4 R + $6 S = Z
B. $2 R + $3 S = Z
C. $6 R + $4 S = Z
D. $3 R + $2 S = Z
E. $5 R + $5 S = Z

This is the objective function.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #66
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

67. What is the production time constraint (in minutes)? 
A. 2 R + 3 S  720
B. 2 R + 5 S  720
C. 3 R + 2 S  720
D. 3 R + 5 S  720
E. 5 R + 5 S  720

This summarizes the usage possibilities with respect to this resource.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #67
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

34
68. Which of the following is not a feasible production combination? 
A. 0 R & 0 S
B. 0 R & 240 S
C. 180 R & 120 S
D. 300 R & 0 S
E. 180 R & 240 S

This combination is not feasible.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #68
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

69. What are optimal daily profits? 
A. $960
B. $1,560
C. $1,800
D. $1,900
E. $2,520

Use the graphical linear programming approach.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #69
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

35
70. For the production combination of 180 Root beer and 0 Sassafras soda, which resource is "slack" (not fully 
used)? 
A. production time (only)
B. carbonated water (only)
C. both production time and carbonated water
D. neither production time and carbonated water
E. cannot be determined exactly

Enter appropriate values for the decision variables and interpret the results.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #70
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

 An electronics firm produces two models of pocket calculators: the A­100 (A), which is an inexpensive four­
function calculator, and the B­200 (B), which also features square root and percent functions. Each model uses 
one (the same) circuit board, of which there are only 2,500 available for this week's production. Also, the 
company has allocated a maximum of 800 hours of assembly time this week for producing these calculators, of 
which the A­100 requires 15 minutes (.25 hours) each, and the B­200 requires 30 minutes (.5 hours) each to 
produce. The firm forecasts that it could sell a maximum of 4,000 A­100's this week and a maximum of 1,000 
B­200's. Profits for the A­100 are $1.00 each, and profits for the B­200 are $4.00 each.

Stevenson ­ Chapter 19
 

36
71. What is the objective function? 
A. $4.00 A + $1.00 B = Z
B. $0.25 A + $1.00 B = Z
C. $1.00 A + $4.00 B = Z
D. $1.00 A + $1.00 B = Z
E. $0.25 A + $0.50 B = Z

This is the objective function.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #71
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

72. What is the assembly time constraint (in hours)? 
A. 1 A + 1 B  800
B. 0.25 A + 0.5 B  800
C. 0.5 A + 0.25 B  800
D. 1 A + 0.5 B  800
E. 0.25 A + 1 B  800

This summarizes the usage possibilities for this resource.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #72
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

37
73. Which of the following is not a feasible production/sales combination? 
A. 0 A & 0 B
B. 0 A & 1,000 B
C. 1,800 A & 700 B
D. 2,500 A & 0 B
E. 100 A & 1,600 B

This is not a feasible combination.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #73
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

74. What are optimal weekly profits? 
A. $10,000
B. $4,600
C. $2,500
D. $5,200
E. $6,400

Use the graphical linear programming approach.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #74
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

38
75. For the production combination of 1,400 A­100's and 900 B­200's which resource is "slack" (not fully 
used)? 
A. circuit boards (only)
B. assembly time (only)
C. both circuit boards and assembly time
D. neither circuit boards nor assembly time
E. cannot be determined exactly

Enter appropriate values for the decision variables and interpret the results.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #75
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

 A local bagel shop produces two products: bagels (B) and croissants (C). Each bagel requires 6 ounces of flour,
1 gram of yeast, and 2 tablespoons of sugar. A croissant requires 3 ounces of flour, 1 gram of yeast, and 4 
tablespoons of sugar. The company has 6,600 ounces of flour, 1,400 grams of yeast, and 4,800 tablespoons of 
sugar available for today's production run. Bagel profits are 20 cents each, and croissant profits are 30 cents 
each.

Stevenson ­ Chapter 19
 

39
76. What is the objective function? 
A. $0.30 B + $0.20 C = Z
B. $0.60 B + $0.30 C = Z
C. $0.20 B + $0.30 C = Z
D. $0.20 B + $0.40 C = Z
E. $0.10 B + $0.10 C = Z

This is the objective function.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #76
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

77. What is the sugar constraint (in tablespoons)? 
A. 6 B + 3 C  4,800
B. 1 B + 1 C  4,800
C. 2 B + 4 C  4,800
D. 4 B + 2 C  4,800
E. 2 B + 3 C  4,800

This summarizes usage possibilities with respect to this resource.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #77
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

40
78. Which of the following is not a feasible production combination? 
A. 0 B & 0 C
B. 0 B & 1,100 C
C. 800 B & 600 C
D. 1,100 B & 0 C
E. 0 B & 1,400 C

This uses 5,600 when only 4,800 are available.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #78
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

79. What are optimal profits for today's production run? 
A. $580
B. $340
C. $220
D. $380
E. $420

Use the graphical linear programming method.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #79
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

41
80. For the production combination of 600 bagels and 800 croissants, which resource is "slack" (not fully 
used)? 
A. flour (only)
B. sugar (only)
C. flour and yeast
D. flour and sugar
E. yeast and sugar

These resources are not fully utilized.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #80
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

 The owner of Crackers, Inc. produces two kinds of crackers: Deluxe (D) and Classic (C). She has a limited 
amount of the three ingredients used to produce these crackers available for her next production run: 4,800 
ounces of sugar; 9,600 ounces of flour, and 2,000 ounces of salt. A box of Deluxe crackers requires 2 ounces of 
sugar, 6 ounces of flour, and 1 ounce of salt to produce; while a box of Classic crackers requires 3 ounces of 
sugar, 8 ounces of flour, and 2 ounces of salt. Profits for a box of Deluxe crackers are $0.40; and for a box of 
Classic crackers, $0.50.

Stevenson ­ Chapter 19
 

42
81. What is the objective function? 
A. $0.50 D + $0.40 C = Z
B. $0.20 D + $0.30 C = Z
C. $0.40 D + $0.50 C = Z
D. $0.10 D + $0.20 C = Z
E. $0.60 D + $0.80 C = Z

This is the objective function.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #81
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

82. What is the constraint for sugar? 
A. 2 D + 3 C  4,800
B. 6 D + 8 C  4,800
C. 1 D + 2 C  4,800
D. 3 D + 2 C  4,800
E. 4 D + 5 C  4,800

This summarizes usage possibilities for this resource.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #82
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

43
83. Which of the following is not a feasible production combination? 
A. 0 D & 0 C
B. 0 D & 1,000 C
C. 800 D & 600 C
D. 1,600 D & 0 C
E. 0 D & 1,200 C

This is not a feasible combination.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #83
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

84. What are profits for the optimal production combination? 
A. $800
B. $500
C. $640
D. $620
E. $600

Use the graphical linear programming method.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #84
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

44
85. For the production combination of 800 boxes of Deluxe and 600 boxes of Classic, which resource is slack 
(not fully used)? 
A. sugar (only)
B. flour (only)
C. salt (only)
D. sugar and flour
E. sugar and salt

These resources are not fully used.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #85
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

 The logistics/operations manager of a mail order house purchases two products for resale: King Beds (K) and 
Queen Beds (Q). Each King Bed costs $500 and requires 100 cubic feet of storage space, and each Queen Bed 
costs $300 and requires 90 cubic feet of storage space. The manager has $75,000 to invest in beds this week, 
and her warehouse has 18,000 cubic feet available for storage. Profit for each King Bed is $300, and for each 
Queen Bed is $150.

Stevenson ­ Chapter 19
 

45
86. What is the objective function? 
A. Z = $150K + $300Q
B. Z = $500K + $300Q
C. Z = $300K + $150Q
D. Z = $300K + $500Q
E. Z = $100K + $90Q

This is the objective function.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #86
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

87. What is the storage space constraint? 
A. 200K + 100Q  18,000
B. 200K + 90Q  18,000
C. 300K + 90Q  18,000
D. 500K + 100Q  18,000
E. 100K + 90Q  18,000

This summarizes usage possibilities for this resource.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #87
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

46
88. Which of the following is not a feasible purchase combination? 
A. 0 King Beds and 0 Queen Beds
B. 0 King Beds and 250 Queen Beds
C. 150 King Beds and 0 Queen Beds
D. 90 King Beds and 100 Queen Beds
E. 0 King Beds and 200 Queen Beds

This is not a feasible combination.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #88
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

89. What is the maximum profit? 
A. $0
B. $30,000
C. $42,000
D. $45,000
E. $54,000

Use the graphical linear programming method.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #89
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

47
90. For the purchase combination 0 King Beds and 200 Queen Beds, which resource is "slack" (not fully used)? 
A. investment money (only)
B. storage space (only)
C. both investment money and storage space
D. neither investment money nor storage space
E. cannot be determined exactly

These resources are not fully utilized.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #90
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

48
91. Wood Specialties Company produces wall shelves, bookends, and shadow boxes. It is necessary to plan the 
production schedule for next week. The wall shelves, bookends, and shadow boxes are made of oak, of which 
the company has 600 board feet. A wall shelf requires 4 board feet, bookends require 2 board feet, and a 
shadow box requires 3 board feet. The company has a power saw for cutting the oak boards into the appropriate 
pieces; a wall shelf requires 30 minutes, bookends require 15 minutes, and a shadow box requires 15 minutes. 
The power saw is expected to be available for 36 hours next week. After cutting, the pieces of work in process 
are hand finished in the finishing department, which consists of 4 skilled and experienced craftsmen, each of 
whom can complete any of the products. A wall shelf requires 60 minutes of finishing, bookends require 30 
minutes, and a shadow box requires 90 minutes. The finishing department is expected to operate for 40 hours 
next week. Wall shelves sell for $29.95 and have a unit variable cost of $17.95; bookends sell for $11.95 and 
have a unit variable cost of $4.95; a shadow box sells for $16.95 and has a unit variable cost of $8.95.
(A) Is this a problem in maximization or minimization?
(B) What are the decision variables? Suggest symbols for them.
(C) What is the objective function?
(D) What are the constraints? 

(A) Since the problem contains information about the selling price, it will involve maximization.
(B) The management can decide how many wall shelves, bookends, and shadow boxes to produce each week. 
We suggest using W, B, and S.
(C) Maximize Z = 12W + 7B + 8S.
(D) Oak) 4W + 2B + 3S  600 board feet
Saw) (1/2)W + (1/4)B + (1/4)S  36 hours
Finishing) 1W + (1/2)B +(3/2)S  40 hours

Feedback: Put the details of the situation into the usual linear programming format.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­01 Describe the type of problem that would lend itself to solution using linear programming.
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #91
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

49
 A company produces two products (A and B) using three resources (I, II, and III). Each product A requires 1 
unit of resource I and 3 units of resource II; and has a profit of $1. Each product B requires 2 units of resource I,
3 units of resource II, and 4 units of resource III; and has a profit of $3. Resource I is constrained to 40 units 
maximum per day; resource II, 90 units; and resource III, 60 units.

Stevenson ­ Chapter 19
 

92. What is the objective function? 

Z = $1A + $3B

Feedback: This is the objective function.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #92
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

93. What is the constraint for resource I? 

1A + 2B  40

Feedback: This is the constraint for resource I.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #93
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

50
94. What is the constraint for resource II? 

3A + 3B  90

Feedback: This is the constraint for resource II.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #94
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

95. What is the constraint for resource III? 

4B  60

Feedback: This is the constraint for resource III.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­02 Formulate a linear programming model from a description of a problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #95
Topic Area: Linear Programming Models
 

96. What are the corner points of the feasible solution space? 

A= 0,B= 0; A= 30,B= 0; A= 20,B= 10; A= 10,B= 15; A= 0,B= 15

Feedback: Use the graphical method to find these corners.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #96
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

51
97. Is the production combination 10 A's and 10 B's feasible? 

Yes

Feedback: Enter these values into the constraint equations and verify that no constraints are violated.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #97
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

98. Is the production combination 15 A's and 15 B's feasible? 

No

Feedback: When these values are entered into the constrain equations, at least one constraint is violated.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #98
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

99. What is the optimum production combination and its profits? 

A= 10,B= 15; Z= $55

Feedback: Use the graphical linear programming method.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #99
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

52
100. What is the slack (unused amount) for each resource for the optimum production combination? 

S(I)= 0; S(II)= 15; S(III)= 0

Feedback: Enter the values for the decision variables into the constraint equations.

AACSB: Analytic
Blooms: Apply
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #100
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

101. A novice linear programmer is dealing with a three decision­variable problem. To compare the 
attractiveness of various feasible decision­variable combinations, values of the objective function at corners are 
calculated. This is an example of _________. 
A. empiritation
B. explicitation
C. evaluation
D. enumeration
E. elicitation

The enumeration approach substitutes the coordinates of each corner point into the objective function to 
determine which corner point is optimal.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #101
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

53
102. When we use less of a resource than was available, in linear programming that resource would be called 
non­ __________. 
A. binding
B. feasible
C. reduced cost
D. linear
E. enumerated

Non­binding resources are not used up.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­03 Solve simple linear programming problems using the graphical method.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #102
Topic Area: Graphical Linear Programming
 

103. Once we go beyond two decision variables, typically the ___________ method of linear programming 
must be used. 
A. simplicit
B. unidimensional
C. simplex
D. dynamic
E. exponential

The simplex method typically must be used for situations in which there are more than two decision variables.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Easy
Learning Objective: 19­04 Interpret computer solutions of linear programming problems.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #103
Topic Area: The Simplex Method
 

54
104. _________________ is a means of assessing the impact of changing parameters in a linear programming 
model. 
A. simulplex
B. simplex
C. slack
D. surplus
E. sensitivity

Evaluating the impact of parameter changes is in the realm of sensitivity analysis.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­05 Do sensitivity analysis on the solution of a linear programming problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #104
Topic Area: Sensitivity Analysis
 

105. It has been determined that, with respect to resource X, a one­unit increase in availability of X would lead 
to a $3.50 increase in the value of the objective function. This value would be X's _______. 
A. range of optimality
B. shadow price
C. range of feasibility
D. slack
E. surplus

The shadow price is the marginal value of an additional unit of the resource in question.

AACSB: Reflective Thinking
Blooms: Remember
Difficulty: Medium
Learning Objective: 19­05 Do sensitivity analysis on the solution of a linear programming problem.
Stevenson ­ Chapter 19 #105
Topic Area: Sensitivity Analysis
 

55