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Suci Apriliana Pertiwi

PBI 5D
Extensive Reading

1. What do you think about extensive reading ? Elaborate!


Answer:
Extensive Reading (ER) is an approach to second language reading. When learners read
extensively, they read very easy, enjoyable books to build their reading speed and fluency.
Another way to say this is students learn to read by actually reading rather than examining texts
by studying the vocabulary, grammar and phrases. It is instructive to compare Intensive Reading
(IR) with Extensive Reading. Extensive Reading gives students chances to read longer pieces of
reading, which they choose, which they can read at their own speed and at their own ability level.
This can be done with Graded readers.

2. What do you think about Evaluating idea, Generalizing, Taking Note, Outlining,
Summarizing, Underlining, ?
Answer:
- Evaluating Idea
Evaluating is a reading strategy that is conducted during and after reading. This involves
encouraging the reader to form opinions, make judgments, and develop ideas from reading.
Teachers can create evaluative questions that will lead the student to make generalizations
about and critically evaluate a text
- Generalizing
generalization is defined as a broad statement or an idea that is applied to a group of people
or things. Often, generalizations are not entirely true, because there are usually examples of
individuals or situations wherein the generalization does not apply. In this respect,
generalizations can be similar to stereotypes in that they are sometimes offensive.
- Taking Note
Taking note is the practice of recording information captured from another source. By taking
notes, the writer records the essence of the information, freeing their mind from having to
recall everything.[1] Notes are commonly drawn from a transient source, such as an oral
discussion at a meeting, or a lecture (notes of a meeting are usually called minutes), in which
case the notes may be the only record of the event. Note taking is a form of self discipline.
- Outlining
An outline help a reader understand the topic of a reading by looking at the organization of
the details in the passage. Readers can use two types of outlines when breaking down the
information in a reading
- Summarizing
Summarizing is how we take larger selections of text and reduce them to their bare essentials:
the gist, the key ideas, the main points that are worth noting and remembering. Webster's.
calls a summary the "general idea in brief form"; it's the distillation, condensation, or
reduction of a larger work into its primary notions.
- Underlining
This strategy helps students reduce a lengthy passage into a comprehensible and manageable
size by marking the text using a systematic technique. On the FCAT, students are allowed to
write on the passages to be read. Therefore, if they have been trained to underline effectively,
they may be able to increase their comprehension.

3. How to handle teaching reading?


Answer:
There are some ways to handle in teaching reading :
 They develop students' awareness of the reading process and reading strategies by asking
students to think and talk about how they read in their native language.
 They allow students to practice the full repertoire of reading strategies by using authentic
reading tasks. They encourage students to read to learn (and have an authentic purpose
for reading) by giving students some choice of reading material.
 When working with reading tasks in class, they show students the strategies that will
work best for the reading purpose and the type of text. They explain how and why
students should use the strategies.
 They have students practice reading strategies in class and ask them to practice outside of
class in their reading assignments. They encourage students to be conscious of what
they're doing while they complete reading assignments.
 They encourage students to evaluate their comprehension and self-report their use of
strategies. They build comprehension checks into in-class and out-of-class reading
assignments, and periodically review how and when to use particular strategies.
 They encourage the development of reading skills and the use of reading strategies by
using the target language to convey instructions and course-related information in written
form: office hours, homework assignments, test content.
 They do not assume that students will transfer strategy use from one task to another. They
explicitly mention how a particular strategy can be used in a different type of reading task
or with another skill.

By raising students' awareness of reading as a skill that requires active engagement, and
by explicitly teaching reading strategies, instructors help their students develop both the
ability and the confidence to handle communication situations they may encounter beyond
the classroom. In this way they give their students the foundation for communicative
competence in the new language.

4. What is the stand for of RFD, RBL, and RFP ? Elaborate


Answer:
- RFD (Reading For Detail)
Reading for detail. Can mean that when you read you pay very close attention to each and
every detail in the reading such as dates, quantities, and names.
- RBL (Reading Between the Line)
Treading between the line is to understand something that is hidden or implied.
- RFP (Reading For Pleasure)
Reading for pleasure is an activity that has emotional and social consequences and other
benefits include text comprehension and grammar, positive reading attitudes, pleasure in
reading in later life, and increased general knowledge.

5. How many stages of process of teaching Reading? Elaborate !


Answer:
The Three Stages Of Reading strategy involves teaching students to delve into text. The
Before Reading stage provides a scaffold for new concepts and vocabulary, promotes engagement
and provides a means for prediction. The second stage, During Reading, allows students to
integrate the knowledge and information they bring to the text with ‘new’ information in the text.
The last stage, After Reading, allows students to articulate and process their understanding of
what they have read and to think critically about the validity of the text. Or we can elaborate like
this :
- Pre – reading
 Establish a purpose for reading
 Activate prior knowledge
 Present new concepts and key vocabulary
 Ask students what information they predict to be included in the text
 Preview test
- While – reading
 Students read, comprehend, clarify, visualize and build connections
 Students integrate the knowledge and information they bring to the text with new
information in the text
 Pay attention to the structure of the text
 Read to achieve the purpose for reading
 Think about answers for certain questions
 Determine the meaning of unfamiliar words and concepts
- Post – reading
 Students expand prior knowledge, build connections and deepen understanding
 Students show their understanding of what they have read by answering some
comprehension questions
 Evaluate the value and quality of the text
 Respond to the text by discussingits main ideas
6. How many language skills do you know? Elaborate
Answer:
People generally learn these four skills in the following order:
a. Listening is the first language skill we acquire in our native language. It is what is known as
a receptive skill, or a passive skill, as it requires us to use our ears and our brains to
comprehend language as it is being spoken to us. It is the first of two natural language skills,
which are required by all natural spoken languages.

b. Speaking is the second language skill we acquire in our native language. It is what is known
as a productive skill, or an active skill, as it requires us to use our vocal tract and our brains to
correctly produce language through sound. It is the second of two natural language skills.

c. Reading is the third language skill we may acquire in our native language. As with listening,
it is a receptive, or passive skill, as it requires us to use our eyes and our brains to
comprehend the written equivalent of spoken language. It is one of the two artificial language
skills, as not all natural spoken languages have a writing system.

d. Writing is the fourth language skill we may acquire in our native language. As with
speaking, it is a productive, or active skill, as it requires us to use our hands and our brains to
produce the written symbols that represent our spoken language. Along with reading, it is one
of the two artificial language skills, as not all natural spoken languages have a writing system.

7. What is the different between language skill and language components?


Answer:
The languange skill of listening contain the language components of vocabulary and structure;
speaking--sound, vocabulary and structure; reading--vocabulary and structure as writing does.
Harris view was a static one as it ignored the dynamic nature of language use which causes the
skills to be interchangeable requiring participants in the interactional and transactional discourses
to negotiate ideas, feelings and understanding .
Both skills and components are nuts and bolts of language. The former may be compared to bone
or skeletal structure of a human flesh body while the latter to the human
flesh. They must be together for form a complete living human being. In language testing, to test
language component alone void of skill is called discrete-point testing.

8. How many figurees of speech do you know? Elaborate


Answer:
 Euphemism: The substitution of an inoffensive term for one considered offensively
explicit. Example: "We're teaching our toddler how to go potty," Bob said.
 Hyperbole: An extravagant statement; the use of exaggerated terms for the purpose of
emphasis or heightened effect. Example: I have a ton of things to do when I get home.
 Irony: The use of words to convey the opposite of their literal meaning. Also, a statement or
situation where the meaning is contradicted by the appearance or presentation of the idea.
Example: "Oh, I love spending big bucks," said my dad, a notorious penny pincher.
 Litotes: A figure of speech consisting of an understatement in which an affirmative is
expressed by negating its opposite. Example: A million dollars is no small chunk of change.
 Metaphor: An implied comparison between two dissimilar things that have something in
common. Example: "All the world's a stage."
 Metonymy: A figure of speech in a word or phrase is substituted for another with which it's
closely associated; also, the rhetorical strategy of describing something indirectly by referring
to things around it.
 Personification: in personofocation inamimate objects and abstract notions are spoken of as
having life and intelligence. Example: “In saxon strength that abbey frowned”
 Apostrophe: an apostrophe is a direct address to the dead, to the absent, or to a personified
object or idea. Example: “ Milton! Thou should”st be living at this hour.
 Euphemism: consists in the description of a disagreeable thing by an agreenle name.
Example: “He has fallen asleep”
 Antithesis: is a striking opposition or cpntrast of words or sentiments is made in the same
sentence. It is employed to secure emphasis. Example: “ Man proposes, God disposes”
 Simile : is a figure of speech that makes a comparison, showing similarities between
two different things. Unlike a metaphor, a simile draws resemblance with the help of
the words “like” or “as.” Therefore, it is a direct comparison. Example : “John is as
slow as a snail”.
 Oxymoron: is a special from antithesis , whereby two contradictory qualities are
predicted at once of the same thing. Example: “His honour rooted in dishonor stood”
 Epigram: is a brief pointed saying frequently introducing anthithetical ideas which
excite surprise and arrest attention. Example: “the child is father of the man”
 Pun: a pun consists in the use of a word in such a way that it is capable of more than
one application, the object being to produce a ludicrous effect. Example: “is life worth
living? It depends upon the liver”
 Synecdoche: inthis a part is used to designate the whole to designate a part.
 Transpered Epithet: in this figure an ephitet is transferred from its proper word to
another that is closely associated with it in the sentence. Example: “He passed a
sleepless night”
 Interrogation: is the asking of a question not for the sake of getting an answer, but to
put a point more effectively. Example: “ Am I my brother’s keeper?”
 Climax: is the arrangement of a series of ideas in the order of increasing importance
Example: “simple, crect, severe, austere, sublime.
 Anticlimax: is the opposite of climax a sudden descent from higer to lower. It is
chiefly used from the porpuse of satire or ridicule. Example: “Here thou, great Anna!
Whom three realms obey, dost sometimes counsel take and sometimes tea.

9. What is the relationship between language skill and language components?


Answer:
Language has been analysed as being composed of skills--listening, speaking, reading,
writing and component-sound, vocabulary, structure. The Language skill of listening contain the
language components of vocabulary and structure; speaking--sound, vocabulary and structure;
reading--vocabulary and structure as writing does. Harris view was a static one as it ignored the
dynamic nature of language use which causes the skills to be interchangeable requiring
participants in the interactional and transactional discourses to negotate ideas, feelings and
understanding.
Both skills and components are nuts and bolts of language. The former may be compared
to bone or skeletal structure of a human flesh body while the latter to the human
flesh. They must be together for form a complete living human being. In language testing, to test
Language component alone void of skill is called Discrete point testing

10. What are personification, Hyperbole, simile, thesis, and antithesis ?


Answer:

Hyperbole: An extravagant statement; the use of exaggerated terms for the purpose of
emphasis or heightened effect. Example: I have a ton of things to do when I get home.

Simile : is a figure of speech that makes a comparison, showing similarities between two
different things. Unlike a metaphor, a simile draws resemblance with the help of the
words “like” or “as.” Therefore, it is a direct comparison. Example : John is as slow as a
snail.

Thesis : The world has a beginning in time, and is limited with regard to space."

Anthithesis : The world has no beginning and no limits in space, but is infinite, in respect
to both time and space