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OPERATOR'S MANUAL

MT SERIES TRUCKS EQUIPPED


WITH AC DRIVE SYSTEMS
AND HIGH PRODUCTIVITY CAB

MARCH 2006
OPERATOR’S MANUAL

MT SERIES TRUCKS EQUIPPED


WITH AC DRIVE SYSTEMS
AND HIGH PRODUCTIVITY CAB

3501 S. FM Hwy 1417, Denison, TX 75020-8904


PHONE: (903) 337-4100
TELEFAX: SALES/SERVICE (903) 337-4140
http://www.terex.com

I
INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this manual is to provide a safe, logical sequence of


events for inspecting and operating a TEREX Unit Rig MT Series rear
dump truck equipped with an AC drive system and the TEREX Unit Rig
High Productivity Cab. For the convenience of the operators, informa-
tion is provided for both standard and optionally equipped trucks. This
information can be disregarded if not applicable.

Before attempting to operate the truck, personnel must become familiar


with systems and component operation. They must be trained in the
proper operation of the truck and instructed on all guidelines and regula-
tions in force in the area of the mine. Good safe practices should be
followed in a common sense way.

The drawings in this manual do not necessarily reflect all vehicle con-
figurations.

The information in this manual does not attempt to cover all details or
variations in equipment nor to provide for every possible contingency to
be met in connection with the inspection and safe operation of a truck.

If there is any information in this manual that is not clear or that you
believe needs to be addressed, please feel free to contact your local
TEREX Unit Rig representative at any time or contact the company di-
rectly at the address on the back cover.

Safety and informational highlights used in this manual include:

SAFETY ALERT SYMBOL

The safety alert symbol is used to alert you to potential personal injury
hazards. Obey all safety messages that follow this symbol to avoid pos-
sible injury or death.

HAZARD CLASSSIFICATION

The multi-tier hazard classification system is used to communicate po-


tential personal injury hazards. The following signal words used with the
safety alert symbol indicate a specific level of severity of the potential
hazard. Signal words used without the safety alert symbol relate to prop-
erty damage and protection only. All are used as attention-getting de-
II
vices throughout this manual as well as on decals and labels to assist in
potential hazard recognition and prevention.

DANGER indicates an imminently hazardous situation which, if not


avoided, will result in death or serious injury.

WARNING indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not


avoided, could result in death or serious injury.

CAUTION indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided,


may result in minor or moderate injury.

CAUTION used without the safety alert symbols indicates a potential


hazardous situation which, if not avoided, may result in property dam-
age.

IMPORTANT and NOTE indicate operations, conditions, or specific


information of sufficient importance to call for additional specific instruc-
tions or information.

SAFE POSITION DEFINITION

A SAFE POSITION is defined as:

1. The truck front or rear wheels must be driven into a ditch, or strad-
dling a berm.
Or
2. The truck must be driven against a berm or a bank.
Or
3. Chocks must be placed in both front and behind the wheels, and must
be sufficient to hold the truck on the grade it is parked.

The truck will be in a SAFE POSITION if these practices are followed,


and the truck will not move if the brakes are released.

III
TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION PAGE

1. DESCRIPTION 1
2. SAFETY 3
3. INDICATORS, GAUGES & CONTROLS 19
4. PRE-OPERATIONAL INSPECTION 43
5. ENGINE STARTING CHECKS 51
6. OPERATION 54

IV
SECTION 1
DESCRIPTION

The TEREX Unit Rig MT Series is a heavy-duty, large-capacity haulage


truck specifically designed for the open pit mining industry. The large
payloads that can be carried make this an efficient means of transporting
material from one point to another in a mine or similar off-highway haulage
operation.

Propulsion for the truck is supplied by a “diesel-electric” power train. The


operating principal is to supply a regulated source of voltage and current
to the wheelmotors, which convert this energy into a mechanical form
through a self contained traction motor and planetary gear drive system
which is directly mounted to the rear dual tire assemblies.

In the “diesel-electric” mode, an alternator, directly coupled to a turbo-


charged diesel engine, supplies the basic electrical energy. A primarily
solid state control system regulates the power output based on a number
of operating factors (including such items as vehicle and engine speed,
demand requirements, and engine power available).

In normal operation, the truck’s speed on downgrades and slowing for


normal stopping is controlled by an electrical dynamic retarding system.
When this system is activated, the wheelmotors function as generators
and convert truck’s kinetic energy (force keeping the truck moving) into
electrical energy. This electrical energy is dissipated as heat through a
series of air-cooled resistors. For further explanation of the dynamic
retarding system, refer to Section 6 - Operation of this manual.

NOTE: The amount of retarding effort available is directly related to the


speed of the truck. This amount remains at a maximum or constant level
from speeds of 1 to 15 mph (2 to 24 km/hr). Above this speed the amount
of retarding effort available reduces as the speed continues to increase.
However, the amount of dynamic retarding required to control the truck
will continue to increase throughout the entire operating range. This creates
a range or limits within which the truck should be operated that will vary
with truck load, speed, electrical propulsion system, and the grade involved.
Operation at speeds in excess of these limits will mean that sufficient
retarding effort may not be available to control the truck without the
assistance of the friction brakes. Information on how to determine this
safe operating range is contained in Section 6 - Operation of this manual,
but always check with the appropriate mine personnel for these speeds in
particular areas of your mine.

1
When needed in emergencies (at any speed) and short term parking
(operator remains in cab with engine running), the friction brake system is
used. This system functions in a manner similar to automotive brakes
and allows the vehicle to be brought to a controlled, complete stop. These
brakes are not intended for use in normal operation at high speeds - except
in emergencies. Use at high speeds may result in the generation of excess
heat which will reduce the effectiveness of the brakes (should they be
required in an emergency) and increased wear on the system’s
components.

A separate mechanical parking brake system is provided for long term


parking (operator leaves cab or the engine is not running). This system
mechanically locks the rear brakes and must be applied only when the
truck is completely stopped. It is strongly recommended and essential to
the safety of the operator and the equipment that the truck is parked in a
SAFE POSITION and the Park Brake is applied prior to the operator leaving
the cab.

The truck is suspended at all tire locations by struts that use a combination
of light weight oil and nitrogen gas. Each of the suspension assemblies
contains integral rebound provisions to dampen movement resulting from
the suspensions absorbing a shock.

Many of the controls on the truck are electrically, hydraulically or in some


cases pneumatically operated or assisted. Electrical energy is provided
by a 24 volt battery system, with the charge maintained by a separate
engine mounted battery charging alternator. Pressurized fluid for the
hydraulic system is obtained from triple-mounted pumps driven directly
from the main traction alternator/generator. Detailed descriptions and
explanations of the operation are available in the Mechanical Maintenance
manuals for the specific trucks.

The operator’s control cab is equipped with the controls and indicators
necessary to provide efficient, reliable operation of the vehicle. The
simplicity of the diesel-electric system operation reduced the main controls
to a steering wheel, throttle or accelerator pedal, dynamic retarding pedal,
brake pedal, shifter, (forward, neutral, and reverse), and dump control lever.
The function of each indicator, gauge, and control in the cab is discussed
in detail in Section 3 - Indicators, Gauges and Controls of this manual.

2
SECTION 2
SAFETY

GENERAL

Safety should be the primary concern of the operator. The operator should
always exercise caution and good judgment to avoid injury and damage
to equipment. The operator should become familiar with all safety informa-
tion.

There are a number of hazard decals on each truck identifying areas of


potential hazards. If any of these decals are missing, they should be
replaced immediately. Keep personnel safety in mind at all time. Use a
mild soap and water to clean the signs. Do not “power wash” directly or
use solvent based cleaners as this may damage the signs or adhesive.
Refer to Figure 1 for typical location and identification.

NOTE: Exact wording and location may vary between models and equip-
ment supplied. If there is any doubt as to its meaning, contact the appro-
priate mine personnel or your local TEREX Unit Rig representative.

FIGURE 1 - HAZARD DECALS (A83678, SHEET 1 OF 5)


3
FIGURE 1 - HAZARD DECALS (A83678, SHEET 2 OF 5)
4
FIGURE 1 - HAZARD DECALS (A83678, SHEET 3 OF 5)
5
FIGURE 1 - HAZARD DECALS (A83678, SHEET 4 OF 5)
6
FIGURE 1 - HAZARD DECALS (A83678, SHEET 5 OF 5)
7
It is important that all operators have read and understand the contents of
this operator’s manual before they begin operation of the truck. If ques-
tions remain, they should be discussed with the appropriate mine person-
nel and/or TEREX Unit Rig representative.

Item 1

Handrails are provided to assist in improving the ascending and descend-


ing of the access ladders. Always use the rails for support whenever
using the ladder to reduce the potential of falling.

Item 2 not used.

Item 3

The electrical propulsion system utilizes high voltage and current levels to
efficiently transmit power to the electric wheelmotors. Extreme care should
be exercised when working in the designated areas, particularly if the
engine is operating.

8
Item 4

The cooling system is of automotive type design and operates under pres-
sure when hot. The radiator cap and related controlling assemblies are
designed to regulate and maintain this pressure. Extra care must be
taken when loosening or removing the cap to prevent the sudden release
of pressure and escape of fluid. This release could injure personnel through
contact with the cap or heated fluids. Proper procedures for removal are
included in this manual.

Item 5

The engine radiator fan assembly is operating much of the time the en-
gine is operating. On most trucks (equipped with a clutching type fan
assembly), the fan many rotate at various speeds depending upon ambi-
ent and engine temperature, load, etc. Extra care must be taken when
working in this area to prevent the engine from being started and to avoid
contact with the moving fan parts when the engine is operating.

Item 6

As the truck’s steering wheel is turned, the front tire assemblies are caused
to move. The movement causes the clearance between the frame and the
tire to increase or decrease. Anyone in this area during this steering
movement (such as in a shop environment) may be caught and injured. It
is imperative that all personnel and equipment be kept from this area
when the truck is being steered.
9
Item 7

The dump body must be secured by safety cable(s) or block whenever


raised to access components. Never work on or near a truck when the
dump body is raised if not so secured.

Item 8

The pressurized air in the tire could be released with explosive force if the
rim or tire is improperly secured. Always completely deflate all tires prior
to loosening any lug nuts. Also, always install and secure all tire and rim
assemblies before re-installing.

Item 9

The accumulators are precharged with dry nitrogen, an inert, non-explo-


sive gas. This precharge pressure may be released with explosive force if
not totally exhausted from the accumulator prior to beginning component
disassembly. It must be released prior to beginning any such servicing.
For detailed information refer to the information in the appropriate TEREX
Unit Rig Mechanical Maintenance Manual.

Also, the use of other gases (such as oxygen) may create an explosive
condition. Use dry nitrogen only.

10
Item 10
The nitrogen/oil suspension components are precharged with dry nitro-
gen, an inert, non-explosive gas. This precharge pressure may be re-
leased with explosive force if not totally exhausted from the suspension
prior to beginning component disassembly. It must be released prior to
beginning any such servicing. For detailed information refer to the infor-
mation in the appropriate TEREX Unit Rig Mechanical Maintenance Manual.

Also, the use of other gases (such as oxygen) may create an explosive
condition. Use dry nitrogen only.

Item 11

The accumulators are precharged with dry nitrogen, an inert, non-explo-


sive gas. This precharge pressure may be released with explosive force if
not totally exhausted from the accumulator prior to beginning component
disassembly. It must be released prior to beginning any such servicing.
For detailed information refer to the information in the appropriate TEREX
Unit Rig Mechanical Maintenance Manual.

Also, the use of other gases (such as oxygen) may create an explosive
condition. Use dry nitrogen only.

Item 12

The accumulators are charged to a high pressure during operation and


may maintain this pressure even after the truck is parked and the engine
stopped. Malfunction of the system could release this pressurized oil,
injuring personnel and contaminating equipment. Refer to the information
in the appropriate TEREX Unit Rig Mechanical Maintenance Manual for
correct procedures.
11
Item 13

The accumulators are charged to a high pressure during operation and


may maintain this pressure even after the truck is parked and the engine
stopped. Malfunction of the system could release this pressurized oil,
injuring personnel and contaminating equipment. Refer to the information
in the appropriate TEREX Unit Rig Mechanical Maintenance Manual for
correct procedures.

Item 14

The accumulators are precharged with dry nitrogen, an inert, non-explo-


sive gas. This precharge pressure may be released with explosive force if
not totally exhausted from the accumulator prior to beginning component
disassembly. It must be released prior to beginning any such servicing.
For detailed information refer to the appropriate information in the appro-
priate TEREX Unit Rig Mechanical Maintenance Manual.

Also, the use of other gases (such as oxygen) may create an explosive
condition. Use dry nitrogen only.

Item 15

The driveshaft shield serves several functions:

1. To prevent individuals working near the shaft (as during maintenance or


testing) from coming into contact with the rotating shaft.
2. Protect the driveshaft from contact with foreign objects.
3. Protect surrounding equipment from damage if the driveshaft malfunc-
tions.

Never start or operate the truck without this important shield in place.
12
Item 16

The accumulators are precharged with dry nitrogen, an inert, non-explo-


sive gas. This precharge pressure may be released with explosive force if
not totally exhausted from the accumulator prior to beginning component
disassembly. It must be released prior to beginning any such servicing.
For detailed information refer to the appropriate information in the appro-
priated TEREX Unit Rig Mechanical Maintenance Manual.

Also, the use of other gases (such as oxygen) may create an explosive
condition. Use dry nitrogen only.

Item 17

The shunts are electrical devices used in the high voltage and current
electrical system to assist in the measuring and proper monitoring of the
operation of the truck’s propulsion and retarding systems. During some
testing, a shunt is moved between insulators to assist in this testing. To
properly allow the wires and the shunt to conduct the high currents and
voltages, good tight connections are essential.

Item 18

On trucks equipped with the dual solenoid latching park brake valve, power
is required to shift the valve to and from the detented Apply and Release
positions. Moving the battery isolation switch to the Off position before
applying the park brakes (releasing the pressure holding the calipers re-
leased) removes this power and prevents the application of the park brake
system. Without this mechanically applied hydraulically released sys-
tem, loss of pressure in the other friction brake systems on the truck
(through manual release or internal bypassing, particularly when the en-
13
gine is off) removes or releases any brake securing the truck. It is then
free to roll.

This re-emphasizes the importance of placing the truck in a SAFE POSI-


TION so that it cannot move, even if all brake systems are released, prior
to performing any work on the truck, even as elementary as switching off
the electrical power with the Battery Isolation Switch. The additional se-
curing of the truck with the park brake system applied prior to switching
the Battery Isolation Switch Off, serves to increase the safety of the situ-
ation.

Items 19 through 25 not used.

Item 26

Item 27

Item 28

A battery disconnect or isolation system has been incorporated that iso-


lates the truck’s 24 and 72 Volt electrical systems by interrupting the
battery ground circuits. The “TX” terminals are common junction points of
battery grounds. Connection of other circuits (especially if they are
grounds) may adversely affect the operation of the isolation system and
leave circuits closed or potentially energized. The different decals reflect
the different wiring configurations in use.

14
FRONT
"FLOAT"
OF CAB

ENSURE HOIST
LEVER IS ALWAYS
IN "FLOAT " WHEN
NOT IN USE.

Item 29 68231G

The dump system is designed so that the dump control valve should be in
the “Float” position at all times the dump body is not raised. In this
configuration, the flow from the dump pump(s) and the dump cylinders is
routed directly back to the hydraulic reservoir. This reduces system cir-
culating pressures and also prevents the cylinders and mounts from car-
rying any of the load, except when actually dumping. On trucks equipped
with hydraulic oil cooler assemblies, the oil is directed through the cooler
only when the dump control pilot valve is in the “Float” position.

Item 30

The large red Capacitor Charged (Indicator) Lights (CCL) in and on the
electrical system control cabinet on trucks equipped with GE AC drive
systems, is lighted whenever there is high voltage in the truck’ propulsion
or dynamic retarding system. The indicator lights when there is 50 Vdc or
more in the DC Link portion of the system.

DO NOT open the doors or touch any terminals or components when


either of the indicators is lighted. Wait until the indicators turn off and then
check with a meter to ensure that no voltage remains in the circuit.
15
WEARING APPAREL

It is recommended that all operators wear appropriate safety hard hat,


safety glasses, and approved safety shoes when operating or servicing
the truck. Always follow the specific requirements of the mine.

SEAT BELT

Fasten seat belts before putting the truck in motion. This is true for both
the operator and anyone riding in the observer’s seat.

OPERATING AREA FAMILIARIZATION

Be familiar with the area in which the truck is to be operated. Be aware of


any road construction or hazards that may be present.

Be observant of the entire situation. Note the location of power cables


and “bridges” over or under them, the position of the shovel or other load-
ing equipment, and other details of importance.

Never drive over unprotected electrical power cables or raise the


body in the vicinity of overhead power cables.

Be familiar with and understand the signalman’s hand signals and instruc-
tions when operating the truck.

Be familiar with and understand the precautions and regulations at all


locations. Always follow all safety guidelines and operating rules of the
mine.

VISIBILITY

Good visibility is important to safe truck operation. Before the truck is


placed into service, clean the windshield, mirrors and headlights, and check
the windshield wipers for proper operation.

16
TRUCK SPEED

The safe speed at which the truck should be driven is determined by the
road and weather conditions, in addition to the truck load. Under adverse
weather conditions, exercise extreme care and drive at reduced speeds.
Observe speed limits posted or listed by the mine for particular areas.

A general rule is to never approach a downgrade at a speed in excess of


15 mph (24 km/hr). Always apply the Dynamic Retarding pedal prior to
reaching the crest of the hill and use it to control the truck’s speed while
descending. Maintain a safe speed that does not require the use of all
available dynamic retarding capabilities. This will provide a margin of
safety for emergencies.

PARKING

There are two basic modes of parking the truck; short-term (operator re-
mains in the truck cab) and long-term (operator leaves the truck unat-
tended).

Short-term parking involves using the truck’s friction brake system to pre-
vent the truck from moving. In the event of an equipment malfunction, the
operator can still control the truck, since he remains in the cab with the
engine running.

Long-term parking, however, involves much more than this. Since the
truck will be left unattended, it should be parked in a SAFE POSITION -
one in which it cannot be moved, even if the truck’s brakes are released.
This involves using chocks, ditches, or berms - anything that will prevent
the accidental movement of the truck, and applying the Park Brakes.

Refer to Section 6 - Operation for detailed instructions for both types of


parking.

LOCKOUT AND TAGOUT PROCEDURES

Lockout and tagout procedures are intended to positively isolate compo-


nents and systems from their sources of energy to prevent unwanted start-
ing, movement, or operation. Operating procedure and regulation vary
due to government or local regulations, mine practices and standards,
etc.

It is important always be on the alert for these provisions before attempt-


ing to start, move, or work on any truck to prevent accident or damage.
They must never be ignored.
17
More detailed information is provided in the appropriate service and main-
tenance publications.

FIGURE 2 - TYPICAL DANGER AREA FOR TIRE EXPLOSION

There is danger of tire explosion due to fire/excessive heat in the


wheel/tire area.

Whenever smell of burning rubber or excessively hot brakes is


detected on the truck, there could be a distinct possibility of the
danger of a tire explosion. It could also occur when fire on the
truck reaches the tire and wheel area. Under such conditions DO
NOT APPROACH THE TRUCK OR ENTER THE DANGER AREA (See
Figure 2). Move the truck to a remote area only if it can be done
without endangering the operator or other personnel in the area.

Stay at least 500 feet (150 meters) away from the tread area and
1500 feet (460 meters) from the tire sidewall. If it is absolutely nec-
essary to reach the suspect tire, approach from the front or the
back of the truck and use a large bulldozer blade as shield in front.
If there is evidence of brake fire or smell of burning rubber, do not
go near the truck. Fight these fires from a distant remote location.
Do not rush to the truck with hand-held fire extinguisher in an effort
to control the blaze. Allow at least eight hours for the tire to cool
before approaching the truck.

18
SECTION 3
INDICATORS, GAUGES AND CONTROLS

TEREX Unit Rig trucks are equipped with indicators, gauges, and controls
to permit safe operation and enable the driver to monitor the condition of
the truck systems.

NOTE: Both standard and optional equipment is shown. Disregard those


items not applicable.

Before operating the truck, operators should be able to identify each indi-
cator, gauge, and control, and understand its function.

NOTE: Items are listed in the most common location, typical on current
products. Some items may vary in location, depending on the vehicle and
its particular configuration.

The warning indicators light when a condition exists that may result in a
serious problem affecting truck operation. If any of the indicator lights
come on which are listed as critical enough to warrant doing so, stop the
truck immediately and park in a SAFE POSITION. Get help. Before
attempting to move the truck, investigate the cause of the warning indica-
tion and correct. The engine should be shut-down (or operated as in-
structed by the engine manufacturer).

NOTE: In these trucks, the following symbols are used to indicate basic
operating conditions:

On Slower

Off Faster

19
FIGURE 1 - TYPICAL CAB LAY-OUT
20
INDICATORS

The AIR CLEANER SERVICE indicator indicates the service requirements


of the air cleaner element. Under normal operating conditions, the green
band is exposed in the indicator. Should the filter element become suffi-
ciently restricted to adversely affect performance, a red band will appear
and remain in place until the element is serviced and the indicator reset.

The AUTO LUBE indicator lights when the pump system on the trucks
automatic lubrication system is operating.

The (LOW) BATTERY VOLTAGE indicator lights to indicate a low level of


charge in the truck’s 24 volt batteries.

Should this indicator light, bring the truck to a stop, and park in a SAFE
POSITION immediately. Get help. Do not move the truck until the
problem has been identified and corrected.

Low battery voltage may result in improper operation of the truck’s


traction drive system, in the form of lost propulsion and/or dynamic
retarding.

The (LOW) BLOWER PRESSURE or the BLOWER OFF indicator lights


when the electrical system cooling blower does not supply a sufficient
amount of air flow to maintain proper system component cooling.

Should this indicator light, bring the truck to a stop, and park in a SAFE
POSITION immediately. Get help. Do not move the truck until the
problem has been identified and corrected.

21
The BRAKE DRAG indicator lights when residual pressure exists in the
brake system that will not allow the front and/or rear brakes to completely
release. Operation with the brakes partially applied will generate exces-
sive heat. This will result in reduced braking effectiveness during normal
service, and will also reduce brake component life.

Should this indicator light, bring the truck to a stop, and park in a SAFE
POSITION immediately. Get help. Do not move the truck until the
problem has been identified and corrected.

The BRAKE ON indicator lights whenever the truck’s friction brake sys-
tem has been actuated.

The (LOW) BRAKE PRESSURE indicator lights when the accumulators


for the hydraulic brake system pressure drop below a preset level. If
equipped with the added feature, automatic application of the brakes be-
gins if the pressure continues to decrease.

Should this indicator light, bring the truck to a stop, and park in a SAFE
POSITION immediately. Get help. Do not move the truck until the
problem has been identified and corrected.

The CHECK ENGINE indicator lights when a condition is monitored within


the engine which warrant checking by trained technicians at the earliest
possible time to minimize the possibility of the problem worsening and
causing damage. If the indicator lights, follow standard mine procedure
for these indications.

22
The COOLANT FLOW indicator lights when circulation in the coolant sys-
tem has been interrupted.

Should this indicator light, bring the truck to a stop, and park in a SAFE
POSITION immediately. Get help. Do not move the truck until the
problem has been identified and corrected.

The (LOW) COOLANT LEVEL indicator lights when the coolant level in
the engine radiator is below the normal operating level.

The COOLANT (WATER) TEMPERATURE indicator lights to indicate an


abnormally high engine coolant temperature.

The DIAGNOSTIC INFORMATION DISPLAY (D.I.D.) panel (if so equipped)


displays information about the operation and troubleshooting of problems
within the electrical propulsion and retarding systems.

Detailed information on the materials displayed is contained in the drive


system vendor’s electrical maintenance manuals.

The DUMP BODY UP indicator lights whenever the dump body is raised
from its resting position on the frame. The truck should only be moved
with the dump body fully down, and the Dump Controller lever in the Float
position.
23
NOTE: On some trucks this indicator is interconnected to an interlock
which prevents propulsion with the dump body raised. An override provi-
sion may be included to allow small amounts of movement.

The DYNAMIC RETARDING APPLIED indicator lights when the dynamic


retarding system has been activated.

The ELECTRICAL SYSTEM FAULT indicator lights when a fault occurs in


the electrical power/control system.

On trucks equipped with General Electric (GE) produced AC drive sys-


tems, there are two indicator lights that operate in a total of three func-
tions:

1. If the red indicator lights, it indicates a problem in the propulsion or


dynamic retarding system that will prevent the proper operation of the
systems. Should this indicator light, bring the truck to a safe, controlled
stop, and park in a SAFE POSITION immediately. Get help. Do not
move the truck until the problem has been identified and corrected.

NOTES:
1. Manual resetting, by depressing the cab mounted SYSTEM RESET
switch or using the electrical control box Reset Button, is required to
restore operating function.
2. The indicator flashes if the truck is moving and remains on steadily if
the truck is at rest.

2. If the amber indicator light flashes, it indicates a significant problem in


the propulsion or dynamic retarding system that may prevent proper op-
eration of the system. Normal propulsion will probably be discontinued
by the control system. Should this indicator light and flash, bring the
truck to a safe, controlled stop, and park in a SAFE POSITION immedi-
ately. Get help. Do not move the truck until the problem has been iden-
tified and corrected.

NOTE: Manual resetting, by depressing the cab mounted SYSTEM


RESET switch or using the electrical control box Reset Button, is re-
quired to restore operating function. Typically this should be done by
experienced, trained personnel.
24
3. If the amber indicator light remains steadily lit, it indicates a problem in
the propulsion or dynamic retarding system that may if left uncorrected
prevent proper operation of the system. The truck must be in the rest
mode including being at a full stop and with the Park Brake system ap-
plied.

On trucks equipped with the General Atomics/ Power Inverters (GA/PI)


produced AC drive systems, it indicates a problem in the propulsion or
retarding control systems that may prevent their proper operation. Should
this occur, the truck will lose propulsion power and/or dynamic retarding.
Manual resetting, by depressing the cab mounted SYSTEM RESET switch
or using the electrical control box Reset Button, is required to restore
operating function.

NOTE: Manual resetting, by depressing the cab mounted SYSTEM


RESET switch or using the electrical control box Reset Button, is re-
quired to restore operating function. Typically this should be done by
experienced, trained personnel.

The (LOW ENGINE) OIL LEVEL indicator lights to indicate that the level
of oil in the engine crankcase is below the level recommended for opera-
tion.

The (LOW) ENGINE OIL PRESSURE indicator lights when the engine oil
pressure is below safe operating limits.

The ENGINE OIL TEMPERATURE indicator lights when the temperature


of the oil in the crankcase exceeds preset safe operating limits.

The (LOW) FUEL LEVEL indicator lights to indicate a low fuel level in the
fuel tank(s).

25
The FUEL PREFILTER (WATER LEVEL) indicator lights when the amount
of water and other contaminants collected in the fuel prefilter assembly
reaches a preset level. If the indicator lights, follow standard mine proce-
dure for these indications.

The HIGH BEAM indicator lights whenever the high beam headlights are
on.

The HYDRAULIC FILTER BYPASSING indicator lights when the pressure


differential in one or more of the individual hydraulic filters is sufficient to
cause the internal bypass valve to open. This allows the oil to bypass the
filter element and receive no filtration. Continued operation of the truck in
this condition could result in component contamination and eventually in
component malfunction.

NOTE: In some operating conditions (e.g. cold weather start up and


operation) this indicator light may remain on for a short period of time
after starting (until the oil warm up to near normal operating temperature).
Check with mine or TEREX Unit Rig personnel for additional information.

The (LOW) HYDRAULIC OIL LEVEL indicator lights to indicate when the
oil level in the truck’s hydraulic oil reservoir or tank is below the desired
low level limit.

Should this indicator light with the dump body rising, stop the dumping
cycle, lower the body to the frame and determine the cause before con-
tinuing.

Should this indicator light with the dump body down, bring the truck to a
stop, and park in a SAFE POSITION immediately. Get help. Do not
move the truck until the problem has been identified and corrected.
26
The HYDRAULIC OIL TEMPERATURE indicator lights when hydraulic oil
temperature exceeds recommended operating levels.

Continued operation with hot hydraulic oil may result in compo-


nent damage and corresponding system malfunctions.

The LOW PRESSURE FIRE DETECTION indicator lights when the auto-
matic fire suppression system has been actuated.

NOTE: In case of fire, trucks equipped with automatic fire suppression


systems will automatically actuate. Follow the approved mine procedure.
If the indication is a result of an equipment malfunction, have the system
deactivated as soon as possible to prevent accidental system discharge,
the problem corrected, then the system reactivated.

The LOW STEERING PRESSURE indicator lights to indicate an unusu-


ally low pressure condition in the steering system.

Should this indicator light, bring the truck to a stop, and park in a SAFE
POSITION immediately. Get help. Do not move the truck until the
problem has been identified and corrected.

Accumulators normally supply the auxiliary steering system if the normal


supply system is disrupted.

NOTE: On trucks equipped with the electrically powered manual supply


system, pull up the Manual Supply System switch to ensure operation if
needed to maintain steering control while stopping the truck. Depress
switch button to deactivate the system as soon as the truck is safely
parked. This will prevent unnecessary drain on the truck’s batteries.
27
The (ENGINE) OIL FILTER DIFFERENTIAL indicator lights when the pres-
sure differential in one or more of the individual engine lubricating oil filters
is sufficient to cause the internal bypass valve to open. This allows the oil
to bypass the filter element and receive no filtration. Continued operation
of the truck in this condition could result in component contamination and
eventually in component malfunction.

The OVERSPEED indicator lights whenever the truck is in automatic


overspeed retarding. The speed that this retarding begins is preset into
the electrical controls for the propulsion/retarding system, and can be set
to any specified speed.

Depressing the PRESS TO TEST or LAMP CHECK button with the Mas-
ter Switch On will cause the indicator lights, excluding certain specifically
designated functions such as AID, to light. If any bulb fails to light, cor-
rect the problem prior to placing the truck into operation.

The RETARD (HOT – LIMITED TO CONTINUOUS OPERATION) indicator


lights when operating conditions and parameters are in an operating range
that causes the dynamic retarding system components to operate at in-
creased temperatures. This causes the control system to reduce the
speed limits on system operation to what is considered to be continuous
operation.

1. If the indicator is off, the system will automatically operate with the
higher speed limit (called 5-minute retard) values.

2. As the limit is approached, the indicator will begin to flash for approxi-
mately 15 seconds with the system limits remaining at the increased
short term level.

3. At the end of this interim flashing, the indicator will remain on steadily
and the system will operate at the reduced continuous operating param-
eters.
28
NOTE: If the indicator lights in either mode, it will be necessary to use
the truck’s friction brake system as a supplement to the retarding system
to slow the truck to speeds within the reduced, continuous rated operat-
ing envelope.

The friction brake system is not to be used to slow or retard the


truck in normal operation. Instead, its use is intended only for slow
speed stopping, short term parking and in emergencies (at any
speed). Use of this system during normal operation will result in
excessive heat and subsequent reduction of brake effectiveness,
should the brakes be required in an emergency.

NOTE: This feature is only included on the 200 and 240 ton (181 and
218 mt) systems provided by General Electric (GE).

The RETARD SPEED CONTROL indicator lights when this portion of the
truck’s propulsion and retarding system is activated. For detailed infor-
mation on this system, refer to the instructions in Section 6 - Operation.

(N) (0)

The RETARD SPEED LIMIT nameplate indicates the operating speed lim-
its on various grades for the truck’s dynamic retarding system. The limits
(on the bottom of the nameplate) are established for the listed operating
parameters (on the top of the nameplate).
29
NOTE: On trucks equipped with the 200 and 240 ton (181 and 218 mt)
systems provided by General Electric (GE) there are two speeds listed for
each grade, the higher speed, 5-minute retard and the reduced speed,
continuous retard speeds.

The STOP ENGINE or ENGINE PROTECTION PROPULSION CUTOUT


OVERRIDE indicator lights when a condition within the engine is moni-
tored which warrants stopping the engine immediately. Should the indi-
cator light, the truck will lose propulsion power, but not dynamic retarding.
If continued movement of the truck is desired (e.g. to find a safe a parking
location) depress and hold the Stop Engine or equivalent Override button.

NOTE: Continued operation of the engine may result in damage to it and


its systems.

Should this indicator light, bring the truck to a stop, and park in a SAFE
POSITION immediately and stop the engine. Get help. Do not move
the truck until the problem has been identified and corrected.

The TURN SIGNAL indicator flash to indicate the truck’s corresponding


turn signal is flashing. The lights also flash to indicate operation of the
emergency warning flasher system.

The WHEELMOTOR TEMPERATURE indicator lights when an exces-


sively high temperature is measured in one or both of the truck’s
wheelmotors.

Should this indicator light, bring the truck to a stop, and park in a SAFE
POSITION immediately. Get help. Do not move the truck until the
problem has been identified and corrected.

NOTE: If the air flow to the wheelmotors is determined to be okay, it is


recommended that the engine continue to run to provide cooling air to the
motors to assist in the cooling to normal temperatures.

30
GAUGES

The AIR CLEANER RESTRICTION gauge indicates the amount of restric-


tion in the air cleaner and induction system, in inches of water. The air
cleaner elements should be serviced if the restriction indicated is:

12 inches (3 kPa) - MTU (396)


20 inches (5 kPa) - Detroit Diesel
25 inches (6 kPa) - Cummins

The AMMETER indicates the rate of charge in the 24 volt battery charging
alternator system in amperes. This gauge should always indicate a plus
or positive reading when the truck’s engine is at operating speeds.

The COOLANT (WATER) TEMPERATURE gauge indicates the tempera-


ture of the engine coolant. Depending upon customer requirements this
may be in o F and/or o C, or a series of color coded bands.

If color-coded, the pointer should be in the green or operating range at all


times the truck is in normal operation. If the gauge indicates true tem-
perature, refer to the engine manufacturer’s information for the normal
operating temperatures.

31
The ENGINE OIL TEMPERATURE gauge monitors the temperature of the
oil in the engine crankcase.

The FUEL gauge indicates the approximate level of fuel in the fuel tank.

The HOURMETER indicates the total number of hours the truck is in


operation and operates whenever the Master Switch is On.

The OIL PRESSURE gauge indicates engine oil pressure. Depending


upon customer requirements, this may be in psi and/or kPa or a series of
color coded bands.

If color coded, the pointer should be in the green or operating range at all
times the truck is in normal operation. If the gauge indicates true pres-
sure, refer to the engine manufacturer’s information for the normal operat-
ing pressures.

The SPEEDOMETER indicates the truck’s speed in miles per hour and/or
kilometers per hour.

NOTES:
1. On some trucks, the distance traveled (in miles or kilometers) is
32
also displayed.
2. Truck’s equipped with digital gauges will appear differently.

The TACHOMETER indicates the engine speed in rpm. Refer to the ap-
propriate engine manufacturer’s information for the proper operating range.

NOTES:
1. On some trucks, the engine operating hours is also displayed.
2. Truck’s equipped with digital gauges will appear differently.

The VOLTMETER indicates in volts the amount of charge in the 24 volt


battery charging alternator system. Normal system voltage is 24 to 27
volts when the engine is at normal operating speed.

Low battery voltage may result in improper operation of the truck’s


traction drive system, in the form of lost propulsion and/or dynamic
retarding.

CONTROLS

The AUTO LUBE TEST switch allows for manual testing of the trucks
automatic lubrication system.

The BACK-UP LIGHT switch provides manual operation of the back-up


lights. The lights come on automatically, whenever the Shifter is moved
to the REVERSE position.

33
The DATA STORE switch provides a means of storing desired operating
information from the trucks computerized electrical propulsion and retard-
ing system during normal truck operation. Each time the switch is de-
pressed, a preset number of data points are stored in the systems memory.
Detailed information on the proper retrieval and use of the information
stored is contained in the vendor’s system maintenance publications.

The DUMP BODY UP OVERRIDE switch allows overriding of the optional


interlocks. These interlocks prevent the truck from being driven with the
dump body in the raised position.

The ELECTRICAL SYSTEM RESET switch provides the operator with a


means of manually resetting the truck’s electrical propulsion and retard-
ing systems from within the cab.

NOTE: There are some conditions that cannot be reset by means of this
switch alone. Always follow standard mine instructions and practices
before depressing this switch and attempting to propel the truck again.

The EMERGENCY (ENGINE) STOP switch provides a positive method of


stopping the engine immediately if the normal engine shutdown control
malfunctions, or if the engine must be stopped suddenly. To operate the
system, depress the button or pull the knob (depending upon the type
installed).

NOTE: Some trucks have additional controls, typically located on the


front bumper assembly and/or the control box area, to allow the engine to
shut down from ground level, in case of an emergency. Do not use these
controls to stop the engine in normal operation. This control may need to
be manually reset after each use.
34
The ENGINE SHUT DOWN DELAY TIMER provides an automatic means
of allowing the engine to cool for a preset amount of time (typically in the
range of 5 minutes) at low idle speed before stopping the engine. Detailed
instructions are included in Section 6 - Operation.

The ENGINE STOP/START switch is used to start and stop the engine.
Rotating the switch to the Start position engages the starter. When re-
leased, the switch rotates to the detented Run position. Rotating to the
Stop position stops the engine.

NOTE: On trucks equipped with a momentary stop switch, it must be


held in the Stop position until the engine completely stops operating to
actually stop the engine. It is then released and will return to the detented
center or Run position. If the switch is released before the engine stops
turning, it may begin to operate again. On other trucks the switch is
detented to the stop position.

The FOG LIGHT switch controls the operation of the truck’s optional fog
lights.

The HAND BRAKE control provides an alternate method of controlling the


truck’s friction brake system. It is designed to be used as an alternative to
the Brake (Foot) Pedal. It is spring loaded to the Release position and is
not intended for long term parking (operator leaves the truck).

NOTES:
1. An indicator lights when the Hand Brake is applied. The propulsion
controlling circuitry is disabled when the indicator is lit.
2. The Hand Brake or Load Brake must be applied to allow the applica-
tion or release of the Park Brake.

35
The HEAD/TAIL LIGHT switch controls the operation of the lights. In the
down position, all lights are off; in the center position, the optional marker
and tail lights are illuminated; in the up position, the head, tail, and marker
lights are all on.

The LOAD BRAKE switch provides an electrically actuated method of


applying the truck’s rear axle or wheelmotor mounted brakes. It is de-
signed for use in short term parking (such as while loading or dumping). It
is not intended for long term parking (operator leaves the truck).

The MANUAL POWER SUPPLY SYSTEM switch (on trucks so equipped)


activates the manual power supply system pump (on trucks so equipped).
This pump operates on 24 V dc, supplied directly from the truck’s batter-
ies. It supplies hydraulic pressure to the steering and braking systems
when needed (such as when towing an inactive truck). An indicator light
in the button will be on whenever the pump is operating, even when auto-
matically actuated.

NOTE: Push the Manual Power Supply System switch button in (deacti-
vating the system) as soon as the truck is safely parked. This will pre-
vent unnecessary wear of the pump and drain on the truck’s batteries.

The PANEL DIMMER switch controls the brightness of the background


lights on the upper and lower control panels.

The PARK BRAKE switch controls the operation of the park brake as-
semblies on the rear wheels.

To apply, move the Hand or Load Brake to the On position, rotate the Park
Brake switch to Apply position and hold for a few seconds until brakes
apply and the indicator lights. Release the Park Brake control and move
the Hand or Load Brake control to the Release position. Make sure the
36
truck can not move.

NOTE: On newer and modified trucks, the switch may be detented to


remain in this position.

To release, apply the Hand or Load Brake, then rotate the Park Brake
switch to the Release position and hold for a few seconds (until the indica-
tor goes out).

NOTES:
1. The park brakes alone should not be used when leaving the vehicle
unattended. Always park in a SAFE POSITION when leaving the truck.
2. The Hand or Load Brake must be applied to allow the Park Brake to be
applied or released.
3. An indicator lights when the park brakes are applied (including applica-
tion by system malfunction). Propulsion circuitry is disabled when the
indicator is lit.

The RETARD SPEED CONTROL switches regulate the operation of this


function in the electrical propulsion/dynamic retarding system. The switch
controls the activation of the system. The rotating knob assembly con-
trols the relative amount of dynamic retarding effort provided by the sys-
tem when activated.

For detailed information on operation of this system, see the instructions


in Section 6 - Operation, in this manual.

The ROTARY FLASHER/BEACON/STROBE LIGHT switch controls the


operation of the rotary flasher, beacon, or strobe light typically mounted
on top of the cab or hood.

The STAIRWAY LIGHT switches control the operation of the light on the
superstructure access ladder.

37
The WINDSHIELD WASHER switch provides a supply of cleaning solu-
tion to the windshield.

The WINDSHIELD WIPER switch controls the operation of the cab’s wind-
shield wipers (Slow-Off-Fast).

MISCELLANEOUS CAB CONTROLS

The BRAKE pedal controls the application of the truck’s friction brake
system. The further the pedal is depressed, the more the brakes are ap-
plied.

NOTE: These brakes are intended for stopping in emergencies at any


speed.

The CIRCUIT BREAKERS, located under the lower edge of the dash,
provide overload protection for the 24 V dc electrical circuits. If a fault
occurs, the button will extend out.

Since the controls for the operation of the truck’s propulsion and dynamic
retarding controls are supplied through these circuits, if a circuit breaker
opens, bring the truck to a stop, and park in a SAFE POSITION immedi-
ately. Get help. Do not move the truck until the problem has been iden-
tified and corrected.

The DOME LIGHT, on the cab ceiling, provides extra illumination within
the cab when such is desired. It is controlled by a separate on and off
switch.
38
RAISE LOWER

HOLD FLOAT
The DUMP CONTROLLER or CONTROL lever controls the operation of
the dump control valve.

The ENGINE DIAGNOSTIC switch provides a means for a technician to


gain diagnostic information from the engines control system to assist in
troubleshooting and correcting problems. Refer to the engine
manufacturer’s technical publications or representatives for details on how
to use this switch.

The FIRE EXTINGUISHER control operates the trucks fire control sys-
tem. To activate, remove the pin and depress the control knob.

NOTE: On some truck there is an additional control knob located on the


front bumper near the superstructure access ladder and/or the control
box area on the superstructure.

The FRESH AIR control, located to the right of the lower control panel,
allows outside air to enter the cab. The control regulates the amount.

The HAZARD WARNING switch, located on the steering column, controls


the operation of the trucks emergency hazard warning lights. Pulling the
switch out causes the signal lights to flash.

The HEAD LIGHT DIMMER switch, located in the turn signal switch as-
sembly on the left side of the steering column, controls the operation of
the headlights high and low beam. Pulling slightly on the indicator lever
39
will alternately switch the headlights from the high to low beam (and back)
configurations.

Blower Defroster Blower Blower


Slow Speed Fast Speed

Air Inside Air Outside Air Heater Heater


Cond. Circulation Circulation Floor Level Face Level

The HEATER/AIR CONDITIONING outlets and controls regulate the tem-


perature of the heating and air conditioning, and provide a multiple speed
control for the fresh air blower. The outlets are individually adjustable.

The HORN button, located on steering wheel, operates the truck’s main
or “forward” horn.

40
The MASTER SWITCH, located on the outside of the cab near the wind-
shield, controls the electrical power to all components of the 24 V dc
system, except the manual power supply system, the horn, panel, head,
brake, and tail lights, and a few other selected features.

NOTE: The stored hydraulic pressure in the steering accumulators is


released each time the Master Switch is turned Off.

The (Dynamic) RETARDER pedal regulates the amount of dynamic re-


tarding applied by the truck’s electrical propulsion/retarding system. When
the pedal is depressed, the wheelmotors act as generators and the trucks
rolling energy is dissipated as heat through a grid of air-cooled resistors.
The further the pedal is depressed, the greater the retarding action ap-
plied, as long as the truck speed remains within the limits of the truck’s
retarding system.

NOTE: For vehicles equipped with the retarding speed control feature
see Section 6 - Operation.

The SHIFTER is a three-position control that operates a switch that con-


trols the trucks electrical drive system. The Shifter selects Forward or
Reverse propulsion, and Neutral.
41
The STEERING WHEEL TILT lever, located on the steering column, per-
mits up and down adjustment of steering wheel position. To change the
tilt of the wheel, move the lever on the steering column and adjust the
wheel as desired. Release the lever to lock the assembly in the new
position.

The THROTTLE or ACCELERATOR pedal controls the operation of the


trucks propulsion system, regulating the truck speed.

The TRIP COUNTER provides a manual registered record of the total trips
or loads.

The TURN SIGNAL lever, located on the steering column, controls the
signal indicators. The lever self-centers when the steering wheel is re-
turned to the straight-ahead position.

42
SECTION 4
PRE-OPERATIONAL INSPECTION

Prior to placing a truck into operation (at each shift change or after repair
or service work has been performed), it is recommended that the vehicle
be inspected for evidence of damage or component wear. The following
procedures are designed to allow the operator/inspector to make the in-
spection in one continuous trip around the truck, beginning at the access
ladder. Correct discrepancies before placing truck in service.

NOTES:
1. The truck must be parked in a SAFE POSITION on level ground to
permit accurate checking of the various fluid levels.
2. While making the inspection note any indications or signs that lockout
or tagout provisions may be in place. If noted, determine their relevance
and proceed per mine or local provisions.

1. Inspect the access ladder to be certain it is free of debris, securely


fastened to the truck, and in general good condition. After confirming its
condition, climb the ladder to the superstructure level. Clean and adjust
all mirrors.

Use the handrails whenever climbing or descending the ladder.

2. If so equipped, verify that all battery disconnect switches are in their on


or operating positions.

3. Visually inspect the superstructure area to ensure that it is free of


debris and in general good condition. After confirming its condition, enter
the cab.

NOTE: If the truck is not equipped with an extension on the left hand
side of the superstructure it is recommended that entry and exit of cab be
made through the right (passenger) side door.

4. Switch on all exterior lights including the emergency flashers (if so


equipped). The lights should be checked during the inspection to verify
that they light and can be seen. Return to ground level and continue the
inspection.

NOTE: During the remainder of the walk-around inspection, check the


overall condition of the vehicle for evidence of air, hydraulic oil, or fuel
43
FIGURE 1 – TYPICAL INSPECTION LOCATIONS
44
leaks, broken, cracked, or missing parts.

5. Verify that all headlights and other lights are clean and illuminated.

6. Visually inspect the air cleaner assembly and engine supply lines for
evidence of damage or leakage.

If the air cleaners are equipped with self-purging Vacuator assemblies on


the bottom cups, squeeze each assembly to ensure that they are func-
tioning properly and exhausting the accumulated dust from the bottom of
the air cleaner.

If not equipped with the assemblies, empty each air cleaner dust bowl by
unsnapping the latch and allowing the bowl to pivot down. After all of the
debris is dumped, close and latch in place.

NOTES:
1. A ladder will be required to reach these assemblies.
2. Do not stand directly under the bowl when releasing the latch.

7. Verify that the left front marker light is clean and illuminated.

8. Check the engine oil level as follows:

a. Carefully climb up the tie rod step, using the frame mounted
hand holds for support. If the truck is not so equipped, use a ladder to
climb to the required level.

b. Pull the engine dipstick from the engine, wipe clean with a
clean rag, and reinsert.

NOTE: If the engine has a self-sealing style dipstick, it may be neces-


sary to turn the handle counter-clockwise several turns to release the
seal. Remember to reseal the dipstick after completing the oil level check.

c. Pull the dipstick out again and read the level; it should be in the
safe, normal, or operating range. If not, bring the level up to proper range
prior to operating the truck.

d. Reinstall the dipstick and carefully return to ground level.

NOTE: On trucks equipped with dipsticks on the right hand side of the
engine, the oil should be checked when checking the other side of the
truck.

45
9. Visually inspect the left front suspension assembly for evidence of wear,
damage, or leakage and verify that it is at the proper ride height (exten-
sion). Also, verify that the assembly is securely attached to the truck.

10. Visually inspect the left front brake and axle king pin assemblies for
evidence of wear, damage, leakage, or looseness. Also, inspect the area
around the wheel bearing seal and brake calipers for indications of leak-
age or damage.

11. Visually inspect the steering system components - clevis pins, tie
rods, bellcranks, and cylinders for the left side of the truck.

12. Visually inspect the left front tire and rim assembly for deep cuts,
missing chunks, adequate tread depth, proper mounting, missing lug nuts,
and proper inflation.

NOTE: Check the condition of the automatic tire pressure maintenance


system hoses if so equipped.

13. Visually inspect the left tank for evidence of damage or leaks. Check
level with sight glass as applicable.

14. Visually inspect all hydraulic and other components mounted near
the tank for evidence of damage or leakage.

15. Visually inspect the left dump cylinder for evidence of leakage, wear,
or damage. Verify that the upper and lower mounting points are secure
and properly lubricated. Verify that the hoses are properly routed and in
good condition.

16. Visually inspect the dump body pad assemblies for evidence of wear,
damage, or improper shimming.

17. Inspect each of the left rear dual tire and rim assemblies for deep
cuts, missing chunks, adequate tread depth, proper mounting, missing
lug nuts, and proper inflation. Inspect the rock knocker assembly (if so
equipped) for free movement and evidence of wear or damage.

NOTE: Check the condition of the automatic tire pressure maintenance


system hoses if so equipped.

18. Visually inspect the left wheelmotor hubcap area for evidence of brake
oil leakage. Verify that the hubcap is securely fastened to the wheel and
cover (if applicable) is closed.

46
19. Verify that the left rear marker light is clean and illuminated.

20. Visually inspect the exterior of the left wheelmotor for evidence of
damage or leakage.

21. Visually inspect the left dump body hinge pin for evidence of damage
or wear, and proper installation and lubrication.

22. Visually inspect the left rear suspension for evidence of wear, dam-
age, and leakage and verify that it is at the proper ride height (extension).
Verify that the upper and lower mounting points are secure and properly
lubricated.

23. Verify that all tail, stop, warning (turn signal), dynamic retarding, and
back-up lights on the truck are clean and operational.

24. Open the axlebox access door. Verify that the components and mount-
ing hardware are in general good repair. Close the door securely to form
a good, airtight seal.

Failure to maintain a good seal around the access door may allow
air to escape from the axlebox. Operation of the truck in this con-
dition could result in damage to the electrical propulsion system
components.

25. Visually inspect the right rear suspension for evidence of damage,
wear, and leakage and verify that it is at the proper ride height (extension).
Verify that the upper and lower mounting points are secure and properly
lubricated.

26. Visually inspect the right dump body hinge pin for evidence of damage
or wear, and proper installation and lubrication.

27. Visually inspect the exterior of the right wheelmotor for evidence of
damage or leakage.

NOTE: Check the condition of the automatic tire pressure maintenance


system hoses if so equipped.

28. Verify that the right rear marker light is clean and illuminated.

29. Visually inspect the right wheelmotor hubcap area for evidence of

47
brake oil leakage. Verify that the hubcap is securely fastened to the
wheel and cover (if applicable) is closed.

30. Visually inspect each of the right rear dual tire and rim assemblies for
deep cuts, missing chunks, adequate tread depth, proper mounting, missing
lug nuts, and proper inflation. Inspect the rock knockers (if so equipped)
for free movement and evidence of wear or damage.

31. Visually inspect all hydraulic and other system components for evi-
dence of damage or leakage.

32. Inspect the axlebox nosecone and attachment assemblies for evi-
dence of damage or wear, proper installation and lubrication.

33. Inspect the underside of the truck for evidence of damage or leakage.
Hoses should be free of kinks and cracks, and should be secured away
from moving parts. All components and mounting hardware should be
properly installed and in good operating condition.

34. Visually inspect the dump body pad assemblies for evidence of wear,
damage, or improper shimming.

35. Visually inspect the right dump cylinder for leakage, wear, or damage.
Verify that the upper and lower mounting points are secure and properly
lubricated. Verify that the hoses are properly routed and in good condi-
tion.

36. Visually inspect the hydraulic pumps, pump drives, and related hoses
for evidence of leakage, damage, or wear.

37. Visually inspect the right tank for evidence of damage or leakage.
Check level with sight glass or petcocks as applicable.

38. Check the blower housing and related ducting for evidence of leakage
or damage. If so equipped, inspect the cooling air blower or precleaner
systems for evidence of leakage or damage.

39. Visually inspect all hydraulic and other components mounted near
the tank for evidence of damage or leakage.

40. Visually inspect the right front tire and rim assembly for deep cuts,
missing chunks, adequate tread depth, proper mounting, missing lug nuts,
and proper inflation.

48
NOTE: Check the condition of the automatic tire pressure maintenance
system hoses if so equipped.

41. Visually inspect the steering system components; clevis assemblies,


tie rods, steering arms, and steering cylinder on the right side of the
truck. If any piece is damaged, bent, or leaking, do not drive the truck.
Report the condition immediately.

42. Visually inspect the right front suspension assembly for evidence of
wear, damage, or leakage and verify that it is at the proper ride height
(extension). Verify that the assembly is securely attached to the truck.

43. Visually inspect the right front brake and axle kingpin assemblies for
evidence of wear, damage, leakage or looseness. Inspect the area around
the wheel bearing seal and brake calipers for indications of leakage or
damage.

44. Visually inspect underside of the truck for indications of damage or


leakage. Hoses should be free of kinks and cracks, and should be se-
cured away from moving parts.

NOTE: On trucks with the engine oil dipstick located on the right-hand
side of the engine, check the engine oil level prior to continuing with the
remaining steps.

45. Inspect the engine drive belts overall condition. Check condition of fan
and fan shroud and guard assemblies.

46. Visually inspect the air cleaner assembly and engine supply lines for
evidence of damage or leakage.

If the air cleaners are equipped with self-purging Vacuator assemblies on


the bottom cups, squeeze each assembly to ensure that they are func-
tioning properly and exhausting the accumulated dust from the bottom of
the air cleaner.

If not equipped with the assemblies, empty each air cleaner dust bowl by
unsnapping the latch and allowing the bowl to pivot down. After all of the
debris is dumped, close and latch in place.

NOTES:
1. A ladder will be required to reach these assemblies.
2. Do not stand directly under the bowl when releasing the latch.

49
47. Verify that the right front marker light is clean and illuminated.

48. Visually inspect the radiator and grille area to be free of debris and
damage.

49. Climb the access ladder to the superstructure level. Visually inspect
the retarding grid and electrical drive system component box to ensure
that they are free of damage, that the doors are securely closed, and that
the air intakes are free of debris.

NOTE: On trucks so equipped, verify the condition of fire suppressant


remote actuation system.

50. Check the engine coolant level in the radiator using the radiator sight
glass.

Use extreme care when removing the radiator cap; remove it slowly
after the engine has cooled. The sudden release of pressure from
a heated cooling system can result in the loss of coolant and pos-
sible injury from the hot liquid.

51. Visually inspect the brake system accumulator and components for
evidence of leakage, damage, or any other abnormal condition.

52. On trucks equipped with the available automatic lubrication system,


check the level of the lubricating grease in the main supply reservoir. Be
sure the supply is adequate to maintain the system during the entire
operating period.

53. On trucks equipped with the available fire suppressant system, check
the pressure level of the actuation system. Also inspect the system for
evidence of wear or damage. Report all problems before proceeding.

54. Return to the cab. Turn all light switches off.

50
SECTION 5
ENGINE STARTING CHECKS

It is recommended that prior to starting the truck, a complete walk around


inspection be performed. The inspection procedure is outlined in Section
4 - Pre-Operational Inspection. After completion of this procedure, the
remainder of the checks are confined to the cab area.

1. Verify that the truck has no indications of lockout or tagout provisions in


place.

2. Turn the Master Switch (located near the windshield outside on the
front of the cab) On, and return to the driver’s seat.

NOTE: If turned off it is recommended that the Battery Isolation switch


be moved to the ON position prior to turning the Master Switch On.

3. Verify that the:

a. Battery voltage is in the green area (24 to 28 Vdc).

b. Warning Alarm sounds.

c. Stop Engine indicator is ON.

NOTE: On some engine equipped trucks this indicator will go off after
operating for a short period of time.

d. Park Brake (and indicator) is On.

e. Shifter is in N (Neutral) position.

f. Appropriate indicators flash and alarms sound.

4. Push the Lamp Check or Press to Test buttons. All of the bulbs should
light.

5. Verify that all Circuit Breakers are in operating position (pushed in).

6. On trucks so equipped, verify the operation of the manual power supply


system by switching the system on (pulling the button out) and turning
the steering wheel. If the pump sounds and the front wheels move, the
system is operating. Remember to turn the system off (push in the but-
ton) immediately after testing.
51
NOTE: It may be necessary to release the Hand Brake or Brake Pedal
(if applied) to allow the front wheels to move. If this is necessary, apply
the Load or Park Brakes, or use other appropriate means to prevent the
truck from moving.

7. Alert any personnel in the area that you are going to move. Make sure
they are clear of the truck. Sound the horn, wait several seconds, then
sound another blast.

8. Rotate the Engine Stop/Start switch to the Start position and hold - the
starter will engage and crank the engine until it starts. When the engine
starts, release the switch and it will return to the Run position. The alarm
will stop sounding when the engine oil pressure rises.

NOTES:
1. Typically when the engine is started cold, it may idle at an “advanced
idle” speed of 1000 to 1200 rpm. This improves its burning of fuel in the
cold combustion chambers. As the engine temperature increases, the
idle speed should steadily decrease to the normal low idle speed.
2. The engine should not be accelerated when cold. Let the engine idle
until the water temperature begins to warm (e.g., show movement on the
gauge), before accelerating the engine or moving the truck. If the engine
does not start, or for cold weather starting information, refer to the appro-
priate engine manual for additional instructions.
3. On trucks equipped with an electric start system, it is recommended
that the engine not be cranked for more than 30 seconds at one time. A
5 minute interval to allow the system components to cool is recommended
before making another starting attempt.
4. If the battery charge is insufficient to start the engine, it must be
replenished from an external source by connecting the source to the trucks
external supply system.

9. As soon as the engine is started and operating, check all gauges and
indicators for proper operating condition and readings.

10. Visually inspect the windows and doors to be sure they are clean and
free of damage.

11. Adjust the operator’s seat to the best driving position for maximum
comfort and safety.

NOTE: Adjustment procedures for seats may be obtained from the seat
supplier or manufacturer. Check with the appropriate mine personnel for
the procedure.

52
12. Adjust all mirrors as required to obtain the maximum possible field of
vision.

13. Verify that the windshield wipers are operational and that there is an
adequate supply of fluid in the washer reservoir.

14. Securely fasten the seat belts. The operator and anyone riding in the
cab should be seated and have seat belts securely fastened at all times
the truck is in operation.

15. As soon as the engine coolant temperature, oil pressure, and system
air pressure and/or battery charge reach normal operating range, the truck
may be put into operation.

53
SECTION 6
OPERATION

INTRODUCTION

The safe operation of a TEREX Unit Rig MT Series truck is the primary
responsibility of the driver as it is with any piece of equipment. A safety
conscious driver operating a well maintained truck is less apt to be involved
in an accident. Remember, safe operation of any vehicle is no accident.

Prior to starting the truck, be certain to understand all of the basic safety
rules of the mine and those outlined in this manual.

ENGINE STARTING

The recommended procedure for starting the engine is outlined in detail in


Section 5 - Engine Start. A walk around inspection (Section 4 - Pre-
Operational Inspection) of the truck is recommended prior to starting the
engine.

PROPULSION

FORWARD-NORMAL OPERATION

To drive the truck forward in normal operation:

1. Verify that the 24 Vdc system battery voltage is in the green band (24
to 28 Vdc).

2. Fully depress the Brake pedal and hold.

3. Verify that the area around the vehicle is clear of personnel and obstruc-
tions.

4. Move the Shifter to F (Forward).

5. Sound the truck’s primary horn to warn personnel in the area of impend-
ing truck movement.

6. Release the:

a. Park Brake

b. Load Brake
54
c. Hand Brake

d. Brake pedal

7. Depress the Throttle/Accelerator pedal. Use the pedal to assist in


regulating the truck’s speed.

DO NOT allow the truck to roll backward prior to accelerating it


forward. If the truck is on a grade and moves backward, bring it to
a complete stop first.

NOTE: Prior to placing the truck into normal operation, it is recommended


that the steering, dynamic retarding, and brake systems be checked
through a series of maneuvers utilizing each system. If any system does
not function normally, stop the truck and notify the appropriate personnel.

NOTE: For slow speed maneuvering, especially in confined locations, it


may be desired to use the Brake pedal to assist in controlling the trucks
movement.

REVERSE

To back the truck up, proceed as follows:

1. Verify that the 24 Vdc system battery voltage is in the green band (24
to 28 Vdc).

2. Fully depress the Brake pedal and hold.

3. Verify that the area behind the vehicle is clear of personnel and obstruc-
tions. Remember that visibility to the rear of the truck is somewhat lim-
ited, especially directly behind the dump body, so make an extra check
to see that the intended travel path is clear.

4. Move the Shifter to R (Reverse) position. The back-up lights and alarm
should come on automatically. The engine will remain at low idle speed.

5. Sound the truck’s primary warning horn to clear any personnel in the
area.

6. Release the:

55
a. Park Brake

b. Load Brake

c. Hand Brake

d. Brake pedal

7. Depress the Throttle/Accelerator pedal. Use the Throttle/Accelerator


and Brake pedals to control the truck’s speed and maneuver the truck as
required.

DO NOT allow the truck to roll forward prior to accelerating it rear-


ward. If the truck is on a grade and it starts to move, bring it to a
complete stop first.

DYNAMIC RETARDING

To slow and stop the truck, or control the speed on a downgrade, release
the Throttle/Accelerator pedal, and depress and hold the Dynamic Re-
tarding pedal. The further the pedal is depressed, the greater the retarding
action.

NOTE: Dynamic retarding is designed to decelerate the truck and bring


it to a stop.

The Dynamic Retarding pedal should be slightly depressed before going


over the crest of a hill, then depressed as required to maintain the desired
speed on the downgrade. This procedure permits the retarding system to
function at maximum efficiency and reduces the lag or delay normally
noted between pedal movement and the onset of retarding.

TEREX Unit Rig trucks employ a dynamic retarding system as the pri-
mary means of decelerating the truck and maintaining speeds on down-
grades. In dynamic retarding, the wheelmotors are caused to function as
generators, to transform the kinetic energy (the energy keeping it moving)
of the truck into electrical energy. This energy is forced through an air-
cooled resistor grid that releases the energy as heat to the surrounding
air.

NOTE: It is important to remember that the dynamic retarding system is


designed to operate most efficiently in a specific speed range. This range
56
varies with truck size and load, electrical propulsion system, and grade
on which it is operated.

IMPORTANT: It should also be remembered that the dynamic retard-


ing effort is generated only by the wheelmotors. The dynamic retarding
system should be used alone (without the friction or service brake sys-
tem) whenever possible, to minimize unnecessary component wear.

Truck speed can be controlled efficiently by dynamic retarding, over a


specific speed range. The amount of dynamic retarding effort available is
maximum and constant in the speed range of 1 to 15 mph (2 to 24 km/hr).
At speeds in excess of 15 mph (24 km/hr), the amount of dynamic retard-
ing effort available decreases as the speed continues to increase.

NOTE: On trucks equipped with the 200 and 240 ton (181 and 218 mt)
systems provided by General Electric (GE) there are two speeds listed for
each grade, the higher speed 5-minute retard and the reduced, continuous
rated retard speeds. An indicator light is on when the system is operating
or approaching operation in the reduced or continuous retarding mode.
Otherwise the system is automatically in the increased or nominal 5-minute
rating dynamic retarding mode.

The chart at the end of this manual represents the typical dynamic retard-
ing curve for a specific model of truck, operating at specific weight restric-
tions. The chart is keyed to reflect two distinct operating zones:

1. Normal Operating Area. This is the safe speed range in which the truck
may be operated for the variety of grades designed for.

2. Normal Operating Limits. This area designates the maximum limita-


tions of the dynamic retarding system with respect to truck speed and
amount of grade.

To determine the operational limit for a particular grade, proceed as fol-


lows:

1. Determine that the following truck equipment is the same as that listed
on the chart:

a. Truck model and size.

b. Tire size.

c. Wheelmotor and gear ratio used.

57
d. Payload and gross vehicle weight.

NOTE: Performance characteristics depend greatly upon vehicle weight.


Heavy bed liners, accumulations of mud or other materials, extra optional
equipment, etc., adds to the weight in the same way a payload or overload
does. If the truck’s empty vehicle weight (EVW) or gross vehicle weight
(GVW) exceed those listed on the curves, contact the appropriate mine
or TEREX Unit Rig personnel for revised operational information.

2. Determine the actual grade in question and whether it will be descended


loaded or empty. Also determine the rolling resistance of the grade, as
this will affect the effective grade that the truck is experiencing.

3. Locate the grade or slope involved on the vertical axis (column of num-
bers) of the chart. Note that the left axis is used if the truck is loaded and
the right axis if the truck is empty during the descent.

4. Draw a horizontal line across the chart, starting at the selected grade
in step 3. This will assist in identification of the speed limits.

NOTES:
1. If the truck’s speed is in excess of the limits, it will be necessary to
use the truck’s friction brake system as a supplement to the retarding
system to slow the truck to speeds within the operating envelope.
2. On trucks equipped with the General Electric (GE) 200 and 240 ton
(181 and 218 mt) propulsion system, there are two curves or speeds. The
slower speed is the continuous rated speed that the truck will operate at
regardless of the operating environment or component temperatures. The
slightly increased speed curve represents the nominal 5-minute rating
that the truck will operate at if the component operating parameters are
maintained. The control system will automatically change from one
configuration to the other based on the temperatures monitored by the
system.

Consult the appropriate mine personnel for the recommended op-


erating speeds.

OVERSPEED RETARDING

Included in the truck’s propulsion system is a feature called overspeed


retarding. In this feature, a preset maximum speed is selected by an
adjustment on the electronic control system. This speed is used as a
maximum speed limiter for safety consideration and is not to be used as
58
a speed governor. Normal dynamic retarding is still the desired method of
controlling truck speed when decelerating or maintaining speeds on down-
grades.

As truck speed approaches this setting, propulsion output is automati-


cally reduced to minimize the ability to reach the overspeed setting. If the
speed is allowed to increase to this level, the control system discontin-
ues propulsion and switches to full dynamic retarding mode. After the
vehicle has slowed to a preset speed below the activation level, the sys-
tem again switches and reverts to normal propulsion if it is still demanded
by the operator. This fast, repetitive cycling from propulsion to retarding
and back is an undesirable operating mode and is the reason that opera-
tion in overspeed is not recommended.

A feature has been installed that allows two separate overspeed settings
to be made. Typically, a decreased speed setting is incorporated when
the truck is loaded. This limits the truck to a speed consistent with the
loads being carried and the terrain being followed. A second, increased,
speed is allowed for an empty truck. This speed improves truck speed
when speed control is not as critical. In a typical installation sensors
automatically select the default or lower setting when the truck is indi-
cated as being even partially loaded. When the load is dumped, one of
several reset methods (such as the use of the Dump Control or Load
Brake controls) allows the system to switch to the higher empty setting
until the truck is again loaded.

An operator should always be aware of the overspeed setting(s) and con-


trol the trucks speed to remain below the preset levels at all times.

RETARDING SPEED CONTROL

The retarding speed control feature was developed to assist the operator
in maintaining a constant speed when retarding on downhill grades, a
form of “cruise control” in dynamic retarding. When activated, the system
eliminates the normal requirement that the operator control the amount of
retarding effort provided (and the truck speed) by means of a foot pedal,
replacing it with automatic controls electronically operated by the propul-
sion system. The operator inputs are only to control activation and over-
ride (if needed) and to set or adjust the desired truck speed range.

To operate the system proceed as follows:

1. At the time the Dynamic Retarding pedal would normally be depressed,


activate the system by pulling the “mushroom shaped” Retarding Speed
Control switch.
59
NOTE: The system can be activated earlier as the control is overridden
whenever the Throttle/Accelerator pedal is depressed.

2. Verify that the amber Retarding Speed Control On indicator on the dash
lights.

3. Adjust the Retard Speed Control potentiometer to the approximate po-


sition for the speed desired.

NOTE: Since the system actually controls the retarding effort and not
the speed, the control is marked simply Maximum and Minimum. The
speed settings are not defined.

4. When the Throttle/Accelerator pedal is released:

a. If the truck is operating at more than 2 mph (4 km/hr) below the


operator preset speed, the electrical propulsion system will cycle into the
coast mode.

b. If the truck is operating at a speed above 2 mph (4 km/hr) faster


than the operator preset speed, the propulsion system will cycle into the
dynamic retarding mode.

c. The system will automatically increase or decrease the amount of


retarding effort developed to maintain the preset speed.

5. To increase the speed, turn the speed control potentiometer clockwise


(CW); to lower the speed turn it counter-clockwise (CCW).

6. If additional retarding effort is needed (up to the normal operational


limits of the system), depress the Dynamic Retarding pedal. The retard-
ing system is controlled by the greater of the demands from the pedal or
retard speed control system.

7. If the Throttle/Accelerator pedal is depressed while in retarding speed


control operation, it overrides the controls and the truck operates nor-
mally, with the exception that retarding speed control automatically will
return the moment the Throttle/Accelerator pedal is released.

8. If the downhill grade lessens or the truck slows to a speed more than 4
mph (6 km/hr) less than the set speed, the retarding contactors may
automatically drop out and the truck will revert to a coast mode.

9. To exit retarding speed control, push the “mushroom shaped” control


button in. The indicator should go off.
60
NOTE: To prevent constant cycling of the system it is recommended
that the retard speed control system be turned off at all times when not
actually in use.

BRAKING

NORMAL BRAKING

To bring the truck to a complete stop under normal operating conditions:

1. Release the Throttle/Accelerator pedal.

2. Depress the Dynamic Retarding pedal to decelerate the truck to a


stop.

NOTE: It is recommended that it be decelerated to a speed of approxi-


mately 1 mph (2 km/hr).

3. Depress the Brake pedal to actuate the friction brakes, regulating any
braking by the amount the pedal is depressed.

The friction brake system is not intended to be used to slow or


retard the truck in normal operation. Instead, its use is intended
only for slow speed stopping, short term parking and in emergen-
cies (at any speed). Use of the friction brakes during normal opera-
tion will result in excessive heat and subsequent reduction of brake
effectiveness, should the brakes be required for emergency stop-
ping.

EMERGENCY BRAKING

In the event that the friction brake system is used to stop the truck
in an emergency, do not attempt to move the truck until the prob-
lem causing the emergency has been corrected and the entire fric-
tion brake system has been inspected and determined to be opera-
tional.

1. If dynamic retarding effort is not operating properly, the friction brake


system should be used to bring the truck to a safe, controlled stop as
quickly as possible. The brake system is controlled by the Brake pedal
61
with the amount of braking increasing the further the pedal is depressed.

Unless required to prevent the truck from skidding, do not pump


the Brake pedal in an emergency braking situation, as this is con-
trary to system design, and may result in excessive heat and a
subsequent decrease in braking effectiveness. Always apply the
brakes sufficiently to bring the truck to a safe stop as quickly as
possible. Park the truck in a SAFE POSITION. In the event of a
malfunction of the dynamic retarding system, do not attempt to use
the friction brake system alone to continue operating the truck.

2. If normal braking (pedal controlled) is not functioning properly, or a


problem is indicated by an indictor light, use all of the truck’s retarding
and braking controls (including the Hand and Load Brake controls) to
bring the vehicle to a safe, controlled stop.

Do not apply park brakes with truck in motion as brake system com-
ponents may be damaged.

PARKING

SHORT TERM (Operator remains in cab)

NOTE: This procedure is for short term parking only, with the engine
running (for places such as at the shovel or for dumping). If the truck is
to be parked for an extended period of time, the engine shut off, or the
operator must leave the cab, the procedures for long term parking should
be followed.

The truck may be parked for short term parking as follows:

1. Bring the truck to a complete stop with the truck’s dynamic retarding
and/or friction brake systems, as described under Braking. Fully depress
the Brake pedal once the vehicle has stopped.

2. Move the Shifter to the N (Neutral) position.

3. Pull the Load Brake switch out to apply.

4. Release the Brake pedal; the truck should not move.


62
Do not leave the cab with the truck in this configuration.

5. To move the truck again, follow the procedures outlined under Propul-
sion.

NOTE: It is recommended that the Park Brakes not be applied for short
term parking (loading, dumping, etc.), as long as the operator remains in
the cab and the engine is running. If the truck is left unattended, or the
engine shut off, the long term parking procedures must be followed.

LONG TERM - SAFE POSITION (Cab unattended)

The truck may be parked in SAFE POSITION for long term parking as
follows:

NOTE: A SAFE POSITION is defined as:


1. The truck’s front or rear wheels are driven into a ditch, or
2. The truck is driven up against a berm or a bank, or
3. Chocks are placed in front of and behind the rear wheels, and are
sufficient to hold the truck on the grade it is parked.
The truck will be in a SAFE POSITION if these practices are followed,
and if the truck will not move if the brakes are released.

NOTE: These procedures must be followed any time the truck is left
unattended, the engine is shut down, or a problem exists in the friction
brake system.

1. Bring the truck to a complete stop with the truck’s dynamic retarding
and/or friction brake systems, as described in the instructions under Brak-
ing. Fully depress the Brake pedal once the truck is stopped.

2. Move the Shifter to the N (Neutral) position.

3. Pull the Load Brake Switch out to apply the truck’s rear brakes.

4. Move the Park Brake switch to Apply position and hold until the Park
Brake indicator lights (approximately 2 seconds).

NOTE: On newer and modified trucks, the switch may be detented to


remain in the Apply position.

63
Do not leave the truck parked unattended with the Loading Brake
only applied. Always park the truck securely in a SAFE POSITION,
with the Park Brake applied.

5. Release the Brake pedal and Hand and Load brakes. The truck must
remain stationary.

6. If the engine is to be stopped, follow the steps outlined under Engine


Shut-Down.

7. Only after it is certain that the truck will remain secure and cannot
accidentally move should the truck be left unattended.

8. If available, use wheel chocks to secure the truck.

NOTE: Always park the truck where other vehicles can easily pass. If
for any reason it is necessary to park on the haul road, it is recommended
that flares or some other warning sign be used. (Flares should be used
for poor visibility, darkness, blind curves, narrow roads, or any other simi-
lar situation.)

LOADING

Although the operator does not actually load the truck, the operator does
exercise a great deal of control over the effectiveness of the loading opera-
tion. Important procedures to remember when loading are:

1. Enter the loading area with caution. Be prepared for trucks or other
equipment in the area, and other loaded trucks leaving the area.

2. Be observant of the entire situation. Note the location of power cables


and bridges over or under them, the position of the shovel or other loading
equipment, and other details of importance.

Never drive over unprotected electrical power cables.

3. Park in a location a safe distance from the loading operation to await


loading.

4. Be prepared to enter load site when instructed to do so. Always follow


64
the signals of the Spotter or Shovel Operator.

5. Once spotted, stop the truck by depressing the Dynamic Retarder and/
or Brake pedal.

Do not apply the park brake when loading. Damage may occur
due to load being dropped causing truck to move. During loading,
do not stop the truck in or on piles of material, as damage may
result to the tires, frame, or other components.

6. Pull out the Load Brake control.

7. Move the Shifter to the N (Neutral) position.

8. Release the Brake pedal. The truck should remain stationary.

9. Generally, it is recommended that the driver remain in the truck cab


during loading.

10. Be prepared to pull away from the load site, once loading is complete
and signaled to proceed.

11. Verify that the anticipated path of travel from the loading site is free of
personnel and obstacles, and that no personnel are on or around the
truck.

12. Place the Shifter in the F (Forward) position.

13. Sound the appropriate blasts with the truck’s horn, to indicate im-
pending forward movement.

14. Release the Load and Hand Brakes and Brake pedals, depress the
Throttle/Accelerator pedal, and drive forward.

15. Operate the truck according to normal procedure.

HAULAGE

Important points to remember while hauling include:

1. Always drive on the proper side of the haul road. Maintain an adequate
distance from the bank or berm, but stay on the assigned side of road.

65
2. Maintain the speed limits as posted or instructed by the mine, and
always allow for poor driving conditions.

Faulty speedometer readings (zero or an obvious error while the


truck is in motion) may indicate that a condition exists which could
result in damage to truck components, especially the wheelmotors.
If this condition exists stop the truck immediately and park in a
SAFE POSITION. Get help. Do not move the truck until the prob-
lem has been identified and corrected.

3. Use the dynamic retarding system to maintain truck speed on grades,


and to decelerate the truck to a stop. Remember to apply the Dynamic
Retarding pedal prior to reaching the crest of the down hill slope, and use
it to control the speed of the truck. A common recommendation is to
never enter or drive a loaded truck on a downgrade at speeds in excess of
15 mph (24 km/hr). Follow the guidelines established by the mine to
govern speed.

NOTE: The amount of retarding effort available is directly related to the


speed of the truck. This amount remains at a maximum or constant level
from speeds of 1 to 15 mph (2 to 24 km/hr). Above this speed the amount
of retarding effort available reduces as the speed continues to increase.
However, the amount of dynamic retarding required to control the truck
will continue to increase throughout the entire operating range. This cre-
ates a range or limits within which the truck should be operated that will
vary with truck load, speed, electrical propulsion system, and the grade
involved. Operation at speeds in excess of these limits will mean that
sufficient retarding effort may not be available to control the truck without
the assistance of the friction brakes. Information on how to determine
this safe operating range is contained in Section 6 - Operation of this
manual, but always check with the appropriate mine personnel for these
speeds in particular areas of your mine.

The friction brake system is not to be used to slow or retard the


truck in normal operation. Instead, its use is intended only for slow
speed stopping, short term parking and in emergencies (at any
speed). Use of this system during normal operation will result in
excessive heat and subsequent reduction of brake effectiveness,
should the brakes be required in an emergency.

66
4. Do not use the truck’s overspeed retarding system to control truck
speed. This system, which causes the electric drive system to change
from the propulsion to the maximum retarding effort available mode if a
preset speed is exceeded, is designed to serve as a back-up control
device, and not as a normal service control.

5. Maintain a safe following distance behind other trucks. This distance


should be sufficient to allow stopping, should another truck make a sud-
den stop. Always consider road and weather conditions.

6. Passing should be done only in designated areas (if allowed in the


mine). A relatively long distance may be required to pass. Allow ad-
equate clearance between trucks, and pass only when it is safe to do so.

7. Always slow down prior to approaching an intersection or sharp curve.


It is better to maintain a safe, slow speed than to possibly lose control of
the truck.

8. When operating on a side slope, extra care must be taken when turning
to maintain proper truck stability.

9. In the event of equipment malfunction (such as the engine or electrical


system) while the truck is in motion, provisions have been made for main-
taining a sufficient level of steering and braking to allow the vehicle to be
brought to a safe stop.

LOSS OF STEERING

An accumulator supplied auxiliary steering system is included to provide


pressurized flow of hydraulic oil to the steering system in the event of
engine or pump malfunction. This flow is to assist in controlling of the
truck during the braking process and should not be used to attempt to
continue operating the truck.

Additional accumulators have been installed to provide a reservoir of stored


pressurized fluid (energy) sufficient to allow steering of the truck to a safe
stop in the event of a loss of hydraulic supply pressure.

On trucks equipped with a manual power supply system, a separate pump,


powered by motors driven directly from the truck’s 24 volt batteries, is
provided to supplement the supply to the accumulators, with the resulting
flows routed into the steering and brake supply accumulator systems.
On these manual power supply pump equipped trucks a large manual
pull-to-activate push-button is to control operation of the driving motors.

67
If a problem is noted in the steering control:

1. Immediately verify that the auxiliary steering system is being provided


by the accumulators in the steering and brake systems by steering the
truck slightly. Bring the truck to a complete stop as soon as road condi-
tions allow.

It is important to remember that the front wheels may not turn as


rapidly with the auxiliary steering system as with normal steering.

2. On trucks equipped with the manual power supply system, pull the
Manual Power Supply switch out, to activate this additional system.

3. Turn the Manual Power Supply Pump off (push in) immediately after
bringing the truck to a safe stop.

DUMPING

To dump the load, proceed as follows:

1. Enter the dump area with extreme care.

Verify that the dumping area is free of other vehicles, personnel


and obstructions.

2. Back the truck to the dump site and position it safely. Be sure that the
truck remains on level, stable, safe footing. Bring the truck to a complete
stop with the dynamic retarding and friction brake system.

NOTES:
1. Always follow the directions of the appropriate personnel in the dump
area.
2. Extra care must be used when on a side slope to ensure proper truck
stability due to the dynamics of raising of the dump body and load shifting
that occurs during the dump process. Do not raise the body on side
slopes where the stability cannot be maintained.

3. Pull the Load Brake control out.

4. Place the Shifter in the N (Neutral) position.


68
5. Verify that no personnel are in the immediate dumping area. Also,
check to see that there are no obstructions that will contact the dump
body during dumping. Contact with such obstacles may cause unneces-
sary damage to the dump body and related equipment.

6. When it is clearly safe to dump:

a. Move the Dump Controller lever to the Raise position.

b. Accelerate the engine to rated speed (typically 1900 rpm) and hold.

NOTE: The rate at which the dump body rises is directly related to the
engine speed, load, and valve (dump lever) position. To increase the rate
at which the body raises, first move the Dump Controller lever to the
maximum Raise position, then accelerate the engine by depressing the
Throttle/Accelerator pedal as required. Be careful not to overspeed the
engine.

c. As the dump body reaches the fully raised position, release the
Throttle/Accelerator pedal and allow the engine to return to idle speed.
Do not continue to raise the dump body to its greatest dumping position
at a high rate of speed, as this may result in damage to the dump cylin-
ders and other components.

NOTES:
1. The dump body should be raised only enough to allow the load to
completely exit the body.
2. If the lever is released, it will automatically move to the Hold position,
which will discontinue raising the dump body, and hold it in a raised posi-
tion.

7. After the payload has been dumped, move the Dump Control lever for-
ward through the Float position to the Lower position and hold, and accel-
erate the engine to rated speed. The dump body will begin to lower.

NOTE: In some instances (such as dumping on a flat surface), it may


be necessary to move the truck ahead slightly to allow complete dumping
of the payload. When this must be done, pull ahead slowly and carefully,
as far ahead as required. Bring the truck to a complete stop.

NOTE: Some trucks are equipped with an additional interlock system,


which prevents propulsion with the dump body raised. On these trucks, it
is necessary to push the Dump Body Up Override button in while moving
the truck.
69
8. When the dump body is approximately half of the way down, release
the Dump Controller lever and Throttle/Accelerator pedal. The lever will
automatically return to the Float position, and the dump body will settle
onto the frame.

Hold the Dump Controller lever in the Lower position only until the
dump body is approximately one-half the way down. Continued
powering down of the dump body will result in the dump body
striking the frame at a relatively high rate of speed as well as,
creating excessive hydraulic oil temperature. With the dump con-
trol in the Float position, the dump body will settle onto the frame.

9. If so equipped, verify that the Dump Body Up indicator is Off. Also,


verify that the dump body indicator (the hose attached to the canopy over
the cab) is visible in the windshield.

10. Verify that the anticipated path of travel away from the dump site is
free of obstacles, and that no personnel are on or around the truck.

11. Place the Shifter in the F (Forward) position.

12. Sound the appropriate blasts with the truck’s horn to indicate impend-
ing forward motion.

13. Release the Load, Hand, and Brake pedal, depress the Throttle/Ac-
celerator pedal, and drive forward.

14. Operate the truck in a safe manner, according to normal procedure.

ENGINE SHUTDOWN

To shut the engine down in normal operation:

1. Park the truck in a SAFE POSITION, as outlined under long term Park-
ing.

2. Prior to shutting the engine off, it is recommended that it be allowed to


idle for three to five minutes, to allow the lubricating oil and engine coolant
to carry heat away from the turbochargers, combustion chamber, bear-
ings, shafts, etc.

3. To shut the engine off, turn the Engine Stop/Start switch to the Stop
position.
70
NOTE: On some trucks equipped with a momentary stop type switch, it
will need to be held in the Stop position until the engine stops operating.
On trucks equipped with detented Stop position switches, it should be
left in the Stop position.

Some trucks are equipped with an optional Engine Idle Timer. This fea-
ture provides an automatic means of allowing the engine to slowly cool
prior to shutting off.

When the push-button is depressed, the engine’s internal circuitry per-


forms the following:

a. Causes the engine to operate at low idle speed, even if the Master
Switch is shut off.

b. Starts a timer that stops the engine completely, typically in the


range of 3 to 5 minutes after the button is depressed.

c. On trucks equipped with the optional Detroit Diesel DDEC elec-


tronic fuel control systems it may be necessary to turn the Master Switch
off then back on prior to restarting the engine.

4. Override features may be included which:

a. Prevent the activation of the timer system unless the park brakes
have been activated.

b. Disable the sequence if the Shifter is moved from the N (Neutral)


position.

5. As the engine oil pressure decreases, the alarm will sound. This will
stop when the Master Switch is turned Off. Upon leaving the cab, remem-
ber to switch the Master Switch to the Off position.

On trucks equipped with the optional Emergency Engine Stop switch,


the engine may be shut down by operating this control which is
located on the lower control panel, and optionally located on the
frame (depending on the requirements of the mine). However, use
of these controls is recommended only in emergencies or if the
normal controls will not stop the engine. If use of this is required to
stop the engine, report the condition immediately.

71
INSERT
RETARDING
CURVE
HERE

72
CALIFORNIA PROPOSITION 65 INFORMATION
TO CALIFORNIA CUSTOMERS AND
TO CUSTOMERS SELLING DIESEL ENGINE EQUIPMENT
INTO OR FOR USE IN CALIFORNIA
Propostion 65, a California law, requires warnings on products which expose
individuals in California to chemicals listed under the law, including certain
chemicals in diesel engine exhaust.

Obligations of Manufacturers of Diesel-Powered Off-Road Equipment. The


California Superior Court has approved either of the following two methods of
compliance with Propostion 65 requirements by manufacturers of off-road equip-
ment containing diesel engines. (The court order containing these provisions
may be furnished on request.)
1. On-Equipment Warning. Place the warning pictured in attachment 1 on all
equipment shipped by you into or for sale in California after January 1,
1996. The warning must be in a location where it is easily visible to the
operator of the equipment when (s)he is operating the equipment. The
warning must be secured to the equipment. If warnings or operating
instructions are provided through a digital display, you may use that
method of providing the warning.
2. Operator Manual Warning. When the operator manual is next revised or by
December 31, 1995, whichever is earlier, place the warning in attachment
2 in the operator manual. The warning may be either printed in the
manual or on a sticker.
The warning must appear in one of the following locations:
* Inside the front cover
* Inside the back cover
* Outside the front cover
* Outside the back cover
* As the first page of text
Under either alternative, the warning must appear in the same size, print and
format as the attachment selected or be of an equally conspicuous size and
format. If the warning is provided in an on-screen display, the warning must
contain the language in the attachment and must be provided at the time of or
in connection with ignition in the same manner as other safety warnings elec-
tronically communicated on screen.

Obligation of Resellers of Diesel Engines. This letter must accompany any


loose diesel engine sold in California.
Should you have any questions, please call Detroit Diesel Corporation, Mr.
John F. Farmer on (313) 592-7111, Fax (313) 592-5014.
Attachment 2

CALIFORNIA
Proposition 65 Warning
Diesel Engine exhaust and some of its constituents
are known to the State of California to cause cancer,
birth defects and other reproductive harm.

WARNING: Battery Posts, terminals and related acces-


sories contain lead and lead compounds, chemicals
known to the State of California to cause cancer and re-
productive harm. Wash hands after handling.

3501 S. FM Hwy 1417, Denison, TX 75020-8904


PHONE: (903) 337-4100
TELEFAX: SALES/SERVICE (903) 337-4140
http://www.terex.com