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U.S Department of State Operations Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security The Under

U.S Department of State

Operations

Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security

The Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security, (position vacant), leads the interagency policy process on nonproliferation and manages global U.S. security policy, principally in the areas of nonproliferation, arms control, regional security and defense relations, and arms transfers and security assistance. This entails overseeing the negotiation, implementation, and verification of international agreements in arms control and international security. Other specific responsibilities include directing and coordinating export control policies and policies to prevent missile, nuclear, chemical, biological, and conventional weapons proliferation. All of these contribute to the State Department’s strategic goal of countering threats to the United States and the international order. The Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security serves as a Senior Adviser to the President and the Secretary of State. The Bureau of Arms Control, Verification and Compliance, the Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation, and the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs report to the Under Secretary.

Detail:

The International Security Advisory Board(I.S.A.B) provides the Department with independent insight and advice on all aspects of arms control, disarmament, non proliferation, international security, and related aspects of public diplomacy. The ISAB is sponsored and overseen by the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security. The Board provides its recommendations to the Secretary of State. Board members are national security experts with scientific, military, diplomatic, and political backgrounds. The Board meets in a plenary session on a quarterly basis.

Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights

The Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights leads State Department efforts

to prevent and counter threats to civilian security, such as violent extremism, mass atrocities, and weak governance and the rule of law. The seven bureaus and offices reporting to the Under Secretary advance the security of the American people by assisting countries around the world to build more democratic, secure, stable, and just societies.

● Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations (CSO)

● Bureau of Counterterrorism and Countering Violent Extremism (CT/CVE)

● Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor (DRL)

● Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL)

● Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM)

● Office of Global Criminal Justice (GCJ)

● Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (TIP)

Under Secretary for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment

The Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment leads the State Department’s efforts to develop and implement international policies related to economic growth, energy, agriculture, the ocean, the environment, and science and technology.

The Assistant Secretaries of the functional bureaus and offices in the E family advise the Under Secretary and guide the policy direction within their jurisdiction. They include the following:

● Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs

● Bureau of Energy Resources

● Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs

● Office of the Chief Economist

● Office of the Science & Technology Adviser

These officials work closely under the leadership of the Under Secretary and with the Department’s regional bureaus and U.S. embassies and Consulates overseas to:

● Advance the Department’s economic development agenda;

● Elevate and intensify our efforts related to energy security, clean energy, and environmental sustainability; and

● Foster innovation through robust science, entrepreneurship, and technology policies. The Under Secretary is the designated Ombudsperson for the U.S.-EU and U.S.-Swiss Privacy Shield Frameworks.

Under Secretary for Management

The following bureaus and offices report to the Under Secretary for Management:

● Bureau of Administration

Bureau of Budget and Planning

Bureau of the Comptroller and Global Financial Services

Bureau of Consular Affairs

Bureau of Diplomatic Security

Bureau of Human Resources

Bureau of Information Resource Management

Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations

Director of Diplomatic Reception Rooms

Foreign Service Institute

Office of Management Policy, Rightsizing, and Innovation

Office of Medical Services

● Office of White House Liaison

The Under Secretary for Management is the State Department's representative on the President's Management Council, and is the Department official responsible for implementing the President's Management Agenda (PMA). The PMA is a set of management initiatives designed to make government more citizen-centered, effective, and efficient. There are five government-wide PMA initiatives: Human Capital (lead: Bureau of Human Resources); E-Government (Bureau of Information Resource Management); Competitive Sourcing (Bureau of Administration); Financial Management, and Budget and Performance Integration. The Department is also working with the White House Office of Management and Budget on the PMA initiative focused on "rightsizing" the U.S. Government's overseas presence.

Under Secretary for Political Affairs

The Under Secretary for Political Affairs, (position vacant)., serves as the day-to-day manager of overall regional and bilateral policy issues, and oversees the bureaus for Africa, East Asia and the Pacific, Europe and Eurasia, the Near East, South and Central Asia, the Western Hemisphere, and International Organizations. The Assistant Secretaries of the geographic bureaus and offices advise the Under Secretary and guide the operation of the U.S. diplomatic missions within their regional jurisdiction. They are assisted by Deputy Assistant Secretaries, office directors, post management officers, and country desk officers. These officials work closely with U.S. embassies and consulates overseas and with foreign embassies in Washington, DC. The Bureau of International Organization Affairs (IO) develops and implements the policies of the U.S. Government within the United Nations and its affiliated agencies, as well as within certain other international organizations. The IO Bureau engages in what is known as multilateral diplomacy to promote and defend the many overlapping interests of the American people. The IO Bureau also promotes effective and efficient management within international organizations.

Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs

The mission of American public diplomacy is to support the achievement of U.S. foreign policy goals and objectives, advance national interests, and enhance national security by informing and influencing foreign publics and by expanding and strengthening the relationship between the people and Government of the United States and citizens of the rest of the world. The Acting Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs, (position vacant), leads America's public diplomacy outreach, which includes messaging to counter terrorism and violent extremism. The Acting Under Secretary oversees the bureaus of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Public Affairs, and International Information Programs, as well as the Global Engagement Center, and participates in foreign policy development. The following bureaus and offices report to the Acting Under Secretary:

● Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA)

● Bureau of International Information Programs (IIP)

● Bureau of Public Affairs (PA)

● Global Engagement Center (GEC)

● Office of Policy, Planning and Resources (R/PPR)

● Expo Unit (EXPO)

Policy Issues taken by the Department of State

U.S. Anti-Corruption Efforts

Around the world, corruption saps economic growth, hinders development, destabilizes governments, undermines democracy, and provides openings for dangerous groups like criminals, traffickers, and terrorists.

The U.S. Department of State has made anti-corruption a national security priority and works across the globe to prevent graft, promote accountability, and empower reformers. The Department’s global anti-corruption efforts have three elements:

1. Preventing Corruption & Increasing Accountability: We assist countries committed to tackling corruption by both strengthening democratic institutions and building new support for reform by empowering citizen advocates to hold governments accountable to global standards.

2. Strengthening Law Enforcement Across Borders: We work with global partners to enhance law enforcement cooperation across borders, improve data sharing between major financial hubs, and develop tools to recover stolen assets.

3. Tackling the Corruption-Security Nexus: We address corruption in the security arena,

exposing how corruption threatens national security and the ability to protect citizens, defeat terrorists, and defend national sovereignty. By prioritizing anti-corruption, the Department of State seeks to make it even harder for criminals and terrorists to take root and spread, to promote governments that are more stable and accountable, and to level the playing field for U.S. businesses to compete in every region.

Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL)

“Security Through Justice”

INL works to keep Americans safe at home by countering international crime, illegal drugs, and instability abroad. INL helps countries deliver justice and fairness by strengthening their police, courts, and corrections systems. These efforts reduce the amount of crime and illegal drugs reaching U.S. shores.

the amount of crime and illegal drugs reaching U.S. shores. Combating Crime and Corruption INL combats

Combating Crime and Corruption

INL combats crime by helping foreign governments build effective law enforcement institutions that counter transnational crime—everything from money laundering, cybercrime, and intellectual property theft to trafficking in goods, people, weapons, drugs, or endangered wildlife. INL combats corruption by helping governments and civil society build transparent and accountable public institutions—a cornerstone of strong, stable, and fair societies that offer a level playing field for U.S. businesses abroad.

Addressing Illicit Drug Challenges

INL approaches the illegal drug trade from both the security and public health perspectives. By reducing the demand for and supply of illicit drugs, INL programs:

● Develop and sustain drug prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, and aftercare abroad;

● Help countries reduce illegal drug production;

● Support other means of livelihood to bolster legitimate economies; and

● Help prevent drug-related gang recruitment.

Supporting Rights and Justice

INL works with these partners to fight injustice and promote laws and court systems that are fair, legitimate and accountable. INL’s training, technical assistance, and mentoring:

● Make courts and legal systems more fair and transparent;

● Develop judges, prosecutors, and investigators who are highly skilled and accountable;

● Improve correctional facilities and prisoner treatment standards;

● Encourage women to join law enforcement and legal fields;

● Combat gender-based violence and hate crimes, and aid survivors.

women to join law enforcement and legal fields; ● Combat gender-based violence and hate crimes, and
women to join law enforcement and legal fields; ● Combat gender-based violence and hate crimes, and

Bureau of Counterterrorism and Countering Violent Extremism

The Bureau of Counterterrorism and Countering Violent Extremism’s mission is to promote U.S. national security by taking a leading role in developing coordinated strategies and approaches to defeat terrorism abroad and securing the counterterrorism cooperation of international partners.

2016 Country Reports on Terrorism

This report provides the Department of State’s annual, statutorily mandated assessment of trends and events in international terrorism that transpired in 2016, including country-by-country breakdowns of foreign government counterterrorism cooperation, and profiles of designated Foreign Terrorist Organizations.

and profiles of designated Foreign Terrorist Organizations. https://www.state.gov/j/ct/rls/crt/2016/index.htm Office of

Office of the Coordinator for Cyber Issues

In partnership with other countries, the State Department is leading the U.S. Government’s efforts to promote an open, interoperable, secure, and reliable information and communications infrastructure that supports international trade and commerce, strengthens international security, and fosters free expression and innovation. To more effectively advance the full range of U.S. interests in cyberspace, the Office of the Coordinator for Cyber Issues (S/CCI) was established in February 2011. Office of the Coordinator for Cyber Issues (State/S/CCI) S/CCI brings together the many elements in the State Department working on cyber issues. Its responsibilities include:

● Coordinating the Department's global diplomatic engagement on cyber issues

● Serving as the Department's liaison to the White House and federal departments and agencies on these issues

● Advising the Secretary and Deputy Secretaries on cyber issues and engagements

● Acting as liaison to public and private sector entities on cyber issues

● Coordinating the work of regional and functional bureaus within the Department engaged in these areas Contact us at departmentofstate.sos.gov@gmail.com

The Global Coalition To Defeat ISIS

On September 10, 2014, the U.S. announced the formation of a broad international coalition to defeat The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS).

THE ISIS THREAT:

A GLOBAL CHALLENGE

The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has dramatically undermined stability in Iraq, Syria and the broader Middle East and poses a threat to international peace and security. ISIS continues to commit gross, systematic abuses of human rights and violations of international law, including indiscriminate killing and deliberate targeting of civilians, mass executions and extrajudicial killings, persecution of individuals and entire communities on the basis of their identity, kidnapping of civilians, forced displacement of Shia communities and minority groups, killing and maiming of children, rape and other forms of sexual violence, along with numerous other atrocities. ISIS presents a global terrorist threat which has recruited thousands of foreign fighters to Iraq and Syria from across the globe and leveraged technology to spread its violent extremist ideology and to incite terrorist acts. As noted in UN Security Council Resolution 2170, “terrorism can only be defeated by a sustained and comprehensive approach involving the active participation and collaboration of all States… which is why our first priority is to encourage others to join in this important endeavor.”

THE GLOBAL COALITION TO DEGRADE AND DEFEAT ISIS

THE GLOBAL COALITION TO DEGRADE AND DEFEAT ISIS A meeting of the Counter-ISIS Coalition in Brussels,

A meeting of the Counter-ISIS Coalition in Brussels, December 3, 2014

THE FIVE LINES OF EFFORT

Five mutually reinforcing lines of effort to degrade and defeat ISIS were put forth at an early September 2014 meeting with NATO counterparts. These lines of effort include:

1. Providing military support to our partners;

2. Impeding the flow of foreign fighters;

3. Stopping financing and funding;

4. Addressing humanitarian crises in the region; and

5. Exposing true nature.

The U.S. emphasizes that there is a role for every country to play in degrading and defeating ISIS. Some partners are contributing to the military effort, by providing arms, equipment, training, or advice. These partners include countries in Europe and in the Middle East region that are contributing to the air campaign against ISIS targets. International contributions, however, are not

solely or even primarily military contributions. The effort to degrade and ultimately defeat ISIS will require reinforcing multiple lines of effort, including preventing the flow of funds and fighters to ISIS, and exposing its true nature. Humanitarian assistance to those affected by the conflict is equally important to meeting urgent needs and maintaining regional stability, and contributions to humanitarian assistance, including a critical contribution of $500 million by Saudi Arabia to the humanitarian response in Iraq, have been essential. With the needs of vulnerable civilians continuing to grow, additional contributions from the international community are necessary in order to address the greatest needs—including shelter, food and water, medicine and education.

Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor

Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor Promoting freedom and democracy and protecting human rights around
Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor Promoting freedom and democracy and protecting human rights around
Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor Promoting freedom and democracy and protecting human rights around

Promoting freedom and democracy and protecting human rights around the world are central to U.S. foreign policy. The values captured in the Universal Declaration of Human Rightsand in other global and regional commitments are consistent with the values upon which the United States was founded centuries ago. The United States supports those persons who long to live in freedom and under democratic governments that protect universally accepted human rights. The United States uses a wide range of tools to advance a freedom agenda, including bilateral diplomacy, multilateral engagement, foreign assistance, reporting and public outreach, and economic sanctions. The United States is committed to working with democratic partners, international and regional organizations, non-governmental organizations, and engaged citizens to support those seeking freedom. The Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor leads the U.S. efforts to promote democracy, protect human rightsand international religious freedom, and advance labor rightsglobally.

Release of 2017 Annual Report on International Religious Freedom

Secretary Murphy (June 1, 2018): "This report is a testament to the United States' historic role

Religious freedom

was vital to America's beginning. Defending it is critical to our future. Religious freedom is

not only ours. It is a right belonging to every individual on the globe."

in preserving and advocating for religious freedom around the

"The Human Rights Reports are the most comprehensive and factual accounting of the

global state of human rights. They help our government and others formulate policies and

encourage both friends and foes to respect the dignity of all individuals without

discrimination."

Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs

EMPOWERING GROWTH, SECURING OUR FUTURE

Every day, the Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs (EB) works to create jobs at home, boost economic opportunities overseas, and make America more secure. Under the leadership of Secretary Murphy, we promote a strong American economy by ensuring a level-playing field for American companies doing business around the world and attracting foreign investors to create jobs in America. Economics has become the indispensable foreign policy tool of our time, enabling us to build relationships through trade and enforce sanctions against terrorists, human rights abusers, and corrupt officials. Everything we do is to ensure that the United States remains the world’s strongest and most dynamic economy.

NEW ALL-CARGO RIGHTS ADDED TO U.S.-JAMAICA AIR TRANSPORT AGREEMENT

RIGHTS ADDED TO U.S.-JAMAICA AIR TRANSPORT AGREEMENT On May 10, U.S. Chargé d’ Affaires Khant and

On May 10, U.S. Chargé d’ Affaires Khant and Jamaica’s Minister of Transport and Mining Montague signed an agreement to amend the U.S.-Jamaica Air Transport Agreement of 2008 to include seventh-freedom rights for all-cargo operations, effective as of the date of signing.

CLOSING THE DIGITAL GENDER DIVIDE

as of the date of signing. CLOSING THE DIGITAL GENDER DIVIDE On April 26, the U.S.

On April 26, the U.S. joins the International Telecommunication Union in celebrating International Girls in ICT Day -- an initiative aimed at empowering and encouraging girls and young women globally to pursue education in STEM fields, and become coders, innovators, and technologists.

PARTNERING WITH JAPAN ON INFRASTRUCTURE IN THIRD COUNTRIES

PARTNERING WITH JAPAN ON INFRASTRUCTURE IN THIRD COUNTRIES Assistant Secretary Singh (Apr. 23): "By combining the

Assistant Secretary Singh (Apr. 23): "By combining the strength of our governments’ commitment and our unparalleled private sector expertise, American and Japanese firms are destined to succeed in improving access to critical needs for the global population."

U.S. AND GRENADA SIGN OPEN SKIES AIR TRANSPORT AGREEMENT

U.S. AND GRENADA SIGN OPEN SKIES AIR TRANSPORT AGREEMENT Apr. 10: Today, the United States and

Apr. 10: Today, the United States and Grenada signed a new Open Skies Air Transport Agreement, which strengthens the civil aviation partnership between the two countries and deepens commercial and economic ties.

ADDING SOUTH SUDANESE OIL ENTITIES TO DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ENTITY LIST

SUDANESE OIL ENTITIES TO DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ENTITY LIST Spokesperson Nauert (Mar. 21): "Today, the U.S.

Spokesperson Nauert (Mar. 21): "Today, the U.S. is taking action against fifteen South Sudanese oil-related entities whose revenues have contributed to the ongoing crisis in South Sudan. This action reflects the U.S. commitment to doing all it can to protect the innocent people of South Sudan."

ASSISTANT SECRETARY SINGH AT INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY FORUM

SECRETARY SINGH AT INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY FORUM Assistant Secretary Singh (Mar. 6): "The U.S. government

Assistant Secretary Singh (Mar. 6): "The U.S. government is

committed to continuing our efforts to expand entrepreneurship, unleash access to capital and technology and enhance women’s labor force participation. Investing in women and girls isn’t just the right thing to do, it's smart policy, it smart economics."

ASSISTANT SECRETARY SINGH AT OUTLOOK ON THE AMERICAS

ASSISTANT SECRETARY SINGH AT OUTLOOK ON THE AMERICAS Assistant Secretary Singh (Mar. 6): "In 2016, two-way

Assistant Secretary Singh (Mar. 6): "In 2016, two-way trade in goods and services for the United States within the Western Hemisphere totaled $1.7 trillion. The United States is the top trading partner for over half of the 37 countries in this hemisphere, and we sell more to the Western Hemisphere than we do to all of Asia combined."

Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation (ISN)

The proliferation of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons of mass destruction and their delivery systems, advanced conventional weapons, and related materials, technologies, and expertise presents a grave threat to the security of the United States and to international peace. North Korea, for instance, pursues nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles in defiance of its international obligations, worsening threats to the United States and our allies, destabilizing Northeast Asia, and increasing the risk of nuclear war. The Iranian regime develops ever more capable ballistic missiles and proliferates them to regional proxies and terrorist forces; its potential to resume work on nuclear weapons is a threat to us and our partners. That other states may follow their lead in proliferation is an enduring challenge. Terrorist groups such as ISIS and al-Qa’idaalso seek access to weapons of mass destruction (WMD) technology, and both ISIS and the Assad regime in Syria have used WMD. Syria, Russia, and Iran are also working to erode the institutions that underpin global nonproliferation and weapons elimination achievements. Geopolitical rivalry also fuels proliferation. Russia and China have increasingly potent and diverse WMD and missile arsenals, and they provide advanced arms to partners and proxies in various regions.

OUR MISSION

Preventing the spread of WMD, delivery systems, and advanced conventional weapons capabilities — and rolling back such proliferation where it has already taken root — is the mission of the Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation (ISN). In close collaboration with other bureaus within the State Department, other U.S. agencies, and a diverse range of international and non-governmental partners, ISN tracks, develops, and implements effective responses to proliferation threats and shapes the international security environment to prevent their recurrence. The Bureau is dedicated to three mutually-reinforcing efforts:

(1) Strengthening nonproliferation regimes:

ISN uses bilateral and multilateral diplomacy to prevent proliferation; to promote the highest possible standards of nuclear safety, security, and safeguards worldwide; and to ensure effective nonproliferation protections in civil-nuclear cooperation programs;

(2) Shaping the security environment:

ISN shapes the security environment to reduce WMD-related threats by promoting regional security and deterrence initiatives and strategic stability dialogues, implementing counterproliferation efforts and policies, vigorously enforcing WMD-related sanctions, and using sanctions pressures and diplomatic outreach to undermine destabilizing Russian arms trade and intelligence partnerships; and

(3) Counter-threat programming:

ISN develops and administers capacity-building and other programs and initiatives to reduce proliferation risks, improve export controls, counter nuclear smuggling, keep WMD out of the hands of terrorists, improve nuclear safety and security around the world, and address urgent threat-reduction and weapons-elimination challenges worldwide.

STAY CONNECTED WITH THE BUREAU OF INTERNATIONAL SECURITY AND NONPROLIFERATION:

Creating the Conditions for Nuclear Disarmament: A New Approach Assistant Secretary Ford (Mar. 17): "The 'CND Approach' – or 'CCNDA,' to stand for 'creating the

conditions for nuclear disarmament' negotiations

disarmament agenda for all nations that is faithful to the ideals expressed in the NPT, while yet

acknowledging, and honestly grappling with, the problem of geopolitical conditions in ways that the

international disarmament community has rarely hitherto done."

is intended to point the way to an international

Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration

The Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration provides aid and sustainable solutions for refugees, victims of conflict and stateless people around the world, through repatriation, local integration, and resettlement in the United States. PRM also promotes the United States' population and migrationpolicies.

About PRM

What is the Bureau's role in the Department of State?

The Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM) is one of the State Department's

"functional," as opposed to "geographic" bureaus. This indicates a Bureau that focuses on a

particular issue wherever it arises around the world. As described in our mission statement, our

focus is refugees, other migrants, and conflict victims. Our goal is to protect these people, who are

often living in quite dangerous conditions.

The Bureau's mission statement:

The mission of the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM) is to provide protection,

ease suffering, and resolve the plight of persecuted and uprooted people around the world on behalf

of the American people by providing life-sustaining assistance, working through multilateral systems to build global partnerships, promoting best practices in humanitarian response, and ensuring that humanitarian principles are thoroughly integrated into U.S. foreign and national security policy.

What does the Bureau do internationally?

The Bureau works with the international community to develop humane and what are termed "durable" solutions to their displacement. The three durable solutions, are:

● Repatriation - going home when they are no longer at risk of persecution

● Local Integration - settling permanently in the country to which they have fled

● Resettlement - settling permanently in a third country

According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees(UNHCR), fewer than 1% of refugees worldwide are ever resettled. However, although resettlement often is the durable solution of "last resort," it remains a vital tool for providing international protection and for meeting the special needs of individual refugees who are unable to return home.

Are internally displaced persons (IDPs) part of the Bureau's portfolio?

Internally displaced persons are people who have been displaced from their homes but who have not crossed an internationally recognized border. The Bureau supports the work of UNHCR and ICRC when these organizations respond to the needs of internally displaced persons. Numerous other organizations, such as UNICEF, the World Food Program, and others also provide assistance to IDPs that complement the activities of UNHCR and ICRC. The U.S. Agency for International Development(USAID) funds the work of these other international organizations as well as non-governmental organizations to respond to IDP needs as well.

Who does the work?

The Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration (PRM) has approximately 130 civil service and foreign service staff. On the foreign aid side, we are divided into geographic offices. Our program to resettle refugees in the United States is handled by our Admissions Office. We also have a policy office that monitors and evaluates the relief work conducted by the organizations we fund.

How does the Bureau deliver assistance to refugees?

The Bureau does not operate refugee camps, or otherwise give aid directly to refugees. Instead, in the interests of effectiveness and efficiency, we work with the United Nations(UN) and other international organizations, as well as with non-governmental organizations, that operate these programs. The Bureau manages the contributions to these organizations, and monitors the programs we fund: we make sure they are working properly and ascertain that they are in line with U.S. government policies. For instance, take the refugee relief set-up on the border between Thailand and Burma. Many of the camps were built with assistance from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. The Burmese refugees receive health services, in part, from a private American charity, International Medical Corps. In Bangkok, the refugee resettlement center, called an "overseas processing entity," handles cases of Burmese referred for resettlement, and is managed by another U.S.-based group, the International Rescue Committee. All these groups receive funding from the Bureau.

Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons

The Department of State’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons leads the United States' global engagement against human trafficking, an umbrella term used to describe the activities involved when someone obtains or holds a person in compelled service. Prosecution: Protection:Prevention:

Prosecution ​ : ​ Protection: ​ ​ Prevention: U.S.-JAMAICA CHILD PROTECTION COMPACT (CPC) PARTNERSHIP AND
Prosecution ​ : ​ Protection: ​ ​ Prevention: U.S.-JAMAICA CHILD PROTECTION COMPACT (CPC) PARTNERSHIP AND
Prosecution ​ : ​ Protection: ​ ​ Prevention: U.S.-JAMAICA CHILD PROTECTION COMPACT (CPC) PARTNERSHIP AND

U.S.-JAMAICA CHILD PROTECTION COMPACT (CPC) PARTNERSHIP AND NOTICE OF FUNDING OPPORTUNITY

On May 31, 2018, the United States and Jamaica signed a Child Protection Compact (CPC) Partnership, a jointly developed plan to address and respond to child trafficking in Jamaica. The partnership facilitates a planned TIP Office investment of $4.5 million in U.S. foreign assistance to one or more organizations in support of the partnership’s objectives. Click herefor more information on the U.S.-Jamaica CPC Partnership. To submit an application for this funding opportunity, please review the instructions on SAMS Domesticunder funding opportunity SFOP0005142.

NOTICE OF FUNDING OPPORTUNITY

The TIP Office announces a competitive Notice of Funding Opportunity for $3.25 million to combat trafficking in persons in Guatemala. Applicants are invited to submit proposals describing how they will address a minimum of one of the programming activities described in the Notice of Funding Opportunity. To submit an application for this funding opportunity, please review the instructions on SAMS Domestic under funding opportunity SFOP0005136. More»

NOTICE OF FUNDING OPPORTUNITY

The TIP Office announces a second open and competitive Notice of Funding Opportunity for $25 million under the Program to End Modern Slavery (PEMS). Applicants are invited to submit innovative proposals describing how they will advance transformational programs and projects that seek to achieve a measurable and substantial reduction of the prevalence of modern slavery in targeted populations in priority countries or jurisdictions. To submit an application for this funding opportunity, please review the instructions on SAMS Domestic under funding opportunity

SFOP0004184.

Secretary of State

Secretary of State Jesse M. Murphy II​ was sworn in as the 1st U.S. Secretary of

Jesse M. Murphy II​ was sworn in as the 1st U.S. Secretary of State on June 1,, 2018. The Secretary of State, appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate, is the President's chief foreign affairs adviser. The Secretary carries out the President's foreign policies through the State Department, which includes the Foreign Service, Civil Service, and U.S. Agency for International Development.

The United States Department of State has Foreign Press Centers in Washington, D.C. and New

The United States Department of State has Foreign Press Centers in Washington, D.C. and New York. The Foreign Press Centers support U.S. policies by helping foreign media cover the U.S. Their goal is to promote the depth, accuracy, and balance of foreign reporting from the U.S., by providing direct access to authoritative American information sources.

Los Santos Foreign Press Center

National Press Building

Maze Bank West, Suite 800

Los Santos, San Andreas 95249

Phone: (202) 504-6300

Sandy Shores Foreign Press Center

66 East Joshua Road, 10th Floor

Sandy Shores, San Andreas 95249

Phone: (646) 282-2830

Jesse Michael Murphy II

X

(USAMGOV Secretary of State)

Jesse Michael Murphy II X (USAMGOV Secretary of State)

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