Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 8

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Disaster Relief Project 
FINAL REPORT 
 
Alfredo M Diaz 
ASUx ­ FSE 100x 
April 16, 2018 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Abstract 
Over the past ten weeks at Sparky Aid Designs, we have been developing an 
innovative solution both with a variety of new skills & tools in our engineering toolbox 
and with the customer in mind throughout the design process. The project titled, 
“Disaster Relief Project”, surrounds the new aircraft design solution with the specific 
effort to help in the aid of zombie outbreaks in North America. With the primary objective 
of medical refuge and aide, design decisions had to be made about the overall 
performance of the aircraft, wing shape & structure, interior payload capacity, 
automation systems, financials, and more.  
 
Introduction 
There is opportunity for innovation and improvement in the designs of aircrafts 
built to help in the aid of disasters of all kinds; hurricanes, wildfires, earthquakes, 
tornadoes, and even infectious viruses that may lead to a zombie outbreak. Specifically 
looking into the zombie outbreak problem, we would need to design an aircraft that can 
reach a large range of populations to provide a temporary medical treatment site to 
places that would otherwise be helpless. With that in mind, our stakeholders include 
those in need of treatment, those providing the treatment, and those who fund and work 
in operations. The most important interests to note are low project & build costs, 
reachability to any in need, and capacity & variety of medical aide.  
 
The following is a table listing all requirements and criteria for our design. 
Requirements  Criteria 
1. The design shall have a range of at  1. Range of Aircraft ­ to service many 
least 5,000 km.  disaster sites as the aircraft is a 
temporary refuge camp. 
2. The design shall make a total of 3 
2. Payload capacity ­ will determine 
trips per day.  how long aircraft can last as a 
3. The design shall have a rate of  refugee camp. 
climb more than 2% of the cruise  3. Endurance ­ long flights for 
speed.  evacuation 
4. The design shall carry 5,000 lbs of  4. Cruise Speed ­ speed of flights for 
equipment/chemicals to produce  evacuation and rescue 
5. Load/Unloading Time ­ quick as 
pills on site.  possible to rescue and treat as 
5. The design shall carry at least 400  many people. 
passengers. 
 
The following is a Analytic Hierarchy Process table use to evaluate which criteria is the 
most important in the eyes of all of our stakeholders. 
  Capacity  Endurance  Range  Cruise Speed  Total  Weight 
Capacity  1  3  1/5  3  7.2  26.00% 
Endurance  1/3  1  1/3  1/3  2  7.20% 
Range  5  3  1  5  14  50.50% 
Cruise Speed  1/3  3  1/5  1  4.53  16.30% 
Total          27.73   
 
 
 
Background 
The missions at hand for our aircraft will primarily focus on the treatment of those 
who are treatable since we can assume that medical treatment centers have otherwise 
been compromised since the outbreak started. Secondarily, the aircraft will provide a 
search and rescue service to seek out those who are infected but treatable in such 
areas. As a last resort, the aircraft will provide evacuation if the landing site and 
surrounding area has been swarmed.  
The mission of the aircraft is as follows. The aircraft will land just outside of the 
targeted outbreak zone and immediately, the team will build a temporary medical 
treatment center around the aircraft itself. Meanwhile, the scouts on board will go into 
the infected area, armed and seek out those who are treatable and those who are 
uninfected. The medical staff will tend to the treatable patients while the scouts continue 
to seek out more survivors. This process will repeat until scouts declare the area 
completely searched. The mission can then be called a success and the aircraft will 
move to the next outbreak zone. 
 
Design Overview 
The important features of our final design for the aircraft will reflect the previously 
stated requirements and criteria such as range of the aircraft, materials chosen for cost, 
and automations for certain scenarios the aircraft might face. As said before, the aircraft 
has the following missions listed by priority; provide medical treatment in outbreak 
zones, search & rescue treatable and uninfected persons, and provide an evacuation 
procedure as a last resort. With that said, the aircraft will feature a wing design to 
support a large range to reach as many populations as possible with the trade­off of 
speed. Since evacuation is not a priority for this aircraft, it will also feature a large 
storage capacity for the vast amount of medical equipment while also featuring some 
seating capacity for both staff and evacuees. Despite not being a priority, an automation 
system of locking all the aircraft doors will also be featured in the case of an evacuation 
procedure. This will ensure the safety of the full capacity aircraft from the infected. 
Subsystems 
Interior Design 

 
The interior of the aircraft, modeled above, will be occupied mostly by the medical 
equipment needed and some by the seating space.  
 
 
Wing Shape & Structure 
The wings of our aircraft will be constructed with an I­Beam made out of steel in order to 
support the large payload and range performance.  

   
 
Automation 
Our automation system will be used for the last resort of an evacuation procedure. It will 
automatically lock all the aircraft doors if all the passenger seats are occupied unless 
the pilot disables the failsafe. 
 

 
 
Trade­Offs & Future Work 
Some significant trade­offs had to be made with such high performance in certain 
subsystems. With the ability to go a long range, the aircraft loses cruise speed. This is 
okay since we only need to be able to go the distance and not necessarily get there 
fast. Ideally the aircraft would be able to support a “full” evacuation plan but the trade­off 
of transporting medics and medical equipment was made. In the future we will need to 
construct models and do some testing & troubleshooting all with the customer and 
stakeholder in mind.  
 
Testing & Evaluation 
The following test procedures were conducted for the shape of our wings on the 
aircraft. The most important part that we need to get out of our wings’ performance was 
the lift since we are working with quite a heavy aircraft. The summary and results follow. 
Experiment 1: Lift­to­Drag based on Camber

 
   
Figure 1.1: Experiment 1 Minimum  Figure 1.2: Experiment 1 Maximum 
Experiment 2: Lift­to­Drag based on Span (m)

   
Figure 2.1: Experiment 2 Minimum  Figure 2.2: Experiment 2 Maximum 
Experiment 3: Lift­to­Drag based on Angle of Attack (degrees)

   
Figure 3.1: Experiment 3 Minimum  Figure 3.2: Experiment 3 Maximum 
 
Summary & Results 
When looking at figures 1.1, 2.1, & 3.1, we see that all have polynomial trendlines but in 
different ways. In experiment 1 (Figure 1.1 & 1.2), we see that as the camber increases 
so does the ‘Lift to Drag Ratio’. However, at a camber input of 0.05, it steadily 
decreases. Experiment 2 (Figure 2.1 & 2.2) shows an increase relationship between 
span of the wing and the LD ratio. As the span increases, the LD ratio also increases; 
though it does steady out at about 40 meters. On the other hand, experiment 3 (Figure 
3.1 & 3.2) has an almost mirrored shape to the graph of experiment 2. As we increase 
the angle of attack, the LD ratio is significantly dropped and slopes smoothly at around 
6 degrees. 
 
Conclusion 
All in all, the aircraft is a solid innovative design for its intended mission as it 
meets the performance expectations and provides the services that our stakeholders 
need. The initial problem to begin with was to provide relief aid in the event of a 
disastrous zombie outbreak. This aircraft design does so by reaching as many 
populations as possible in order to, temporarily, establish a medical treatment site in 
locations where such facilities would otherwise be compromised. With a large range and 
large payload capacity, we trade off speed of the aircraft and the intent to evacuate. At 
the very beginning of the project, I thought the mission would be to prioritize evacuation 
but quickly learned that we can think outside the box and use the design process to 
build a different, innovative solution. I think that’s the most important lesson in this 
engineer’s design process; the fact that your whole project can change for the better in 
ways that you’d never imagine initially. During the project, I’ve taken what I’ve learned 
from this course to my everyday life both at work and home. I’ll never forget the lessons 
learned and I definitely have a new vision on any project that I work on. The engineer’s 
design process and the engineer’s toolbox is incredibly applicable and useful for any 
problem in the future. 
 
Works Cited 
Aircraft Market Place. (2018).  Top 5 Aircraft for Surviving the Zombie Apocalypse . 
[online] Available at: 
http://www.acmp.com/blog/top­5­aircraft­for­surviving­the­zombie­apocalypse.ht
ml [Accessed 19 Apr. 2018]. 

Bender, J. (2018).  The Pentagon has an actual plan for the zombie apocalypse . 
[online] Business Insider. Available at: 
http://www.businessinsider.com/pentagon­zombie­apocalypse­training­plan­201
6­3 [Accessed 19 Apr. 2018]. 

HuffPost UK. (2018).  Your 5­Step Guide For Surviving A Real­Life Zombie 
Apocalypse . [online] Available at: 
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/31/walking­dead­zombie­apocalypse_
n_6065332.html [Accessed 19 Apr. 2018]. 

Is, A. and Zombies, H. (2018).  Are You Prepared for a Zombie Apocalypse? The 
U.S. Government Is . [online] HISTORY.com. Available at: 
http://www.history.com/news/are­you­prepared­for­a­zombie­apocalypse­the­u­
s­government­is [Accessed 19 Apr. 2018].