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Jasmine Davis

LBS 405
5E Lesson Plan with Arts Integration

NAME: Jasmine C Davis

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GRADE LEVEL (S): 3rd-5th Grade

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STANDARDS:
Engineering, Technology and the Application of Science
3-5 ETS-1 Engineering Design
● Physical Science - Energy
● Engineering, Technology and the Application of Science - Engineering Design

Performance Expectations
4-PS3-4​ Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to
another.
Assessment Boundary: Devices should be limited to those that convert motion energy to electric
energy or use stored energy to cause motion or produce light or sound.

4-PS3-2​ Make observations to provide evidence that energy can be transferred from place to place by
sound, light, heat, and electric currents.
Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include quantitative measurements of energy.

Science and Engineering Practices


SEP: Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions: ​Apply scientific ideas to solve design problems.

SEP: Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information: ​Obtain and combine information from books
and other reliable media to explain phenomena.

Disciplinary Core Ideas


ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions: Research on a problem should be carried out before beginning to
design a solution. Testing a solution involves investigating how well it performs under a range of likely
conditions.

PS3.A: Definitions of Energy: Energy can be moved from place to place by moving objects or through sound,
light, or electric currents.

Crosscutting Concepts
CC5.Energy and Matter: Energy can be transferred in various ways and between objects.
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LEARNING OUTCOME/ OBJECTIVES:
● Students will learn how a simple generator transforms mechanical energy, such as wind, into
electrical energy.
● Students will learn practical applications of this technology that have been designed to make life
better in developing countries.

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RESOURCES/MATERIALS:
Textbook: ​The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind​ By William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer

Per group of 4:
• Dynamo torch or LED crank flashlight (see Internet Resources)
• Small screwdriver
• Drawing paper
• Colored pencils
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CURRICULUM CONNECTION (Identify how this lesson fits in the larger unit of instruction):
Grade 4 standards ask students to “interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively
(e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on web pages) and explain
how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.”
This lesson is for grades 4–6 and concentrates on energy transformations, specifically the
transformation of mechanical energy from the wind into electricity and finally into light energy. The Boy Who
Harnessed the Wind provides an engaging real-world context for this abstract concept of energy
transformation.
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ENGAGEMENT
● Describe how the teacher will capture students’ interest.
Show students the cover of The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind and ask them to infer what they think
the book might be about from the title and the cover art. Then read the synopsis on the back cover, “The true
story of a boy whose great idea and perseverance lit up his home and inspired the world.” Read the first page
and then have students locate Malawi on a map of Africa. Next, read the story aloud, stopping before the end
matter. After reading, go back to page 24 where William says, “I have made electric wind” and elicit students’
preconceptions by asking how they think a windmill can make a bulb light up. Ask them to draw or write what
they think is inside of a windmill that makes this happen. Answers will vary based on students’ prior
experiences. You may also want to show students the eight-minute documentary about William on his website
so they can hear the story in his own words (see Internet Resources).
This picture book adaptation of the adult biography of the same title tells the true story of a boy who
turned junkyard scraps into a working windmill to bring electricity and water to his famine-stricken African
village. End matter contains an explanation of the science behind windmills.

● What kind of questions should the students ask themselves after the engagement?
1. What does William mean by electric wind? What is electric wind?
2. What inside the windmill causes the light bulb to light up?
3. What resources are available in Africa, that allows William to create this windmill?
4. How can I create something similar with the resources available to our class?

Grouping​: Whole Group Instruction


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Accommodations/Modifications for EL Student-Expanding Proficiency:
● Provide EL students with Visuals:​ Give students more time to analyze picture books or provide them
with their own copy.
● Find the Text in the EL’s Language: ​ Take time to have a copy of the text, or find unique vocabulary
that students will be able to relate to or make connections with.
● Provide Second Language Support:​ Allow students to work with ESL Specialist/Teacher/Aide or have
students partner or group up with a peer(s) in the classroom for second language support.

Accommodations/Modifications for Student with Auditory Processing Disorder:


● Allow Extra Time for Processing:​ Give students the opportunity to process the information provided
and repeat instruction or information multiple times.
● Speak slow and Clearly: ​Speak slowly and enunciate clearly. Pausing as you give instructions can also
help students process what you’re saying.
● Provide Visual Support:​ ​Provide students with their own copy of the text and create/provide visuals of
the story.
● Use Assistive Devices:​ Use assistive listening devices and speakers/microphone to increase teacher’s
voice to student.
● Adjust Proximity:​ Allow students to sit in best seat available for activity/instruction from teacher to
eliminate distractions and minimize sound barriers.
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EXPLORATION
● Describe what hands-on/minds-on activities students will be doing.
Provide each group of four students a simple hand powered generator, such as an LED crank flashlight
or a dynamo torch. Be sure to follow all of the safety guidelines included in the packaging. Allow students time
to explore the device. Ask them to record what happens to the light when they turn the crank faster and how
long the light continues to glow after they stop cranking. Students will discover that the faster they crank, the
brighter the light, and as soon as they stop cranking, the light goes out. Tell students that this device is similar
to the one that William used in his windmill, but instead of cranking it by hand, William used wind power.
Allow students to carefully disassemble the device with a small screwdriver, being sure to keep all of the parts
together so that it can be reassembled later.
● List “big idea” conceptual questions the teacher will use to encourage and/or focus students’
exploration.
As students look at all of the parts, ask them:
1. How is light created with this device?
2. What happens as you crank faster? Slower? Record results.
3. Where do you think the electricity that lit the bulb was being generated.

Grouping: ​Heterogeneous Grouping of 4 students per group (depending on amount of hand generators
available, group sizing may vary).

Accommodations/Modifications for EL Student-Expanding Proficiency:


● Allow Extra Time for Processing:​ Give students the opportunity to process the information provided
and repeat instruction or information multiple times.
● Provide students with examples/modeling:​ Personally work with students to demonstrate what
should be done during activity.
● Hands on Scaffolding:​ Demonstrate with students as a group, then allow them to work in collaborative
groups with peers.
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● Provide Second Language Support:​ Allow students to work with ESL Specialist/Teacher/Aide or have
students partner or group up with a peer(s) in the classroom for second language support.

Accommodations/Modifications for Student with Auditory Processing Disorder:


● Allow Extra Time for Processing:​ Give students the opportunity to process the information provided
and repeat instruction or information multiple times.
● Provide students with examples/modeling:​ Personally work with students to demonstrate what
should be done during activity.
● Hands on Scaffolding:​ Demonstrate with students as a group, then allow them to work in collaborative
groups with peers.
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EXPLANATION

● Student explanations should precede introduction of terms or explanations by the teacher. What
questions or techniques will the teacher use to help students connect their exploration to the concept
under examination?
● List higher order thinking questions, which teachers will use to solicit ​student​ explanations and help
them to justify their explanations.

Show students the diagram of William’s windmill (see Internet Resources). Have them compare the
parts of their LED crank flashlight or dynamo torch to the parts of William’s windmill (CC ELA Connection:
Reading Informational Text Standards, Integration of Knowledge and Ideas). Students will see that the crank is
similar to the blades of the windmill, the gears are similar to the bicycle tire and bicycle chain ring, the wires
are similar to the copper wire, and the small generator is similar to the bicycle dynamo that William used.
Read the end matter section of the book aloud to students and have them listen for what is inside of a
generator that causes electric current to flow when it is cranked. Students will learn that the generator
William used, just like the one they have been using, contains magnets and a coil of wire.
Explain that in the 1800s, a scientist named Michael Faraday discovered a remarkable relationship
between magnetism and electricity. He figured out that by passing a magnet through loops of wire or moving
a coil of wire against a magnet, he could make an electric current flow through the wire. This is called
electromagnetic induction and is the basis for all generators, even the ones that send power to our schools
and homes. In the dynamo torch, two magnets are inside walls of the generator casing and a wire is coiled
around the center axle. When the axle is turned (by cranking it), the coil turns between the magnets and an
electric current is produced that is strong enough to light up the LED lamp. (See Internet Resources for a video
of a simple generator being constructed.)
Draw a diagram that shows the energy transformations that take place when the Dynamo torch is
used: mechanical energy (crank) à electrical energy (generator) à light energy (bulb). Then ask students:
● Where the energy came from to allow them to turn the crank (from the food they ate).
● Where the energy stored in food comes from (animals and/ or plants).
● Where that energy originally comes from (the Sun).
Add those energy transformations to the diagram. Tell students that almost all energy on Earth can be
traced back to the Sun.

Grouping: ​Whole Group Instruction

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Accommodations/Modifications for EL Student-Expanding Proficiency:
● Provide EL students with Visuals:​ Give students more time to analyze picture books or provide them
with their own copy.
● Find the Text in the EL’s Language: ​ Take time to have a copy of the text and questions in second
language, or find unique vocabulary that students will be able to relate to or make connections with.
● Provide Second Language Support:​ Allow students to work with ESL Specialist/Teacher/Aide or have
students partner or group up with a peer(s) in the classroom for second language support.

Accommodations/Modifications for Student with Auditory Processing Disorder:


● Allow Extra Time for Processing:​ Give students the opportunity to process the information provided
and repeat instruction or information multiple times.
● Speak slow and Clearly: ​Speak slowly and enunciate clearly. Pausing as you give instructions can also
help students process what you’re saying.
● Provide Visual Support:​ ​Provide students with their own copy of the text and create/provide visuals of
the story.
● Use Assistive Devices:​ Use assistive listening devices and speakers/microphone to increase teacher’s
voice to student.
● Adjust Proximity:​ Allow students to sit in best seat available for activity/instruction from teacher to
eliminate distractions and minimize sound barriers.
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ELABORATION
● Describe how students will develop a more sophisticated understanding of the concept.

Ask students to reassemble their dynamo torch and test it. Have a contest to see who can keep their
light bulb lit for the longest amount of time. Students will realize very quickly that cranking a device by hand
can be very tiring and difficult to sustain. Challenge students to design some other way for the light bulb to
remain lit with less effort. In William’s case, he used the wind to turn the axle inside the generator. What else
could be used?
Have students share their ideas to the class and if time and materials allow, have them build them.
Students can present information in small group and collaborate to make the best way to light the bulb. Some
ideas may be as simple as taking turns cranking or a longer arm for the crank, or as complex as pumping
bicycle pedals to turn the crank. Tell students that a group of female students from Harvard University
designed a way to create and store electrical energy that is also fun. Show students some photos and video of
the soccket, a soccer ball that can power a light (see Internet Resources). It uses the same scientific principle
as the generator they have been using. A magnet moves back and forth in a coil of wire as the ball is being
kicked around. This produces electric current, which is stored in a battery inside the ball. After playing with the
ball for 15 minutes, a small lamp can be plugged into it and produce light for three hours. This new invention is
bringing electricity into places that have not had it before.

● What vocabulary will be introduced and how will it connect to students’ observations?
The following is a list of terms students will encounter during this activity:
o Generate Energy Current
o Stability Sustainable Power (Source)
o Dynamo Electric Work
o Heat Energy (Sun) Mechanical Energy (Wind) Electrical Energy (Current)
Students will have to make connections, in relation to the text and activity, with the vocabulary after
defining terms.
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● How is this knowledge applied in our daily lives?


Students will be able to explain multiple aspects of energy and electricity. For example, the use of
generators and windmills to create electrical currents/electricity. Students will be able to identify what
sustainable energy looks like in order to create a stable current/flow of energy to light a power source.

Grouping: ​Heterogeneous Grouping From Earlier in Activity

Accommodations/Modifications for EL Student-Expanding Proficiency:


● Allow Extra Time for Processing:​ Give students the opportunity to process the information provided
and repeat instruction or information multiple times.
● Provide students with examples/modeling:​ Personally work with students to demonstrate what
should be done during activity.
● Hands on Scaffolding:​ Demonstrate with students as a group, then allow them to work in collaborative
groups with peers.
● Provide Second Language Support:​ Allow students to work with ESL Specialist/Teacher/Aide or have
students partner or group up with a peer(s) in the classroom for second language support.
● Alternative Forms of Production: ​ Provide students with optionals form of production, like drawing or
creating/building a diagram.

Accommodations/Modifications for Student with Auditory Processing Disorder:


● Allow Extra Time for Processing:​ Give students the opportunity to process the information provided
and repeat instruction or information multiple times.
● Provide students with examples/modeling:​ Personally work with students to demonstrate what
should be done during activity.
● Hands on Scaffolding:​ Demonstrate with students as a group, then allow them to work in collaborative
groups with peers.
● Use Assistive Devices:​ Use assistive listening devices and speakers/microphone to increase teacher’s
voice to student.

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EVALUATION
● How will students demonstrate that they have achieved the lesson objective? This should be
embedded throughout the lesson as well as at the end of the lesson

Have students create a diagram that shows the energy transformations in William’s windmill and write
a paragraph explaining what is causing those transformations to take place. They should include heat energy
(Sun) causing mechanical energy (wind) being transformed to electrical energy (current) that is then
transformed into light energy (bulb).

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Sources:
http://ngss.nsta.org/Resource.aspx?ResourceID=253

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VAPA INTEGRATION & COMMENTARY (5 points)

VAPA Integration in this lesson supports learning of all academic subjects. In this activity, students are

able to use visual arts to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of the electrical energy. The use of

drawing diagrams, building models, viewing the text and related pictures, and using hands on devices/tools to

discover the root of electrical energy allow students multiple avenues for engagement and learning. Students

engage in performing arts aspects of the VAPA Framework, by presenting ideas and models to class and small

groups. Students work collaboratively to build the best device. There are developmental skills that allow

students to be able to rationalize and work together. Students reach multiple benchmarks of development by

working together and creating healthy relationships in the classroom with their peers and teacher. Students

are able to not only able to build their knowledge through traditional academic methods but also build on

social and personal attributes.

By incorporating the use of the VAPA Framework, students are able to foster engagement in school

and are motivation to learn. When presenting this activity to my class, I found students were more likely to

engage and collaborate with each other if they were going to be presenting to the class. They became

competitive, but engaged in some of the best collaborative groups in order to create the best hand generator.

Students debated within groups as they shared their ideas and were able to compromise and work together,

incorporating multiple students’ ideas. Students are able to understand that the skills they gain from

collaboration and communication is a building block or foundational tool necessary for the future. We explain

to our students that soon, they will be navigating and understanding the diversity of the world needed for

success in college and career. This is all built through their ability to demonstrate the use of visual art and

performing arts (public speaking and deliberative skills).

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Lesson Plan Rationale Assignment* ​(25 points)

Designing Learning Activities​: I choose this activity because I had recently read this book to my 3rd

grade class. I was fascinated to see the extent my students went to ask questions about how William was able

to generate electricity from the vague resources he had available. I did a search and found this lesson from a

STEAM teaching website. I incorporated the questions my students were asking, but kept most of the lesson

plan model. Before I went to present this lesson to my students, I wanted to make sure we were able to get

all the resources/materials listed in this activity guide. I overheard multiple groups of students talking and

relating to the text days after we had read it and realized I needed to teach a science lesson for course work.

So, I asked my students, “Wouldn’t it be cool if we could create electricity like William? How many of you

would want to do something like that?” And the response was phenomenal. My students were engaged days

before the activity, asking questions like, “how did he [William] get electricity out of a windmill?” and “Can’t

he get the same energy out of the sun?”. (I would be very interested in doing a energy measurement

comparison on wind energy and solar energy, but the time did not permit to do so. I think those question calls

for another lesson/activity in the future). When we brought the book out again, as a review, they knew we

were going to do something hands on. I wanted to make sure I found an activity to harness the full breadth of

information provided in the text. In terms of incorporating new vocabulary and making connections to

multiple aspects of the state standards. By working hands on and collaboratively all of my students wanted to

actively participate for days.

Designing Instructional Strategies​: I chose to use multiple instructional strategies like: explaining,

modeling, scaffolding, asking questions to guide discussion and providing instructions to guide an activity. My

master teacher notified me that the activity was a higher standard, because we are a 3rd grade class, but the

students were able to anything they put their minds to do. We started with whole group instruction and asked

questions as a group. We allowed students to ask their own questions and we wrote them out on the board

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for the class to see. These questions were going to be formed into their driving questions throughout the

activity. The questions outline in the lesson plan, were all questions students drafted themselves and placed

on the board. Throughout the activity, we used modeling to show students our expectations. My master

teacher has great classroom management, so when I spoke in front of the class the students were very

attentive and strived to ask questions even during the modeling. Throughout the activity we did use

scaffolding, for example, when students had to go and actually build the devices, we brought in our models

and helped the students in their groups. By providing so much support throughout the activity, I believe

students were able to fully engage and participate.

Academic Rigor: ​Students engaged in their own inquiry process before, during and after the activity.

When we came to a new section of the lesson, like the exploration and explanation section, students asked

questions to prompt the next portion of the activity. The one aspect that amazed me was how much

information was expelled by the class. For example, the student that asked, “Can’t William get the same

energy out of the sun?” had a phenomenal understanding of solar energy. He took charge in his group asking

higher level questions, applying his knowledge and providing information to his group. The lesson plan is

scaffolded in a way in such that the students automatically ask questions to prompt their thinking to go

further. By asking questions whole group, students built a foundation of the types of questions that were

higher level. So when they began the activities, their questions prompted them to question higher content.

Language Demands: ​I did not personally have any students in my class that would be classified as a ESL

or English Learners. However, the information I provided as adaptations and accommodations for ELs and ESLs

should be beneficial. There is a set of vocabulary that is introduced to students during this lesson. It is

important to be mindful and take time to address the vocabulary throughout the activity. That means listening

for its use in the correct way. The text was a simple read with very well drawn illustrations to serve as a

support. The text is read by the teacher and the materials provided throughout the lesson are presented in

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whole group and small group instruction. Students with language demands will have additional support so

they can be in the least restrictive environment possible. We want to make sure students have a true

understanding of what is being asked of them. All students, including ELs, should be able to participate,

engage, and execute an understanding through the assessment at the end of the activity. The activity is

shaped in way that allows for accommodations to be made at any grade/speech level.

Organization of Student Work: ​I decided whole group instruction was best to begin with, to set a

foundation of expectations at the beginning of the activity. We decided small groups was the furthest extent

to which this lesson needed to be broken down. Small groups of 3-4 students allowed for the perfect setting in

the class for students to work together, also students are traditionally working in their small groups of 3-4. The

assessment portion is the only portion that includes an individual aspect, in which student are displaying their

knowledge in a written piece. Each aspect of grouping supports multiple aspects of their students’ learning. In

whole group, students are allowed to hear others’ opinions and share their views and ideas. In small group, a

more intimate setting, students are able to discuss and collaborate. This builds on their personal development

also. Lastly, the individual grouping, allows the teacher to see how the student evaluates their information and

demonstrates their understanding in a clear and concise paragraph.

Student Assets and Needs: ​Students are able to incorporate their funds of knowledge in this activity,

prior experiences and interests. This lesson shows a young boy who grew to provide assistance and support

for his village. The story allowed students to share experiences about their lives and make connections to

William. This story brought on socioeconomic and cultural awareness in the classroom. Students asked

questions about Africa and William’s village. They were genuinely intrigued and inspired. Because this lesson

allows students to not only ask questions, but to share about themselves at the beginning, students really

exemplified their knowledge throughout the lesson. This lesson peaks an interest of future engineers,

scientist, and humanitarians.

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Socio-Emotional Development Considerations’: ​The selection of ​The Boy who Harnessed the Wind​, set

the stage for a lot of questions. I had a lot of emotions from my students. A few “Awww” moments and a lot

of “Wow” moments. Students engaged in a new set of emotions I had not seen before. Not only did the story

elicit emotional response but the activity itself created some emotions. I did have one student who became

frustrated, because he felt like his group was leaving him behind. He would ask questions but no one

answered. I had this student write down his questions, so he wouldn’t forget, and he was able to ask them

later to the entire class. This was that young man who kept asking about solar energy. He lit up when he

shared with the class and we also found out his family uses solar panels at home. He shared a piece of himself

and the entire class became engaged, talking about how they see solar panels when they are driving with their

parents. By allowing the students to work in groups, they had to grow together. They had to listen to each

other and work with each other. One thing not mention in the lesson plan is the time limits per section.

Students were given a set amount of time to work on each section. They found they really had to work

together to get work done. I had many students verbally express their happiness and excitement as we were

coming to a close. And there were also emotions in such that working in groups made a few shy students feel

welcomed and were ready to participate. Working in groups allowed students to socialize with one another

and learn about each other as learners and peers.

Resources, Materials, Tools, and/or Educational Technology to Support Learning: ​The resources

provided were from my master teacher and the lesson plan guide. Some of the strategies I chose was

specifically chosen due to the lack of resources available. For example, we did not have a class set of the story

so whole group reading was the best option for the engagement section. The other sources and materials

were all provided on a group basis. I decided first students should work collaboratively, but each one also

needed their own crank flashlight to disassemble. So those resources are necessary for separate purchase by

the school/district funds. In this case, our teacher went to purchase the necessary tools needed.

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