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MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment 13 Noise and Vibration 13.1 Introduction Scope 13.1.1 The site

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

13 Noise and Vibration

13.1

Introduction

Scope

13.1.1 The site at Whitecleave is a quarry formerly operated by Hanson. The site is now leased by Sam Gilpin Demolition Ltd (SGDL) who are in the process of expanding their operations to develop waste material recycling at the site.

13.1.2 Consultations with Teignbridge District Council (TDC) and Devon County Council (DCC) [1][2] have been undertaken to agree the scope of work associated with the noise and vibration chapter. Assessment methodologies and criteria used in the assessment relating to the proposed facility have been discussed and agreed.

13.1.3 This chapter provides an assessment of the noise and vibration impacts associated with the construction and operation of the proposed facility at Whitecleave Quarry on the closest sensitive receptors. In particular the following aspects are considered:

baseline noise survey;

construction noise and vibration impact assessment;

operational noise impact assessment; and

operational road traffic noise impact assessment.

13.1.4 Current activities at the site comprise HGV movements onto the public highway and within the site for the stockpiling of materials.

13.1.5 The various phases of the development are detailed in Chapter 6 of the ES. The development will be fully operational by 2014.

13.1.6 A brief summary of noise theory and terms used within this report are provided in Appendix 13A.

13.1.7 A plan of the site and surrounding area is given in Figure 13B.1, Appendix 13B.

Site Operations

Construction

13.1.8 The following construction operations are included within the assessment:

construction of Materials Recycling Facility (MRF);

blasting to create the platform for the Incinerator Bottom Ash (IBA); and

construction of IBA processing facility.

Operation

13.1.9 The following operations are included within the noise assessment:

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment • operation of the Material Recycling Facility (MRF) for

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

operation of the Material Recycling Facility (MRF) for construction waste;

operation of the Incinerator Bottom Ash (IBA) processing facility;

operation of a crusher at the existing quarry; and

HGV movements on site.

13.1.10 In addition, the impact on existing road traffic noise levels due to changes in traffic flows on local roads due to the operation of the site is also considered.

Working Hours

Construction

13.1.11 Standard construction working hours are proposed 07:00 to 18:00 Monday to Friday and maintenance for plant between 07:00 to 13:00 on Saturdays with no working on Sundays or Public / Bank Holidays. It is not anticipated for construction works to be required outside of these hours.

Operation

13.1.12 The proposed working hours are 07.00 to 19:00 Monday to Friday inclusive. Saturday from 07.00 to 13.00 for maintenance. No working on Sundays or Bank Holidays is proposed. Access to site for equipment and vehicles is required at all times for the demolition business as SGDL are on call for emergencies i.e. working with the emergency services and for bridge demolition over road, rail and water. During emergency conditions the MRF and IBA facilities will not be operational.

13.2 Relevant Legislation and Policy

Legislation

13.2.1 Noise levels generated by demolition and construction activities are regulated by guidelines and subject to local authority control. The Control of Pollution Act 1974 (CoPA) [3] and Part III of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 (EPA) [4] contain sections which can be applied to construction noise and vibration.

13.2.2 Under Section 60 of the CoPA a Local Authority can serve a notice on a contractor in order to control construction works. Under Section 61 of the CoPA a contractor can apply for ‘prior consent’ to carry out construction works, in order to agree in advance with the Local Authority the details of the works and the methods to be employed to minimise noise.

13.2.3 Under the EPA a Local Authority can serve an abatement notice on a contractor if they consider noise or vibration from construction works to amount to a statutory nuisance. In addition, individuals can also pursue private action under the EPA.

PPG24

13.2.4 Planning Policy Guidance (PPG) 24 Planning and Noise was published by the Department of Environment in 1994 [5]. Paragraph 1 on page 1 of PPG 24 indicates that it is intended to:

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment 13.2.5 “…provide advice on how the planning system can be

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

13.2.5 “…provide advice on how the planning system can be used to minimise the adverse impact of noise without placing unreasonable restrictions on development or adding unduly to the costs and administrative burdens of business … It outlines some of the main considerations which local planning authorities should take into account in drawing up development plan policies and when determining planning applications for development which will either generate noise or be exposed to existing noise sources.”

13.2.6 For new developments that would introduce noise into an area PPG 24 confirms, in Appendix 3, that it is appropriate to continue using previously established assessment routines, for example when assessing noise from road traffic (Appendix 3, paragraph 1), noise from construction sites (Appendix 3, paragraph 21) and noise from waste sites (Appendix 3 Paragraph 23). PPG24 references MPG11 [6] in Appendix 3, now superseded by MPS2 as the established assessment criteria to be used when assessing surface mineral workings. The appropriate assessment approaches applicable to the Proposed Development are discussed in the Assessment Methodology section below.

Minerals Policy Statement 2

13.2.7 Minerals Policy Statement 2 (MPS 2) [7] Appendix 2: Noise, states that planning conditions should be used to apply absolute controls on noise emissions with limits normally being set at particular noise sensitive properties. It is recommended to aim to establish noise limits at the noise sensitive properties that do not exceed the background level by more than 10 dB(A).

13.2.8 MPS 2 also recognises, however, that these prescribed levels will in many circumstances be difficult to achieve without imposing unreasonable burdens on the mineral operator. It goes on to state:

‘In such cases, the limit set should be as near that level as practicable during normal working hours (0700-1900) and should not exceed 55dB(A) L Aeq,1hr (free field). Evening (1900-2200) limits should not exceed background level by more than 10dB(A) and night time limits should not exceed 42 dB (A) L Aeq, 1hr free field at noise sensitive dwellings.’

13.2.9 However, it is accepted within MPS 2 that all operators will have some particularly noisy short- term activities that cannot meet the limits set for normal operations. An example includes the construction of new permanent landforms.

13.2.10 As a result, and where these activities can bring a longer-term environmental benefit, increased temporary daytime limits are suggested of up to 70 dB L Aeq, 1h (free field) for up to 8 weeks in a year.

13.2.11 Therefore, with reference to this assessment, temporary exceedences of daytime noise level of 70 dB L Aeq, 1h is considered acceptable for construction activities.

13.2.12 No evening or night-time operations are proposed.

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment Local Authority Requirements 13.2.13 Discussions were held with the

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

Local Authority Requirements

13.2.13 Discussions were held with the Environmental Health Department at Teignbridge Borough Council to agree the details of the noise monitoring survey. In addition, a formal response to the EIA Scoping opinion has been provided by Devon County Council [8], which incorporates the advice from the Environmental Health Department at Teignbridge Borough Council.

13.2.14 With regard to construction noise and vibration impacts the Council recommended that a Construction Environmental Management Plan (CEMP) should be produced detailing the various mitigation measures to be implemented during the works.

13.2.15 With regard to road traffic noise impacts the Council advised that this should be considered.

13.2.16 With regard to operational noise and vibration impacts a range of comments have been provided covering site design, hours of operation, reversing alarms, operational controls and blasting.

13.2.17 The formal response suggested the following controls on operational noise impacts:

Noise emitted from the site should not exceed 55 dB (L Aeq 5 minutes) at the boundary of the site at any time.

Noise Levels may exceed these limits between the hours of 09:00 and 17:00 Monday – Friday for temporary periods only for essential work in the preparation of the site. However, consideration must be given to local residents during temporary periods – notification to the Local Authority and mail drops to nearby residents should be made.

The hours of operation should not exceed 07:00 to 18:00 Monday to Friday and 08:00 and 13:00 on Saturdays. The site should not operate at all on Sundays and Bank Holidays.

13.2.18 The proposed noise limit suggested in the Scoping Opinion is significantly different to the previous planning conditions for the site in terms of the location to which it applies and the time period [9]:

Noise emitted from the Mineral Site shall not exceed 55 dB(L Aeq ) (one hour) free-field between 0700 and 1900 hours Mondays to Fridays and 0800 and 1300 hours on Saturdays and shall not exceed 45dB(L Aeq ) (one hour) at any other time as measured at any occupied residential building not in the control of the operator.

Noise limits may exceed these limits between the hours of 0900 and 1700 Monday to Friday inclusive for temporary periods during bund construction, soil stripping, removal of spoil heaps and the construction of new permanent landforms with the prior agreement in writing of the Mineral Planning Authority.

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment 13.2.19 Further discussions and a meeting were held with officers

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

13.2.19 Further discussions and a meeting were held with officers from the Environmental Health Department at Teignbridge Borough Council to resolve the differences between the previous condition, which is in line with the guidance in MPS 2, and the controls suggested in the Scoping Opinion. The following limits were provided by Teignbridge Borough Council;-

Free-field noise levels resulting from operation of the site should not exceed 55 dB L Aeq,30 minutes at any sensitive receptor

In respect of ground borne vibration and air overpressure resulting from blasting during the construction of the plateau for the IBA facility, the guidelines set out in the 1998 application for the site shall be adhered to, namely:

“Ground vibration from blasting shall not exceed a peak velocity of 9.5mm per second, as measured at any building not in control of the operator, in 95% of all blasts, with no single blast exceeding a resultant peak particle velocity of 12mm per second as measured at any building not in the control of the operator.”

“Vibration from the operations hereby permitted, in terms of the measurable air overpressure at any building not in the control of the operator, shall not exceed 120 decibels.”

13.3 Assessment Methodology

Baseline Noise Monitoring

13.3.1 In order to facilitate the assessment of noise impacts from the proposed development, it is first necessary to acquire an understanding of the existing noise climate in the surrounding area. For this purpose, background noise monitoring was undertaken continuously between 4th March 2011 and 11th March 2011 at four selected receptor locations surrounding the site.

N1 – ’41 Plymouth Road’ – residential property west of the current site entrance.

N2 – ‘21 Elm Bank’ a residential property west of the site.

N3 – ’10 Gypsy Lane’ a residential property west of the site.

N4 – ‘Loverscombe Farm’, residential property on the eastern side of the quarry.

13.3.2 Additional short-term attended noise monitoring was also carried out at a further two locations:

N5 – ‘Bagpuss’ Nursery, located west of the site.

N6 – Potters Wood, located to the south of the site.

13.3.3 The baseline measurement locations were selected following a meeting at the site with an Environmental Health Officer from Teignbridge District Council. The aim was to represent the closest noise sensitive receptors (residential properties) in each direction from the proposed site.

13.3.4 All noise monitoring locations are illustrated in Figure 13B.1, Appendix 13B.

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment 13.3.5 All the noise monitoring was undertaken in accordance with

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

13.3.5

All the noise monitoring was undertaken in accordance with the guidance in British Standard BS 7445: 2003 ‘Description and Measurement of Environmental Noise’ [10].

13.3.6

Details of the instrumentation employed are as follows:

Norsonic 140, Serial No. 1403078 (N1);

Brüel & Kjær 2238, Serial 2541000 (N2);

Brüel & Kjær 2238, Serial 2541001 (N3);

Norsonic 140, Serial No. 1403077 (N4);

Norsonic 140, Serial No. 1403883 (N5 and N6); and

Brüel & Kjær field calibrator 4231, Serial 2061469.

13.3.7

The equipment was set to measure various parameters, including the L Aeq and L A90 values, logging at contiguous periods of 15-minutes throughout the monitoring period. The equipment calibration was checked prior to, and after, the monitoring periods – no significant changes (±0.2 dB) were noted. Calibration certificates for the noise instrumentation are available on request.

13.3.8

Weather conditions during placement and collection of the equipment were noted to be suitable for noise monitoring i.e. no precipitation and only light winds (<5 ms -1 ).

13.3.9

The weather conditions over the measurement period were reported to be mainly dry, with average daytime (07:00 to 18:00) temperatures in the range 3 to 10°C and the wind generally from the east or west averaging less than 5 ms -1 on most days (with the exception of Thursday 10 th March with average wind speeds of 7 ms -1 ).

13.3.10

Details of the weather conditions over the measurement periods during the daytime (07:00 to 18:00) are given in Table 13C.1, Appendix 13C.

Construction Noise

13.3.11

The noise levels generated by construction activities and experienced by nearby sensitive receptors, such as residential properties, depend upon a number of variables, the most significant of which are:

Site preparation, drilling, hammering and blasting;

the noise generated by plant or equipment used on site, generally expressed as sound power levels (L W );

the periods of operation of the plant on the site, known as its ‘on-time’;

the distance between the noise source and the receptor; and

the attenuation provided by ground absorption and any intervening barriers.

13.3.12

BS 5228: 2009 ‘Noise and vibration control on construction and open sites’ [11] provides a methodology for the estimation of likely construction noise levels as an equivalent continuous noise level averaged over a suitable assessment period, for example a one-hour period (L Aeq,1h ).

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment 13.3.13 BS 5228 contains a database of the noise emission

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

13.3.13 BS 5228 contains a database of the noise emission from individual items of equipment, activities and routines to predict noise from construction activities at identified receptors. The prediction method gives guidance on the effects of different types of ground, barrier attenuation and how to assess the impact of fixed and mobile plant.

13.3.14 In order to quantify the likely noise from construction works in accordance with the methods and guidance in BS 5228, it is necessary to define the various activities to be undertaken and the equipment to be used, based upon the anticipated programme of work. Assumed activities and plant used within the calculations are provided within Appendix 13D.

13.3.15 Construction noise levels have been estimated at a selection of the closest identified receptors to the site using the SoundPLAN (v7.0) noise mapping software. The selected receptors correspond with the monitoring locations agreed on site with Teignbridge Borough Council:

C1 - 41 Plymouth Road;

C2 - 21 Elm Bank;

C3 - 10 Gypsy Lane; and

C4 - Loverscombe Farm.

13.3.16 Noise levels generated by construction activities are regulated by guidelines and subject to local authority control.

13.3.17 The significance of construction noise levels has been assessed using the ‘ABC Method’ provided in BS 5228, Table 13.1 is taken directly from BS 5228.

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment Table 13.1: Construction Noise Threshold of Significant Effect

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

Table 13.1: Construction Noise Threshold of Significant Effect

Assessment Category and Threshold Value Period

 

Threshold Value (dB)

Category A a)

Category B b)

Category C c)

Night-time (23:00 – 07:00)

45

50

55

Evenings and Weekends d)

55

60

65

Daytime (07:00 – 19:00) and Saturdays (07:00 – 13:00)

65

70

75

NOTE 1: A significant effect has been deemed to occur if the total L Aeq noise level, including construction, exceeds the threshold value for the category appropriate to the ambient noise level. NOTE 2: If the ambient noise level exceeds the threshold values given in the table, then a significant effect is deemed to occur if the total noise level for the period increases by more than 3 dB due to construction activity. NOTE 3: Applies to residential receptors only.

a) Category A: Threshold values to use when ambient noise levels (when rounded to the nearest 5 dB) are less than these values.

b) Category B: Threshold values to use when ambient noise levels (when rounded to the nearest 5 dB) are the same as Category A values.

c) Category C: Threshold values to use when ambient noise levels (when rounded to the nearest 5 dB) are higher than Category A values.

d) 19:00 – 23:00 weekdays, 13:00 – 23:00 Saturdays, 07:00 – 23:00 Sundays.

 

13.3.18 For the appropriate period (night, evening/weekend, day), the ambient noise level is determined and rounded to the nearest 5 dB. The appropriate Threshold Value is then determined. The total noise level (sum of prevailing ambient level and estimated construction noise level) is then compared with this Threshold Value. If the total noise level exceeds the Threshold Value, then a significant effect is deemed to occur.

Construction Vibration

13.3.19 The principal source of vibration during construction works relates to blasting activities to create the level surface for the IBA processing facility. Typical surface plant such as cranes, excavators etc. are not recognised as sources of high levels of environmental vibration. No piling of foundations for the MRF and IBA buildings is proposed.

13.3.20 A qualitative assessment of air overpressure and ground vibration has been carried out, identifying the locations and sensitivities of potentially affected receptors and indicating best practicable means to minimise the impact.

13.3.21 The planning permission for the previous quarrying activities on the site included conditions relating to ground vibration and air over pressure from blasting :

“Ground vibration from blasting shall not exceed a peak velocity of 9.5mm per second, as measured at any building not in control of the operator, in 95% of all blasts, with no single blast exceeding a resultant peak particle velocity of 12mm per second as measured at any building not in the control of the operator.”

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment “Vibration from the operations hereby permitted, in terms of the

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

“Vibration from the operations hereby permitted, in terms of the measurable air overpressure at any building not in the control of the operator, shall not exceed 120 decibels.”

Operational Noise – Operations on Site

13.3.22 A noise propagation model has been developed in the SoundPLAN suite of programs, which implements the ISO 9613-2 calculation method for industrial noise sources [12]. Input data for the model are outlined in Appendix 13E.

13.3.23 The model consists of a detailed three dimensional representation of the proposed facility and the surroundings and has been employed to calculate noise levels at surrounding sensitive receptors due to noise breakout from the facility buildings, noise emission from external sources and noise emission from HGVs on site, taking into account noise reflected from the quarry face.

13.3.24 All significant topographical detail and buildings that may influence the transmission of noise to affected receptors are included in the noise model. A digital terrain model, created using provided ground elevation contours, has been used to position buildings and other noise sources at the correct height. The model is based on the situation at the end of phase 3 when the quarry has

been filled in and therefore the crusher and material stockpiles in the quarry area are raised up to

a level comparable with the adjacent IBA processing area. This is considered to be a worse case

approach as during earlier phases the crusher and associated stockpiles will be at a lower level

in the quarry void and will therefore be more shielded from receptors outside the site boundary.

13.3.25 Operational noise levels have been estimated at a number of the closest identified receptors to the site using the SoundPLAN (v7.0) noise mapping software:

R1 - 37 Plymouth Road;

R2 – 41 Plymouth Road;

R3 – 94 Plymouth Road;

R4 – 92 Plymouth Road;

R5 – 87 Plymouth Road;

R6 – Flat, Clevehurst, Duckspond Road;

R7 – Bagpuss Nursery, Duckspond Road;

R8 – 86 Plymouth Road;

R9 – 76 Plymouth Road;

R10 – 71 Plymouth Road

R11 – 11 Gypsy Lane;

R12 – 2 Elm Bank;

R13 – 2 Fairy Lane;

Environmental Statement Volume 1: Main Text

13-9

May 2011

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment • R14 – 67 Plymouth Road; • R15 – 60

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

R14 – 67 Plymouth Road;

R15 – 60 Plymouth Road; and

R16 - Loverscombe Farm

13.3.26 Noise levels have been estimated for a worst-case 30 minute period, in line with the requirements of the Environmental Health Department at Teignbridge Borough Council.

13.3.27 The noise sources considered in the noise predictions are outlined in Table 13.2. Full octave band data are provided in Appendix 13E and have been used in the predictions.

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment Table 13.2 Operational Noise Data Noise Source Parameter

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

Table 13.2 Operational Noise Data

Noise Source

Parameter

Noise level dB(A)

Typical on Time over 30 minutes

MRF

MRF Internal Noise Level*

L

p

85

 

30

mins

Material dumped from HGV #

L

w

110

 

5

mins

Material Handling (shovel) ~

L

w

108

 

30

mins

Material Handling (forklift) #

L

w

103

 

30

mins

Conveyors #

L w per m

77

 

30

mins

Material dropping from conveyors

#

L

w

99

 

30

mins

HGV moving slowly in site*

L

w

102

1 per 30 mins

IBA

IBA Internal Noise Level #

L

p

99

 

30

mins

Material dumped from HGV #

L

w

110

 

5

mins

Material drop into funnel #

L

w

112

 

30

mins

Material Handling (shovel) ~

L

w

108

 

30

mins

Conveyor #

L w per m

77

 

30

mins

Material dropping from conveyor

#

L

w

99

 

30

mins

HGV moving slowly in site*

L

w

102

1 per 30 mins

Quarry Area

 

Crusher #

L

w

133

 

30

mins

Material Handling (loader) ~

L

w

108

 

30

mins

     

2

per 30 mins (1 to

HGV moving slowly in site*

L

w

102

MRF stockpile and

 

1

to IBA stockpile)

* SW measured data # Data provided by Muller BBM for IBA process ~ BS5228 data of 15 minute levels

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment 13.3.28 Predicted noise levels at the receptor locations have been

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

13.3.28 Predicted noise levels at the receptor locations have been assessed against the requirements of Teignbridge Borough Council.

13.3.29 The activities carried out during operation of the IBA and MRF will not result in significant levels of ground borne vibration. Any vibratory equipment within the IBA will be suitably mounted to isolate it from the foundations. Consequently, operational vibration is scoped out of this assessment.

Operational Noise – Road Traffic

13.3.30 The proposed development will have an impact on traffic flows on existing roads in the area surrounding the site once the development is operational.

13.3.31 The traffic impact assessment results for the scenarios: 2016 future year without the development and 2016 future year with the development, have been used to determine if any roads are predicted to undergo a potentially significant change in traffic noise. To ensure a worst case approach the traffic noise assessment is based on 1 hour traffic flows in the ‘inter peak’ period (09:00-16:00). Outside of the ‘rush hour’ periods existing traffic flows are lower, therefore the impact of the development traffic, in particular HGV traffic, will be at its greatest.

13.3.32 A significant change in traffic flow is normally defined as a change of +25/-20% or more, due to the operation of the proposed development. The Design Manual for Roads and Bridges (DMRB) [13] states that a change in traffic flows of less than +25/-20% results in a change in traffic noise levels of less than 1 dB assuming all other parameters remain the same, such a change is imperceptible to the human ear. The change in traffic flows on the B3380 north and south of the site due to the operation of the proposed development is very small, less than +4%, the change on the A38 is less than +0.5%.

13.3.33 However, a significant proportion of the traffic generated by the site will be from HGVs, therefore there is the potential for the composition of the traffic on surrounding roads to be affected by the operation of the development.

13.3.34 In order to give an indication of the magnitude of the impact of changes in road traffic noise due to the proposed development the change in the traffic noise L A10,1h at the roadside of the B3380 and the A38 has been predicted.

13.3.35 The predictions have been carried out using the standard UK prediction methodology prescribed in the Calculation of Road Traffic Noise (CRTN) [14].

13.3.36 It is generally accepted that changes in road traffic noise levels of 1 dB(A) or less are imperceptible, and changes of 1 to 3 dB(A) are not widely perceptible. Consequently the significance of the predicted change in traffic noise levels has been considered using the scale shown in Table 13.3.

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment Table 13.3: Classification of Significance of Noise Effects Change

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

Table 13.3: Classification of Significance of Noise Effects

Change in Noise Level (dB)

Significance of Effect

 

< 1

Negligible

1

< 3

Low

3

< 5

Moderate

 

5 < 10

Substantial

 

10

Severe

13.4 Baseline Conditions

Noise Monitoring Results

13.4.1 Time history graphs of all the measured noise levels are provided in Figures 13C.1 to 13C.4, Appendix 13C. A summary of the measurement data during the proposed operating hours (weekdays only 07:00 to 19:00 and maintenance on Saturdays 07:00 to 13:00) and construction working hours (weekdays 07:00 to 18:00 and maintenance on Saturdays 07:00 to 13:00) is provided in Table 13.4.

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment Table 13.4 Noise Monitoring Summary Noise Monitoring Location

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

Table 13.4 Noise Monitoring Summary

Noise Monitoring Location

Time Period

L Aeq,T (dB)

L A90* (dB)

L Amax,fast (dB)

N1 - 41 Plymouth Road

Weekday 07:00-19:00

65

61

100

Saturday 07:00-13:00

63

60

82

N2 - 21 Elm Bank

Weekday 07:00-19:00

58

54

87

Saturday 07:00-13:00

62

58

87

N3 - 10 Gypsy Lane

Weekday 07:00-19:00

58

52

98

Saturday 07:00-13:00

62

54

97

N4 - Loverscombe Farm

Weekday 07:00-19:00

42

36

82

Saturday 07:00-13:00

39

32

68

N5 – ‘Bagpuss’ Nursery

Friday 11/03/11

57

54

71

13:35-14:35

N6 – Potters Wood

Friday 11/03/11

59

57

69

16:15-16:45

*Arithmetic average

The L Aeq,T is the single number parameter that represents the total sound energy measured over the time period T.

L Aeq is the sound level of a notionally steady sound having the same energy as a fluctuating sound over a specified measurement period.

The L A90,T is the noise level exceeded for 90 % of the measurement period T, and generally reflects the noise level in the lulls between individual noise events. Over a one hour period, the L A90 will be the noise level exceeded for 54 minutes.

The L Amax,fast is the maximum noise level measured over the measurement period T.

13.4.2 At N1 road traffic on the B3380, Strode Road and the A38 was the dominant noise source. Lorry movements into the quarry site on the B3380, Strode Road were noted. No other noise from the quarry was discernable upon installation and collection of the monitoring equipment. Other noise sources included the stream running past the property and aircraft noise.

13.4.3 At N2, N3 and N5 road traffic noise on the A38 was the dominant noise source. Noise from the quarry site was not discernible upon installation and collection of the monitoring equipment.

13.4.4 At N4 the dominant noise source was distant road traffic noise. Noise from the quarry site was not discernible upon installation and collection of the monitoring equipment.

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment 13.4.5 At N6, the dominant noise source was road traffic

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

13.4.5 At N6, the dominant noise source was road traffic noise on the A38. Other noise sources included children playing outside at the nursery. Noise from the quarry site was not discernible upon installation and collection of the monitoring equipment.

13.4.6 Existing ambient noise levels during the proposed weekday operating hours are above the level within the previous planning condition of 55 dB L Aeq at all the monitoring locations, except N4 to the east which is well away from major roads.

Road Traffic Noise

13.4.7 A summary of the calculated baseline roadside road traffic noise levels on the B3380 and A38 is provided in Table 13.5.

Table 13.5 Baseline Roadside Road Traffic Noise Levels

Road Link

Distance from

L A10,1h dB (free field) Inter peak

kerb (m)

A38 south of Lower Dean Junction

10

80.4

A38 between Lower Dean and Dart Bridge Junctions

10

80.4

A38 north of Dart Bridge Junction

10

80.4

B3380 Plymouth Rd between A38 underbridge & Strode Road

4

64.5

B3380 Strode Rd between Plymouth Rd & site access

4

65.8

B3380 Strode Rd north of site access

4

66.1

13.5 Incorporated Mitigation

Construction Noise

13.5.1 A range of good site practices would be adopted in order to mitigate construction phase noise. It is assumed that the contractor will follow best practicable means to reduce the noise and vibration impact on the local community, including:

fixed and semi-fixed ancillary plant such as compressors, wood chippers etc which can be located away from receptors to be positioned so as to cause minimum noise disturbance. If necessary, acoustic barriers or enclosures to be provided for specific items of fixed plant.

all plant used on site will comply with the EC Directive on Noise Emissions for Outdoor Equipment, where applicable.

selection of inherently quiet plant where appropriate. All major compressors to be ‘sound reduced’ models fitted with properly lined and sealed acoustic covers which are kept closed whenever the machines are in use, and all ancillary pneumatic percussive tools to be fitted with mufflers or silencers of the type recommended by the manufacturers.

all plant used on site will be regularly maintained, paying particular attention to the integrity of silencers and acoustic enclosures.

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment • machines in intermittent use to be shut down in

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

machines in intermittent use to be shut down in the intervening periods between work or throttled down to a minimum.

drop heights of materials from lorries and other plant will be kept to a minimum.

adherence to the codes of practice for construction working and piling given in British Standard BS 5228 and the guidance given therein for minimising noise and vibration emissions from the site.

13.5.2 Teignbridge Borough Council have recommended that a CEMP is produced for the works once a contractor is appointed which will detail all the mitigation measures to be implemented during the works.

13.5.3 It is strongly recommended that local residents are kept informed. In response to this a local Liaison Committee is set up already and can be a conduit for information. In addition queries can be directed to the offices at Whitecleave or MVV’s Plymouth office. SGDL and MVV will offer a regular newsletter that can be accessed on our web page with notification of planned works on site.

Construction Vibration

13.5.4 Ground vibration levels to surrounding sensitive receptors resulting from blasting works are very site specific. The appointed blasting contractor will incorporate any required mitigation to ensure that air over-pressure and ground vibration levels will satisfy the planning condition. This will include close liaison with occupiers of residential properties in the vicinity.

Operational Noise

13.5.5 Details regarding the proposed building facades, including the roof and wall specifications and associated acoustic properties are provided in Appendix 13E.

13.5.6 All processing of materials will be carried out inside the MRF and IBA buildings, the only external activities relate to the handling of input materials and the finished product.

13.5.7 The topography and design of the site has been used to provide shielding where possible.

13.6 Impact Assessment

Construction Noise

13.6.1 Construction noise levels have been predicted at free-field positions at a selection of the closest residential properties to the site, corresponding with the monitoring locations agreed with Teignbridge Borough Council. The estimated construction noise levels are provided in Table 13.6. All such effects are considered temporary in nature as they are present only for the duration of the construction works.

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment Table 13.6: Estimated Construction Noise Levels – Construction

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

Table 13.6: Estimated Construction Noise Levels – Construction only

Activity

 

L Aeq,T dB (free-field)

 

C1

C2

 

C3

C4

MRF

Phase 1 – Slab construction

56

49

 

49

24

Phase 1 – Access road / car park construction

60

53

 

52

27

IBA

Phase 2b – Site clearance

50

39

 

42

33

Phase 2b - Earthworks

48

39

 

40

31

Phase 2b – Excavations and foundations

49

39

 

41

32

Phase 2b – Slab construction

41

37

 

39

29

Phase 2b – Steelwork construction

44

47

 

46

31

Phase 2b – Finishing and fitting

42

42

 

42

30

Phase 2b – Access road / car park construction

61

55

 

52

30

Existing Ambient*

63

58

 

58

40

* Either weekday L Aeq (07:00-18:00) ambient noise levels or Saturday morning L Aeq (08:00-13:00) ambient noise levels, whichever is lowest

13.6.2 Since it is unlikely that the activities will be occurring simultaneously, the highest noise level at each receptor (shown in bold in Table 13.6) have been used to determine the significance of the works employing the ABC method in BS 5228. In Table 13.7, the estimated construction noise levels have been combined with the prevailing existing ambient noise levels (L Aeq,T ). The ambient noise levels assumed for each receptor are as reported in Table 13.4 for the weekday daytime or Saturday morning, whichever is lowest.

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment Table 13.7: Estimated Construction Noise Levels – Construction

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

Table 13.7: Estimated Construction Noise Levels – Construction and Ambient Noise Levels combined

Receptor

 

Noise Level L Aeq,T dB (free-field)

 

Highest

Measured

Ambient and

 

Level

 

Predicted

Construction

Noise

Ambient

Noise

Construction

Noise

Threshold

Value

Above

Threshold

Significance

C1 – 41 Plymouth Road

61

63

65

70

-5

Negligible

C2 – 21 Elm Bank

55

58

60

65

-5

Negligible

C3 – 10 Gypsy Lane

52

58

59

65

-6

Negligible

C4 – Loverscombe Farm

33

40

41

65

-24

Negligible

13.6.3 At receptors C1 to C4 the highest noise levels from construction works are well below the threshold value in BS 5228, and the significance of the effect is deemed to be negligible.

13.6.4 With respect to construction traffic, no data relating to construction traffic on public roads are currently available. It is likely that construction traffic will approach and leave the site via B3380, Strode Road and access the A38 at the junction to the north-east of the site.

13.6.5 Strode Road currently has a 1 hour interpeak flow of 195 vehicles, 13 of which are HGVs. The A38 to the north-east of the site currently has a 1 hour interpeak flow of 2524 vehicles, 316 of which are HGVs. An additional 8 HGV movements per hour would be required on Strode Road to result in a 1 dB(A) increase in noise level to adjacent receptors. An additional 138 HGV movements per hour would be required on the A38 to result in a 1 dB(A) increase in noise level to adjacent receptors (a 1 dB(A) increase being assessed as of negligible significance).

13.6.6 It is highly unlikely that the HGV traffic associated with the construction of the development will provide additional flows of this magnitude and it is concluded that the significance of construction traffic on public roads is negligible.

Construction Vibration

13.6.7 The latest Government guidance on the subject of blast vibration is given within MPG 9, 1992 [15] and MPG 14, 1995 [16] where a range of between 6 to 10 mms -1 at a 95% confidence level is suggested as a suitable limit, measured over any period of 6 months at vibration sensitive buildings with no individual blast exceeding 12 mms -1 .

13.6.8 These same criteria are also recommended within the 1998 Department of the Environment Transport and The Regions research publication, The Environmental Effects of Production Blasting from Surface Mineral Workings [17].

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment 13.6.9 This same DETR publication also notes that "It would

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

13.6.9 This same DETR publication also notes that "It would appear that over the years conditions have become progressively more stringent. No doubt this is as a result of MPAs seeking to reduce the number of complaints and by operators seeking to resolve issues more quickly. However, a reduction in complaints will not necessarily follow". Furthermore the report also states one of the principal findings of the study which lead to this publication is "Once the threshold of perception had been crossed the magnitude of vibration seemed to bear little relation to the level of resulting complaint".

13.6.10 The British Standards Institution have published BS 6472 - 2: 2008, ‘Guide to Evaluation of Human Exposure to Vibration in Buildings, Part 2: Blast-induced Vibration’ [18]. The document discusses how and where to measure blast-induced vibration and gives maximum satisfactory magnitudes of vibration with respect to human response. Satisfactory magnitudes are given as 6 to 10 mms -1 at a 90% confidence level as measured outside of a building on a well-founded hard surface as close to the building as possible.

13.6.11 A person will generally become aware of blast induced vibration at levels of around 1.5 mms -1 , although under some circumstances this can be as low as 0.5 mms -1 . Even though such vibration is routinely generated within any property and is also entirely safe, when it is induced by blasting activities it is not unusual for such a level to give rise to subjective concern. Such concern is also frequently the result of the recent discovery of cracked plaster or brickwork that in fact has either been present for some time, or has occurred due to natural processes and unrelated to blast induced vibration.

13.6.12 British Standard 7385 [19] gives guide values to prevent cosmetic damage to property. Between 4 Hz and 15 Hz, the guide value is 15 to 20 mms -1 , whilst above 40 Hz the guide value is 50 mms -1 . These vibration criteria reconfirm those of the US Bureau of Mines advice that no damage has occurred in any published data below 12.7mms -1 [20].

13.6.13 Measurements of vibration levels during blasting when operational under Hanson’s equate to 4.0mms -1 at the site entrance [21]. Limits within the existing planning permission pertaining to ground vibration state that it shall not exceed a peak velocity of 9.5mms -1 , as measured at any building not in control of the operator.

13.6.14 No predictions of vibration levels to sensitive receptors in the vicinity the site are provided here. The contractor should carry out measurements of vibration at several locations resulting from one or more trial blasts. Vibration measurements should be carried out in all directions of interest. Depending on the number of directions of interest and the local geology, several trial blasts may be needed.

13.6.15 Scaled distance graphs can then be prepared for each direction of interest. The peak particle velocity (ppv) values should be plotted against scaled distance (on a logarithmic scale), where the scaled distance, s, is given by:

s = d / C 1/2

where d is the slant distance from the blast in metres and C is the maximum instantaneous charge (MIC) in kilograms.

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment 13.6.16 The scaled distance graphs can then be used to

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

13.6.16 The scaled distance graphs can then be used to indicate the likely vibration magnitudes at a given distance for a given MIC, and thus support blast design to ensure specific vibration limits at sensitive receptors are not exceeded.

13.6.17 Accurate prediction of air overpressure is almost impossible due to the variable effects of the prevailing weather conditions and the large distances often involved. Control of air overpressure should always be by its minimization at source through appropriate blast design.

Operational Site Noise

13.6.18 A summary of the predicted operational noise levels at the receptor locations given in paragraph 13.3.25 are provided in Table 13.8 for ground floor level. Figure 13E.1 in Appendix E shows the receptor locations (excluding R16), all noise sources on the site and the predicted noise levels.

Table 13.8: Estimated Operational Noise Levels (L Aeq,30 mins )

 

Predicted Free-Field Noise Level

Receptor

L Aeq,30 mins dB

R1

48.3

R2

48.8

R3

52.4

R4

53.3

R5

53.8

R6

54.4

R7

53.3

R8

54.4

R9

53.8

R10

53.8

R11

54

R12

55.7

R13

51.2

R14

51.5

R15

48.9

R16

31.8

13.6.19 As shown in Table 13.8, the predicted noise levels with all noise sources from the IBA and MRF operating are below the limit of 55 dB L Aeq,30 mins , as required by Teignbridge Borough Council, except for receptor R12, where the predicted noise level is just above the limit.

13.6.20 The main contributors to the resultant noise levels at the receptors are, in order of precedence;-

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment 1) crusher in quarry area 2) breakout noise from IBA

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

1)

crusher in quarry area

2)

breakout noise from IBA building

13.6.21 To reduce resultant noise levels at the receptors and ensure predicted noise levels are below the agreed limit, mitigation to either or both of the above noise sources is required.

Operational Traffic Noise

13.6.22 A summary of the operational roadside road traffic noise levels on the B3380 and A38 is provided in Table 13.9. The change from the corresponding baseline levels is provided in brackets. The traffic assessment has considered two potential routes for site traffic on the A38 from the direction of Exeter to access the site, via the Lower Dean junction or via the Dart Bridge Junction. The results for both options are provided.

Table 13.9 Operational Roadside Road Traffic Noise Levels

Road Link

Distance

 

L A10,1h dB (free field) Inter peak

from kerb

(m)

Lower Dean Jc

Dart Bridge Jc

A38 south of Lower Dean Junction

10

80.4

(+0.0)

80.4

(+0.0)

A38 between Lower Dean and Dart Bridge Junctions

10

80.4

(+0.0)

80.4

(+0.0)

A38 north of Dart Bridge Junction

10

80.4

(+0.0)

80.4

(+0.0)

B3380 Plymouth Rd between A38 underbridge & Strode Road

4

65.4

(+0.9)

65.3

(+0.8)

B3380 Strode Rd between Plymouth Rd & site access

4

66.5

(+0.7)

66.4

(+0.6)

B3380 Strode Rd north of site access

4

66.4

(+0.3)

66.7

(+0.6)

13.6.23 As would be expected the additional traffic generated by the operation of the proposed development has no effect on noise generated by road traffic on the A38 as existing flows are high. On the B3380 a negligible increase in noise generated by road traffic is predicted.

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment 13.6.24 At individual properties in Buckfastleigh on the B3380 the

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

13.6.24 At individual properties in Buckfastleigh on the B3380 the actual increase in overall traffic noise levels experienced will be rather less than indicated here, as traffic on the B3380 is not the only source of road traffic noise at such properties. The close proximity of the A38 is a significant additional source of road traffic noise, which will reduce the impact on overall traffic noise levels of changes on the B3380.

13.7 Additional Mitigation

Construction

13.7.1 Noise - No additional mitigation, beyond that detailed in paragraphs 13.5.1 to 13.5.3, is required. Full details of the working methods and mitigation measures will be combined in the CEMP to be produced once a contractor is appointed.

13.7.2 Vibration – No additional mitigation, beyond the contractor developing appropriate blast designs and monitoring ground vibration levels during the works (and modifying blast design as and when necessary), is required.

Operation

13.7.3 To reduce resultant noise levels at the receptors and ensure predicted noise levels are below the agreed limit, mitigation to the crusher in the quarry area and/or to breakout noise from the IBA building is required.

13.7.4 The crusher will be mobile, able to move around and work in any part of the quarry area. It may be difficult to incorporate mitigation (generally in the form of bunding made up of material to be processed or processed material) within this process. However, if this is possible, it will be done.

13.7.5 The acoustic specification for the cladding to the IBA building is given in Appendix E, Table 13E.5. These values are relatively low, when compared to the sourced data for single skin cladding employed for the MRF building given in Appendix E, Table 13E.2.

13.7.6 The cladding to the IBA building will be upgraded to provide sound reduction values comparable to those in Appendix E, Table 13E.2. This will ensure that the predicted noise levels to all receptors are below the limit of 55 dB L Aeq,30 mins , as required by Teignbridge Borough Council.

13.8 Residual Effects (with Mitigation in Place)

Construction

13.8.1 With the provision of good site practices as outlined in paragraph 13.5.1, residual construction noise effects remain as negligible.

13.8.2 With appropriate blast design by the contractor, construction vibration effects are assessed as negligible/minor and are within the according guidance.

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment Operation 13.8.3 With the upgraded cladding to the IBA building,

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

Operation

13.8.3 With the upgraded cladding to the IBA building, as discussed above, the resultant noise levels to the receptors are given in Table 13.10. Figure 13E.2 in Appendix E shows the receptor locations (excluding R16), all noise sources on the site and the predicted noise levels.

Table 13.10: Estimated Operational Noise Levels (L Aeq,30 mins ) with Upgraded IBA Cladding

 

Predicted Free-Field Noise Level

Receptor

L Aeq,30 mins dB

R1

48.0

R2

48.4

R3

52.1

R4

52.6

R5

52.3

R6

52.2

R7

50.9

R8

52.7

R9

52.8

R10

52.9

R11

53.1

R12

54.8

R13

50.0

R14

50.5

R15

48.1

R16

29.9

13.8.4 As shown in Table 13.10, the predicted noise levels with all noise sources from the IBA and MRF operating are below the limit of 55 dB L Aeq,30 mins , as required by Teignbridge Borough Council.

13.8.5 Operational vibration effects are assessed as negligible.

13.8.6 No additional mitigation with regard to road traffic noise is proposed, therefore the impact of additional traffic generated by the development remains negligible

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment 13.9 Conclusion Construction 13.9.1 The construction noise

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

13.9

Conclusion

Construction

13.9.1 The construction noise assessment has shown that the construction noise levels to surrounding sensitive receptors will be below the proposed limit values and below existing ambient noise levels.

13.9.2 Overall, the significance of construction noise effects is assessed as negligible.

13.9.3 Taking into account the construction works to be carried out (and, in particular, the location of blasting works) the significance of construction vibration effects is assessed as negligible/minor.

Operation

13.9.4 With the mitigation incorporated in the plant design, and with upgraded cladding to the IBA building, the significance of operational noise effects is assessed as negligible.

13.9.5 Operational road traffic noise effects are assessed as negligible.

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment 13.10 References 1 Email from Robert Colder of URS Scott

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

13.10 References

1 Email from Robert Colder of URS Scott Wilson Ltd to Colin Bignall of Teignbridge District Council on 21/03/2011.

2 Email from Amanda Arnold of Teignbridge District Council to Alf Maneylaws of URS Scott Wilson on 15/06/11.

3 Control of Pollution Act (CoPA) 1974.

4 The Environmental Protection Act 1990.

5 Planning policy Guidance 24: Planning and Noise (PPG24). Department of the Environment, 1994.

6 Minerals Planning Guidance: The Control Of Noise At Surface Mineral Workings. Department of the Environment. Welsh Office.

7 Minerals Policy Statement 2 (MPS2), 2005. Controlling and Mitigating the Effects of Minerals Extraction in England. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister.

8 Devon County Council Scoping Opinion for proposal at Whitecleave Quarry, Buckfastleigh, April

2011.

9 Planning condition - Application Ref: 98/3304/32/9DCC.

10 British Standard BS 7445: 2003 ‘Description and Measurement of Environmental Noise.’

11 BS 5228: 2009 ‘Noise and vibration control on construction and open sites’.

12 ISO 9613-2: 1996 ‘Acoustics -- Attenuation of sound during propagation outdoors -Part 2: General method of calculation.’

13 Design Manual for Roads and Bridges (DMRB), Highways Agency, 2008.

14 Calculation of Road Traffic Noise (CRTN), 1988, Department of Transport and the Welsh Office.

15 Minerals Planning Guidance Note No. 9, 1992 Planning and Compensation Act 1991: Interim Development order permissions (IDOS) – Conditions. Department of the Environment, Welsh office.

16 Minerals Planning Guidance 14: Environment Act 1995 - review of mineral planning permissions.

17 The Environmental Effects of Production Blasting from Surface Mineral Workings, Vibrock Report on behalf on the DETR, 1998.

18 BS 6472: 2008. Guide to Evaluation of Human Exposure to Vibration in Buildings. Part 2: Blast- Induced Vibration.

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment 19 BS 7385: 1993. Evaluation and Measurement for Vibration in

MVV Environment, Devonport Whitecleave Redevelopment

19

BS 7385: 1993. Evaluation and Measurement for Vibration in Buildings – Part 2. Guide to Damage Levels from Groundborne Vibration.

20

United States Bureau of Mines (R.I. 8485, 1980).

.

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