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102086: Assessment 2: Lesson Plan 16788510

102086 Designing Teaching & Learning


Assignment 2
Lesson Plan Analysis

Contents

Original Lesson Plan……………………………………………………………2


Lesson Plan Analysis…………………………………………………………...6
Modified Lesson Plan…………………………………………………………..8
Academic Justification………………………………………………………...13
References…………………………………………………………………......15
Learning Portfolio Web Link………………………………………………….15

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102086: Assessment 2: Lesson Plan 16788510

Original Lesson Plan


KLA: Human Society & its Environment
Geography

Topic area: Stage of Learner: 4 Syllabus Pages:


Place & Liveability 48-49

Date: Term 2: Week Location Booked: J4 Lesson Number: 1 / 25


One/Period One
Time: 60 minutes Total Number of students Printing/preparation
30 Advanced Organiser,
Worksheet 1
Assessment task notification

Outcomes Assessment Students learn about Students learn to

Syllabus outcomes Informal, formative Investigate factors that


GE4-1- locates and describes the assessment influence perceptions of the
diverse features and Introduction to Place and
liveability of places.
characteristics of a range of places *Diagnostic Pre- Liveability and Influence
and environments. testing during and Perceptions
GE4-7- acquires and processes introductory activity
geographical information by
selecting and using geographical *Participation in class
tools for inquiry. discussions

* Assessment of
capabilities during
visual representation
exercises

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102086: Assessment 2: Lesson Plan 16788510

Time Teaching and learning actions

Students line up outside and enter the classroom in an orderly fashion. Ask students to take their seats
and pull out their books and writing utensils.

Writing Activity-

Explain to the class that they are about to begin a new unit of work as they can see on the board- place
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and liveability. Ask students to rip a page out of their books for the next activity. Read aloud the
sentence starter on the board ‘ A good place to live is one where…..’ and ask the students to complete a
paragraph of writing in order to finish the statement. Advise the students that they have five minutes
to complete the task.

After five minutes advise students their time is up and collect their responses- this will be used for
assessment of both literacy and their level of knowledge on the topic so far.

15

Provide students with their advanced organisers and ask them to look through and ask any questions
they may have about the direction of the next ten weeks.

Provide students with Australian Curriculum definitions of Place and also Liveability below. Ask them to
copy the definitions into their workbooks and also ask them to use each word in a sentence.

“Liveability: An assessment of what a place is like to live in, using particular criteria, for example,
environmental quality, crime and safety, education and health provision, access to shops and services,
recreational facilities and cultural activities.” (Australian Curriculum, n.d)

“Place: A part of the earth’s surface that is identified and given meaning by people, which may be
perceived, experienced, understood and valued differently.” (Australian Curriculum, n.d)

20 Think/Pair/Share Activity:

Using the above definition of liveability have students think about the following, discuss in pairs and
then with the class:

 What features of their local community make it a good place to live in?

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102086: Assessment 2: Lesson Plan 16788510

25

Visual Representations Activity:

Students are to get into mixed ability groups of three or four. On the board draw three columns with
the headings:

- Environmental Factors
30 - Social Factors
- Human Factors
Provide students with their worksheets which will look very similar to the columns on the board (
Worksheet 1 attached).

Provide the groups with some photos of different places where people live and the Four Resources
model for literacy (Worksheet2).
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In their groups, ask students to complete their four resources literacy worksheet and answer the
following question for each photo:

1. Assess the liveability of each place. Include at least one feature you observe that makes this
place liveable and at least one feature that makes you feel less likely to want to live there.
While students are completing this activity, spend some time with each group to ensure that students
are on task and on the right track. Extra time could be provided to students who find group work
difficult or also who may need some extra assistance completing the task.
40

Have students come up to the whiteboard and put the factors they determined from the assessment of
liveability of each place on the board under the appropriate heading (ie- whether it is environmental
factors, human factor or social factor). If some of the answers do not fit under these headings, provide
a fourth column ‘Other’

Answers should include factors such as:

Environmental: climate, natural hazards, natural resources, natural hazards, air & water quality.

Social Factors: Culture, public spaces, community

Human Factors: access to services, safety/ crime, income, work opportunities, technology.

Have students copy these answers into their worksheet and ask them to glue it into their notebooks.
This sheet will be referred to throughout the unit.

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Class Discussion:

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102086: Assessment 2: Lesson Plan 16788510

Although some of these photos demonstrated that some places are less liveable than others, ask
students ‘ Why do people still live in these places?’

50
Facilitate class discussion and ensure that discussion includes mention of the following:

- poverty and lack of ability to move


- opportunities for work
- family ties and connections to the land

If students are not able to come up with these answers the question could be rephrased using some of
60 the pictures and the answers the students provided: “ If you lived in this town, with this violence, why
would you need to still live here?”

Provide students with assessment task notification and take student books for formative assessment of
both the pre-test and also the visual representation activity.

Set Homework: Ask students to read through the notification at home and make any notes about
anything that may be unclear. This will be discussed further in the next lesson.

Ask students if there are any other questions and when the bell rings ask the students to pack up their
belongings and leave the room.

How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?

Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording

GE4-1- locates and describes the Students will write the answers to the visual representation
diverse features and activity in their books, which will be taken for formative
characteristics of a range of
assessment.
places and environments.

GE4-7- acquires and processes Students are to work in groups to use and interpret
geographical information by photographs of different scenarios and places and identify
selecting and using geographical
features that make that these places liveable as well as
tools for inquiry.
features observed within the photograph that may make
the place less appealing to live in. Students have a series of
questions to answer in their groups. I will walk around the
room and assess the group discussions that are occurring.

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102086: Assessment 2: Lesson Plan 16788510

Furthermore, informal formative assessment will also


occur, as I will take their workbooks to read and check
students’ work.

PART B- Analysing and Modifying the Lesson Plan


102086 Designing Teaching & Learning
Quality Teaching Analysis
1 Intellectual quality
1.1 Deep knowledge
1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – Comments: Central idea focuses on livability. Teacher creates a connection to local area
5 requesting students write about features of their local community.

1.2 Deep understanding


1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – Comments: Deep understanding is addressed where teacher addresses factors of livability
5 such as crime, poverty environment. Yet no visual, spatial of relationships between various
factors livability are worked on. Considering geographical studies is a visual discourse. Map
activities are beneficial in L/P.
1.3 Problematic knowledge
1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – Comments: Problematic knowledge is evident since teacher requires conflicting
5 perspectives of culture, social, environmental perspectives to address livability. Livability
needs to be addressed as a subjective experience not a determined one.

1.4 Higher-order thinking


1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – Comments: The lesson allows for flexibility where it states “the question could be rephrased
5 using some pictures”. In order to convey advanced geographical concepts and ideas spatial
information is most appropriate in geography. Although pictures are basic, it’s a start for
lesson 1/25.

1.5 Metalanguage
1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – Comments: Place, livability, community, environment, social and human factors are all
5 examples of good metalanguage use.

1.6 Substantive communication


1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – Comments: Teacher facilitates discussion requests students to come up to whiteboard as
5 well as students to work in groups and make interpretations of photos. Interaction is high.

Quality learning environment


2.1 Explicit quality criteria
1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – Comments: Poor establishment of expectations and quality criteria. “Provide students with
5 assessment task notification” and teacher requests students to make notes of what they
think is unclear. Not focused.
2.2 Engagement
1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – Comments: Students requested to copy answers and glue in books.
5
2.3 High expectations
1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – Comments: Poor expectation and under stimulating homework for future lesson
5 preparation where teacher requests, “Students to read notification and make notes on
unclear content”. No encouragement to use digital resources google maps, google earth, or
ABS maps. Relative to contemporary society and necessary skills.

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102086: Assessment 2: Lesson Plan 16788510

2.4 Social support


1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – Comments: Students answer questions in their groups. Teacher to walk around the room
5 and assess group discussions occurring. Evidence of support.

2.5 Students’ self-regulation


1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – Comments: Minimal student-self-regulation. However, lesson is diverse in activities such as
5 group work, discussion and individual work. There is also informal assessment allowing for
students to find a way to behave in different contexts.
2.6 Student direction
1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – Comments: Student directed with diverse discussion, group work. Yet cut and paste
5 definitions is teacher directed task and repetitive exercise.

3 Significance
3.1 Background knowledge
1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – Comments: ‘A good place to live is one where…..’ teacher requires five minutes pre lesson
5 to gather information on livability and place.

3.2 Cultural knowledge


1– 2 – 3 – 4 – 5 Comments: Limited understanding, valuing and acceptance of the knowledge, skills and
understandings of diverse social groups. Indigenous perspectives not addressed. ‘Family ties
and connections to the land’ briefly mentioned yet can be included more thoroughly in this
subject.

3.3 Knowledge integration


1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – Comments: Average integration of other areas when introducing environmental factors
5 such as water quality affecting livability in a place. Could elaborate

3.4 Inclusivity
1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – Comments: Inclusivity not mentioned in lesson plan.
5
3.5 Connectedness
1 – 2 – 3 – 4 – Comments: Connectedness is introductory in mentioning poverty and work in relation to
5 livability. No public problem, natural disaster or event utilized as tool for social development

3.6 Narrative
1– 2 – 3 – 4 – 5 Comments: No story telling, or case studies, Personal perspective addressed through
question, “What features of their local community make it a good place to live in?”

Identifying Areas for Improvement


QT model
1) 1.2 Deep Understanding 2) 2.3 High expectations
3) 3.2 Cultural Knowledge 4) 3.5 Connectedness

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102086: Assessment 2: Lesson Plan 16788510

Modified Lesson Plan

Topic area: Stage of Learner: 4 Syllabus Pages: 48-49


Place & Liveability
Date: Term2, week 1, Period 1 Location Booked: J4 Lesson Number: 1 / 25
Computer room access required
Time: 60 minutes Total Number of students: Printing/preparation:
30 students Advanced Organiser,
Worksheet 1
Assessment task notification

Map of Greater Sydney region


With two variables already highlighted for cla
see and copy and draw onto their map

Worksheet of details
of unit content to raw on throughout
unit

-Computer room access for this class

Map diagram

Outcomes Assessment Students learn about Students learn to

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102086: Assessment 2: Lesson Plan 16788510

Syllabus outcomes Lesson assessment Introduction to Place and Investigate factors that
GE4-1- locates and describes the Liveability and Influence and influence perceptions of the
diverse features and Informal, formative Perceptions liveability of places.
characteristics of a range of places assessment
Interpreting maps with 2 Interpret maps
and environments.
*Diagnostic Pre- variables
GE4-7- acquires and processes Make connections with
geographical information by testing during
 Unemployment indigenous groups
selecting and using geographical introductory activity
 Indigenous displacement across Greater
tools for inquiry. displacement Sydney (real life context) and
*Participation in class
(critical thinking) suggest ways to improve
discussions 
Builds ability in verbally conveying livability for these groups
spatial information and drawing * Assess basic map Map of Greater Sydney (address a social problem)
out themes from maps and visual Region
interpretation skills
diagrams - Digital access to
and level of
computers for brief map
engagement and search exercise
Familiarize students with maps
explanation. Desire Highlighting
through increased exposure.
to go further into - Unemployment rates
analysis Link to 2nd variable
- Indigenous marginalization / socio-
economic disadvantage

Time Teaching and learning actions


INTRO

5 minutes Students line up outside and enter the classroom in an orderly fashion. Ask students to take their seats and pull out
their books and writing utensils.

WRITING ACTIVITY / SEARCH MAP COMPUTER AND COPY SYDNEY MAP FROM BOARD
10
minutes Explain to the class that they are about to begin a new unit of work as they can see on the board- place and
liveability. Ask students to discuss what they think, ‘A good place to live is one where?’.

Class discussion, hands to be raised on answer. Have student’s brain storm openly and write answers down as we
speak. Class interaction. No individual writing task.

This will be used for assessment of both literacy and their level of knowledge on the topic so far.

Advise the students we have five minutes to come up with as many answers as possible, be creative as we will use
these answers to identify a social problem later in the class

Finish and students to log on to computers and access Google maps.

GE4-7 Students are then to follow instructions


 access Google maps
 Search: Greater Western Sydney
 Print map
 Students to Copy two variables off my diagram on board onto their sheet (unemployment and low socio-
economic groups in Sydney)

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102086: Assessment 2: Lesson Plan 16788510

BODY Walk around room and check work and map interpretation from board is correct. After five minutes advise students
to check and collect their maps for brief check and mark off complete.
15
minutes Provide students with their advanced organisers and ask them to look through and ask any questions they may have
about the direction of the next ten weeks.

Provide students with Australian Curriculum definitions of Place and also Liveability below. Worksheet provided no
copy of definitions or dictation or use of words in a sentence. Liveability and place to be conveyed through map and
oral explanation. Informal formative assessment, walk around class.

“Liveability: An assessment of what a place is like to live in, using particular criteria, for example, environmental
quality, crime and safety, education and health provision, access to shops and services, recreational facilities and
cultural activities.” (Australian Curriculum, n.d)

“Place: A part of the earth’s surface that is identified and given meaning by people, which may be perceived,
experienced, understood and valued differently.” (Australian Curriculum, n.d)

Think/Pair/Share Activity:

20- mins Using the above definition of liveability have students think about the following, discuss in pairs and then with the
class:

What features of their local community make it a good place to live in?

Visual Representations Activity:


30-mins

Students are to get into mixed ability groups of three or four. On the board draw three columns with the headings:

- Environmental Factors
- Social Factors
- Human Factors
Provide students with their worksheets which will look very similar to the columns on the board ( Worksheet 1
attached).

Provide the groups with some photos of different places where people live and the Four Resources model for
literacy (Worksheet2).

In their groups, ask students to complete their four resources literacy worksheet and answer the following question
for each photo:

2. Assess the liveability of each place. Include at least one feature you observe that makes this place liveable
and at least one feature that makes you feel less likely to want to live there.
3. Then ask the students to identify how would they fix or what would they do to change this problem to
reduce inequality or disadvantage? (connectedness, ADDRESS A SOCIAL ISSUE AND SOLVE IT, encourage
creative ideas)
e.g FOR poverty and unemployment how could the students make an area more liveable.
-Students to incorporate a solution to their issue such as community groups,
-better schools
-council petitions
-VET education

45-mins Their answer should contain some form of community cohesion and encourage changes that promote the
social good and civic education. Draw on their understanding of their role in society.

While students are completing this activity, spend some time with each group to ensure that students are on task
and on the right track. Extra time could be provided to students who find group work difficult or also who may need
some extra assistance completing the task.

Have students come up to the whiteboard and put the factors they determined from the assessment of liveability of
each place on the board under the appropriate heading (ie- whether it is environmental factors, human factor or

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102086: Assessment 2: Lesson Plan 16788510

social factor). If some of the answers do not fit under these headings, provide a fourth column ‘Other’

Answers should include factors such as:

Environmental: climate, natural hazards, natural resources, natural hazards, air & water quality.

Social Factors: Culture, public spaces, community

Human Factors: access to services, safety/ crime, income, work opportunities, technology.

Have students copy these answers into their worksheet and ask them to glue it into their notebooks. This sheet will
be referred to throughout the unit. (Removed task and provide students with already constructed sheet to draw on
throughout unit, minimal dictation)

50-mins Class Discussion:


Although some of these photos demonstrated that some places are less liveable than others, ask students ‘ Why do
people still live in these places?’

Facilitate class discussion and ensure that discussion includes mention of the following:

- poverty and lack of ability to move


- opportunities for work
- family ties and connections to the land
GE4-1 Introduce a challenged perspective that addresses indigenous marginalisation (CULTURAL KNOWLEDGE).
Aboriginal recognition of land. Displaced and marginalized communities as well as perspective of what it means to
have a community that supports each other.

“If you lived in this town, with this violence, why would you need to still live here?” Guide students to
understanding the value of community for certain groups and why they remain intact regardless of socio-economic
60-mins disadvantage.

Provide students with assessment task notification and take student books for formative assessment of both the
pre-test and also the visual representation activity.

Set Homework:

Administer homework activity task that utilises online resources

1) access google maps

2) download image of Greater Sydney

3) highlight areas discussed of unemployment and Indigenous groups already identified in class

4) Find a new phenomenon (their choice through discovery) to do with liveability and inequality and make a link to
the 2 variables identified in the lesson.

5) begin next lesson with some phenomena found for further discussion

Ask students if there are any other questions and when the bell rings ask the students to pack up their belongings
and leave the room.

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102086: Assessment 2: Lesson Plan 16788510

Conclusion GE4-1- locates and describes the diverse features and characteristics of a range of places and
environments.
Addressed with;
1) map of Sydney
2) two socio-economic variables addressed unemployment and indigenous marginalization

GE4-7 is better acquired in the updated lesson plan we going onto google maps and using this resources as a tool for
geographical enquiry.

The updated lesson plan addresses learning outcomes more thorough and place specific, i.e Sydney

FINAL: Teacher will ask some questions will prompt some key learning areas of the lesson

How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?

Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording

GE4-1- locates and describes the Students will write the answers to the visual representation
diverse features and activity in their books, which will be taken for formative
characteristics of a range of assessment.
places and environments.

GE4-7- acquires and processes Students are to work in groups to use and interpret photographs
geographical information by of different scenarios and places and identify features that make
selecting and using geographical that these places liveable as well as features observed within the
tools for inquiry. photograph that may make the place less appealing to live in.
Students have a series of questions to answer in their groups.

Groups will be assessed on their ability to demonstrate an


understanding of how to address a social problem from these
themes and encourage the creation of a solution to their
problem. Will explain relationship to civic duties and how we can
make changes in the present time. I will walk around the room
and assess

Utilise computer aided and Interpret geographic maps and


online geographical resources:
Maps to be collected and marked
Access google maps and copy
two variables from board onto
map

Draw out a solution for a social Informal formative assessment of maps and understanding of
problem derived from the concepts

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102086: Assessment 2: Lesson Plan 16788510

problematic areas related to


livability

PART C- Academic Justification

The lesson plan addresses central elements and themes related to geographical studies, yet activities
were vague and introductory. The lesson plan has been predominantly modified using the NSW
Quality Teaching Model (Ladwig and Gore, 2009) in order to develop a more thorough lesson plan
that acknowledges appropriate geographical skills in lesson 1/25. The modified lesson plan
encourages the use of, technology, localised places, relevant and local social issues as well as
addressing cultural inequalities that stimulate an understanding of a wide range of concepts such as
civil education. Informal formative assessment still remains as a form of assessment as themes can be
explained differently through subjective experience and interpretation thus allowing for flexibility in
answers.

Element 1.2 Deep Understanding is the first to be adjusted. The lesson plan failed to include visual
maps in regards to interpreting liveability and place in the Australian context. There was no
determined/specific location and the concepts of place and liveability were vague with little detail
given to addressing specific analysis such as “Sydney” as a place. This adjustment makes the lesson
relational to contemporary circumstances. Thus, the initial ‘cut and paste’ definitions were removed
and worksheet with already outlined content was given. This left time for computer access, a google
search on ‘GOOGLE MAPS’ and a Greater Western Sydney map to be printed. What emerges is a
unique spatial skill in a three dimensional map, which now exposes students to new skills and abilities
of map and image interpretation and familiarity. Deep understanding is met by; 1) the use of
technology 2) autonomous searching 3) spatial interpretation and map analysis. Egan (2018) suggests
it is not about what is taught but how content is taught in regards to methods and procedures used. The
geography lesson becomes enhanced through the use of computer and online resources which are part
of a student’s necessary skills. Students were too incorporate their own artistic element when copying
the two variables unemployment and socio-economic disadvantage from the board.

Element 3.2 Cultural Knowledge was addressed at the end of the lesson in regards to the question “If
you lived in this town, with this violence, why would you need to still live here?” The final concept of
community was introduced and students were required to reason and discuss why disadvantaged
groups remain concentrated in these areas. Their maps from the start of the lesson highlight these
areas spatially and thus acknowledges minority groups spread across Sydney. This concept pays
respect to Aboriginal communities by recognising certain inequalities and allows students to

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102086: Assessment 2: Lesson Plan 16788510

understand that ‘liveability’ is not just only related to their own perspective but also that certain
communities have a ‘connection to the land’. Jorgensen (2010) suggests tests are culturally
inappropriate whilst Ford (2012) suggests that there are discriminatory policies steeped in racialized
discourses applicable to indigenous people and can be named institutional racism. As such, by
addressing the indigenous perspective we remove western bias from the lesson and allow for
indigenous perspectives to be recognised. This addition does not change the lesson but builds on a
better cultural understanding and acknowledges that liveability is a relative subject experience rather
than a fixed one.

Element 2.3 High Expectations is poorly addressed where the teacher administers vague homework,
“Ask students to read through the notification at home and make any notes about anything that may be
unclear”. The homework task was modified to repeat the instructions given in class at home by
accessing google maps and finding and applying a new social phenomena that can be interrelated with
the two previous socio-economic variables outlined in the lesson. This change allows students to
become familiar with geographical information systems. It engages use of technology, public
resources that are relevant whilst incorporating critical thinking skills and assists students in
conveying information spatially. This is also a form of differentiated instruction which allows
students with diverse needs to access the same curriculum with different learning tasks and outcomes
tailored to students (Watts-Taffe et al., 2012). This works well for students who have trouble conveying
textual information. Fogarty & Pete (2011) suggest that, students with learning disabilities, such as
dyslexia, may better learn through kinesthetic learning methods that are hands on and tangible when
learning new information. Furthermore, Gore (2007) suggests that high expectations reminds teachers
to avoid labelling students who appear to be disengaged and in turn provide support.

Element 3.5 Connectedness is addressed by creating an activity that allows students to find a solution
to their social problem. If their problem was environmental, they may require a community clean-up
plan or build better water management and waste systems. Ladwig and Gore (2009) state that
connectedness advocates solutions to social problems, providing assistance to people, or creating
performances or products and exploring their utilitarian or aesthetic value. This acknowledges
students education on civic duties as well as encompassing twenty-first century skills; e.g. literacy,
critical thinking skills (Savage & O’Connor, 2015).

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102086: Assessment 2: Lesson Plan 16788510

Reference List

Gore, J. (2007). Improving pedagogy: The challenges of moving teachers toward higher levels of
quality teaching. In J. Butcher & L. McDonald (Eds.), Making a difference: Challenges for
teachers, teaching, and teacher education (pp. 15-33). Rotterdam, The Netherlands: Sense
Publishers.
Egan, K. (1978). What is curriculum? Curriculum Inquiry, 8(1), 65-72. doi:
10.1080/03626784.1978.11075558
Fogarty, R,J. & Pete, B, M. ( McTighe, J. Ed.). (2011). Supporting Differentiated Instruction: A
professional Learning communities Approach
Ford, M. (2012). Achievement gaps in Australia: what NAPLAN reveals about education inequality in
Australia, Race Ethnicity and Education, 16:1, 80-102, DOI: 10.1080/13613324.2011.645570
Jorgensen, R. (2010). Structured failing: Reshaping a mathematical future for marginalized learners.
In shaping the future of mathematics education: Proceedings of the 33rd annual conference of
the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia, ed. L. Sparrow, B. Kissane and C.
Hurst, 26–35. Fremantle: MERGA. http://
www.merga.net.au/documents/MERGA33_Keynote_Jorgensen.pdf.
Ladwig, J. & Gore, J. (2009) Quality teaching in NSW public schools: A classroom practice guide.
Department of Education and training, NSW, Australia
Savage, G. C., & O'Connor, K. (2015). National agendas in global times: Curriculum reforms in
Australia and the USA since the 1980s. Journal of Education Policy, 30(5), 609-630.
doi:10.1080/02680939.2014.969321.
Watts‐Taffe, S., Laster, B., Broach, L., Marinak, B., McDonald Connor, C., & Walker ‐
Dalhouse, D. (2012). Differentiated Instruction: Making Informed Teacher
Decisions. Reading Teacher, 66(4), 303-314.

Learning Portfolio web link

https://mjfederici.weebly.com/

mjfhttps://mjfederici.weebly.com/ederici.weebly.com

mjfederici.weebly.com

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