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NATIONAL

UNIVERSITY OF SANTA
CEIDUNS

CYCLE : Conversation III

TOPIC : Frank Miller y Alan Moore

STUDENT : Loyola Espinoza Piero

Nuevo Chimbote- Perú

2017
This work is dedicated to my mother

for her advice, values, constant

motivation and my father for his

confidence, thanks to him, I lack

nothing.
INDEX
1. INTRODUCTION…………………………………………...……..4
2. WRITERS RECOGNIZED……………………………..….….…..6
2.1. Frank Miller……………………………………….….…………6
2.1.1 Biography…………………………………….……………………..…...6
2.1.2 Major Works………………………………………………………..……6
2.2. Alan Moore……………………………………..………………...………7
2.2.1 Biography…………………………….……………..……...……..……...7
2.2.2 Major Works……………………………………..………………….……7
3. COMICS RECOGNIZED……………………….…………………8
3.1. Batman: The Dark Knight Returns……………………..……………8
3.1.1 Information…………………...………………………...…………….…...8
3.1.2 Plot……………………………..…………………………………….……..8
3.2. Batman: Year One…………………………………...………….…..…..9
3.2.1 Information………………………………………………………...……...9
3.2.2 Plot………………………………………………………….…….………...9
3.3. Watchmen…………………………………………………...…….…….11
3.3.1 Information…………………………………………….………………...11
3.3.2 Plot……………………………………………………..……………….…11
3.4. V for Vendetta………………………………………………...………...13
3.4.1 Information…………………………….………………………………...13
3.4.2 Plot……………………………………….……………….……………….13
3.5. Batman: The Killing Joke……………………………………...……..14
3.5.1 Information……………………………….……………………………...14
3.5.2 Plot……………………………………………………………..………….14
4. CONCLUSIONS……………….…………………………………16
5. LINKOGRAPHY………………………………………………….17
INTRODUCTION

Many people have a wrong thought of comics and although many people
like Comics, I would like to tell you why Comics are very important in
history.
The first appearance of Superman in the comics was in “Action Comics
N°1” in the year 1938.Superman is the most famous character in comics
and thanks to him people started buying comics.
But in the year 1939 in “Detective Comics N°27” appeared a character
who was the opposite of Superman. A dark character, a detective who
used his mind rather than his fists. He is Batman.
Many years later. Batman and Superman pass a series of changes endless.
For a long time Superman was better than Batman in sales and stories. But
times would change. The world would become a dark place. The good
values would begin to disappear.
1986, New York city was a forgotten city. Crime and poverty abounded in
the streets. New York was the center of the world, but at that time New
York had many social problems. A new of creators born. Writers and
artists who had grown up reading comics and also they lived in New York
and they saw crimes every day.
One of them, Frank Miller became the new writer of the comic Batman.
A city full of crime and poverty was ruled by criminal. It is “Gotham City”,
City where Batman lives, place where stories of Batman by Frank Miller
happen. But also it is representing the city in which Frank lived.
A god coming to earth was not enough. A man without power. A man who
came out of the misery of “Ghotam City” This was the ideal man to
represent the difficult times that Frank lived in his days.
For this reason. I think that Batman is the character who best represents
the connection between fantasy and reality.
Bruce Wayne is a man that in the background is a child who lost their
parents, Bruce Wayne created Batman, but not as a hero, He created
Batman as a symbol to overcome difficult times, in a time of crisis you can
forget everything and become a criminal, an alcoholic, a bad person, but
costs much more overcome problems.
I live in Chimbote, maybe I do not live in New York of Frank Miller of 1986,
but this is probably a worse place. Where corruption is normal, crime is
normal, people seeking money leaving the poor poorer. We know
“Ghotam City” does not exist, but Chimbote exists, is there when the
reality and fantasy are connected.
Batman is not my favorite character because He kill bad people, Batman is
my favorite character because He is a symbol that represents the light in
the dark and I met Batman thanks to the comics.
“Batman: The Dark Knight Returns”, “Watchmen”, “Batman: Year One”, “V
for Vendetta”, “Batman: The Killing Joke”, “Civil War”, all these stories
would not have been possible without Frank Miller. These stories did not
deal with the villain of the day. These stories were the creation of
philosophical concepts trying to explain the darkness in which the world
was.
The stories of comics does not exist in this world. These stories live in the
imagination of many generations. These stories inspired writers, artists,
film directors and people like you and me.
Books, Movies and Music, help inspire and increase our spirits and
imagination and the comics make us think and believe that times can
change.
So in this monograph we will talk about the two best and most famous
comic writers who changed the way that they do comics. Their comics are
not only for children. They expanded the genre and made it part of
popular culture. They are Frank Miller and Alan Moore.
RECOGNIZED WRITERS
Frank Miller
-Biography:
Frank Miller (born January 27, 1957) is an American writer, artist, and film director best known
for his dark comic book stories and graphic novels such
as “Ronin”, “Daredevil: Born Again”, “The Dark Knight Returns”, “Sin
City” and “300”.

He also directed the film version of “The Spirit”, shared directing


duties with Robert Rodriguez on Sin City and Sin City: A Dame to Kill
For, and produced the film 300. His film Sin City earned a Palme
d'Or nomination, and he has received every major comic book
industry award. In 2015, Miller was inducted into the Eisner
Awards Comic Book Hall of Fame.

He created the comic book characters Elektra for Marvel Comics' Daredevil series, and the
future version of the Robin character,Carrie Kelly, for DC Comics.

Miller is noted for combining film noir and manga influences in his comic art creations. “I
realised when I started Sin City that I found American and English comics be too wordy, too
constipated, and Japanese comics to be too empty. So I was attempting to do a hybrid”.

-Major Works:

 Along with writer Chris Claremont, he created the miniseries “Wolverine” for September-
December 1982 issue. This series of “Wolverine”, a fictional superhero got instant success and
secured his place as a popular artist of comic stories.

- In 1986, his portrayal of Batman in his groundbreaking series “Batman: The Dark Knight
Returns” reflects his modern approach towards this fictional character. The rising popularity of
this superhero brought him critical acclaim.

- In 1987, along with artist David Mazzuccelli, he published the four-part storyline “Batman :
Year One” that earned him wide recognition.

- In 1991, he worked on his “Sin City” story .He drew the entire story in black and white to
highlight its film noir style. In 1995, his first story of “Sin City” appeared under the name “The
Hard Goodbye”.

In 1993, along with artist John Romita, he worked on a five issue miniseries of “Daredevil:
Man Without Fear” under the publication of Marvel Comics. In association with Darrow, his
comics work appeared on “Big Guy and Rusty the Boy Robot” in 1995.
Alan Moore
-Biography:
Alan Moore (born 18 November 1953) is an English writer
primarily known for his work in comic books
including Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From
Hell. Frequently described as the best graphic novel writer in
history, he has been called "one of the most important
British writers of the last fifty years". He has occasionally
used such pseudonyms as Curt Vile, Jill de Ray, Translucia
Baboon, and The Original Writer.
Moore started writing for British underground and alternative fanzines in the late
1970s before achieving success publishing comic strips in such magazines as 2000
AD and Warrior. He was subsequently picked up by the American DC Comics, and as
"the first comics writer living in Britain to do prominent work in America", he worked
on major characters such as Batman (Batman: The Killing Joke)
and Superman (Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?), substantially
developed the character Swamp Thing, and penned original titles such as Watchmen.
During that decade, Moore helped to bring about greater social respectability for
comics in the United States and United Kingdom. He prefers the term "comic" to
"graphic novel". In the late 1980s and early 1990s he left the comic industry
mainstream and went independent for a while, working on experimental work such as
the epic From Hell, the pornographic Lost Girls, and the prose novel Voice of the Fire.
He subsequently returned to the mainstream later in the 1990s, working for Image
Comics, before developing America's Best Comics, an imprint through which he
published works such asThe League of Extraordinary Gentlemen and the occult-
based Promethea.
Despite his own personal objections, his books have provided the basis for a number of
Hollywood films, including From Hell (2001),The League of Extraordinary
Gentlemen (2003), V for Vendetta (2005), and Watchmen (2009). Moore has also been
referenced in popular culture, and has been recognised as an influence on a variety of
literary and television figures including Neil Gaiman, Joss Whedon, and Damon
Lindelof.

-Major Works:
- His graphic novel, ‘Watchmen’ is regarded as one of his ground-breaking works and also one
of the best comic books to have ever been written. The novel was a massive commercial
success and also received critical acclaim.

-His ‘The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen’ was made into a film in the year 2003. Volume I
also received the Bram Stoker Award for ‘Best Illustrated Narrative’. ‘Time Magazine’ listed the
second volume of his comic as the ‘9th Best Comic of 2003’.
RECOGNIZED COMICS
Batman: The Dark Knight Returns
-Information:
The Dark Knight Returns (alternatively titled Batman: The
Dark Knight Returns) is a 1986 four-issue comic
book miniseries starring Batman, written by Frank Miller,
illustrated by Miller and Klaus Janson, and published by DC
Comics.
The immense popularity of The Dark Knight
Returns served both to return the character of Batman to
a central role in pop culture, but also started the era
known as the Dark Age of Comic Books.

-Plot:
The Dark Knight Returns is set in a dystopian near-future version of Gotham City. Bruce
Wayne, at 55, has retired from crime-fighting for ten years after the death of Jason
Todd. Wayne has a breakdown and assumes the role of Batman again.
Batman saves 13-year-old Carrie Kelley from an attack by a gang called the Mutants.
Kelley buys herself an imitation Robin costume and searches for Batman, seeking to
help him. She finds Batman at the city dump, where he fights an army of Mutants.
Though Batman defeats the Mutant army with his weaponry, the Mutant leader beats
him in combat. Kelley creates a diversion and helps Batman escape. With the help of
retiring Commissioner James Gordon and the new Robin, Batman defeats the Mutant
leader on his own terms. The Mutants disband and some rename themselves the Sons
of Batman, using excessive violence against criminals.
Superman tries to reason with Batman, but Batman uses his technological inventions
and mastery of hand-to-hand combat to fight him. During the battle, Superman
compromises Batman's exoframe, while Queen shoots a kryptonite-tipped arrow to
greatly weaken Superman. Batman reveals that he intentionally spared Superman's life
by not using a more powerful kryptonite mix; the fight and near-death experience was
meant as a warning to Superman to stay out of Batman's way. Before he can finish his
monologue, Batman suddenly has a heart attack, apparently dying. Alfred
Pennyworth destroys the Batcave and Wayne Manor before dying of a stroke,
exposing Batman as Bruce Wayne, whose fortune has disappeared. After Wayne's
funeral, it is revealed that his death was staged using his own chemical concoction that
can suspend his vital life signs. Clark Kent attends the funeral and winks at Robin after
hearing Wayne's heartbeat resume. Some time afterward, Bruce Wayne leads Robin,
Queen, and the rest of his followers into the caverns beyond the Batcave and prepares
to continue his war on crime.
Batman: Year One
-Information:
"Year One," later referred to as "Batman: Year
One," is an American comic book story
arc published by DC Comics, and recounts
superhero Batman's first year as a crime-fighter.
It was written by Frank Miller, illustrated by David
Mazzucchelli, colored by Richmond Lewis, and
lettered by Todd Klein.
Batman: Year One has received widespread
critical acclaim. IGN Comics ranked Batman: Year
One number 2 on a list of the 25 greatest Batman
graphic novels (behind "The Dark Knight Returns",
also by Miller) and said that "no other book
before or since has quite captured the realism,
the grit and the humanity of Gordon and Batman
so perfectly." The website added, "It's not only
one of the most important comics ever written,
it's also among the best.

-Plot:
The story recounts the beginning of Bruce Wayne's career as Batman and Jim Gordon's with
the Gotham City Police Department. Bruce Wayne returns home to Gotham City at the age of
twenty-five from training abroad in martial arts, manhunting, and science for the past 12
years, and James Gordon moves to Gotham with his wife, Barbara, after a transfer from
Chicago. Both are swiftly acquainted with the corruption and violence of Gotham City, with
Gordon witnessing his partner Detective Arnold John Flass assaulting a teen for fun.

On a surveillance mission to the seedy East End, a disguised Bruce is propositioned by


teenaged prostitute Holly Robinson. He is reluctantly drawn into a brawl with her violent pimp
and is attacked by several prostitutes, including dominatrix Selina Kyle. Two police officers
shoot and take him in their squad car, but a dazed and bleeding Bruce breaks his handcuffs
and causes a crash, dragging the police to a safe distance before fleeing. He reaches Wayne
Manor barely alive and sits before his father’s bust, requesting guidance in his war on crime. A
bat crashes through a window and settles on the bust, giving him the inspiration to become a
bat.

As Gordon becomes a minor celebrity for several brave acts, Batman strikes for the first time,
attacking a group of thieves. Batman soon works up the ladder, even attacking Flass while he
was accepting a drug dealer’s bribe. After Batman interrupts a dinner party attended by many
of Gotham’s corrupt politicians and crime bosses to announce his intention to bring them to
justice, including Carmine "The Roman" Falcone, Loeb orders Gordon to bring him in by any
means necessary.
As Gordon tries in vain to catch him, Batman attacks Falcone, stripping him naked and tying
him up in his bed after dumping his car in the river, further infuriating the mob boss.
Assistant district attorney Harvey Dent becomes Batman’s first ally, while Detective Sarah
Essen and Gordon, after Essen suggested Bruce Wayne as a Batman suspect, witness Batman
save an old woman from a runaway truck. Essen holds Batman at gunpoint while Gordon is
momentarily dazed, but Batman disarms her and flees to an abandoned building.

Claiming the building has been scheduled for demolition, Loeb orders a bomb dropped on it,
forcing Batman into the fortified basement, abandoning his belt as the explosives inside catch
fire. A trigger-happy SWAT team led by Branden is sent in, whom Batman attempts to trap in
the basement. They soon escape and, after tranquillising Branden, Batman dodges as the rest
open fire, barely managing to survive after two bullet wounds. Enraged as the team’s
carelessly fired bullets injure several people outside, Batman beats the team into submission
and, after using a device to attract the bats of his cave to him, he flees amid the chaos. Selina
Kyle, after witnessing him in action, dons a costume of her own to begin a life of crime.

Gordon has a brief affair with Essen, while Batman intimidates a mob drug dealer for
information. The dealer comes to Gordon to testify against Flass, who is brought up on
charges. Upset with Gordon's exploits, Loeb blackmails Gordon against pressing charges with
proof of his affair. After bringing Barbara with him to interview Bruce Wayne, investigating his
connection to Batman, Gordon confesses the affair to her.

Batman sneaks into Falcone’s manor, overhearing a plan against Gordon, but is interrupted
when Selina Kyle, hoping to build a reputation after her robberies were pinned on Batman,
attacks Falcone and his bodyguards, aided from afar by Batman. Identifying Falcone’s plan as
the morning comes, the uncostumed Bruce leaves to help.

While leaving home, Gordon spots a motorcyclist enter his garage. Suspicious, Gordon enters
to see Johnny Vitti, Falcone’s nephew, and his thugs holding his family hostage. Gordon
decisively shoots the thugs and chases Vitti, who has fled with the baby. The mysterious
motorcyclist, now revealed to the reader as Bruce Wayne, rushes out to chase Vitti. Gordon
blows out Vitti's car tire on a bridge and the two fight hand-to-hand, with Gordon losing his
glasses, before Vitti and James Gordon Junior fall over the side. Bruce leaps over the railing
and saves the baby. Gordon realizes that he is standing before an unmasked Batman, but says
that he is "practically blind without [his] glasses," and lets Bruce go.

In the final scenes of the comic, Flass turns on Loeb, supplying Dent with evidence and
testimony, and Loeb resigns. Gordon is promoted to captain and stands on the rooftop waiting
to meet Batman to discuss somebody called the Joker, who is plotting to poison the reservoir.
Watchmen
-Information:
Watchmen is an American comic-book limited
series published by DC Comics in 1986 and 1987, and
collected in 1987. The series was created by
a British collaboration consisting of writer Alan Moore,
artist Dave Gibbons, and colorist John Higgins.
A commercial success, Watchmen has received critical
acclaim both in the comics and mainstream press, and is
considered by several critics and reviewers to be one of
the most significant works of 20th-century
literature. Watchmen was recognized in Time'sList of the
100 Best Novels as one of the best English language
novels published since 1923, and placed #91 on The
Comics Journal's list of the top 100 comics of the 20th
century.

-Plot:
In October 1985, New York City police are investigating the murder of Edward Blake.
With the police having no leads, costumed vigilante Rorschach decides to probe
further. Discovering Blake to be the face behind The Comedian, a costumed hero
employed by the United States government, Rorschach believes he has discovered a
plot to terminate costumed adventurers and sets about warning four of his retired
comrades: Dan Dreiberg (formerly the second Nite Owl), the superpowered and
emotionally detached Doctor Manhattan and his lover Laurie Juspeczyk (the second
Silk Spectre), and Adrian Veidt (once the hero Ozymandias, and now a successful
businessman).
After Blake's funeral, Manhattan is accused on national television of being the cause of
cancer in friends and former colleagues. When the U.S. government takes the
accusations seriously, Manhattan exiles himself to Mars. As Manhattan is one of the
United States' greatest military powers, his departure throws humanity into political
turmoil, with the Soviet Union invading Afghanistan to capitalize on the perceived
American weakness. Rorschach's concerns appear vindicated when Adrian Veidt
narrowly survives an assassination attempt, and Rorschach himself is framed for
murdering Moloch, a former supervillain.
Neglected in her relationship with the once-human Manhattan, whose now-godlike
powers and transformation have removed him completely from the everyday concerns
of living beings and no longer kept on retainer by the government, Juspeczyk stays
with Dreiberg; they begin a romance, don their costumes, and resume vigilante work
as they grow closer together. With Dreiberg starting to believe some aspects of
Rorschach's conspiracy theory, the pair take it upon themselves to break him out of
prison. Manhattan, after looking back on his own personal history, places the fate of
his involvement with human affairs in Juspeczyk's hands. He teleports her to Mars to
make the case for emotional investment. During the course of the argument,
Juspeczyk is forced to come to terms with the fact that Blake, who once attempted to
rape her mother, was in fact her biological father following a second, consensual
relationship. This discovery, reflecting the complexity of human emotions and
relationships, re-sparks Manhattan's interest in humanity.
On Earth, Nite Owl and Rorschach continue to uncover the conspiracy surrounding the
death of The Comedian and the accusations that drove Manhattan into exile. They
discover evidence that Veidt may be behind the plan. Rorschach writes his suspicions
about Veidt in his journal, in which he has been recording his entire investigation, and
mails it to New Frontiersman, a local right-wing newspaper. The pair then leave New
York and confront Veidt at his Antarctic retreat. Veidt explains his underlying plan is to
save humanity from impending nuclear war between the United States and Soviet
Union by faking an alien invasion in New York City, which will annihilate half the city's
population. He hopes this will unite the nations against a perceived common enemy.
He also reveals that he had murdered The Comedian, arranged for Dr. Manhattan's
past associates to contract cancer, staged the attempt on his own life in order to place
himself above suspicion, and killed Moloch in order to frame Rorschach. This was all
done in an attempt to prevent his plan from being exposed. Nite Owl and Rorschach
find Veidt's logic callous and abhorrent, but Veidt has already enacted his plan.
When Manhattan and Juspeczyk arrive back on Earth, they are confronted by mass
destruction and wide scale death in New York City, with a gigantic Cthulhu-like
creature, created by Veidt's laboratories, dead in the middle of the city. Manhattan
notices his abilities are limited by tachyons emanating from the Antarctic, and the pair
teleport there. They discover Veidt's involvement and confront him. Veidt shows
everyone news broadcasts confirming the cessation of global hostilities and
cooperation against a new threat; this leads almost all present to agree that concealing
Veidt's truth from the public is in the best interests of the world to keep it united.
Rorschach refuses to compromise and leaves, intent on revealing the truth. As he is
making his way back, he is confronted by Manhattan. Rorschach tells Manhattan that
he will have to kill him to stop him from exposing Veidt and his actions, and Manhattan
responds by vaporizing him. Manhattan then wanders through the base and finds
Veidt, who asks him if he did the right thing in the end. In response, Manhattan states
that "Nothing ever ends" before leaving the Earth to create life elsewhere. Dreiberg
and Juspeczyk go into hiding under new identities and continue their romance. Back in
New York, the editor at New Frontiersman complains about having to pull a two-page
column about Russia due to the new political climate. He asks his assistant to find
some filler material from the "crank file," a collection of rejected submissions to the
paper, many of which have not been reviewed yet. The series ends with the young
man reaching towards the pile of discarded submissions, near the top of which is
Rorschach's journal.
V for Vendetta
-Information:
V for Vendetta is a graphic novel written by Alan
Moore and illustrated by David Lloyd (with additional art
by Tony Weare), published by Vertigo, an imprint of DC
Comics.
Anonymous, an Internet-based group, has adopted
the Guy Fawkes mask as their symbol (in reference to
an Internet meme).
On 17 March 2006 Warner Bros. released a feature-film
adaptation of V for Vendetta, directed by James
McTeigue (first assistant director on The Matrix films)
from a screenplay by the Wachowskis. Natalie
Portman stars as Evey Hammond and Hugo Weaving as V.

-Plot:
On Guy Fawkes Night in London in 1997, a financially desperate 16-year-old, Evey
Hammond, sexually solicits men who are actually members of the state secret police,
called "The Finger". Preparing to rape and kill her, the Fingermen are dispatched by V,
a cloaked anarchist wearing a Guy Fawkes mask, who later remotely detonates
explosives at theHouses of Parliament before bringing Evey to his contraband-filled
underground lair, the "Shadow Gallery". Evey tells V her life story, which reveals that a
global nuclear war in the late 1980s has since triggered the rise of England's
fascist, white supremacist government, Norsefire.
Meanwhile, Eric Finch, a veteran detective in charge of the regular police force—"the
Nose"—begins investigating V's terrorist activities. Finch often communicates with
Norsefire's other intelligence departments, including "the Finger," led by Derek
Almond, and "the Head", embodied by Adam Susan: the reclusive government Leader,
who obsessively oversees the government's Fate computer system. Finch's case
thickens when V mentally deranges Lewis Prothero, a propaganda-broadcasting radio
personality;forces the suicide of Bishop Anthony Lilliman, a Paedophile priest; and
prepares to murder Dr. Delia Surridge, a medical researcher who once had a romance
with Finch. Finch suddenly discovers the connection among V's three targets: they all
used to work at a former Norsefire "resettlement camp" near Larkhill. That night, V
kills both Almond and Surridge, but Surridge has left a diary revealing that V—a former
inmate and victim of Surridge's cruel medical experiments—was able to destroy and
flee the camp, and is now eliminating the camp's former officers to keep his true
identity hidden. Finch reports these findings to Susan, who suspects that this
"vendetta" is actually just a cover for V, who, he worries, may be plotting an even
bigger terrorist attack.
Batman: The Killing Joke
-Information:
Batman: The Killing Joke is a 1988 one-shot graphic
novel featuring the characters Batman and
the Joker written by Alan Moore, illustrated by Brian
Bolland, and published by DC Comics.

Many critics consider the graphic novel to be the


definitive Joker story and one of the best Batman stories
ever published. The comic won the Eisner Award for 'Best
Graphic Album' in 1989 and appeared on The New York
Times Best Seller List in May 2009. In 2006, The Killing
Joke was reprinted as part of the trade paperback DC
Universe: The Stories of Alan Moore.

-Plot:
The man who will become the Joker is an unnamed
engineer who quits his job at a chemical company to become a stand-up comedian,
only to fail miserably. Desperate to support his pregnant wife Jeannie, he agrees to
guide two criminals through the chemical plant he previously worked at so that they
can rob the card company next door. During the planning, the police inform him that
his wife has died in a household accident. Grief-stricken, the engineer tries to
withdraw from the plan, but the criminals strong-arm him into keeping his
commitment to them.
At the plant, the criminals make him don a special mask to become the infamous Red
Hood. Unknown to the engineer, the criminals plan to use this disguise to implicate
any accomplice as the mastermind and to divert attention away from themselves.
Once inside, they run into security personnel, and a shootout ensues. The criminals are
gunned down and the engineer finds himself confronted by Batman, who is
investigating the disturbance.
Terrified, the engineer jumps into the chemical plant's waste pound lock to escape
Batman and is swept through a pipe leading to the outside. Once outside, he discovers,
to his horror, that the chemicals have permanently bleached his skin chalk-white,
stained his lips ruby-red and dyed his hair bright green. This disfigurement,
compounded with the man's misfortunes of that one day, drives him completely
insane and marks the birth of the Joker.
In the present day, the Joker kidnaps Commissioner Gordon and imprisons him in a
run-down amusement park and shoots and paralyzeshis
daughter Barbara (alias Batgirl). His henchmen then strip Gordon naked and cage him
in the park's freak show. He chains Gordon to one of the park's rides and forces him to
view giant pictures of his wounded daughter, naked, hoping to drive Gordon insane in
order to prove that the most upstanding citizen can go mad after having "one bad
day." Once Gordon has run the horrifying gauntlet, the Joker puts him on display in the
freak show, ridiculing him as "the average man," a naïve weakling doomed to insanity.
Batman's attempts to locate Commissioner Gordon are unsuccessful until the Joker
sends him a clue that leads him to the amusement park. Batman arrives to save
Gordon, and the Joker retreats into the funhouse. Though traumatized by the ordeal,
Gordon retains his sanity and moral code, and he insists that Batman capture the Joker
"by the book" in order to show him that adhering to the legal process works. Batman
enters the funhouse and faces the Joker's traps, while the Joker tries to persuade his
old foe that the world is "a black, awful joke" and thus not worth fighting for. He also
states that it takes only "one bad day" to turn an ordinary man insane, and taunts
Batman by correctly speculating that it was one bad day where he lost a loved one at
the hands of a criminal that drove Batman into becoming a vigilante. Batman tracks
down and subdues the Joker, tells him that Gordon survived everything he suffered at
the Joker's hands, and suggests that the Joker is alone in his madness. Batman then
attempts to reach out to the Joker and offers to help his old foe recover and put an
end to their everlasting war, which Batman fears may one day result in a fight to the
death. The Joker declines, saying it is too late for that. He then says that this situation
reminds him of a joke, and proceeds to tell the joke. Batman chuckles at the punch
line, accompanying the Joker's maniacal cackling as the police arrive. Batman then
reaches out to put a hand on the Joker's shoulder and the light disappears as the rain
continues to fall.
CONCLUSIONS

-The comic, if it is done as art and not only as a way of working, can
be a great educational tool.

- Frank Miller y Alan Moore were who began what was the called as
the golden age of the comic, an age that lasted little, because now
only the comic is treated as if it could only deal about the super hero
of turn.

-When most people hear the word comic or cartoon think in a way of
entertainment for children, however, there are many genres
dedicated to covering the multiple narrative needs of readers.

-The media helps us build a general idea of what is happening


around us, whether local, national or worldwide.This leads us to
think that comics influence the way a child perceives the world and
specifically in this case to the United States.
LINKOGRAPHY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comics
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Miller_(comics)
http://www.thefamouspeople.com/profiles/frank-miller-3387.php
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Moore
http://www.thefamouspeople.com/profiles/alan-moore-4231.php
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dark_Knight_Returns
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watchmen
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batman:_Year_One
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V_for_Vendetta
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batman:_The_Killing_Joke
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_War_(comics)