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Running Head: EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES 1

Emerging Technologies

Melissa Driscoll

CSN EDU214
EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES 2

Abstract

In this report we will take a look at three different emerging technologies. First we will

look at smartphones in the classroom. Then we will look at game based learning. Lastly we will

evaluate collaboration tools. For each of these technologies we will attempt to answer the

following questions for elementary school, junior high school, and high school; How is it used

in different grade levels, Impact teaching, Impact learning, How it works, and Benefits for

classroom.
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Emerging Technologies

The purpose of this research paper is to look at three different types of Emerging

Technologies and to try to answer questions regarding how these technologies affect the high

school classroom, the middle school classroom, and the elementary school classroom.

Technology 1

The first emerging technology we are going to take a look at is smartphones in the

classroom. According to statistics reported by Statista ("Smartphone user penetration in the

United States by age group from 2014 to 2020"), 28.7% of children ages 0 - 11 years old had a

smartphone in 2014. By the year 2020 they estimate 49.7% of children ages 0 - 11-years-old

will have a smartphone. 71% of children ages 12 - 17 had smartphones in 2014, and by 2020

92.9% are estimated to have smartphones.

How it’s used in different grade levels According to National Education Association

(Graham), high schools are using smartphones to stay organized and assess learning, to make it

more interesting for the kids, and to get the parents more involved as well. An article on CNN’s

website called “Smartphones aren't a smart choice in middle school” (Ruston) reviews impact on

middle schoolers and it says, “We know that the frontal lobe -- the part of the brain responsible

for impulse control -- is not fully developed in middle school-aged children. When we expect

kids to learn how to handle phone use in places like classrooms, we are setting many of them up

for failure.” The article also says, “More than 80% of parents do not want their kids to use cell

phones during school”. In elementary schools, some schools are incorporating the use of

smartphones while others are banning entirely according to The Washington Post article

“Schools and cellphones: In elementary schools? At lunch?” (St. George, 2017).


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Impact teaching Where high school is concerned, taking into account the information

outlined in “Using Smartphones in the Classroom” (Graham), smartphones could be a useful

tool in the classroom and may just require rearranging the classroom to more of a nontraditional

setting, so you can walk around and see what everyone is doing. According to Ruston’s article

on CNN’s website (Ruston), smartphones in middle school may not be such a good idea and

maybe shouldn’t be incorporated into the classroom at all. The Washington Post article (St.

George, 2017) also says elementary schools are mostly banning smartphones from instruction,

which is probably the wiser decision based on the finding of how smartphones are affecting

middle schoolers. Based on these articles, they are just not mature enough to handle the tool.

Impact learning “Using Smartphones in the Classroom” (Graham) states incorporating

smartphones in the classroom may help high schoolers to stay more focused and engaged.

“Smartphones aren't a smart choice in middle school” (Ruston) says, “The mere presence of

smartphones reduces available cognitive capacity.” The same article also mentioned that

smartphones cause the children to be more depressed. The Washington Post article (St. George,

2017) says smartphones in elementary school maybe be more of a distraction than anything.

How it works While there are different ways to use smartphones in the classroom

through all grade levels, each teacher would have to decide for themselves how and if to use

them. The articles mentioned above give some ideas of how smartphones could work. In high

school, as mentioned in “Using Smartphones in the Classroom” (Graham), apps suchs as Remind

and polleverywhere.com could be useful tools. Where middle schoolers are concerned the article

“Smartphones aren't a smart choice in middle school” (Ruston) mentions social media uses,

which have an adverse impact. The Washington Post article (St. George, 2017) mentions
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providing a level of safety for elementary students with smartphones, which is more for the

parents peace of mind.

Benefits for classroom For high schoolers, National Education Association (Graham)

says the classroom is actually more quiet, and the kids are more productive. “Smartphones aren't

a smart choice in middle school” (Ruston) believes there may not be a benefit for middle

schoolers. The only benefit mentioned in The Washington Post article (St. George, 2017) for

elementary students using smartphones in the classroom is to stay in touch with their parents

more easily.

Technology 2

The second emerging technology we will look at is game based learning in the classroom.

According to an article Games and Learning.org (Sanders, 2015), her research showed, “70% of

teachers said they saw an increase in student engagement when using educational video games.”

How it’s used in different grade levels An article found on the website Educational

Connections Inc. (Hossfeld, 2015) says, “Engagement in school tends to drop rapidly starting in

middle school and continuing through high school, so it’s really important to find ways to keep

students interested in what they’re learning.” It also provides links to a variety of different high

school level games that can be used for subjects such as math, science, english, social studies,

foreign language, and test prep. Where middle school is concerned, the article in EdSurge “How

to Roll Out Game-Based Learning—and Boost Engagement—in Your Classroom“ (Fradkin,

2018), performed a study about how game based learning should be used with middle schoolers.

The article says, “Our pilot demonstrated that game-based learning that is aligned to the

curriculum should play an increasingly significant role in the classroom, becoming a staple

blended learning technique.” Where elementary school is concerned, a study was conducted
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according to an article called “Elementary School Teachers’ Views on Game-based Learning as

a Teaching Method” (Ucus, 2015). The article says, “Game based learning (GBL) help students

improve problem-solving skills and make it possible for them to interpret their society, nature

and the world around them through experiences. Games provide information in a relevant

context or setting”.

Impact teaching According to Educational Connections Inc. (Hossfeld, 2015) regarding

high schoolers, “Game-based learning is a great way to keep students naturally engaged”. “How

to Roll Out Game-Based Learning—and Boost Engagement—in Your Classroom“ (Fradkin,

2018) says of their study regarding middle schoolers, “As the teachers implemented the games in

their classes, they communicated by email and phone about lesson strategies and student

reactions to games. This led to an increase in confidence and comfort in taking risks with their

lesson planning, allowing them to embrace games fully.” In regards to elementary school, the

article “Elementary School Teachers’ Views on Game-based Learning as a Teaching Method”

(Ucus, 2015) states, “It is obvious that interest in GBL for elementary education is growing.

Thus, helping teachers understand how to use these new pedagogies is not only important but

also crucial.”

Impact learning According to the three articles on game based learning mentioned in

this paper, the impact on learning for high schoolers, middle schoolers, and elementary schoolers

are positive. Educational Connections Inc. (Hossfeld, 2015) says, “Engagement in school tends

to drop rapidly starting in middle school and continuing through high school, so it’s really

important to find ways to keep students interested in what they’re learning.” The article also

does mention there seems to be more game based learning tools available for younger students

than for older students, and the gaming industry has an area of opportunity here. “How to Roll
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Out Game-Based Learning—and Boost Engagement—in Your Classroom“ (Fradkin, 2018) says

of their study on middle schoolers and game based learning that, “All teachers reported student

engagement in the games group was either high at 42% or very high at 58%. In the control

group, 58% of teachers reported average or low engagement.” “Elementary School Teachers’

Views on Game-based Learning as a Teaching Method” (Ucus, 2015) states, “Games help

students develop necessary knowledge, skills and values in order to be an active member of their

classroom and even in their society.”

How it works For highschool, middle school, and elementary school a variety of

software applications can be accessed from a variety of different electronic devices. The game

based learning tools work by keeping high schoolers engaged, as mentioned in Educational

Connections Inc. (Hossfeld, 2015). Game based learning also works for middle schoolers

because it keeps them enthusiastic about projects, as mentioned in “How to Roll Out Game-

Based Learning—and Boost Engagement—in Your Classroom“ (Fradkin, 2018). The article

from ScienceDirect (Ucus, 2015) says of elementary students, “When teachers choose

appropriate games related to their teaching goals and when they organize GBL process

effectively, permanent learning can be provided, courses can be found enjoyable and interesting

by learners.” (Gözütok, 2000).

Benefits for classroom The benefits of game based learning in the classroom is that it

keeps the kids more engaged and excited about learning, as outlined in these articles. High

schoolers stay more engaged according to Educational Connections Inc. (Hossfeld, 2015).

Regarding middle schoolers, “They shared enjoyment in playing many of the games, and most

students improved in their comprehension, recall, and ability to apply learning objectives to real-

world contexts.” according to the article in EdSurge (Fradkin, 2018). The article about
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elementary schoolers from ScienceDirect (Ucus, 2015) says, “Teachers explained that students

feel happy for being active in the game and games are suitable for all elementary school courses

as a teaching method.”

Technology 3

The third and final emerging technology we will take a look at in this report is

Collaboration Tools. According to the article on SlideShare’s website titled “10 Eye Opening

Stats About Collaboration You Need to Know”(ProofHub Follow, 2017), “About 75% of

employers rate teamwork and collaboration as “very important.” It also states that, “Businesses

with effective communication are 50% more likely to have lower employee turnover”, and “49%

of Millennials support social tools (online collaboration tool) for workplace collaboration”.

How it’s used in different grade levels Across all grade levels, “Many of our students

will work with people all over the world that they may never meet. Google has already

revolutionized how many of our teachers and students are working on a daily basis.” (Niehoff,

2018). EdSurge is a website that provides links to many different collaboration tools that can be

used for all grade levels ("Collaboration Tools - Teacher Needs - Product Reviews").

Impact teaching We have to show the students how to use collaboration tools by using

them ourselves. According to Getting Smart’s article “3 Ways To Model Collaboration and

Partnership in Schools and Classrooms”, “If this is the most desired skill, then we need to

explicitly teach it. We need to teach and model for our students how effective teams work and

how our collective work can improve through teaming. “(Niehoff, 2018).

Impact learning According to Getting Smart’s article “3 Ways To Model Collaboration

and Partnership in Schools and Classrooms”(Niehoff, 2018),“Our students desperately need to be


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shown that they can (and need to be taught how to) use these tools to learn, better the world and

ultimately partner with others.”

How it works The students work together with online collaboration tools to share their

works. According to Getting Smart’s article “3 Ways To Model Collaboration and Partnership

in Schools and Classrooms”(Niehoff, 2018), “Our students are expected to write, and rightly so.

They are also expected to digitally publish and share their work (although many classrooms are,

unfortunately, not quite there yet). This is another great opportunity to model 21st-century

skills.”

Benefits for classroom Using collaboration tools will help get our students ready for the

future of communication. According to Getting Smart’s article “3 Ways To Model Collaboration

and Partnership in Schools and Classrooms”(Niehoff, 2018), “Our students are entering a global

and digital economy that will demand they know how to devise and maximize their various

professional and personal learning networks.”

Conclusion

The three emerging technologies that we have reviewed are smartphones in the

classroom, game based learning, and collaboration tools.

According to the statistics and reports quoted above, smartphones are becoming

increasingly more used with each passing year by all age groups. High schools are embracing

and incorporating the technology more than junior high or elementary schools. While pros have

been outlined, there are also many cons for younger children.

Game based learning looks to be very popular across all grade levels according to the

research above. There was no negative feedback found regarding game based learning in the

classrooms in this research.


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Collaboration tools are becoming increasingly more popular across all grade levels as

cited above as well.

The research shows there is benefit to all of these tools, but smartphones may be more of

a benefit after junior high school when the kids are a more mature.
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References

Collaboration Tools - Teacher Needs - Product Reviews. (n.d.). Retrieved May 3, 2018,
from https://www.edsurge.com/product-reviews/teacher-needs/collaboration-tools

Fradkin, A. (2018, March 13). How to Roll Out Game-Based Learning-and Boost
Engagement-in Your Classroom - EdSurge News. Retrieved April 28, 2018, from
https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-04-03-how-to-roll-out-game-based-learning-and-
boost-engagement-in-your-classroom

Graham, E. (n.d.). Using Smartphones In The Classroom. National Education


Association. Retrieved April 21, 2018, from http://www.nea.org/tools/56274.htm

Hossfeld, S. (2015, June 27). Game-based Learning for High Schoolers. Retrieved April
28, 2018, from https://ectutoring.com/game-based-learning-high-schoolers

Niehoff, M. (2018, February 26). 3 Ways To Model Collaboration and Partnership in


Schools and Classrooms. Retrieved May 3, 2018, from
http://www.gettingsmart.com/2018/02/3-ways-to-model-collaboration-and-partnership-
in-schools-and-classrooms/

ProofHub Follow. (2017, February 22). 10 eye opening stats about collaboration you
need to know. Retrieved May 3, 2018, from https://www.slideshare.net/ProofHub/10-
eye-opening-stats-about-collaboration-you-need-to-know-72444878

Ruston, D. (n.d.). Smartphones aren't a smart choice in middle school. Retrieved April
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opinion-ruston/index.html

Sanders, J. (2015, April 27). ABOUT MARKET ANALYSIS GAME DEVELOPMENT


LEARNING RESEARCH CLASSROOM USE FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES Update
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St. George, D. (2017). Schools and cellphones: In elementary schools? At lunch?


Retrieved April 28, 2018, from
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schools-at-lunch/2017/11/13/1061064a-ba81-11e7-a908-
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Ucus, S., Dr. (2015, May 31). Elementary School Teachers' Views on Game-based
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https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877042815024763

US smartphone penetration by age group 2014-2020. (n.d.). Retrieved April 27, 2018,
from https://www.statista.com/statistics/805110/us-smartphone-users-penetration-by-
age-group/

ProofHub Follow. (2017, February 22). 10 eye opening stats about collaboration you
need to know. Retrieved May 3, 2018, from https://www.slideshare.net/ProofHub/10-
eye-opening-stats-about-collaboration-you-need-to-know-72444878