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SAMPLE CHAPTERS ON

HANDBOOK OF PRACTICAL
PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY
[A SYSTEMATIC APPROACH TO TITRIMETRIC ANALYSIS]

BY
DR. RAJESH KUMAR SINGH
M. PHARM., PH.D.

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY


SHIVALIK COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
(UNDER LOVAL GOVT. DEPT. PUNJAB)
NAGAL, ROPAR, PUNJAB

Note: For any kind of queries or suggestions, please contact the author.
LIST OF CONTENTS

1. Calibration of balance and apparatus


1.1. To familiarize with analytical balance, weight box and use of rider.
1.2. To transfer a definite weight of the given chemical using weighing by difference
method.
1.3. To transfer a definite weight of the given chemical using weighing by addition
method.
1.4. To calibrate the given volumetric flask.
1.5. To calibrate the given pipette.
1.6. To calibrate the given burette.
2. Acid-base titration

2.1. To prepare and standardize 0.1 N HCl using sodium carbonate as primary standard.
2.2. To prepare and standardize 0.1 N NaOH using succinic acid as primary standard.
2.3. To prepare and standardize 0.1 N H2SO4 using standard sodium hydroxide as
secondary standard.
2.4. To determine the percentage purity (assay) of given sample of ammonium chloride
using standard 0.1 N NaOH.
2.5. To determine the amount of carbonate and hydroxide in a given sample using
standard 0.1 N HCl.
2.6. To determine the percentage purity (assay) of acetic acid in a given sample of
vinegar standard 0.1 N NaOH.
2.7. To determine the percentage purity (assay) of boric acid in a given sample using
standard 0.1 N NaOH.
2.8. To determine the percentage purity (assay) of sodium bicarbonate in a given sample
using standard 0.1 N H2SO4.
2.9. To determine the percentage purity (assay) of sodium bicarbonate in a given sample
using standard 0.1 N HCl.
2.10. To determine the percentage purity (assay) of ammonia using standard 0.1 N
H2SO4by back titration.

3. Oxidation-reduction titrations

3.1. To prepare and standardize 0.1 N KMnO4 solution using sodium oxalate as primary
standard.
3.2. To determine the percentage purity (assay) of ferrous sulphate using standard 0.1 N
KMnO4.
3.3. To determine the percentage purity (assay) of hydrogen peroxide using standard 0.1
N KMnO4.
3.4. To prepare and standardize 0.1 N iodine solution using arsenic trioxide as primary
standard (Iodimetry).
3.5. To prepare and standardize 0.1 N sodium thiosulphate solution using potassium
dichromate as primary standard (Iodometry).
3.6. To prepare and standardize 0.1 N iodine solution using standard 0.1 N sodium
thiosulphate as secondary standard (Iodimetry)

2
3.7. To determine the percentage purity (assay) of copper sulphate using standard 0.1 N
sodium thiosulphate solution (Iodometry).

4. Argentometric titrations

4.1. To prepare and standardize 0.1 N AgNO3 using sodium chloride as primary standard
(Mohr’s method).
4.2. To determine the percentage purity of given sample of sodium chloride injection
using standard 0.1 N AgNO3 (Mohr’s method).
4.3. To prepare and standardize 0.1 N ammonium thiocyanate solution using standard
AgNO3 as secondary standard (Volhard’s method).
4.4. To determine the percentage purity of given sample of ammonium chloride using
standard 0.1 N AgNO3 (Volhard’s method).
4.5. To determine the percentage purity of given sample of potassium chloride using
standard 0.1 N AgNO3 (Volhard’s method).

5. Complexometric titration

5.1. To prepare and standardize 0.1 N EDTA using granulated zinc as primary standard.
5.2. To determine the percentage purity of given sample of calcium carbonate using
standard 0.1 N EDTA (Direct titration).
5.3. To determine the percentage purity of given tablet of calcium lactate using standard
0.1 N EDTA (Direct titration).
5.4. To determine the percentage purity of given sample of magnesium sulphate using
standard 0.1 N EDTA (Direct titration).
5.5. To determine the total hardness of water using 0.1 N EDTA.
5.5. To prepare and standardize 0.1 N zinc sulphate solution using standard 0.1 N EDTA.
5.6. To determine the percentage purity of given sample of calcium phosphate using
standard 0.1 N EDTA (Back- titration).
5.7. To determine the percentage purity of given sample of sodium calcium edetate using
standard 0.1 N EDTA (Replacement titration).

6. Non-aqueous titration

6.1. To prepare and standardize 0.1 N perchloric (HClO4) acid using potassium hydrogen
phthalate as primary standard.
6.2. To determine the percentage purity of given sample of sodium acetate using standard
0.1 N HClO4.
6.3. To determine the percentage purity of nitrazepam in a given tablet of nitrazepam
using standard 0.1 N HClO4.
6.3. To determine the percentage purity of chlorpromazine hydrochloride in a given tablet
of chlorpromazine hydrochloride using standard 0.1 N HClO4.
6.4. To prepare and standardize 0.1 N tetrabutylammonium hydroxide solution using
benzoic acid as primary standard.

3
6.5. To determine the percentage purity of ethosuximide in a given tablet of ethosuximide
using standard 0.1 N tetrabutylammonium hydroxide.
6.6. To prepare and standardize 0.1 N sodium methoxide solution using benzoic acid as
primary standard.
6.7. To determine the percentage purity of allopurinol in a given tablet of ethosuximide
using standard 0.1 N tetrabutylammonium hydroxide.

7. Diazotization titration

7.1. To prepare and standardize 0.1 N sodium nitrite solution using sulphanilic acid as
primary standard.
7.2. To find out the contents of sulphamethoxazole in given tablet using standard 0.1 N
sodium nitrite.

4
SAMPLE CHAPTERS
EXPERIMENT-1

TO PREPARE AND STANDARDIZE 0.1 N HCl USING SODIUM CARBONATE


AS PRIMARY STANDARD
THEORY
Laboratory grade hydrochloric acid cannot be used as primary standard as it is not sufficiently
pure because of its gaseous form at room temperature. So the solution of hydrochloric acid needs
to be standardized before any analytical applications. In order to standardize it, one must have an
especially pure reagent which can be accurately weighed out on analytical balance. This pure
reagent is called primary standards which are extremely pure, stable, has no water of hydration,
and has a high molecular weight.

Various primary standards can be used for standardization of hydrochloric acid like anhydrous
sodium carbonate (eq. wt.= 53), potassium bicarbonate (eq. wt.= 100), thallous carbonate (eq.
wt.= 234.40), borax (eq. wt.= 190.70) etc.

In this experiment, a standard solution of sodium carbonate will be used as the primary standard
to determine the exact concentration of a hydrochloric acid solution. The neutralization reactions
that take place in two steps are as follows:

The pH at the completion of this reaction is 3.93 (acidic). For this pH, methyl orange indicator
solution can be used. At the end-point – when neutralisation just occurs – the indicator changes
colour from yellow to orange.
Note: a) All burette readings must be read and recorded to 2 decimal places. For example, if the volume of the
solution in the burette used was 10.5 ml, record down as 10.50 ml and not 10.5. The zero is significant and must be
included.

5
b) Round off your answers to 3 significant figures. For example, if your result is 0.12 N, record down as 0.12 N and
not 0.1 N.

PROCEDURE

Calculation:
Calculation for making 0.1 N HCl acid: To prepare 500 ml of a 0.1 N HCl, 4.20 ml of conc HCl
will be diluted to 500.0 ml of distilled water. Before making any calculations, use only one
system and one unit of measurement. DO NOT mix measurement systems and units.

Descriptive method Shortcut method 1


1000 ml of 1 N HCl =36.50 g eq. of HCl M= No. of moles or Mass (g) x 1000
500 ml of 0.1 N HCl= 36.5 x 500 x 0.1 Volume (L) Equivalent mass x volume (ml)
1000
= 1.82 g of HCl 0.1 = Mass (g) x 1000 = Mass = 1.82 g of HCl
Density= Mass 36.50 x 500
Volume
Volume=Mass 1.82 g = 1.51 ml of HCl Density= Mass
Density 1.20 g/ml Volume
Volume=Mass 1.82 g = 1.51 ml of HCl
Since the purity of conc. HCl is 36.50 % Density 1.20 g/ml
Therefore, 36.50 % = 1.51 ml
100 % = 1.51 x 100 = 4.20 ml Since the purity of conc. HCl is 36.50 %
36.5 Therefore, 36.50 % = 1.51 ml
100 % = 1.51 x 100 = 4.20 ml
36.5
Shortcut method 2
N1V1 = N2V2
(Desired strength) (Conc. HCl)
V2= N1V1 = 0.1 x 500 = 4.3 ml, N2 =Normality of
N2 11.50 conc. HCl acid
Hence, about 4.2 ml of HCl will be measured and dissolve in 200 ml of distilled water and
volume will be made up to 500 ml to make 0.1 N HCl solution.

Preparation of 0.1 N standard sodium carbonate solution


Descriptive method Shortcut method
1000 ml of 1.0 N Na2CO3 = 53.0 g eq. of M= No. of moles or Mass (g) x 1000
Na2CO3 Volume (L) Equivalent mass x volume (ml)
(Since two mol of HCl will react with one mol
of Na2CO3 )
100 ml of 0.1 N HCl= 53.0 x 100 x 0.1 0.1 = Mass (g) x 1000 = Mass= 0.53 g of HCl
1000 53.0 x 100
= 0.53 g of Na2CO3

Hence, Weigh accurately nearly 0.53 g of sodium carbonate and dissolve in 50 ml of distilled
water and make up the volume to 100 ml.

6
Standardization of HCl solution using sodium carbonate as primary standard.

Preparation of Hydrochloric acid solution:

S. No Steps Reason
1. Measure about 4.20 ml of HCl by measuring cylinder As per above calculation.
and dissolved in 200 ml of distilled water and make
up the volume to 500 ml to make 0.1 N HCl. Never
add water to concentrated acid.
2. Rinse the burette with distilled water and fill the Burette is rinsed to wash out
burette with above prepared hydrochloric acid any impurities left while doing
solution to the zero mark using funnel previous titration.
3. Remove the funnel from the burette and note the So that drops of solution from
reading in note book. Eye must be horizontal to the funnel will not fall into the
meniscus. burette. Eye must be
horizontal to meniscus to
remove parallax erro.

Preparation of standard 0.1 N sodium carbonate solution (standard solution):

S. No Steps Reason
1. Weigh nearly about 0.53 g of sodium carbonate as Sodium carbonate is very pure
primary standard in watch glass and dissolve in and stable and therefore use as
volumetric flask (100 ml) where 50 ml distilled water primary standard.
is already filled.
2. Stopper the flask and mix your solution thoroughly by To ensure proper mixing
inverting the flask. without producing bubbles.
3. Make up the volume to the mark using a dropping To prevent ‘overshooting’ the
pipette to add the last few milliliters of distilled water.
mark resulting in change in
strength. If this occurs, the
experiment will have to be
started again.
4. Transfer the prepared solution to a clean, dry storage As volumetric flask is
bottle and label it if want to store overnight. NEVER transparent, this may degrade
store solutions in a volumetric flask. light sensitive solution so store
in amber coloured bottle.
5. Never hold large volumetric flask by the neck To prevent accidental
alone. Provide support at the bottom. breakage of apparatus.

6. Using the clean pipette (rinsed with distilled water To ensure that all the sodium
and sodium carbonate solution), transfer 10.0 ml of carbonate solution is
sodium carbonate solution into the clean conical flask transferred to the volumetric
(rinsed with distilled water only). flask.
7. When the whole solution has been drained into To allow the last of the liquid

7
conical flask, touch the tip of the pipette to the side of to drain out. A small amount
the flask. DO NOT blow out the pipette. of solution will always remain
at the pipette’s tip.

8. Add 2-3 drops of methyl orange indicator. Note the Methyl orange is best
colour of the solution. indicator at this pH.

9. Place the conical flask on a white tile or sheet of white To assist in seeing the change
paper. in colour at the end-point.

Titration of hydrochloric acid solution and sodium carbonate solution (standard):

S. No Steps Reason
1. Carry out a rough titration by adding hydrochloric Constant swirling will ensure
acid solution from the burette with constantly complete mixing of reactants.
swirling the flask, until the colour of the solution in
the conical flask changes from yellow to reddish-
yellow.
2. Note the burette reading and calculate how much acid This information enables the
was used. This is only a trial titration and gives the subsequent titrations to be
approximate value of the end point. carried out more quickly.

3. Again, pipette 10.0 ml of sodium carbonate solution Methyl orange is best


into the flask and add 2-3 drops of methyl orange indicator at this acidic pH.
indicator.

4. Add hydrochloric acid solution from the burette To get end point quickly and
rapidly at the start of the titration and then slowly near more accurately.
the rough end point until the colour of the solution
changes from yellow to orange.

5. Repeat the titration until you get the concordant This will minimize error by
results (two readings agree within 0.1 ml) getting accurate readings
within 0.1 ml of each other.
6. Donot try to match the colour of the repeat On long standing, the colour
titration with the previous titration. Just watch for may fade or disaapear.
the change in colour.
7. Take the average of the concordant results To minimize the error.
excluding the rough titration reading and calculate
the concentration of hydrochloric acid.

Observation Table (Specimen reading)


S. Volume of Na2CO3 solution Burette reading Volume of HCl
No (ml) Initial Final used (ml)

8
1. 10.0 (Rough titration) 0.0 9.6 10.10
2. 10.0 10.0 19.90 9.50
3. 10.0 20.0 29.80 9.60

Average of 2 and 3 reading= 9.50 + 9.60 = 9.55


2

Nacid x Vacid = N(sod. carb.) x V(sod. carb.)

Nacid = N(sod. carb.) x V(sod. carb = 0.1 x 10 Volume of Na2CO3 solution in each titration = 10 ml
Vacid 9.55 Concentration of Na2CO3 = 0.1 M

N1 = 0.105

RESULT
The normality of hydrochloric acid solution is 0.105 N.

9
Using the equations attached to the experiment and all of your knowledge about reactions
and statistics answer the following questions.

1. Calculate the approximate weight of sodium carbonate required so that about 15.0 mL of 0.20
N NaOH will be consumed in a titration. (E.W. sodium carbonate = 53 g/equiv.)

N= No. of moles or Mass (g) x 1000


Volume (L) Eq. weight x volume (ml)

Mass= Normality x Volume (ml) x Eq. weight


1000

Mass= 0.20 x 53.0 x 15.0 = 0.159 g of sodium carbonate


1000

Hence, 0.159 g of sodium carbonate is required to titrate with 20 ml of 0.20 N


NaOH

2. If 20 ml of the 0.1 N sodium carbonate solution uses 10 ml of the hydrochloric acid solution
for complete neutralization. Calculate the normality of the acid. (E.W. sodium carbonate = 53
g/equiv.)
Nacid = 20.0 x 0.1 = 0.2 N
N1 x V1 = N2 x V2 10.0
(Acid) (Na2CO3)

Hence, normality of the hydrochloric acid is 0.20 N

3. If 20 ml of the HCl solution reacts with 25.0 ml of 0.15 N NaOH. Calculate the strength of the
HCl solution in grams of HCl per litre. (E.W. of HCl = 36.5 g/equiv.)

Strength in grams per litre = Normality x Equivalent weight of the solute.

N1 x V1 = N2 x V2 Nacid = 25.0 x 0.50 = 0.625 N


(HCl) (NaOH) 20.0

Strength of HCl solution = 0.625 x 36.5 = 22.8 grams of HCl/litre


4. Titration reveals that 15.50 ml of 0.15 M HCl are required to neutralize 25.0 ml of NaOH solution.
What is the normality and strength of the NaOH solution?

10
Measure 4.2 ml of HCl and dissolve in
Preparation of 200 ml of distilled water and make up the
0.1 N HCl soln. volume to 500 ml

Fill the burette with hydrochloric


acid solution to the zero mark using f unnel

Remove the funnel, so that drops of solution


f rom the f unnel will not f all into the
burette and record the reading in note book.

Preparation of Weigh 0.53 g of sodium carbonate in volumetric


0.1 N Na2CO3 f lask (100 ml) and make up the volume to 100 ml
soln.

Stardardization Using pipette, transf er 10 ml of sodium


of 0.1 N HCl soln. carbonate solution into the clean conical f lask

DO NOT blow the last drop f rom the


pipette.

Add 2-3 drops of methyl orange indicator.


Note the colour of the solution.

Add HCl solution f rom the burette Constant swirling of conical f lask
with constant swirling until the colour will ensure complete mixing of
of the solution turns yellow to reddish- reactants.
yellow.

Note the burette reading and calculate


how much acid was used.

This is only a trial titration and gives the Rough reading will enable quick
approximate value of the end point. subsequent titrations

Repeat the titration until two readings


agree within 0.1 ml.

Take the average of the readings

Flowchart illustrating the preparation and standardization of 0.1 N HCl.

11
EXPERIMENT-2

TO PREPARE AND STANDARDIZE 0.1 N NaOH USING SUCCINIC ACID AS PRIMARY


STANDARD

THEORY

Solid sodium hydroxide cannot be used as a primary standard as it is not available in pure form because it
absorbs atmospheric moisture and carbon dioxide during storage and also during a weighing operation.

Since hydroxide ion is consumed by this reaction, the concentration of a standard sodium hydroxide solution
will be changed.
Another reason for not using sodium hydroxide solutions as primary standard is that it often contains significant
amounts of impurities as carbonates and bicarbonates, and is highly hygroscopic. Therefore the solution of
sodium hydroxide needs to be standardized before any analytical applications.
Various primary standards can be used for standardization of sodium hydroxide like succinic acid (eq. wt. = 59),
potassium hydrogen phthalate (eq. wt. = 204.0), benzoic acid (eq. wt.= 122.0), sulfamic acid (eq. wt.= 97.0) etc.

In the present experiment, a standard solution of succinic acid is used as the primary standard to determine the
exact concentration of a sodium hydroxide solution. The succinic acid is stable, pure, well characterized
material which dissolves in water to produce H+ and succinate ions. Succinic acid contains two titrable acidic
hydrogens, which react according to the equations as follows:

The pH at the completion of this reaction is around 8.0 (basic). For this pH, phenolphthalein indicator solution
can be used. At the end-point – when neutralisation just occurs – the indicator changes colour from colourless to
faint pink.

12
PROCEDURE

Calculation:
Calculation for making 0.1 N NaOH solution: To prepare 500 ml of a 0.1 N NaOH, weigh about 2.0 g of
NaOH and dissolve in 200 ml of distilled water and make up the volume to 500 ml with distilled water. Before
making any calculations, use only one system and one unit of measurement. DO NOT mix measurement
systems and units.

Descriptive method Shortcut method


1000 ml of 1 N NaOH = 40 g of NaOH N= No. of moles or Mass (g) x 1000
500 ml of 0.1 N NaOH= 40 x 500 x 0.1 Volume (L) Molar mass x volume (ml)
1000
= 2.0 g of NaOH 0.1 = Mass (g) x 1000 = Mass = 2.0 g of NaOH
40 x 500

Hence, 2.0 g of NaOH will be weighed and dissolve in 200 ml of distilled water and volume will
be made up to 500 ml to make 0.1 M NaOH solution.

Preparation of 0.1 M standard succinic acid solution


Descriptive method Shortcut method
1000 ml of 1 N succinc acid =59.0 g eq. of N= No. of moles or Mass (g) x 1000
succinic acid Volume (L) Equivalent mass x volume (ml)
(Since two mol of NaOH will react with one mol
of succinic acid )
100 ml of 0.1 N HCl= 59.0 x 100 x 0.1 0.1 = Mass (g) x 1000 = Mass= 0.59 g of HCl
1000 59.0 x 100
= 0.59 g of Na2CO3

Hence, weigh nearly about 0.59 g of succinic acid and dissolved in 50 ml of distilled water and
make up the volume to 100 ml.

Standardization of NaOH solution using succinic acid as primary standard.

Preparation of 0.1 N NaOH solution:


.

S. No Steps Reason
1. Weigh about 2.0 g of NaOH and dissolve in 200 ml of Tap and even deionised water
freshly prepared distilled water and make up the may contain dissolved carbon
volume to 500 ml to make 0.1 N NaOH. dioxide.

2. Fill the burette with as much NaOH solution as To prevent exposing NaOH to
needed for titration. PREPARE THE BURETTE the atmospheric moisture and
WHEN IT NEEDED. CO2.
3. Remove the funnel from the burette and note the So that drops of solution from
13
reading in note book. the funnel will not fall into the
burette

Preparation of standard solution of 0.1 N succinic acid:

S. No Steps Reason
1. 0.53 g of succinic acid as primary standard will be Succinic acid is very pure and
weighed in watch glass and dissolve in 100 stable and therefore use as
volumetric flask where 50 ml distilled water is already primary standard.
filled.
2. Stopper the flask and mix your solution thoroughly by To ensure proper mixing
inverting the flask. without producing bubbles.
3. Make up the volume to the mark using a dropping To prevent ‘overshooting’ the
pipette to add the last few milliliters of distilled water.
mark resulting in change in
strength. If this occurs, the
experiment will have to be
started again.
4. Transfer the prepared solution to a clean, dry storage As volumetric flask is
bottle and label it if want to store overnight. NEVER transparent, this may degrade
store solutions in a volumetric flask. light sensitive solution so store
in amber coloured bottle.
5. Never hold large volumetric flask by the neck To prevent accidental
alone. Provide support at the bottom. breakage of apparatus.

6. Using the clean pipette (rinsed with distilled water To ensure that all of the
and sodium carbonate solution), transfer 10 ml of succinic acid solution is
sodium carbonate solution into the clean conical flask transferred to the volumetric
(rinsed with distilled water only). flask.
7. When the whole solution has been drained, touch the To allow the last of the liquid
tip of the pipette to the side of the flask. to drain out. DO NOT blow
out the pipette.

8. Add 2-3 drops of phenolphthalein indicator. Note the Phenolphthalein (transition pH


colour of the solution. range 8.0-9.6) is the
appropriate indicator at this
pH.

Titration of sodium hydroxide solution and succinic acid solution (standard)

S. No Steps Reason
1. Carry out a rough titration by adding NaOH solution Constant swirling will ensure
from the burette with constantly swirling the flask, complete mixing of reactants.
until the colour of the solution in the conical flask
changes from colorless to faint pink.
2. Note the burette reading and calculate how much base This information enables the

14
was used. This is only a trial titration and gives the subsequent titrations to be
approximate value of the end point. carried out more quickly.

3. Again, pipette 10 ml of succinic acid solution into the Phenolphthalein is best


flask and add 2-3 drops of phenolphthalein indicator. indicator at this pH.
Fill the burette with fresh sodium hydroxide solution.

4. Add sodium hydroxide solution from the burette To get end point quickly and
rapidly at the start of the titration and then slowly near more accurately.
the rough end point until the colour of the solution
changes from colourless to faint pink.

5. Repeat the titration until you get the concordant This will minimize error by
results (two readings agree within 0.1 ml) getting accurate readings
within 0.1 ml of each other.
6. Donot try to match the colour of the repeat On long standing, the colour
titration with the previous titration. Just watch for may fade or disappear.
the change in colour.
7. Take the average of the concordant results To minimize the error.
excluding the rough titration reading and calculate
the normality of sodium hydroxide.

Observation Table (Specimen reading)


S. Volume of succinic acid Burette reading Volume of NaOH
No solution (ml) Initial Final used (ml)
1. 10.0 (Rough titration) 0.0 9.6 10.1
2. 10.0 10.0 19.9 9.50
3. 10.0 20 29.8 9.60

Average of 2 and 3 cocordant readings= 9.50 + 9.60 = 9.55


2
NNaOH x VNaOH = N(succ. acid.) x V(succ.acid.)

NNaOH = N(succ. acid) x V (succ. acid) = 0.1 x 10 Volume of succinic acid solution in each titration = 10 ml
VNaOH 9.55 Normality of succinic acid = 0.1 M

NNaOH = 0.105 N

RESULT
Concentration of sodium hydroxide solution is 0.105 M.

15
Using the equations attached to the experiment and all of your knowledge about reactions and statistics
answer the following questions.

1. Calculate the approximate weight of succinic required so that about 20.0 ml of 0.1 N sodium hydroxide will
be used in a titration. (E.W. succinic acid= 59.0 g/equiv.)

N= No. of moles or Mass (g) x 1000


Volume (L) Eq. weight x volume (ml)

Mass= Normality x Volume (ml) x Eq. weight


1000

Mass= 0.1 x 59.0 x 20.0 = 0.118 g of succinic acid


1000

Hence, 0.118 g of succinic acid is required to titrate with 20 ml of 0.1 N NaOH

2. Calculate the normality of a solution of potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHP) prepared by mixing a 0.50 g in
50.0 ml of water. (E.W. KHP = 204.0 g/equiv.)

N= No. of moles or Mass (g) x 1000


Volume (L) Eq. weight x volume (ml)

N = 0.50 x 1000 = 0.049 N


204 x 50

Hence, the normality of 0.049 N will be prepared by mixing 0.5 g of KHP in


50.0 ml of water.

3. Calculate the approximate weight of potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHP) require to prepare 100 ml of 0.1 N
KHP solutions for standardization of sodium hydroxide solution. (E.W. KHP = 204 g/equiv.)

2.04 g of KHP

16
Flowchart illustrating the preparation and standardization of 0.1 N NaOH

17
EXPERIMENT-3

TO DETERMINE THE PERCENTAGE PURITY OF GIVEN SAMPLE OF AMMONIUM CHLORIDE


USING STANDARD 0.1 N NaOH

THEORY

% purity is the percentage of the material which is the actually desired chemical in a sample of it. In
pharmaceutical industry, it would not be acceptable to manufacture a drug with impurities in it that may be
harmful to health. However in any chemical process it is almost impossible to get 100.00 % purity and so
sample should be analyzed in industry for % purity to monitor the quality of the product.
Ammonium chloride is also known as the salt of ammonia. It is represented by a chemical formula NH4Cl.
Ammonium chloride when dissolve in water form acidic solution. Reaction between ammonium chloride and
sodium hydroxide produces some new compounds like ammonia, water and sodium chloride. Ammonia gas
liberated may combine with hydrochloric acid to form ammonium chloride and hence direct titration of
ammonium chloride with sodium hydroxide produce erroneous results.

So for the titration of ammonia chloride with base, the addition of formaldehyde would improve the titration.
The ammonium chloride reacts with formaldehyde to form hexamethylene tetramine. Because the weak acid
ammonium (pKa 9.3) is converted to the stronger hexamethylene tetramine ion (pKa 4.9). This improves the
end point.

18
PROCEDURE

S. No Steps Reason
1. 0.1 N NaOH will be prepared and standardized using As per the procedure
succinic acid. explained previously.
2. Weigh accurately about 0.1 g of ammonium This helps to make sure that
chloride in triplicate in analytical balance using results are consistence with
weighing by difference method directly into a conical each other. Scientific evidence
flask and add 20 ml of water. must be reproducible.

3. Add a mixture of 5.0 ml of formaldehyde solution Formaldehyde improves the


(previously neutralize to dilute phenolphthalein) and titration by forming
20 ml of water. hexamethylenetetramine.

4. After two minutes, add 2-3 drops of phenolphthalein To get end point quickly and
indicator and titrate solution slowly against 0.1 N more accurately.
NaOH till faint pink colour appear.

5. Note down the burette reading. Repeat the titration Averaging of the results will
with other two flasks and take the average readings of minimize the random error.
sample taken and volume of NaOH used.

Note: Neutralization of formaldehyde: Formaldehyde is neutralized by taking in a conical flask 20 ml


formaldehyde solution and two drops of phenolphthalein then titrate against 0.1 N NaOH till faint pink
colour appear.

Observation Table (Specimen reading)


S. Amount of sample taken (g) Burette reading Volume of NaOH
No Initial Final used (ml)
1. 0.095 0.0 17.0 17.0
2. 0.11 0.0 18.2 18.2
3. 0.10 0.0 17.8 17.8
Total 0.305 Total 53.0
Mean of sample taken 0.305/3=0.101 g Mean of volume used 53.0/3= 17.6 ml

Calculation for percentage purity:

Descriptive method Short cut method


1000 ml of 1 N NaOH=53.5 g eq. of NH4Cl Percentage purity= V x N x 53.5 x 100
17.6 ml of 0.1 N NaOH= 53.5 x 17.6 x 0.1 W (gm) x 1000
1000
= 0.0942 g V=Volume of NaOH (ml)
0.101 g of sample contains= 0.0942 g of N= Normality of NaOH
NH4Cl W= Weight of sample (gm)
100 gm of sample contain = 0.0942 x 100 17.6 x 0.1 x 53.50 x 100
0.101 0.1 x 1000
= 93.28 %
= 93.28 %
19
RESULT
The given sample of ammonium chloride contains 93.28 % of pure ammonium chloride.

Using the equations attached to the experiment and all of your knowledge about reactions and
statistics answer the following questions.

1. A 0.5 gm sample of ammonium chloride required 12 ml of 0.1 N for titration. Calculate the percentage
purity (assay) of the ammonium chloride.

Percentage purity= V x N x 53.5 x 100


W (gm) x 1000

V=Volume of NaOH (ml)


N= Normality of NaOH
W= Weight of sample (gm)
12 x 0.1 x 53.5 x 100
0.5 x 1000
= 12.84 %

2. Suppose 30 ml of 0.2 M NaOH is required to titrate 1.5 g of a sample containing ammonium chloride.
What percentage ammonium chloride is present in the sample?

21.4 %

20
0.1 N NaOH will be prepared and
Preparation of standardized using succinic acid as per the
0.1 N NaOH soln. procedure explained previously

Fill the burette with standard 0.1 N


NaOH solution as needed f or titration

To prevent exposing NaOH to the


atmospheric moisture and CO2

Determination of % Weigh accurately about 0.1 g of ammonium


purity of ammonium chloride in triplicate directly into a conical f lask and
chloride add 20 ml of water.

Add a mixture of 5 ml of previously


neutralized f ormaldehyde solution and 20 ml of
water.
To remove any acidic impurities present in
formaldehyde solution

Add 2 drops of phenolphthalein indicator


Note the colour of the solution.

Add NaOH solution from the burette Constant swirling of conical flask
with constant swirling until the colour will ensure complete mixing of
of the solution turns colourless to reactants.
faint pink.

Note the burette reading and calculate


how much base was used.

Repeat the titration with other two f lask

Take the average of the readings

Flowchart illustrating the assay (% purity) of ammonium chloride

21
EXPERIMENT-4

TO DETERMINE THE AMOUNT OF CARBONATE AND HYDROXIDE IN A GIVEN SAMPLE


USING STANDARD 0.1 N HCl

THEORY

Sodium hydroxide or caustic soda - both solid and dissolved – is the most typical of the strong alkalis. It is
highly hygroscopic and easily reacts with atmospheric carbon dioxide. It is also highly deliquescent and absorbs
moisture to form an aqueous solution. That means it is usually contaminated with sodium carbonate Na2CO3. It
is not a problem to determine sum of hydroxide and carbonates concentration by titration with a strong acid.

Solution of caustic soda contains three bases - OH-, CO32- and HCO3-. The stronger the base, the easier it react
with acid. Of the three bases present, NaOH is the strongest, so it will be neutralized first corresponding to
reaction A. The change is pH near the equivalence point is 4.5 to 9.5 and phenolphthalein can be used as an
indicator. Next one is CO32- . Sodium carbonate reacts with HCl in two stages by reaction B and C.

There are three reactions taking place during titration:

When all CO32- is converted to HCO3- (corresponding to reaction B), pH of the solution is 8.35 and and
completion of the reaction B (HCO3-), the pH of the solution is 3.90. The first end point can, therefore be
detected by means of phenolphthalein and the second end point by using methyl orange as indicator.

PROCEDURE

S. No Steps Reason
1. 0.1 N HCl will be prepared and standardized using As per the procedure
sodium carbonate. explained previously.
2. Weight 0.1 g of sample of caustic soda in triplicate This helps to make sure that
22
in analytical balance using weighing by difference results are consistence with
method directly into conical flask and add 10 ml of each other. Scientific evidence
distilled water. must be reproducible.

3. Add 2 to 3 drops of phenolphthalein indicator and The change is pH near the


titrate against standard 0.1 N HCl till the colour equivalence point is 4.5 to 9.5
changes from faint pink to colourless. and phenolphthalein is
appropriate indicator.
4. Note the burette reading which give the volume of Since Na2CO3 has been
HCl used for the complete neutralization of NaOH converted to bicarbonates.
and half neutralization of Na2CO3.
5. After that add 2-3 drops of methyl orange indicator Methyl orange is the best
(colour changes to orange) in the same conical flask indicator at this pH range.
and again continue the titration with standard 0.1 N
HCl till the colour changes from red to yellow.
6. Note down the burette reading. This give the volume of HCl
used for the complete
neutralization of Na2CO3.
7. Repeat the titration with other two flasks and take the Averaging the results will
average readings of sample taken and volume of minimize the random error.
NaOH used.

Calculation (Specimen reading)

Volume of 0.1 N HCl used for the neutralization of ½ Na2CO3 and NaOH (X) = 18.0 ml
Volume of 0.1 N HCl used for the neutralization of complete NaOH + ½Na2CO3 + ½Na2CO3 (Y) ml= 20 ml
Volume of 0.1 N HCl used for the neutralization of ½Na2CO3 = (Y-X) = 20 - 18 ml
= 2.0 ml
Volume of 0.1 N HCl used for the neutralization of complete Na2CO3 = 2(Y-X) = 4.0 ml
Volume of 0.1 N HCl used for the neutralization of NaOH = X - 2(Y-X) = 18 – 4 = 16.0 ml

To calculate the % purity of Na2CO3

Descriptive method Short cut method


1000 ml of 1 N HCl=53.0 g eq. of Na2CO3 Percentage purity= V x N x 53 x 100
4.0 ml of 0.1 N HCl = 53 x 4.0 x 0.1 W (gm) x 1000
1000
= 0.0212 g V=Volume of HCl (ml)
0.1 g of sample contains= 0.0212 g of N= Normality of HCl
Na2CO3 W= Weight of sample (gm)
100 gm of sample contain = 0.0212 x 100
0.1 Percentage purity= 4.0 x 0.1 x 53.5 x 100
0.1 x 1000
= 2.12 % = 2.12 %

23
To calculate the % purity of NaOH

Descriptive method Short cut method


1000 ml of 1 N HCl=40 g eq. of NaOH Percentage purity= V x N x 40 x 100
16 ml of 0.1 N HCl = 40 x 16 x 0.1 W (gm) x 1000
1000
= 0.064 g V=Volume of HCl (ml)
0.1 g of sample contains= 0.064 g of Na2CO3 N= Normality of HCl
100 gm of sample contain = 0.064 x 100 W= Weight of sample (gm)
0.1
Percentage purity= 16 x 0.1 x 40 x 100
= 64.0 % 0.1 x 1000
= 64.0 %

RESULT
The given sample of caustic soda contains 2.12 % of sodium carbonate and 64.0 % of sodium hydroxide.

24
Using the equations attached to the experiment and all of your knowledge about reactions and statistics
answer the following questions.

1. A water sample contains OH- and CO32- ions and HCO3- are absent. On titrating 50 ml of the sample with 0.1
N HCl, the X and Y values were found to be 12 and 15 respectively. Calculate the amounts of NaOH and
Na2CO32- present per litre of the sample.

X ≡ NaOH + ½ Na2CO3 = 12.0 ml of 0.1 N HCl


Y ≡ NaOH + ½Na2CO3 + ½Na2CO3 = 15.0 ml of 0.1 N HCl

Na2CO3 ≡ 2 (Y-X) = 2 x (15-12) = 6.0 ml.


NaOH ≡ Y-2(Y-X) = 9.0 ml

Calculation of the amount of NaOH

1000 ml of 1 N HCl ≡ 40 g of NaOH


9.0 ml of 0.1 N HCl = 40 x 9.0 x 0.1
1000
= 0.034 g or 34.0 mg NaOH
Now, 100 ml of the sample contains 34.0 mg of NaOH
1000 ml of the sample contains = 34.0 x 1000 = 340.0 mg of NaOH/litre
100

Calculation of the amount of Na2CO3

1000 ml of 1 N HCl=53 g eq. of Na2CO3 ≡53.0 g of Na2CO3

6.0 ml of 0.1 N HCl = 53 x 6.0 x 0.1


1000
= 0.0318 g or 31.8 mg Na2CO3
Now, 100 ml of the sample contains 31.8 mg Na2CO3
1000 ml of sample contain = 31.8 x 1000
100
= 318 mg of Na2CO3 /litre

25
0.1 N HCl solution will be prepared and
Preparation of standardized using sodium carbonate as per
0.1 N NaOH soln. the procedure explained previously

Fill the burette with hydrochloric


acid solution to the zero mark using
funnel
Remove the funnel, so that drops of solution
from the funnel will not fall into the
burette and record the reading in note book

Determination of % Weigh accurately about 0.1 g of caustic soda in


purity of hydroxide triplicate directly into a conical f lask and add 10 ml
and carbonates of distilled water.

Add 2-3 drops of phenolphthalein indicator


Note the colour of the solution. It will be faint
pink colour.

Add HCl solution f rom the burette


until the colour of the solution turns
faint pink to colourless.

This volume of HCl was used for


Note the burette reading and calculate the complete neutralization of
how much acid was used. NaOH and half sodium carbonate

Again add 2-3 drops of methyl orange


and titrate with 0.1 N HCl till colour
changes f rom red to yellow

Note the burette reading and calculate This volume of HCl was
consumed f or the complete
how much acid was used neutralization of sodium carbonate

Repeat the titration with other two flask

Take the average of the readings

Flowchart illustrating the determination of NaOH and Na2CO3 in a given sample.

26
EXPERIMENT-5

TO DETERMINE THE PERCENTAGE PURITY OF ACETIC ACID IN A GIVEN SAMPLE OF


VINEGAR USING 0.1 N NaOH

THEORY

Acetic acid (vinegar) is the main component of Vinegar. It is a carbon based compound with a single ionizable
proton with a –COOH functional moiety

According to the reaction equation

PROCEDURE

S. No Steps Reason
1. 0.1 N NaOH will be prepared and standardized using As per the procedure
succinic acid. explained previously.
2. Weigh accurately about 2 g or 2 ml (density of acetic This helps to make sure that
acid is ~ 1.0, so you can take 2 ml) in triplicate of results are consistence with
vinegar in volumetric flask and dilute with 50 ml of each other. Scientific evidence
water. must be reproducible.

3. Add 2-3 drops of phenolphthalein indicator and titrate Phenolphthalein is the


solution slowly with 0.1 N NaOH. appropriate indicator at this
pH.
4. Note down the burette reading. Repeat the titration Averaging of the results will
with other two flasks and take the average readings of minimize the random error.
sample taken and volume of NaOH used.

27
Observation Table (Specimen reading)
S. Amount of sample taken (g or Burette reading Volume of NaOH
No ml) Initial Final used (ml)
1. 2.0 0.0 16.40 16.40
2. 2.5 0.0 19.70 19.70
3. 1.5 0.0 11.60 11.60
Total 6.0 Total 47.70
Mean of sample taken 6.0/3= 2.0 g Mean of volume used 47.70/3= 15.90 ml

Calculation

Descriptive method Short cut method


1000 ml of 1 N NaOH=60 g eq. of CH3COOH Percentage purity= V x N x 60 x 100
15.9 ml of 0.1 N NaOH= 60 x 15.90 x 0.1 W (gm) x 1000
1000
= 0.0954 g V=Volume of NaOH (ml)
2.0 g of sample contains = 0.096 N= Normality of NaOH
g of CH3COOH W= Weight of sample (gm)
100 gm of sample contain = 0.0954 x 100 15.90 x 0.1 x 60 x 100
2 2 x 1000
= 4.77 %
= 4.77 %

RESULT
Percentage purity of given sample of acetic acid contain 4.77 % of pure acetic acid.

Using the equations attached to the experiment and all of your knowledge about reactions and statistics
answer the following questions.

1. A vinegar sample is titrated with 0.54 M NaOH. In one trial, 2.5 g vinegar requires 11.0 ml of NaOH to reach
a phenolphthalein endpoint. Find the % purity of acetic acid in this vinegar.

Descriptive method Short cut method


1000 ml of 1 N NaOH=60 g eq. of CH3COOH Percentage purity= V x N x 60 x 100
7.0 ml of 0.54 N NaOH= 60 x 11.0 x 0.54 W (gm) x 1000
1000
= 0.3564 g V=Volume of NaOH (ml)
2.5 g of sample contains=0.3564 g of CH3COOH N= Normality of NaOH
100 gm of sample contain = 0.3564 x 100 W= Weight of sample (gm)
2.5 11 x 0.54 x 60 x 100
2.5 x 1000
= 14.2 % = 14.2 %

28
Using the equations attached to the experiment and all of your knowledge about reactions and statistics
answer the following questions.

1. 1.5 g acid sample contaminated with some impurities was taken in 100 ml volumetric flask and volume was
made up to the mark. To titrate 10 ml of this acid sample need 20 ml of 0.1N NaOH solution. What is the
percentage purity of the sample?
1000 ml of 1 N NaOH=60 g eq. of CH3COOH ≡ 60 g of CH3COOH acid
20.0 ml of 0.1 N NaOH= 60 x 20.0 x 0.1
1000
= 0.12 g of CH3COOH acid
i.e. 10 ml of acid sample contain 0.12 g of CH3COOH
100 ml of acid sample will have 1.2 g of CH3COOH acid
That mean, 1.5 g of sample contain 1.2 g of CH3COOH acid
100 gm of sample contain = 1.2 x 100
1.5
= 80.0 %
2. 3.0 g sample of unknown acid was dissolved in distilled water and diluted to 50 ml. What was the percentage
of acetic acid in the sample, if titration of 10.0 ml aliquot of the diluted solution requires on average 25.0 ml of
0.12 N solution of NaOH.
30.0 %

29
0.1 N NaOH solution will be prepared and
Preparation of standardized using succinic acid as per the
0.1 N NaOH soln. procedure explained previously

Fill the burette with standard 0.1 N


NaOH solution as needed f or titration

To prevent exposing NaOH to the


atmospheric moisture and CO2

Determination of % Weigh accurately about 2.0 g or 2.0 ml of sample in


purity of acetic acid triplicate directly into a conical flask and add 20 ml
of water.

Add 2-3 drops of phenolphthalein indicator


Note the colour of the solution.

Add NaOH solution from the burette Constant swirling of conical flask
with constant swirling until the colour will ensure complete mixing of
of the solution turns colourless to reactants.
f aint pink.

Note the burette reading and calculate


how much base was used.

Repeat the titration with other two flask

Take the average of the readings

Flowchart illustrating the assay (% purity) of acetic acid in a given sample of vinegar

30
BIO-SKETCH

Dr. Rajesh Kumar Singh has completed his B. Pharmacy


(1999-2003) & M. Pharmacy (2003-2005) from Panjab
University, Chandigarh after qualifying GATE (2003) with
92.26 percentile and PhD (2008-2013) from I.K. Gujaral
Punjab Technical University, Jalandhar. He is presently an
Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Shivalik
College of Pharmacy, Nangal affiliated to Punjab Technical
University, India. Dr. Singh’s major area of research interests
are drug-design, polymer-drug conjugates for targeted
delivery, CNS active therapeutic agents and green chemistry
approach for chemical synthesis.
Dr. Singh has over 10 years of teaching experience and guided 16 postgraduate students. He has published more than 40
peer-reviewed scientific research papers in various Chemistry and Pharmacy Journals including Pharmaceutical Research
(Springer), European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Elsevier), Medicinal Chemistry Research (Springer), Journal of
Enzyme Inhibition and Medicinal Chemistry (Informa Healthcare), Arabian Journal of Chemistry (Elsevier) and Research
on Chemical Intermediates (Springer). He has also to his credit 46 National And International Conference Abstracts, 1
Book, 5 Best Paper Presentation Awards, 1 Travel grant to attend International Conferences and 5 Research Projects
funded by Punjab State Council for Science and Technology (PSCST), Chandigarh.

Dr. Singh is approved paper setter and evaluator of various Universities, approved PG guide for M. Pharmacy students,
reviewer of various reputed International Journals and Editorial Board Member of one Elsevier’s Journal. He has reviewed
more than thirty research papers of six different International Journals of Springer, Elsevier and Bentham of Impact Factor
varies from 1.3 to 4.0. He is an elected member of Association of Institution of Chemist (AIC), registered Pharmacist of
Punjab State Pharmacy Council and life member of APTI. Recently his biographical profile has been nominated and
selected for Marquis Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare 2015-2016 as world's foremost achievers.

31
CURRICULUM VITAE

DR. RAJESH KUMAR SINGH


M. Pharm. Ph.D., A.I.C.

Residential Address:
Office Address:
House No. 160, Type I A, Sector-2,
Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Naya Nangal, Distt-Ropar, Punjab.
Pharmaceutical Chemistry Division
E-mail: rksingh244@gmail.com
Shivalik College of Pharmacy, Nangal, 140126
Web: www.shivalikpharmacycollege.in
Affiliated to IK Gujaral Punjab Technical University,
Research gate Profile
Jalandhar.
http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rajesh_Singh20
District: Rupnagar, Nangal Dam
Punjab, India

EDUCATION
 B. Pharmacy (1999-2003), UIPS, Panjab University, Chandigarh.
 M. Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Chemistry (2003-2005), UIPS, Panjab University, Chandigarh.
 Ph.D. (Pharmacy) (2008-2013), I.K. Gujral Punjab Technical University, Jalandhar.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
 Assistant Professor (10th March 2006-Till Date) in Shivalik College of Pharmacy, Nangal, Ropar,
Affliated to Punjab Technical University, Jalandhar, Punjab, India.
 Lecturer (September 2005-February 2006) in Global College of Pharmacy, Anandpur Sahib,
Ropar, Affliated to Punjab Technical University, Jalandhar, Punjab, India.
 Member, External Practical Examiner, Punjab Technical University and Himachal Pradesh
Technical University, Hamirpur, H.P.
 Approved Question Papers Setter for Panjab University, Chandigarh and Himachal Pradesh
Technical University, Hamirpur, H.P
 Answer Books Evaluator for Panjab University, Chandigarh and Punjab Technical University,
Jalandhar, Punjab.
 Member, Board of Studies, PTU Jalandhar for Reformation of M. Pharmacy (Pharmaceutical
Chemistry) Syllabus.
 Editorial Board Member of Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Elsevier.
 Editorial Board Member of International Journal of Chemical and Biological Sciences, American
Journal of Science and Technology.

32
 Invited Expert Reviewer of following International Journals:
Medicinal Chemistry Research, Springer (IF 1.4)
Arabian Journal of Chemistry, Elsevier (IF 3.7)
Journal of Saudi Chemical Society, Elsevier (IF 2.5)
Research on Chemical Intermediates, Springer (IF 1.3)
Current Green Chemistry, Bentham
Current Organic Chemistry, Bentham (IF 3.0)
International Journal of Nanomedicine, Dove Medical Press (IF 4.0)
Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Elsevier

AGREEMENT FOR RESEARCH


 Agreement of research has been signed in between Researchist-Dr. Rajesh Kumar Singh and the
Prof. Songlig Wang, Capital Medical University, China for collaborative research work, patent
proposals, and commercialization of the research output.

AWARDS
 Awarded with M. Pharm. Research Schloarship from UGC for the year 2003-2005
 Awarded with Associateship of Institution of Chemist (AIC), Kolkata, India, 2009, having ID No
5944 LA.
 Excelled in Graduate Aptitude Test in Engineering (GATE), conducted by IIT, Chennai in 2003
by securing All India Rank 514 (92.26 percentile).
 Awarded with travel grant to attend International Conference (GOLD-CT 2014), North
Maharashtra University, Jalgaon (Best Oral Paper Presentation Award).
 Biographical profile is nominated and selected for inclusion in Marquis‟s Who's Who in Medicine
and Healthcare 2015-1016 as world's foremost achievers.

SCIENTIFIC ACHIEVEMENTS
 Research Publications: 38 (National 8, International 30)
 Abstract in Conference Proceedings: 46 (National 36, International 10)
 Paper Presentation/Conference/Workshop/Training Courses Attended: 18
 Research Grants: Completed 05 Student’s Projects funded by Punjab State Council for Science and
Technology (PSCST), Chandigarh, Punjab.

 Book: 01

33
Rajesh K. Singh and Akshdeep Sandhar, “Multicomponent One Pot Green Synthesis of 1, 5-
Benzodiazepines: Investigating various acids for its catalytic potential and their mechanism”, LAP
LAMBERT Academic Publishing , Germanay, ISBN-13: 978-3845422589, 136 pages.

RESEARCH INTERESTS
 Synthesis of targeted polymer-drug conjugates for the treatment of cancer and malaria.
 Design and synthesis of CNS active therapeutic agents.
 Exploration of innovative catalyst for the green synthesis of organic compounds of medicinal
interests.

RESEARCH GROUP
 16 Students have been completed for their 1 year M. Pharm. projects
PUBLISHED PAPERS (LAST FIVE YEARS)
*Corresponding Author
2016
1. Rajesh K. Singh*, Shikha Sharma, Akshdeep Sandhar, Manpreet Saini and Sahil Kumar, “Recent
advances in the development of various catalysts for an efficient green synthesis of 1,5-
benzodiazepines”, Iranian Journal of Catalysis (2016), 6(1), 1-21, ISSN No. 2252-0236 Cite 0 times

2. Rajesh K. Singh*, Renu Bala, Sahil Kumar, “Investigating various green chemistry techniques for an
efficient synthesis of 1-amidoalkyl-2-naphthols catalyzed by zinc oxide nanoparticles under solvent-free
conditions”, Ind. J. Chem. (2016), 55B (3), 381-386
3. Yuhao Zhao, Deepak Kumar, Rajesh K. Singh* & Yanxu Ma*, “Morphoanatomical, physicochemical
and phytochemical standardization with HPTLC fingerprinting of aerial parts of Aerva lanata (Linn)
Juss ex. Schult”, Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Elseveir (Accepted), 2016.

4. Sahil Kumar*, Rajesh K. Singh, Babita Patial, Sachin Goyal, T.R. Bhardwaj*and R.S.R. Murthy,
“Recent advances in novel heterocyclic scaffolds for the treatment of drug-resistant malaria”, J. Enzyme
Inhib. Med. Chem., Informa Healthcare, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/14756366.2015.1016513,
(In press, 2015), ISSN No. 8755-5093 (P), 1029-2462 (E) (IF 2.4), Cite 0 times

2015

34
5. Rajesh K. Singh*, Sahil Kumar and Manpreet Saini, “Green chemistry approach for an efficient
synthesis of 1, 5-benzodiazepines promoted by stannic oxide nanoparticles under solvent-free
condition,” Ind. J. Heterocycl. Chem., 25(2), 2015, 369-374, ISSN No. 0971-1627, (IF 0.301).

6. Sahil Kumar*, Rajesh K. Singh, RSR Murthy and TR Bhardwaj*,“Synthesis and evaluation of
substituted poly(organophosphazenes) as a novel nanocarrier system for combined antimalarial therapy
of primaquine and dihydroartemisinin,” Pharmaceutical Research, (2015), 32(8), 2736-2752, Springer
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11095-015-1659-5, ISSN No. 074-8741 (P), 1573-904X (E), (IF 3.5),
Cite 1 times

7. Sahil Kumar*, Rajesh K. Singh, Rajiv Kumar, RSR Murthy and T.R, Bhardwaj, “Design, synthesis and
evaluation of antimalarial potential of polyphosphazene linked combination therapy of primaquine and
dihydroartemisinin”, European J. Pharm. Sci., Elsevier, (2015), 66, 123-137, DOI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejps.2014.09.023, ISSN No. 0928-0987, (IF 3.0), Cite 3 times

8. Rajesh K. Singh*, Renu Bala and Sahil Kumar, “Microwave assisted facile synthesis of 1-amidoalkyl-2-
naphthols catalyzed by stannous oxide nanoparticles,” J. Ind. Chem. Soc. (2015), 92 (7): 1161-1165,
ISSN No. 00194522-7077, (IF 0.25), Cite 0 times

9. Rajesh K. Singh*, D.N. Prasad, T.R. Bhardwaj, “Hybrid pharmacophore-based drug design, synthesis
and antiproliferative activity of 1,4-dihydropyridines linked alkylating anticancer agents”, Med. Chem.
Res., (2015), 24 (4), 1534-1541, Springer DOI; http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00044-014-1236-1, ISSN
No. 1054-2523 (P), 1554-8120 (E), (IF 1.4), Cite 1 times

10. Rajesh K. Singh*, Sonia Devi, D.N. Prasad, “Synthesis, physicochemical and biological evaluation of 2-
aminobenzophenone derivatives as potent skeletal muscle relaxant,” Arab. J. Chem. (2015), 8 (3), 308-
312, Elsevier DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arabjc.2011.11.013, ISSN No. 1878-5352 , (IF 3.7), Cite
5 times

11. Rajesh K. Singh*, D.N. Prasad and T.R. Bhardwaj, “Synthesis, physicochemical and kinetic studies of
redox derivative of bis(2-chloroethylamine) as alkylating cytotoxic agent for brain delivery, Arab. J.
Chem. (2015), 8 (3), 380-387, Elsevier DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arabjc.2012.11.005, ISSN No.
1878-5352 , (IF 3.7), Cite 6 times

35
12. Rajesh K. Singh*, Renu Bala, Robita Duvedi and Sahil Kumar, “Recent advances in the development
of various catalysts for an efficient green synthesis of amidoalkyl-naphthols”, Iranian Journal of
Catalysis (2015), 5(3), 187-206, ISSN No. 2252-0236 Cite 0 times

13. Rajesh K. Singh*, Balpreet Singh, Robita Duvedi and Sahil Kumar, “Sulfanilic acid: a versatile and
efficient catalyst among various organocatalysts screened for the synthesis of 1-amido-2-alkyl-naphthols
under solvent-free condition”, Res. Chem. Intermed. (2015), 41: 4083-4099, DOI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11164-013-1513-5 Springer, ISSN No. 0922-6168 (E), I.F. (1.22), Cite 3
times

14. Tiangang Li, Sandeep Singh, Xing Zhai, Xiangqi Meng* & Rajesh K. Singh*, “Microwave-assisted
synthesis, insilico ADME prediction and antibacterial study of 2-(substituted acetamido)-5-
nitrobenzophenone derivatives”, Asian J. Chem., 27 (7), 2015, 2452-2456. DOI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.14233/ajchem.2015.17914, ISSN No. 0970-7077, (IF 0.45), Cite 3 times

2014
15. Rajesh K. Singh* and Robita Duvedi, “Environmental-friendly green chemistry approaches foran
efficient synthesis of 1-amidoalkyl-2-naphthols catalyzed by tannic acid”, Arab. J. Chem., Elsevier,
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arabjc.2014.08.022 (In press, 2014), ISSN No. 1878-5352, (IF 3.7),
Cite 1 times

16. Rajesh K. Singh*, D.N. Prasad and T.R. Bhardwaj, “Design, synthesis, chemical and biological
evaluation of brain targeted alkylating agent using reversible redox prodrug approach”, Arab. J. Chem.,
Elsevier (In press, 2014), DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arabjc.2013.12.008, ISSN No. 1878-5352,
(IF 3.7), Cite 0 times

17. Yuhao Zhao, Xuejie Yu, Manpreet Kaur, Yanxu Ma & Rajesh K. Singh*, “Highly efficient zinc oxide
nanoparticles catalyzed green synthesis of 1, 5-benzodiazepines under solvent-free path”, Asian J.
Chem., (2014), 26 (24), 8539-8542. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14233/ajchem.2014.18319 ISSN No.
0970-7077 (IF 0.45), Cite 1 times

18. Rajesh K. Singh*, Sahil Kumar, D.N. Prasad and T.R. Bhardwaj “Reversible redox system based drug
design for targeting alkylating agent across brain”, Med. Chem. Res., (2014), 23 (5), 2405-2416,

36
Springer, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00044-013-0833-8, ISSN No. 1054-2523 (P), 1554-8120 (E),
(IF 1.4), Cite 3 times

19. Rajesh K. Singh*, “Design, Synthesis and Physicochemical Characterization of Nicotinic Acid Linked
Nitrogen Mustard Agent Capable of Penetrating the Brain”, Int. J. Pharmacy Teaching and Pract.,
5(1), 2014, 925-929, ISSN No. 1986-8111, Cite 0 times

20. Yuhao Zhao, Shikha Sharma, Minghua Huang, Akshdeep Sandhar, Rajesh K. Singh*, YanXu Ma*,
“Investigation of various organocatalysts for an improved and efficient one pot synthesis of 2, 3-
dihydro-1H-1, 5-benzodiazepines under solvent-free condition”, Asian J. Chem., 26 (16), 2014, 5116-
5120. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14233/ajchem.2014.16440, ISSN No. 0970-7077, (IF 0.45), Cite 2
times

21. Pengying Li, Ketki Sahore, Jianjun Liu* & Rajesh K. Singh*,“Synthesis and antimicrobial evaluation of
2-aminobenzophenone linked 1, 4-dihydropyridine derivatives”, Asian J. Chem., 26 (16), 2014, 5291-
5294, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14233/ajchem.2014.17403, ISSN No. 0970-7077, (IF 0.45), Cite 3
times

22. Tiangang Li, Xing Zhai, Dharmaveer Singh, Rajesh K. Singh*, Xuegong Xu*,“Multicomponent one-
pot green synthesis of 1-amidoalkyl-2-naphthols promoted by PNBA under solvent-free condition”,
Asian J. Chem. 26 (16), 2014, 5207-5211, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14233/ajchem.2014.16707, ISSN
No. 0970-7077, (IF 0.45), Cite 3 times

2013

23. Rajesh K. Singh*, D.N. Prasad and T.R. Bhardwaj, “Design, synthesis and antiproliferative activity of
benzodiazepine-mustard conjugates as potential brain antitumour agents”, J. Saudi Chem. Soc.,
Elsevier (Published Online, 2013)
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jscs.2013.10.004, ISSN No. 1319-6103, (IF 2.5), Cite 2 times

24. Rajesh K. Singh*, D.N. Prasad and T.R. Bhardwaj, “Synthesis, in vitro/in vivo evaluation and in silico
physicochemical study of prodrug approach for brain targeting of alkylating agent”, Med. Chem. Res.
(2013), 22:5324-5336. Springer: DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00044-013-0537-0, ISSN No. 1054-
2523 (P), 1554-8120 (E), (IF 1.4), Cite 7 times

37
25. Rajesh K. Singh*, D.N. Prasad and T.R. Bhardwaj, “Design, synthesis and evaluation of
aminobenzophenone derivatives containing nitrogen mustard moiety as potential CNS antitumour
agents”, Med. Chem. Res. (2013), 22 (12):5901-5911. Springer: DOI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00044-013-0582-8, ISSN No. 1054-2523 (P), 1554-8120 (E), (IF 1.4), Cite 5
times

26. Akshdeep Sandhar and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Rapid and efficient synthesis of 2,3-dihydro-1H-1,5-
benzodiazepines catalyzed by chloroacetic acid screened among various aliphatic acids under solvent
free conditions,” Chem. Sci. Trans., 2(1), 2013, 176-180, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7598/cst2013.315,
ISSN No. 2278-3458 (P), 2278-3318 (E), (IF 0.23), Cite 0 times

27. Prabhjot Kaur and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Investigation of various green chemistry approaches for the
efficient synthesis of dialkyl-1,4-dihydro-4-(substitutedphenyl)-2,6-dimethylpyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate,”
Chem. Sci. Trans., 2(S1), pp S295-S301 (2013), DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7598/cst2013.443, ISSN
No. 2278-3458 (P), 2278-3318 (E), (IF 0.23), Cite 2 times

28. Rajesh K. Singh* and Sapna Sharma, “Restructuring pharmaceutical education for next generation
pharmacist: a survey report, Int. J. Pharmacy Teaching and Pract. 4(2), 2013, 568-570, ISSN No. 1986-
8111 (IF Awaited), Cite 0 times.

2012

29. Akshdeep Sandhar, D.N. Prasad and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Salicylic acid catalyzed synthesis of 2,3-
dihydro-1H-1,5-benzodiazepines under solven-free condition,” Ind. J. Heterocycl. Chem., 21(2), 2012,
369-374, ISSN No. 0971-1627, (IF 0.17), Cite 6 times

30. Akshdeep Sandhar, D.N. Prasad, Abhinav Kapoor and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Efficient p-amino benzoic
acid catalyzed eco-friendly synthesis of 1,5-benzodiazepines among various amino acids under solvent-
free condition,” Current Res. Chem., Science Alert, USA, 4, 2012, 68-75, DOI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.3923/crc2012, ISSN No. 1996-5052 (P), 2152-3385X (E), Cite 2 times

31. Akshdeep Sandhar and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Rapid and efficient tannic acid mediated one-pot synthesis
of 1, 5-benzodiazepines under solvent-free condition,” Asian J. Chem., 24(12), 2012, 5643-5645, ISSN
No. 0970-7077, (IF 0.45), Cite 10 times

38
32. Sapna Malik, Sumit Sharma and Rajesh K. Singh*, Microwave assisted synthesis of 1-amidoalkyl-2-
naphthols catalyzed by anhydrous zinc chloride,” Asian J. Chem., 24(12), 2012, 5669-5672, ISSN No.
0970-7077, (IF 0.45), Cite 7 times

33. Prabhjot Kaur, Heena Sharma, Rekha Rana, DN Prasad and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Comparative study of
various green chemistry approaches for the efficient synthesis of 1,4-dihydropyridines,” Asian J.
Chem., 24(12), 2012, 5649-5651, ISSN No. 0970-7077, (IF 0.45), Cite 8 times

34. Robita Duvedi and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Environment friendly, efficient chloroacetic promoted synthesis
of 1-amidoalkyl-2-naphthols under neat condition,” Asian J. Chem., 24 (12), 2012, 5665-5668, ISSN
No. 0970-7077, (IF 0.45), Cite 2 times

35. Amarjit Singh and Rajesh K. Singh*, “A study on student’s perception of ideal teacher: a survey on
students of pharmacy colleges in Punjab”, Int. J. Pharmacy Teaching and Pract., 3(3), 2012, 298-300,
Cite 3 times

36. Rajesh K. Singh*, Sapna Malik, Sumit, Deep Sharma, D.N. Prasad and T.R. Bhardwaj, “Synthesis and
study of chemical delivery system for targeting nitrogen mustard to the brain”, Asian J. Chem., 24 (12),
2012, 5635-5638, ISSN No. 0970-7077, (IF 0.45), Cite 6 times

37. Rajesh K. Singh*, D.N. Prasad and T.R. Bhardwaj, “Synthesis, alkylation activity and physicochemical
evaluation of nitrogen mustard agent to penetrate the blood-brain barrier”, Asian J. Chem., 24(12),
2012, 5605-5608, ISSN No. 0970-7077, (IF 0.45), Cite 6 times

2011

38. Shikha Sharma, D.N. Prasad, Rajesh K. Singh, “One pot synthesis of 2,3-dihydro-1h-1,5-
benzodiazepines under solvent-free conditions using anhydrous stannous chloride as catalyst, “ J.
Chem. Pharm. Res., 3 (5), 2011, 382-389, ISSN No. 0975-7384, (IF 0.9), Cite 10 times

39. Rajesh K. Singh*, Ketki Sahore and Sahil Kumar, “Recent advances in the synthetic approaches and
current pharmacological applications of 1, 4-dihydropyridines”, Iranian J Catalysis (Communicated).

39
40. Sahil Kumar, Rajesh K. Singh*, R.S.R. Murthy, T.R. Bhardwaj, “Emerging Treatment Approaches
and Targets for Drug-resistant Malaria: A Wrestle Towards Innovation in the Advanced
Chemotherapy of Malaria”, Current Drug Targets (Under Preparation).

41. Sahil Kumar, Rajesh K. Singh*, R.S.R. Murthy, T.R. Bhardwaj, “Synthesis of Novel Controlled
Molecular Weight Substituted Poly(organophosphazenes): Synthesis, Characterization and In Vitro
Degradation Studies”, (Under Preparation).

ABSTRACTS PUBLISHED IN CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS (NATIONAL)


Presenter
Corresponding Author*

1. Arun Sharma, Rajesh K. Singh*, S. Duggal and D.N. Prasad, “Synthesis of Lipophilic Analogues of
Alkylating Anticancer Agents for Brain Delivery”, 10th Punjab Science Congress (PSC), Feb-2007.
Abstract No-E-2-01

2. Sapna Sharma, S. Duggal*, Rajesh Kumar, R.K. Singh and D.N. Prasad, “Antiinflammatory Activity of
Aqueous Extract of Stem Bark of A. indica”, 10th Punjab Science Congress (PSC), Feb-2007. Abstract
No-A2/02-01

3. Rajesh K. Singh* and S. Duggal, “Women Entrepreneurship: Challenges, Motivating Factors, Obstacles
and Scope of Women Entrepreneurship in Indian Rural Sector”, National Seminar organized by
Industrial Development and Management Association (IDMA), March 2007.

4. Sapna Sharma, R.K. Singh, D.N. Prasad and S. Duggal*,“Effect of Fresh Leaf Juice of C. Roseus on
Fructose Induced Hyperlipedemia and Hyperglycemia”, 59th Indian Pharmaceutical Congress,
Varanasi, Dec. 2007, Abstract No-D-31

5. Vijay Tripathi, R.K. Singh, D.N. Prasad and S. Duggal* “Effect of Fresh Leaf Juice of C. Roseus on
Isolated Frog Heart”, Indian Pharmaceutical Graduate Association , IPGA, Nov 2007 Abstract No.
RTPER-178

6. Rajesh K. Singh*, D.N. Prasad and S. Duggal, “Synthesis and Characterization of Some Ester Prodrugs
of Ibuprofen: A prodrug Approach,” AICTE sponsored National Seminar on “Emerging trends in
Advanced Drug Delivery System”, Dec-2007, Nagpur, Abstract No. B-23

40
7. Rajesh K. Singh*, “Diabetes-II”, Indian Science Congress, Panjab University, Chandigarh, Jan-2004

8. Rajesh K. Singh*, Kumar M, Bhardwaj T.R. “Design and Synthesis of Polyphosphazene Linked
th
Alkylating Anticancer Agent: A polymer-drug Conjugate Approach”, 60 Indian Pharmaceutical
Congress, New Delhi, 12-14 Dec., 2008, Abstract No.MC-160

9. Sharma Sapna, Sharma D, Prasad D.N. and Rajesh K. Singh*, “A need to reorient pharmaceutical
education: A survey on students of Pharmacy colleges in Punjab”, organized by Indian Congress of
Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences 2009 and Indian Pharmaceutical Association Convention-2009
at DIPSAR , New Delhi, 14-15 March, 2009, Abstract No PP132.

10. Singh A, Singh M, Prasad D.N. and Rajesh K. Singh*, “A Student Perception of Ideal Teacher: A
Survey on Students of Pharmacy Colleges in Punjab”, organized by Indian congress of Pharmacy and
Pharmaceutical Sciences 2009 and Indian Pharmaceutical Association Convention-2009 at DIPSAR ,
New Delhi, 14-15 March, 2009, Abstract No PP133 (2nd BEST PAPER AWARD).

11. Sharma D, Sharma S, Prasad D.N. and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Restructuring Pharmaceutical Education for
Next Generation Pharmacist”, organized by Indian congress of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
2009 and Indian Pharmaceutical Association Convention-2009 at DIPSAR , New Delhi, 14-15 March,
2009, Abstract No PP134

12. Rajesh K. Singh*, Sonia Devi, Rekha Rana, Amarjit Singh and D.N. Prasad, “Current and Future
Strategies for Brain Drug Targeting”, A.I.C.T.E Sponsored Regional Seminar on Standardisation of
Herbal Drugs, Shivalik College of Pharmacy, Nangal, 12-13 Sep 2009, ABS-44
(2nd BEST PAPER AWARD).

13. Richa Johar, Dipti Sharma, D.N. Prasad and Rajesh K. Singh*, “A Study on Awareness Regarding
“Swine Flue” among Rural Area people”, A.I.C.T.E Sponsored Regional Seminar on Standardisation
of Herbal Drugs, Shivalik College of Pharmacy, Nangal, 12-13 Sep 2009, ABS-35 (2nd BEST PAPER
AWARD).

41
14. Amarjit Singh, D.N. Prasad, Goyal S and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Recent Progress in High Throughput
Screening", A.I.C.T.E Sponsored Regional Seminar on Standardisation of Herbal Drugs, Shivalik
College of Pharmacy, Nangal, 12-13 Sep 2009, ABS-19

15. Kumar Mithlesh, Chauhan Gaurav, Rana Madhu, Dhruv Dev, Prasad D.N. and Rajesh K. Singh*,
"Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology: Tools, Application and Scope". A.I.C.T.E Sponsored Regional
Seminar on Standardisation of Herbal Drugs, Shivalik College of Pharmacy, Nangal, 12-13 Sep 2009,
ABS-30

16. Sapna Sharma, D.N. Prasad, Neeru Malik and Rajesh K. Singh*, "Current and Futute Status of herval
Medicines", A.I.C.T.E Sponsored Regional Seminar on Standardisation of Herbal Drugs, Shivalik
College of Pharmacy, Nangal, 12-13 Sep 2009, ABS-39

17. Rajesh K. Singh*, Prasad D.N., Kumar M, and Bhardwaj T.R., "Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel
Chemical Delivery System of Nitrogen Mustard to the Brain", Silver Jubilee Conference of IPGA-2009,
ISF college of Pharmacy, Moga, 7th-8th Nov 2009, B-23

18. Singh Amarjit, Prasad D.N., and Rajesh K. Singh*, "Reversible Redox Drug Delivery System: Selective
Targeting of Drugs to the Brain", Silver Jubilee Conference of IPGA-2009, ISF college of Pharmacy,
Moga, 7th-8th Nov 2009, C-4

19. Devi Sonia, Prasad D.N., and Rajesh K. Singh*, "CNS Drug Delivery: Barriers, Molecular
Physicochemical Properties and Various Strategies", Silver Jubilee Conference of IPGA-2009, ISF
college of Pharmacy, Moga, 7th-8th Nov 2009, C-6

20. Sharma Dipti, Johar Richa and Rajesh K. Singh*, "Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology in Health Care ",
Silver Jubilee Conference of IPGA-2009, at ISF college of Pharmacy, Moga, 7th-8th Nov 2009, C-7

21. Johar Richa, Sharma Dipti, Prasad D.N. and Rajesh K. Singh*, "A Recent Advances in Development of
Needle-Free Injection Technologies", Silver Jubilee Conference of IPGA-2009, ISF college of
Pharmacy, Moga, 7th-8th Nov 2009, C-30

42
22. Rana Rekha, Devi Sonia, Singh A, Prasad D.N., and Rajesh K. Singh*, "Tumour Hypoxia: A Promising
Target for a Selective Chemotherapy of Cancerous Cells", Silver Jubilee Conference of IPGA-2009, ISF
college of Pharmacy, Moga, 7th-8th Nov 2009, A-8

23. Rajesh K. Singh*, Devi Sonia, Prasad D.N. and Bhardwaj T.R. “Synthesis and Physicochemical
Characterization of Dibenzazepine linked Nitrogen Mustard as Potential Brain Antitumour agent”, 61th
Indian Pharmaceutical Congress, Ahmedabad, 11-13 Dec., 2009, Abstract No. B-70

24. Singh A, Rana R, Prasad D.N. and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Synthesis and Studies of Reversible Redox
Chemical Delivery System of Nitrogen Mustard Anticancer Agent", 61th Indian Pharmaceutical
Congress, Ahmedabad, 11-13 Dec., 2009, Abstract No. B-254

25. Johar R, Sharma D, Singh H and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Are Doctors in Teaching Hospitals Really Serious
About Pharmacovigilance? A Survey Report”, 61th Indian Pharmaceutical Congress, Ahmedabad, 11-13
Dec., 2009, Abstract No. H-8

26. Sharma D, Johar R, Singh H and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Survey Study on the Correlation between the
Body Mass Index and Socio economic Status and Prevalence of Diabetes”, 61th Indian Pharmaceutical
Congress, Ahmedabad, 11-13 Dec., 2009, Abstract No. H-9

27. Sharma Shikha, Prasad D.N. Kumar R and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Recent advancements in RNA targeted
drugs: A brief review”, INDIAN JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL PHARMACY, Vol., 47 (6), Nov-Dec,
2010, pp 122 Abstract No PT-1

28. Sharma Ankita, Kumar R, Prasad D.N. and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Recent innovation in cancer treatment
by nanoshells”, INDIAN JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL PHARMACY, Vol., 47 (6), Nov-Dec, 2010, pp
124 Abstract No PT-8

29. Robita Duvedi, D.N. Prasad and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Microwave assisted one-pot three-component
synthesis of 1-Amidoalkyl-2-naphthols under solvent free conditions, APTI-16th Annual National
Convention 2011, ISF College of Pharmacy, Moga, 07-09 October, 2011, Abstract No-MC 21

43
30. Sapna Malik, D.N. Prasad and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Tannic acid catalyzed one-pot multi-component
synthesis of Amidoalkyl naphthols, APTI-16th Annual National Convention 2011, ISF College of
Pharmacy, Moga, 07-09 October, 2011, Abstract No-MC 47

31. Sharma Shikha, D.N. Prasad and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Rapid and efficient synthesis of 1,5-
benzodiazepine derivatives under solvent free, APTI-16th Annual National Convention 2011, ISF
College of Pharmacy, Moga, 07-09 October, 2011, Abstract No-MC 27

32. Prabhjot, Akshdeep, D.N. Prasad and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Pharmaceutical Waste: Causes, Effects and
Management Strategies, APTI-16th Annual National Convention 2011, ISF College of Pharmacy, Moga,
07-09 October, 2011, Abstract No-PE-08

33. Akshdeep, Prabhjot, D.N. Prasad and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Uncontrolled Proliferation of Pharmacy
Colleges in India: Are we Ready for this Pharmacy Cancer? APTI-16th Annual National Convention
2011, ISF College of Pharmacy, Moga, 07-09 October, 2011, Abstract No-PE-08

34. Renu Bala, Mandeep Singh, Sahil Kumar, D.N. Prasad and Rajesh K. Singh*, “A new drug target for
antimalarial chemotherapy”, National Seminar on Advancement, Challenges & Opportunities in
Pharmaceutical Research, Oct 18-20, 2013, Paper No 081.

35. Manpreet Saini, Mandeep Singh, D.N. Prasad and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Development of novel
approaches for the management of obesity”, National Seminar on Advancement, Challenges &
Opportunities in Pharmaceutical Research, Oct 18-20, 2013, Paper No 056.

36. Sahil Kumar, Ashwani Kumar, Rajesh K. Singh* and T.R. Bhardwaj, “Design, docking, synthesis and
antihypertensive evaluation of novel peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (ppar-γ) agonists”, 17th
Punjab Science Congress, Theme: Science and Technology for Sustainable Growth, Feb 14-16, 2014,
D036.

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCES

1. Rajesh K. Singh*, D.N. Prasad and T.R. Bhardwaj, “Design, synthesis and study of 1,4-
dihydropyridines based nitrogen mustard pharmacophore as anticancer agents”, International

44
Conference on Global Opportunities for Latest Developments in Chemistry and Technology
(GOLD-CT-2014), School of Chemical Sciences, North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon. 06-08
Feb, 2014, OP-69 (BEST ORAL PRESENTATION AWARD).

2. Rajesh K. Singh*, D.N. Prasad and T.R. Bhardwaj, “Synthesis and study of novel alkylating
anticancer agents for brain delivery using reversible redox prodrug approach”, International
Conference on Interdisciplinary Areas with Chemical Sciences (ICIACS 2013), 30-01 Nov-Dec,
2013, Panjab University, Chandigarh, C-6.

3. Babita Patial, Sahil Kumar, Sachin Goyal, Rajesh K. Singh and T.R. Bhardwaj, “A long march
towards synthesis of various novel heterocyclics for the treatment of malaria”, Indo-Bulgaria
International Conference, Recent Advances in Herbal Technology, Sep 7, 2013, PCHEM-7.

4. Rajesh K. Singh*, Singh A, Devi S, Prasad D.N., Kumar M and Bhardwaj T.R.,"Targeting Aniline
Mustard across Brain by Reversible Redox Drug Delivery System", 14th ISCB International
Conference on Chemical Biology for Discovery: Perspective and Challenges, Organised by Indian
Society of Chemist and Biologist, CDRI, Lucknow, Jan 15-18, 2010, P-91

5. Akshdeep Sandhar, D.N. Prasad, Rajesh K. Singh*, “Rapid and Efficient Tannic acid Mediated
One-pot Synthesis of 1, 5-Benzodiazepines under Solvent-free Condition” International
Conference on Global Trends in Pure and Applied Chemical Sciences, 3-4 March 2012, Udaipur
(Rajasthan) AB-255.

6. Rajesh K. Singh*, D.N. Prasad1 and T.R. Bhardwaj “Synthesis, Alkylation Activity and
Physicochemical Evaluation of Nitrogen Mustard Agent to Penetrate the Blood-Brain Barrier”
International Conference on Global Trends in Pure and Applied Chemical Sciences, 3-4 March
2012, Udaipur (Rajasthan) AB-213.

7. Rajesh K. Singh*, Sumit, Deep Sharma, D.N. Prasad and T.R. Bhardwaj “Synthesis and Study of
Chemical Delivery System for Targeting Nitrogen Mustard to the Brain” International Conference
on Global Trends in Pure and Applied Chemical Sciences, 3-4 March 2012, Udaipur (Rajasthan)
AB-241.
8. Sapna Malik, Robita Duvedi, D.N. Prasad and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Microwave assisted synthesis of
1-amidoalkyl-2-naphthols catalysed by Anhydrous Zinc Chloride” International Conference on

45
Global Trends in Pure and Applied Chemical Sciences, 3-4 March 2012, Udaipur (Rajasthan) AB-
278.

9. Prabhjot Kaur, Heena Sharma, Rekha Rana, D.N. Prasad and Rajesh K. Singh* “Comparative
Study of Various Green Chemistry Approaches for the Efficient Synthesis of 1,4-Dihydropyridines”
International Conference on Global Trends in Pure and Applied Chemical Sciences, 3-4 March
2012, Udaipur (Rajasthan) AB-241.

10. Robita Duvedi, Sapna Malik, D.N. Prasad and Rajesh K. Singh*, “Environment Friendly, Efficient
Chloroacetic Acid Promoted Synthesis of 1-Amidoalkyl-2-naphthols Under Neat Condition”
International Conference on Global Trends in Pure and Applied Chemical Sciences, 3-4 March
2012, Udaipur (Rajasthan) AB-259.

WORKSHOP/ PROFESSIONAL TRAINING/CONFERENCES

1. Rajesh K. Singh, Attended and Presented paper in Indian Science Congress held at Panjab University,
Chandigarh, Jan-2004.
2. Rajesh K. Singh, Attended International Symposium on India Emerging as a Global Pharmaceutical
Competitor, Panjab University, Chandigarh, 25-26 Feb, 2005.
3. Rajesh K. Singh, Ten days Industrial training on HPLC, GC and other sophisticated instruments at
Ranbaxy Lab Ltd, Mohali (PUNJAB), 23-03 Dec-Jan 2004-2005.
4. Rajesh K. Singh, Invited for oral paper presentation in 10th Punjab Science Congress, Feb-2007.
5. Rajesh K. Singh, Invited for oral paper presentation in AICTE sponsored National Seminar organized
by Industrial Development and Management Association (IDMA), March 2007.
6. Rajesh K. Singh, Attended and presented paper in AICTE sponsored National Seminar on “Emerging
Trends in Advanced Drug Delivery System” organized by Sharad Pawar College of Pharmacy, Dec
2007, Nagpur.
7. Rajesh K. Singh, Attended and presented paper in 60th Indian Pharmaceutical Congress, New Delhi,
12-14 Dec., 2008.
8. Rajesh K. Singh, AICTE Sponsored two weeks Quality Improvement Programme on Theoretical and
Practical training on Discovery and Development of New Chemical Entities organized by Poona
College of Pharmacy, Bharathi Vidyapeeth University, Pune from 16 Feb-28 Feb 2009.
9. Rajesh K. Singh, One Week Summer Workshop on hand-on practical training on HPLC at NIPER,
Mohali from July 13-July 17 2009.

46
10. Rajesh K. Singh, Attended A.I.C.T.E Sponsored Regional Seminar on Standardisation of Herbal
Drugs, Shivalik College of Pharmacy, Nangal, 12-13 Sep 2009.
11. Rajesh K. Singh, Attended and presented paper in National Conference on Silver Jubilee Conference
of IPGA-2009 organized by ISF college of Pharmacy, Moga, 7th-8th Nov 2009.
12. Rajesh K. Singh, Attended 30th Annual Conference of Biomedical Scientist (IABMS) organized by
Indian Association of Biomedical Scientist, DRDO, Chandigarh 18th-20th November 2009.
13. Rajesh K. Singh, Attended and presented paper in 61th Indian Pharmaceutical Congress, New Delhi,
11-13 Dec., 2009.
14. Rajesh K. Singh, Attended and presented paper in 14th ISCB International Conference on Chemical
Biology for Discovery: Perspective and Challenges, Organised by Indian Society of Chemist and
Biologist, CDRI, Lucknow, Jan 15-18, 2010.
15. Rajesh K. Singh, Two Weeks Staff Development Programme sponsored by AICTE on “Modern
Sophisticated Analytical Techniques and Their Applicaations in Pharmaceuticals from 16-30 July, 2011
at ISF college of Pharmacy, Moga.
16. Rajesh K. Singh, invited for oral for oral presentation in International Conference on Global Trends in
Pure and Applied Chemical Sciences, 3-4 March 2012, Udaipur (Rajasthan) AB-213.
17. Rajesh K. Singh, invited for poster presentation in International Conference on Interdisciplinary Areas
with Chemical Sciences (ICIACS 2013), 30-01 Nov-Dec, 2013, Panjab University, Chandigarh,C-6.
18. Rajesh K. Singh, invited for oral for oral presentation in International Conference on Global
Opportunities in Chemistry and Technology (GOLD-CT-2014), North Maharashtra University,
Jalgaon, 06-08 Feb 2014, OP-69.

ASSOCIATIONS/LIFE-MEMBERSHIP
 Life Member of APTI having Ref. No PU/LM-158
 Associate of Institution of Chemist (AIC), Kolkata, India
 Registered Pharmacist to Punjab State Pharmacy Council having Registration No 30394
PERSONAL BIO-DATA
 Date of Birth: 24th April 1980
 Nationality: Indian
 Marital status: Married, blessed with a daughter and a son.

Date 10-04-2016 (Rajesh Kumar Singh)

47