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Abstract

This study title “A Study on Consumer preference to wards


Perfumes“ A Visual interaction remains the central
ideology of perfume packaging industry. To achieve this
ideology, packaging must clearly establish a complete
sensory relationship between the customer and the
product which includes visual, aroma and tactile
elements. The aim of this research work is to identify
the key factors that affect customers’ buying
preferences and thus propose a methodology that will
represent the fragrance in form of visual cues. To
understand the customer’s buying pattern of perfumes,
an online survey was conducted in which 50
candidates participated (23 female, 27 male). ANOVA
analysis was conducted using SPSS software to analyze
the results procured from the online survey. Results
clearly indicate that visual cues affects the decision
making process during purchase of perfumes. The
proposed methodology may provide a useful guideline
to the perfume packaging industry in establishing
harmony between customer’s perception of the
perfume and the fragrance of perfume in reality. Factors
influencing the buyers preferences. Brand loyalty is not found
significant.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
It gives me immense pleasure to express sincere thanks to all who helped me in the
successful completion of this project work. First of all, I would like to thank the GOD
ALMIGHTY, who has been a constant support in every walk of my life and source of strength
in presenting this project.
I wish to convey my sincere thanks to Dr.P.Selvaraj, Chairman, Er.
S. Prabhakaran, Treasurer, Er.S.Vigneshwaran, Secretary, Shivani School of Business
Management, Trichy for their encouragement in doing this project.
I express my special privilege and heartful thanks to, Dr.J.Sivasubramanian, Director
Shivani School of Business Management, Trichy for his guidance and encouragement.
I am greatly thankful to Mr.M.Arivazhaganmy internal guide and project coordinator
for giving me this opportunity and for extending constant support and valuable guidance
throughout the project work.
I extend my sincere thanks to Dr.W.E.EugineKingsly Professor, and Ms.M.Lakshmi
Assistant Professor.
My sincere thanks go to all faculty members of Shivani School of Business
Management for their help and assistance for the completion of the study.
Last but not least I wish to extend my sincere gratitude to my parents and friends, for
the support and co-operation they rendered to me to make this project perfect in its total. I
convey my thanks to all who helped me directly and indirectly to carry out this project
successfully.

S.RAMACHANDRAN

TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER
NO CONTENTS PAGE NO
1 INTRODUCTION
1.1 Introduction to the study
1.2 Statement of the problem
1.3 Company profile
1.4 Scope of the study
1.5 Objective of the study
2 METHODOLOGY
2.1Review of Literature
2.2Research methodology
2.2.1Research Design
2.2.2Sampling Design
2.2.3Data Collection
2.2.4Statistical Tools Used
2.2.5Limitations of Study
3 ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION
3.1 Data Analysis And Interpretation
4 FINDINGS, SUGGESTIONS & CONCLUSION
4.1Findings
4.2Suggestions
4.3Conclusion
APPENDICES
1.Questionnaire
REFERENCE
1.Bibliography
CHAPET-I
Introduction
CHAPTER 1

INTRODUCTION

I.1 NTRODUCTION OF THE STUDY

The globalization and liberalization led to high standard of living in urban


and suburban India. It resulted into increased demand for fashionable products
especially among the younger generation.

The adolescents adapt new fashion, style and trends with an inclination
towards body perfumes to present their unique image. Perfumes influence the
mood and behavior of individuals and form a major part of fragrances which
constitute essence, flavors odors in all edibles and non edible products. The aroma
therapy is the best example of fragrance persuasion. The young population of India
between the ages of 15 to 30 is highest population in the world which is
claimed to be a high potential market to use perfumes, toilet water, cologne
and other cosmetic products. Irina Barbalova (GCI November 2008) stated that the
young people living in urban India are increasingly brand conscious and are key to
the future India.

The total value of cosmetics sales is likely to rise to$6 billion by 2012, making India a
safer bet for investors. Indian fragrance market is worth $ 30 million out of which 50 percent is
accounted for alcoholic and attar perfumes and is growing at the rate of 8.5 percent .It
has reached to 2 million units in 2008. [10]The ‘Datamonitor’ (October 2009)
has forecasted the fragrance market in 2013 assessing its worth at US $40 million and
2.7 million units, a growth of 41.1 percent and 35 percent respectively by
2013 ,though India accounts for just 1.2 percent of Asia pacific market. On
the other side the Indian market researcher RNOS (May 2009) predicted the
growth of cosmetic market at 7 percent between 2009 and 2012. This indicates that
there is a lot of potential stuff in the crust. Since last two decades the cottage industry of attar
and perfumes in India has emerged with new vistas of manufacturing and
became a singular industry. while a traditionally managed household business of making
attar & perfume at Kannauj located on the bank of Ganga had flavored the world with
its uniqueness in attar and perfumes and is called the perfume city of India .

The official statistics shows more than 250 registered manufacturers in kannauj, out of
which 30 units are large scale manufacturers and 12 units are leading
exporters with approximately Rs. 30 crores of annual turnover. The new multinational
entrants from France, Spain, Italy and China have also developed the strategies and
cached the buying motives of Indian market. Perfumes are an element of
cosmetics and the cosmetic market is flourishing at a fast pace. Cosmetics
today have become a part of life in all age groups of men and women while perfumes
are traditionally used all over the world. Prof. Philip M Parker at ICON Group
International Inc. reported in the “world outlook for perfume, toilet water, and cologne across
more than 200 countries” and reported that the market latent demand for perfume,
toilet water, and cologne in India for the year 2010 would be US $ 830.90 million
and for the year 2011 it would be US $ 860.36 million. Maharashtra and Uttar
Pradesh, the two most populous states of India, are at 16th and 25th position in world ranking.

1.2 Manufacturing and supply of raw


Material

The perfumes and attars are traditionally manufactured using raw


materials like herbs, flowers, barks of the tree etc especially nagar motha, sandal wood,
jasmine and other
essential oils of fragrances. While perfumes are made with alcohol bases, the Indian attars are
made in sandal wood base. In advanced techniques even synthetic chemicals are
used
and the blending plays a vital role in making perfumes and attar. The constraint of making
attars in India include inadequate supply of sandal wood and the
manufacturing process involves collection and extraction, blending and aging of scent taking
too much time.

1.3 Prevailing Market Segmentation

Customarily the perfume market is segmented demographically considering age,


sex, income levels etc . Daniel Yankelovich (1964) stated that the perfume market is
segmented at micro
level with respect to the purpose of buying and preferences of user. Aesthetic as well
as functional features of the product are also part of segmentation criteria.

David Pybus, an Alchemist and Aromancer known as an Indiana Jones of


perfume industry (also called as the Perfume Hunter since ‘Hunter’ is his
middle Christian name) says a razzle-dazzle is also an important factor. He quoted that “It
seems that the ‘razzle-dazzle’ is important now and not the juice. The fragrance world
has gone celebrity crazy and it appears the thing to do whilst you have your five
minutes of fame is to get a biography written and launch a perfume”, He
categorized the perfumes as

1. Most celebrity brand and some


designer fragrances &
2. Some designer fragrances and
fragrance houses.
1.4 SCOPE OF THE STUDY

The research enables to study the purchasing behavior, attitude & preferences and buying
motives of graduate students towards body perfume. The detail analyses of gathered data through
questionnaire envisage appropriate conclusions which may help in making and marketing new
products of perfumes.
1.5 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY
To understand the adolescents’
awareness & consumption patterns
towards perfumes.

o To evaluate the attitudes and


preferences of adolescents in buying
perfumes.

o To assess the functional & aesthetic


attributes like odor, Brand, Price,
packaging in perfumes.

o To determine the consumers’


preferences about suitable outlets for
shopping perfumes.
CHAPET-II
METHODOLOGY
METHODOLOGY

REVIEW LITERATURE

SHAW, R., AND LAURA (1997) argue that action factors in (consumer behavior
models) revolve around the thought process of consumer, therefore to determine factors
behind the purchase of perfume, researchers should attempt considering what goes
on in the mind of the consumer, as in terms of product categories, product
consideration, and abstract causality that is consumer’s perception on the extent to
which the considered product of perfume can triggers attraction.
JIM BLYTHE (2003) argues that understanding the purchasing behavior
of consumer is somewhat complicated, consumer’s attachment and involvement with a
product or brand are determined by number of reasons and therefore it is almost
impossible to nail a definite reason behind consumer’s purchasing behavior.

RETIVEAU (2004) uses different instrument to understand individual different and


perception of perfume. Retiveau submits

KOTLER AND KELLER (2007) meanwhile surmise from a different standpoint yet
somewhat akin, their argument revolves how to fathom consumer’s purchasing
behavior. Their argument although can be equally effective in understanding
the buying behavior of perfume users. Kotler and Keller underpins problem
recognition, (what could have informed the desire for a perfume), information search (about
the best of perfume), evaluation of alternatives, purchase decision and post-purchase behavior
( the last of course will indicate the extent to which the user is convinced, satisfied or
dissatisfied with the product and thus explicable for brand loyalty or discontinuity.

HOYER AND MACLNNIS (2008) support the argument thatconsumers are prone to
be attracted to a product or brand on account of how much appealing, eye-catching and
attractive models, spokesperson or celebrities reflect the essence of the product
or brand. Similarly, research suggests that consumer get influenced by race, being drawn
to a product or brand when the advertising model or sale-people share certain
commonality appealing to the cognitive disposition of the consumer.

JOBBER (2012: 71) concurs to the narratives of top models, celebrity influencing
purchasing attitude, giving the fact that these make-to-believe personality have extended
their integrity in spectrum of products “from music to clothes to perfume,
which are essentially aspiration brands,” and yet argues that consumer’s purchasing
behavior is having variety of factors and thus, buying situation is a range of personal influ
ence and some social influences all combine to make up the nature of the relationships that
individuals have with products and services.”

While conducting research on employees’ usage of perfume before and


after employment,
(DHAR ET AL., 2008) suggests that fragrance carries a strong weight
among all factors considered by research respondents, hence, the reason why consumers
would prefer foreign brand over local product.

ATUL NAYAK (2009) suggests that situational analysis should be considered when
attempting to understand consumer’s purchasing behavior. According to him, the
uncontrollability of situation and need of consumer is potential enough to influence
buying behavior. Citing an instance, the absence of a particular and urgently needed
product or brand is unavailable in a store, consumer might be forced giving this
situation, consumer “may to choose a competitor’s produce.”

KUNES ET AL (2011) look at the purchasing behavior of perfume


users from a gender perspective as to what really influence the different gender to
either choose to purchase or otherwise. The research addresses the role of salesprofessionals
on the behavior of male and female consumers, how effective are advertisements featuring
celebrities and models, and the factors that influence male purchase intent for
perfume and factors that influence female smell intent for perfume. The
outcome of the research suggest print ad featuring either a model or celebrity is
irrelevant when a 18-22 year old male is purchasing a fragrance for his mother, while no
significant evidence that shows a celebrity endorsed fashion brand fragrance is
preferred over a celebrity brand fragrance by 18-22 year old females. Though, 18-22 year
old males are more likely to purchase a fragrance with a sales promotion
than
Exploring Indians as fashionable people, Borgave and Chaudhari (2010)
suggest that the preference and usage of perfumes will have to be placed in
accordance with demography, situation, mood and buying motives of the
consumer. Although the paper focuses on adolescents between (20-25) preferences
for perfumes, yet discovers that gender difference does not change the buying pattern of
this age group. Meanwhile, the paper also concurs with the narrative that Indian youth
are enchanted to bu ying perfume on account of price and celebrity brand.

Fah et al (2011) investigate the relationships between advertising appeals, spending


tendency, perceived social status and materialism on perfume purchasing behavior among
Malaysians. The research outcome delineates a picture which does not totally break from
global trend and perception. The outcome shows the willingness of surveyed
respondents ready to purchase and spend money on perfume that had high level of
advertising appeals, yet influenced by perceived social status and materialism, though their
spending inclination is moderate.
2.2 RESERACH METHODOLOGY

Meaning of research methodology


Research methodology is a way to systematically solve the research problem. It may be understood as a
science of studying how research is done scientifically. The scope of research methodology is wider than that
of research methods. When we talk of research methodology we not only talk of research methods but also
consider the logic behind the methods we use in the context of our research study and explain why we are
using a particular method or techniques
Population
The population refers to the entire group of people, event or things of interest that the researcher wishes
to investigate. it is the group of people, event or things of interest for which then researcher wants to make
inferences(based on sample statistics.
2.2.1 DATA COLLECTION
Data refers to information or facts. It includes numerical figures, non-numerical figures, descriptive facts,
and qualitative information. The task of data collection begins after researcher problem has been defined and
research plan has been decided. The nature of the data is both primary and secondary data.

1. PRIMARY DATA
The primary data those that are collected through questionnaire and direct personal interview. `The
questionnaire was framed in such a manner to obtain correct information, graded suitably for the study.

2. SECONDARY DATA
The secondary data has been collected through oral communication. Secondary data about the company
profile and other details were collected from the company website.

2.2.2 SAMPLING DESIN


SAMPLE

A sample is a subject of the population. It comprises some members selected from it. In other word, some, but
not all, elements of the population from the sample.
A sample is thus a subgroup or subject of the population. By studying the sample, the researcher
should be able to draw conclusion that are generalizable to the population of interest.

2.2.3 SAMPLING UNIT


The sampling unit is the element or set elements that is available for selection in sone stage of the
sampling process.

2.2.4 SAMPLE SIZE


The research objectives
The extent of precision desire
The acceptable risk predicting that level of precision
The amount of variability in the population itself
The cost and time constraints
In some cases, the size of the population itself
For a research study to be perfect the sample size selected should be optimal i.e. it should neither be
excessively large nor too small. Here the sample size was bounded to 150.

2.2.5 SAMPLE METHOD


Nonprobability sampling
In nonprobability sampling design, the elements in the population do not have any probabilities attached
to their being chosen as sample subjects. This means that the findings from the study of the sample cannot to
be confidently generalized to the population. As stated earlier, however, researchers may be, at times, being
less concerned about gerneralizability than obtaining some preliminarly information in quick and inexpensive
way. They might then resort to non much needed to ability sampling, sometimes nonprobabilitly sampling is
the only way to obtain data. Some non probability sampling plans are more dependable than

others and could offer some important leads to porentially useful information with regard to the population.

Convenience sampling

Convenience sampling refers to the collection of information from members of the population who are
conveniently available to provide it. Convenience sampling is most often used during the exploratory phase of
research project and is perhaps the best way of getting some basic information quickly and efficiently. In my
research study, I have used convenient sampling techniques.

2.2.6 STATISTICAL TOOLS USED

It is not possible to imagine, organizing the enormous amount of data and manipulating them as easily
without data collection tools. Then again, the task is not easily done unless the right kind of tool appropriate
for the project is not selected. These data collections tool are very much needed to generate the numerical data.
The various analysis techniques used are

Percentage analysis
Multiple regression
One way ANOVA
Chi-square test
Correlation

PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS
Percentage refers to a special kind of ratio. Percentage is used in making comparison between two or more
series of data. Percentages are used to describe relationship. One of the simplest methods of analysis is the
percentage, the data are reduced in the standard form with the base equal to 100, which facilitates comparison.
The formula used to compute percentage analysis is,

No. of respondents

Percentage = -------------------------*100

Total respondent
ONE WAY ANOVA
Analysis of variance (ANOVA) helps to examine the significant mean differences among more than two
groups on an interval or ratio –scaled dependent Variable.
CHI-SQUARE
The chi-square test is mainly used to test significant differences. It is an important test among the several test
of significance developed by statisticians. It is use to make comparison between theoretical and actual data
when categories are used.
2.2.5 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY


Lack of environmental support for the study on the topic.


Basically based on primary data , hence we cannot argue that the research is applicable in each
condition, time & place.


Short time duration, with in such short span of time it is too much difficult to analyse the online
shopping.


Lack of customer support, while asking the consumer they were behaving rudely and not responding to
the questions.
CHAPET-III
ANALYSIS AND
INDERPRETATION
ANALYSIS AND INDERPRETATION

CHI-SQUARE
TO FIND THE ASSOCIATION DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AGE AND INCOME.
NULL HYPOTHESIS: There is no association difference between age and income.
ALTERNATIVE HYPOTHESIS: There is no association difference between age and income

Chi-Square Tests
Value DF Asymp. Sig. (2-sided)
Pearson Chi-Square 44.219a 16 .000
Likelihood Ratio 47.203 16 .000
Linear-by-Linear Association 20.228 1 .000
N of Valid Cases 50
a. 22 cells (88.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum expected count is .24.
INTERPRETATION:
From the above table, it is interfered that the value (0.000) is less than the significant value at 0.01. So
the Null hypothesis is rejected and the alternative hypothesis is accepted. Hence there is significant
difference between age and income.
CORRELATIONS
TO FIND OUT THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AGE AND INCOME
NULL HYPOTHESIS: There is no relationship between age and income
ALTERNATIVE HYPOTHESIS: There is relationship between age and income

Correlations
Age Income
Age Pearson Correlation 1 .643**
Sig. (2-tailed) .000
N 50 50
Income Pearson Correlation .643** 1
Sig. (2-tailed) .000
N 50 50
**. Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed).
INTERPRETATION:
From the above table, it is interfered that the value (0.643) is greater than the relationship value at 0.01.
So the alternative hypothesis is rejected and the null hypothesis is accepted. Hence there is no relationship
between age and income
ONEWAY
TO FIND OUT THE SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCE BETWEEN GENDER AND MONTHLY
SPEND
NULL HYPOTHESIS: There is no significant difference between gender and monthly spend
ALTERNATIVE HYPOTHESIS: There is significant difference between gender and monthly spend

ANOVA

GENDER

Sum of Squares Df Mean Square F Sig.

Between Groups 2.056 4 .514 2.232 .080

Within Groups 10.364 45 .230

Total 12.420 49

INTERPRETATION:
From the above table, it is interfered that the value (0.080) is less than the significant value at 0.01. So
the Null hypothesis is rejected and the alternative hypothesis is accepted. Hence there is significant
difference between gender and monthly income
Table-1

DISTRUBTION OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON GENDER

S.NO PARTICULARS Frequency Percent


1 a)Male 27 54.0
2
b)Female 23 46.0
Total
50 100.0

Source: primary data


Interpretation:
From the above table, it is interfered that 54% of the respondents are male and 46% of the respondents are
female.
Thus the majority of the respondents are male.

Chart-1
DISTRUBTION OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON AGE

s.no Particulars Frequency Percent

1 a)15-20 6 12.0
2
b)21-25 24 48.0
3
c)26-30 5 10.0
4
d)31-40 12 24.0
5
e)Above40 3 6.0

Total 50 100.0

Source: primary data


Interpretation:
From the above table, it is interfered that 12% of the respondents are 15-20, 48% of the respondents are
21-25, 10 % of the respondents are 26-30, 24% of the respondents are31-40 and 6% of the respondents are
above40
Thus the majority of the respondents are 21-35 .
DISTRUBTION OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON INCOME

S.NO PARTICULAR FREQUENCY PERCENT


1 a)Below6000 16 32.0
2 b)6001to9000 6 12.0
3 c)9001to12000 4 8.0
4 d)12001to15000 12 24.0
5 Above15000 12 24.0
Total 50 100.0
Source: primary data
Interpretation.
From the above table, it is interfered that 32% of the respondents are below6000,12% of the respondents
are 6001-9000,8% of the respondents are9001-12000, 24% of the respondents are 12001-15000 and 24% of
the respondents are above15000.
Thus the majority of the respondents are below6000
DISTRUBTION OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON EDUCATION

S.NO PARTICULAR FREQUENCY PERCENT


1 a)SSLC 5 10.0
2 b)High School 2 4.0
3 c)UG 19 38.0
4 d)PG 16 32.0
5 e)prefer Not Answer 8 16.0
Total 50 100.0

Source: primary data


Interpretation.
From the above table, it is interfered that 10% of the respondents are SSLC,4% of the respondents are
High school,38% of the respondents are UG, 32% of the respondents are PG and 16% of the respondents are
above prefer not answer.
Thus the majority of the respondents are UG
DISTRUBTION OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON USUALLY BUY

S.NO PARTICULR FREQUENCY PERCENT


1 a)Super market 25 50.0
2 b)Cosmetic Shops 9 18.0
3 c)Retail outlets 3 6.0
4 d)Online Shops 2 4.0
5 e)Malls 11 22.0
Total 50 100.0
Source: primary data
Interpretation.
From the above table, it is interfered that 50% of the respondents are Super market,18% of the
respondents are Cosmetic Shop,6% of the respondents are Retail outlets, 4% of the respondents are oneline
shop and 22% of the respondents are above malls.
Thus the majority of the respondents are Super market
DISTRUBTION OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON WHATSIZE

S.NO PARTICULARS FREQUENCY PERCENT


1 a)Below20ml 5 10.0
2 b)30ml 5 10.0
3 c)40ml 11 22.0
4 d)50ml 9 18.0
5 e)100ml 20 40.0
Total 50 100.0
Source: primary data
Interpretation.
From the above table, it is interfered that 10% of the respondents are below20ml,10% of the respondents
are 30ml,22% of the respondents are40ml, 18% of the respondents are50ml and 40% of the respondents are
above100ml.
Thus the majority of the respondents are 100ml

DISTRUBTION OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON MONTHELYSPEND


S.NO PARTCULARS FREQUENCY PERCENT
1 b)51to100 11 22.0
2 c)101to250 19 38.0
3 d)251to500 11 22.0
e)Above500 9 18.0
Total 50 100.0
DISTRUBTION OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON TRY A NEW BRAND

S.NO PARTICULARS FREQUENCY PERCENT


1 a)Weekly 1 2.0
2 b)Monthly 24 48.0
3 c)EverySeason 10 20.0
4 d)More than Year 8 16.0
5 e)Randamly 7 14.0
Total 50 100.0
Source: primary data
Interpretation.
From the above table, it is interfered that 2% of the respondents are Weekly,48% of the respondents are
monthly,8% of the respondents are9001-12000, 24% of the respondents are 12001-15000 and 24% of the
respondents are above15000.
Thus the majority of the respondents are below6000

DISTRUBTION OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON CHANGE CURENT PRM


S.NO PARTICULARS FREQUENCY PERCENT
1 a)If smelt a sample from a Retailer/shop 12 24.0
2 b)If my Favorite Brand released a new Perfume 7 14.0
3 c)If my Current perfume run's out 14 28.0
4 e)Word of Mouth 17 34.0
Total 50 100.0
Source: primary data
Interpretation.
From the above table, it is interfered that 24% of the respondents are sample a retailer/shop,14% of the
respondents are Favorite brand released a new perfume,28% of the respondents are Current run’s out, 34% of
the respondents are Word of Mouth.
Thus the majority of the respondents are Word of Mouth.
DISTRUBTION OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON HOW OFTEN TO USE PRM

S.NO PARTCULARS FREQUENCY PERCENT


1 a)Every day 27 54.0
2 b)2-3 Times a week 15 30.0
3 c)4-6 Times a Week 5 10.0
4 d)once a week 2 4.0
5 e)only for special occasion 1 2.0
Total 50 100.0
Source: primary data
Interpretation.
From the above table, it is interfered that 54% of the respondents are Every Day,30% of the respondents
are 2-3Times a week,10% of the respondents ar 4-6 Times a week, 4% of the respondents are Once a week and
2% of the respondents are above only for special occasion.
Thus the majority of the respondents are Every Day
DISTRUBTION OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON HOE OF TO YOU BUY

S.NO PARTCULARS FREQUENCY PERCENT


1 a)Every Month 21 42.0
2 b)one's in 2 Months 17 34.0
3 c)Every 6 Months 6 12.0
4 d)Every Year 1 2.0
5 e)Randamly 5 10.0
Total 50 100.0
Source: primary data
Interpretation.
From the above table, it is interfered that 42% of the respondents are below every month,34% of the
respondents are one’s in 2 month,12% of the respondents are Every 6 month, 2% of the respondents areEvery
year and 10% of the respondents are above Randamly.
Thus the majority of the respondents are Every Month.
DISTRUBTION OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON WHAT KIND OF PRM

S.NO PARTCULARS FREQUENCY PERCENT


1 a)Jasmine 15 30.0
2 b)chocolate 6 12.0
3 c)Rose 20 40.0
4 d)citrus 4 8.0
5 e) I have no Perference on FRAGARANCE 5 10.0
Total 50 100.0
Source: primary data
Interpretation.
From the above table, it is interfered that 30% of the respondents are below jasmine,12% of the
respondents are chocolate,40% of the respondents are Rose, 8% of the respondents are cirtrus.
Thus the majority of the respondents are Rose.
DISTRUBTION OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON EXPECT PRM

S.NO PARTCULAR FREQUENCY PERCENT


1 a)A Long Lasting smell 22 44.0
2 b)As that makes me feel attractive 8 16.0
3 c)A scent that people Comment on 13 26.0
4 d)A send represent a life Style 4 8.0
5 e)No skin problem 3 6.0
Total 50 100.0
Source: primary data
Interpretation.
From the above table, it is interfered that 44% of the respondents are below a long lasting smell,16% of
the respondents are feel attractive,26% of the respondents are people comment on, 8% of the respondents are
life style and 6% of the respondents are above no skin problem.
Thus the majority of the respondents are long Lasting smell
DISTRUBTION OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON IMPORTANT BUY

S.NO PARTCULARS FREQUENCY PERCENT


1 a)Brand 16 32.0
2 b)price 4 8.0
3 c)Fragrance 30 60.0
Total 50 100.0
Source: primary data
Interpretation.
From the above table, it is interfered that 32% of the respondents are belowBrant,8% of the respondents
are price,60% of the respondents are Fragrance.
Thus the majority of the respondents are Fragrance.
DISTRUBTION OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON PRM PREFER

S.NO PARTCULAR FREQUENCY PERCENT


1 a)Fashine designer brands 12 24.0
2 b)Cosmatic Brands 12 24.0
3 c)Celebrity Brands 9 18.0
4 d)Other Kind of Brands 12 24.0
5 e)The Brand is not Important to me 5 10.0
Total 50 100.0
Source: primary data
Interpretation.
From the above table, it is interfered that 24% of the respondents are below Fashine designer
brands,24% of the respondents are Cosmatic Brands,18% of the respondents are Celebrity Brands, 24% of the
respondents are other kind of Brands and 10% of the respondents are aboveBrand is not importent.
Thus the majority of the respondents are fashine designer Brands.
DISTRUBTION OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON DIFFERENT PRM TRY

S.NO PARTCULAR FREQUENCY PERCENT


1 a)one 6 12.0
2 b)two 6 12.0
3 c)three 13 26.0
4 d)four 16 32.0
5 e)five Above 9 18.0
Total 50 100.0

Source: primary data


Interpretation.
From the above table, it is interfered that 12% of the respondents are below one,12% of the respondents
are two,26% of the respondents are three, 32% of the respondents are fore and 18% of the respondents are
above five above.
Thus the majority of the respondents are Four.
CHAPTER – 4
FINDINGS , SUGGESTIONS & CONCLUSION
FINDING , SUGGESTIONS AND CONCLUSION

4.1 FINDINGS

FERCENTAGE ANALYSIS METHOD

54% of the respondents are male


48% of the respondents are 21-25
32% of the respondents are below6000
38% of the respondents are UG
50% of the respondents are Super market
the majority of the respondents are 100ml
48% of the respondents are monthly
34% of the respondents are Word of Mouth.
it is interfered that 54% of the respondents are Every Day
42% of the respondents are below every month
40% of the respondents are Rose
that 44% of the respondents are below a long lasting smell
60% of the respondents are Fragrance
24% of the respondents are below Fashine designer brands
26% of the respondents are three
4.2 SUGGESTIONS

1.The scope of the study can be extended to other major cities of


Pakistan to get nationwide customer trends

2. A study can be made to further probe and explain the demographics of the
customers and their relationship with purchase decision of perfumes

3. As the study has highlighted Brand, Packaging, Bottle Design,


Fragrance and Quality as major factors, therefore, it is be highly
recommended that all these factors should be individually analyzed in depth
4.3 Conclusion

The present research focuses the resemblance and differences amongst the group in buying
perfumes, their attitudes and preferences towards perfumes. It is found that the adolescent
segment have unique characteristics in buying pattern. The segment is largely interested in
perfumes and feels better in using the product. Presenting good image and odour are major
priorities for using perfumes. The males and females in the age group of 20 to 25 have
similar buying pattern and possess two to three perfume bottles for daily use. The
adolescents are price cautious and try celebrity brands of lower cost perfumes even though the
income levels vary they are more attracted towards celebrity brands. The brand is also a
foremost priority to the group. However they are less loyal to a particular brand since they
have a tendency to quick switch over. The group is more influenced through their friends
and families, while advertisements through television and magazines are subconsciously
heartwarming.
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