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Syllabus

Content
Course Overview

Welcome to your Capella University online course, PSY8502 – Advanced Research


Design and Methodology for Professional Psychology.

This course is an extension of PSY8501 – Advanced Research Methods and Statistics for
Professional Psychology. It is intended to expand your understanding of the types of
research and evaluation in which professional psychologists may engage. The course
focuses on a topic of your choice and explores qualitative research methods and design,
theory application, community needs assessment, program design, and program
evaluation from the perspective of your selected topic. In addition, ethical and diversity
issues in research development and theory application are considered throughout the
course.

Program development, in this course and as a dissertation option for clinical Doctor of
Psychology (PsyD) learners at Capella, is viewed as the process by which new programs
are conceived, justified, designed, implemented, and evaluated. This course will
emphasize three major steps or components of program development: needs assessment,
program design, and program evaluation. When you enter the dissertation stage of your
program, these will be the options within program development that are open to you for
dissertation.

You begin the course by identifying a clinical problem of interest and exploring
qualitative research on the topic and clinical problem of interest. You will develop a
qualitative proposal that addresses the topic and clinical problem, then explore how
theory is applied to the clinical problem. Throughout the course, you will apply the
concepts from texts, readings, and other activities to the clinical problem you have
selected. Following qualitative research design, you will engage in a critical analysis of
how two or more different theories are currently applied to the clinical problem you
selected. Next, you will identify and analyze an existing program that is intended to
address the clinical problem of interest. This analysis will result in identified gaps in the
clinical program, and the rest of the course will focus on program development to better
address the clinical problem. You will design a survey that could be used to gather input
from experts in fields related to the clinical problem, develop a logic model for your
proposed clinical program, and explore professional associations that focus on program
evaluation. In the end, you may decide that theory analysis or some component of
program development is the approach to take for your dissertation, or you may determine
that one of the more traditional research approaches covered in this course and prior
coursework is the best way to address your topic and problem.
The final assignment for this course will tie together the content from this course with the
content from PSY8501. For this assignment, you will select a preferred dissertation
approach for your chosen topic from among those taught in both courses, and you will
complete the first two sections of a dissertation plan using the appropriate form. For this
reason, it is to your benefit to use the same topic for this course as used in PSY8501. You
can rely on the literature reviewed for PSY8501 activities and assignments for the
dissertation plan, and you can utilize concepts from the proposals developed for the two
courses to complete the dissertation plan.

Course Competencies

To successfully complete this course, you will be expected to:

1. Synthesize knowledge of research ethics and design to critically evaluate and


design qualitative research.
2. Critically analyze existing theory as applied to a clinical problem.
3. Use current theory, research, ethics codes, and practice literature to develop a
needs assessment and brief proposal for a new program and its components.
4. Apply program development concepts to design an evaluation plan that
effectively assesses program outcomes.
5. Synthesize knowledge of program development, theoretical application,
qualitative and quantitative research design, and ethical considerations to propose
a dissertation topic and approach.
6. Communicate in a manner that is scholarly, ethical, and consistent with the
expectations of professional psychology.
 Toggle Drawer

Prerequisites

For PsyD Clinical Psychology learners only. PSY8501.

 Toggle Drawer

Grading

Course requirements include the following major independent measures of learner


competency.

Activity Weight Scoring Guide


1. Discussion Participation 30% Attributes and Evaluation of
Discussion Contributions.
2. Unit Activities 70%
u03a1: Qualitative Proposal 10% Qualitative Proposal Scoring
Guide.
Activity Weight Scoring Guide
u04a1: Theory Analysis 10% Theory Analysis Scoring Guide.
u06a1: Needs Assessment 10% Needs Assessment Scoring
Guide.
u08a1: Program Design 10% Program Design Scoring Guide.
u09a1: Program Evaluation 10% Program Evaluation Plan Scoring
Plan Guide.
u10a1: Dissertation Planning 20% Dissertation Planning Scoring
Guide.
Total: 100%

 Toggle Drawer

Final Course Grade

A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
F = 69% and below

 Toggle Drawer

Course Materials

Required

The materials listed below are required to complete the learning activities and projects in
this course. Unless noted otherwise, the books, software, and coursepacks are available
for purchase from the Capella University Virtual Bookstore. To purchase these texts, visit
the bookstore and select your school and course ID.

Books

Calley, N. G. (2011). Program development in the 21st century: An evidence-based


approach to design, implementation, and evaluation. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE
Publications, Inc. ISBN: 9781412974493.

Maxwell, J. A. (2013). Qualitative research design: An interactive approach (3rd ed.).


Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc. ISBN: 9781412981194.

E-books
The following required readings are linked to electronic books in the Capella University
Library. If you need assistance, please refer to the How Do I Find Books? library guide.

Roeckelein, J. E. (Ed.). (2006). Elsevier's dictionary of psychological theories. Oxford,


UK: Elsevier Science & Technology.

Articles

Library

The following required readings are provided for you in the Capella University Library or
linked directly in this course. To find library resources, use the Journal and Book Locator
tool found on the library home page.

Afifi, R. A., Makhoul, J., El Hajj, T., & Nakkash, R. T. (2011). Developing a logic model
for youth mental health: Participatory research with a refugee community in Beirut.
Health Policy and Planning, 26(6), 508–517.

Berndtsson, I., Claesson, S., Friberg, F., & Öhlén, J. (2007). Issues about thinking
phenomenologically while doing phenomenology. Journal of Phenomenological
Psychology, 38(2), 256–277.

Busuttil, W. (2006). The development of a 90-day residential program for the treatment
of complex posttraumatic stress disorder. Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment &
Trauma, 12(1/2), 29–55.

Cobigo, V., Morin, D., & Mercier, C. (2012). Evaluating the effectiveness of a program
targeting behaviour disorders: The development of a logic model. Journal on
Developmental Disabilities, 18(1), 87–95.

Dowling, M., & Cooney, A. (2012). Research approaches related to phenomenology:


Negotiating a complex landscape. Nurse Researcher, 20(2), 21–27.

Epstein, D., & Klerman, J. A. (2013). When is a program ready for rigorous impact
evaluation? The role of a falsifiable logic model. Evaluation Review, 36(5), 375–401.

Haahr, A., Norlyk, A., & Hall, E. O. C. (2014). Ethical challenges embedded in
qualitative research interviews with close relatives. Nursing Ethics, 21(1), 6–15.

Hays, D., & Wood, C. (2011). Infusing qualitative traditions in counseling research
designs. Journal of Counseling and Development: JCD, 89(3), 288–295.

Luptak, M., Kaas, M. J., Artz, M., & McCarthy, T. (2008). Project ADAPT: A program
to assess depression and provide proactive treatment in rural areas. The Gerontologist,
48(4), 542–548.
Martino, D. J., (2003). Heidegger: Through phenomenology to thought. Journal of
Phenomenological Psychology, 34(2), 279–285.

Nelson, M. L., & Quintana, S. M. (2005). Qualitative clinical research with children and
adolescents. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 34(2), 344–356.

Radley, A., & Chamberlain, K. (2012). The study of the case: Conceptualising case study
research. Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology, 22(5), 390–399.

Silverstein, L. B., Auerbach, C. F., & Levant, R. F. (2006). Using qualitative research to
strengthen clinical practice. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 37(4),
351–358.

Smith, J., Bekker, H., & Cheater, F. (2011). Theoretical versus pragmatic design in
qualitative research. Nurse Researcher, 18(2), 39–51.

Subirana, M., Long, A., Greenhalgh, J., & Firth, J. (2014). A realist logic model of the
links between nurse staffing and the outcomes of nursing. Journal of Research in
Nursing, 19(1), 8–23.

Wagner, R. A., & MacCaughelty, C. R. (2013). A track-based approach for treating


eating disorders. Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, 77(3), 222–232.

Wainer, A. L., & Ingersoll, B. R. (2013). Disseminating ASD interventions: A pilot study
of a distance learning program for parents and professionals. Journal of Autism and
Developmental Disorders, 43(1), 11–24.

Internet Resources

Please note that URLs change frequently. While the URLs were current when this course
was designed, some may no longer be valid. If you cannot access a specific link, contact
your instructor for an alternative URL. Permissions for the following links have been
either granted or deemed appropriate for educational use at the time of course
publication.

American Evaluation Association. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.eval.org/

NREPP: SAMHSA's national registry of evidence-based programs and practices. (2016).


Retrieved from http://www.nrepp.samhsa.gov

Optional

The following optional materials are offered to provide you with a better understanding
of the topics in this course. These materials are not required to complete the course.

Optional Books
Use the Journal and Book Locator tool to see if the library has access to the book or the
How Do I Find Books? library guide for additional options.

Bekerian, D. A., & Levey, A. B. (2012). Applied psychology: Putting theory into practice
(2nd ed.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Optional E-books

Use the Journal and Book Locator tool to see if the library has access to the book or the
How Do I Find Books? library guide for additional options.

Bauer, M. S., & McBride, L. (2003). Structured group psychotherapy for bipolar
disorder: The life goals program (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Springer Publishing
Company.

Craske, M. G., Antony, M. M., & Barlow, D. H. (2006). Mastering your fears and
phobias: Therapist guide (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Epstein, E. E., & McCrady, B. S. (2009). A cognitive-behavioral treatment program for


overcoming alcohol problems: Therapist guide. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Epstein, E. E., & McCrady, B. S. (2009). A cognitive-behavioral treatment program for


overcoming alcohol problems: Workbook. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Freeman, J. B., & Garcia, A. M. (2008). Family-based treatment for young children with
OCD: Therapist guide. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Freeman, J. B., & Garcia, A. M. (2009). Family-based treatment for young children with
OCD: Workbook. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Hickling, E. J., & Blanchard, E. B. (2006). Overcoming the trauma of your motor vehicle
accident: A cognitive-behavioral treatment program: Workbook. New York, NY: Oxford
University Press.

Hickling, E. J., & Blanchard, E. B. (2006). Overcoming the trauma of your motor vehicle
accident: A cognitive-behavioral treatment program: Therapist guide. New York, NY:
Oxford University Press.

Holden, D. J., & Zimmerman, M. A. (Eds.). (2009). A practical guide to program


evaluation planning: Theory and case examples. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Lauriello, J., & Pallanti, S. (2012). Clinical manual for treatment of schizophrenia.
Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing.

LeCroy, C. W. (Ed.). (2008). Handbook of evidence-based treatment manuals for


children and adolescents (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
McCrady, B. S., & Epstein, E. E. (2009). Overcoming alcohol problems: A couples-
focused program: Therapist guide. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

McCrady, B. S., & Epstein, E. E. (2009). Overcoming alcohol problems: Workbook for
couples. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Mertens, D. M., & Wilson, A. T. (2012). Program evaluation theory and practice: A
comprehensive guide. New York, NY: The Guilford Press.

Mueser, K. T., Rosenberg, S. D., & Rosenberg, H. J. (2009). Treatment of posttraumatic


stress disorder in special populations: A cognitive restructuring program. Washington,
DC: American Psychological Association.

Osborn, L. (2007). Sex offender treatment programs in correctional settings: Participant


selection, treatment experience, and treatment completion. New York, NY: LFB
Scholarly Publishing.

Otto, M. W., Reilly-Harrington, N. A., Kogan, J. N., Henin, A., Knauz, R. O., & Sachs,
G. S. (2008). Managing bipolar disorder: A cognitive-behavioral approach: Therapist
guide. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Piper, W. E., Rosie, J. S., Joyce, A. S., & Azim, H. F. A. (1996). Time-limited day
treatment for personality disorders: Integration of research and practice in a group
program. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Royse, D. D., Staton-Tindall, M., Badger, K., & Webster, J. M. (2009). Needs
assessment. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Veale, D., & Neziroglu, F. (2010). Body dysmorphic disorder: A treatment manual.
Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.

Optional Articles

Use Journal and Book Locator to see if the library has access to the full text of an article.
If the full text is not available, try using Interlibrary Loan to obtain a copy.

Library

Beenstock, M. (2010). Partial program evaluation with observational data: The effect of
treatment on drug addiction. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 6(1), 83–113.

Brunk, M. A., Chapman, J. E., & Schoenwald, S. K. (2014). Defining and evaluating
fidelity at the program level in psychosocial treatments: A preliminary investigation.
Zeitschrift Für Psychologie, 222(1), 22–29.
Cook, J. M., O'Donnell, C., Dinnen, S., Bernardy, N., Rosenheck, R., & Hoff, R. (2013).
A formative evaluation of two evidenceâ€ï¿½based psychotherapies for PTSD in VA
residential treatment programs. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 26(1), 56–63.

Hagen, E. H. (2011). Evolutionary theories of depression: A critical review. Canadian


Journal of Psychiatry, 56(12), 716–726.

Kim, R. J., & Jackson, D. S. (2009). Outcome evaluation findings of a Hawaiian culture-
based adolescent substance abuse treatment program. Psychological Services, 6(1), 43–
55.

Kratochwill, T. R., Hitchcock, J. H., Horner, R. H., Levin, J. R., Odom, S. L., Rindskopf,
D. M., & Shadish, W. R. (2013). Single-case intervention research design standards.
Remedial and Special Education, 34(1), 26–38.

Linke, S. E., Robinson, C. J., & Pekmezi, D. (2014). Applying psychological theories to
promote healthy lifestyles. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, 8(1), 4–14.

Murray, E., Linke, S., Harwood, E., Conroy, S., Stevenson, F., & Godfrey, C. (2012).
Widening access to treatment for alcohol misuse: Description and formative evaluation of
an innovative Web-based service in one primary care trust. Alcohol and Alcoholism,
47(6), 697–701.

Nickerson, A., Bryant, R. A., Silove, D., & Steel, Z. (2011). A critical review of
psychological treatments of posttraumatic stress disorder in refugees. Clinical Psychology
Review, 31(3), 399–417.

Zvoch, K. (2012). How does fidelity of implementation matter? Using multilevel models
to detect relationships between participant outcomes and the delivery and receipt of
treatment. American Journal of Evaluation, 33(4), 547–565.

Optional Internet Resources

Please note that URLs change frequently. While the URLs were current when this course
was designed, some may no longer be valid. If you cannot access a specific link, contact
your instructor for an alternative URL. Permissions for the following links have been
either granted or deemed appropriate for educational use at the time of course
publication.

American Correctional Association (ACA). (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.aca.org

CARF International. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.carf.org

Council on Accreditation. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.coanet.org

The Joint Commission. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.jointcommission.org


Optional Audiovisual Media

Duignan, P. (2009). Faster program evaluation planning: A new visual approach [Video]
| Transcript. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BjCGisIO6T0

Syllabus
Content
Course Overview

Welcome to your Capella University online course, PSY8501 – Advanced Research


Methods and Statistics for Professional Psychology.

In this course, you will develop advanced knowledge of research methods and statistics,
with an emphasis on the practical application of research and statistical concepts and the
interpretation of findings to both critical research review and the conduct of research.
You will further your knowledge of quantitative research design by studying the
foundations, strategies, and practice of research in the field of psychology. You will
formulate research questions and hypotheses based on data characteristics, use statistics
software to manipulate and analyze data, and interpret, communicate, and critique the
results of analysis. You will engage in the critical analysis of current quantitative
research, construct your own research proposals, and exchange critical, constructive
project feedback with your peers.

During this course, you are expected to develop a working knowledge of advanced
quantitative research design and analysis techniques, building on what was learned in
research methods and inferential statistics courses. This includes factorial ANOVA,
repeated measures ANOVA, multiple regression, and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA).

This course expands on the tools presented in a beginning graduate-level inferential


statistics course (PSY7620). Learning statistics is cumulative, so it is important to
understand the foundational material before moving on to more advanced statistical
techniques. For this reason, your class begins with a review of the basics. The first few
weeks offer an opportunity to self-assess, review, and practice these foundational
statistics concepts. This course also expands on the tools and knowledge presented in
basic research methods courses for quantitative research methods, digging more deeply
and applying concepts of ethics and diversity in research to advanced quantitative
statistical approaches, and culminating in the development of a research proposal that
may form the basis for your dissertation proposal or capstone project. This course will
move quickly and it is very important to stay up-to-date on discussions and assignments
so that the material learned can be applied to the discussions and assignments in the
following units. We cover a great deal of material in this course, through a combination
of discussions, assignments, and self-assessments. As such, this course has four major
components that will contribute to your final grade: course participation (in the form of
weekly discussions), research ethics education, research reports and critiques, and
research proposals. Self-assessments are required to help identify areas related to
statistics where you may need to spend more time, but do not contribute to the final
grade.

Participation Guidelines

You are expected to actively participate in the discussion of each assigned topic with
posts submitted in a timely fashion while that discussion is in progress. You are also
expected to help other learners gain the most from discussions by responding to their
posts with your best suggestions, comments, insights, and questions. The quality and
depth of your responses to other learners is an important component of your course
participation grade.

Post your responses to the discussion questions as early in the week as possible, as this
allows others the opportunity to respond to you and to engage in meaningful discussions.
Posts made at the very end of the week do not typically add to the course discussion, as
fellow learners are moving on to the next unit. Your instructor may have specific rules
regarding when discussion posts and responses are due, so be sure to review faculty
expectations at the beginning of the quarter. Additionally, your comments, questions, and
suggestions to other learners must further enhance the discussion through your insight
and comprehension of the topic, relevant personal experience, introduction of relevant
literature topics, or other sources that add to the discussion. Comments that simply state
"good post," "nice job," or "I agree" will not meet the requirements for a substantive
reply.

Use of APA form and style is expected when citing sources used in your posts. You do
not need to respond in third person in the discussion area. Since this part of the course
corresponds to classroom discussions, feel free to be informal as long as the discussion
remains professional and respectful.

Research Ethics Education

Good research is grounded in a solid understanding of and adherence to standards of


research ethics. In this course, you will be completing the modules required by Capella
for all student and faculty researchers through the CITI program. You will be required to
complete a set of modules and pass the quizzes associated with those modules during the
first week of this course. The research ethics foundation will be incorporated throughout
your assignments and discussions this quarter, as you begin to understand how to build
research proposals on a strong ethical foundation.

Data Analyses and Interpretation

An important part of the work you will do this quarter revolves around analyzing and
interpreting data using advanced inferential statistical techniques. You will have
assignments that require statistical analysis due in Units 2, 4, and 5. The assignment in
Unit 2 requires the use of G*Power, and other assignments require SPSS. You will have
the option of refreshing your SPSS skills using datasets provided in Units 2 and 3 to
practice specific analyses that form a foundation for later assignments. For the majority
of your assignments, you will run an analysis and then complete a research report form or
write a full research report based on the results. It is your responsibility to have the
software up and running by the second week of the course so you do not fall behind on
assignments.

Research Reports and Critique

You will have the opportunity to tie together skills from quantitative research methods
and statistics in the writing of research reports in this course as you write up the analyses
conducted in Units 4 and 5. Research reports may be completed in proposal form, or you
may be asked to write a full research report depending on the assignment. You will also
be critiquing research using a peer and article critique form, including published
qualitative and quantitative research studies that you locate in the Capella library and the
reports and proposals created by your peers.

Research Proposals

The final aspect of your course grade is made up of a quantitative research proposal. You
will submit a draft of your research proposal in Unit 7 and get feedback from your
instructor and peers before submitting the final proposal in Unit 10.

Self-Assessments

This course includes a self-assessment that tests your knowledge of statistical concepts.
You are required to complete the self-assessment during the first three units of the course,
and can take it as many times as you like. The self-assessment is a review of concepts
that were learned in a basic inferential statistics course, which is a prerequisite for this
course. The preliminary units in this course include optional review readings from the
text as well as optional review activities using SPSS and optional review videos. Your
self-assessment should be done during the first few weeks to help determine with which
concepts you need to spend some time before moving on to new, more advanced,
statistical concepts.

Course Competencies

To successfully complete this course, you will be expected to:

1. Critically evaluate published research to demonstrate advanced knowledge of


quantitative research concepts and terminology.
2. Apply foundational statistical concepts to advanced parametric and non-
parametric statistical analysis.
3. Synthesize knowledge of research methodology, advanced inferential statistics,
and ethical considerations to create research proposals.
4. Synthesize knowledge of research ethics to critically evaluate and design
quantitative research.
5. Communicate in a manner that is scholarly, ethical, and consistent with the
expectations of professional psychology.
 Toggle Drawer

Prerequisites

For PsyD learners only. PSY7620, PSY7650.

 Toggle Drawer

Grading

Course requirements include the following major independent measures of learner


competency.

Activity Weight Scoring Guide


1. Discussion Participation 20% Attributes and Evaluation of
Discussion Contributions.
2. Unit Activities 80%
u01a1: CITI Ethics Modules 5% CITI Ethics Modules Scoring
Guide.
u02a1: Statistics Review and 5% Statistics Review and Application
Application Scoring Guide.
u03a1: Power Analysis 5% Power Analysis Scoring Guide.
u04a1: Published Article 10% Published Article Critique
Critique Scoring Guide.
u05a1: Factorial ANOVA 10% Factorial ANOVA Analysis
Analysis Scoring Guide.
u06a1: Repeated Measures 10% Repeated Measures Analysis and
Analysis and Interpretation Interpretation Scoring Guide.
u07a1: Draft Quantitative 10% Draft Quantitative Proposal
Proposal Scoring Guide.
u08a1: Multiple Regression 10% Multiple Regression Report
Report Scoring Guide.
u10a1: Final Quantitative 15% Final Quantitative Proposal
Proposal Scoring Guide.
Total: 100%
 Toggle Drawer

Final Course Grade

A = 90-100%
B = 80-89%
C = 70-79%
F = 69% and below

 Toggle Drawer

Course Materials

Required

The materials listed below are required to complete the learning activities and projects in
this course. Unless noted otherwise, the books, software, and coursepacks are available
for purchase from the Capella University Virtual Bookstore. To purchase these texts, visit
the bookstore and select your school and course ID.

Books

Goodwin, C. J., & Goodwin, K. A. (2013). Research in psychology: Methods and design
(7th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. ISBN: 9781118360026.

Optional Companion Web Site

Research in psychology: Methods and design, 7th edition. (n.d.). Available at


http://bcs.wiley.com/he-bcs/Books?action=index&bcsId=7688&itemId=1118360028

Warner, R. M. (2013). Applied statistics: From bivariate through multivariate techniques


(2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. ISBN: 9781412991346.

Optional Student Study Site

Applied statistics: From bivariate through multivariate techniques. (n.d.). Available at


http://www.sagepub.com/warner2e/study/default.htm

Articles

Library

The following required readings are provided for you in the Capella University Library or
linked directly in this course. To find specific library articles by journal title, use Journal
and Book Locator. Refer to the Journal and Book Locator library guide to learn how to
use this tool.
Kratochwill, T. R., Hitchcock, J. H., Horner, R. H., Levin, J. R., Odom, S. L., Rindskopf,
D. M., & Shadish, W. R. (2013). Single-case intervention research design standards.
Remedial and Special Education, 34(1), 26–38.

Shadish, W. R., & Sweeney, R. B. (1991). Mediators and moderators in meta-analysis:


There's a reason we don't let dodo birds tell us which psychotherapies should have prizes.
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 59(6), 883–893.

Tversky, A., & Kahneman, D. (1971). Belief in the law of small numbers. Psychological
Bulletin, 76(2), 105–110.

Internet Resources

Please note that URLs change frequently. While the URLs were current when this course
was designed, some may no longer be valid. If you cannot access a specific link, contact
your instructor for an alternative URL. Permissions for the following links have been
either granted or deemed appropriate for educational use at the time of course
publication.

Buchner, A., Erdfelder, E., Faul, F., & Lang, A. (n.d.). G*Power: Statistical power
analyses for Windows and Mac. Retrieved from http://www.gpower.hhu.de/

Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative. (2015). How do I enroll in a CITI course


for the first time? Retrieved from
http://support.citiprogram.org/customer/portal/articles/163300-how-do-i-enroll-in-a-citi-
course-for-the-first-time

Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative. (n.d.). CITI program. Retrieved from


https://www.citiprogram.org

Software

Capella University requires learners to meet certain minimum computer requirements.


Please note that some software required for a course may exceed these minimum
requirements. The following statistical analysis software is required to complete learning
activities in this course:

o IBM SPSS Statistics Premium GradPack (recent version for PC or Mac).

As a Capella learner, you have access to this more robust IBM SPSS Statistics Premium
GradPack arranged at an academic discount through a contracted vendor. Basic
procurement expectations are provided in the Capella bookstore within the specific listing
for this course ID and for this quarter offering. Versioning: This software is routinely
updated. While it is recommended that you use the latest version of the software available
to Capella learners, you may use an older licensed version if you already own it or have
access to it, but it must be version 22 or higher. Be sure to use the version that is
compatible with your operating system (PC or Mac). Refer to the Statistical Software
page on Campus for general information on SPSS software, including the most recent
version made available to Capella learners.

Audiovisual Media

These media are provided with the permission of the publisher. Copying or redistribution
of the material is strictly prohibited.

Insight Media. (n.d.). How Results Can Be Misleading: Problems in Experimental


Methodology | Transcript.

Insight Media. (n.d.). Quantitative Research: Methods in the Social Sciences | Transcript.

Insight Media. (n.d.). Experimentation: Types of designs and interpretation of data


[PowerPoint presentation] | Transcript.

Optional

The following optional materials are offered to provide you with a better understanding
of the topics in this course. These materials are not required to complete the course.

Optional Books

Use the Journal and Book Locator tool to see if the library has access to the book or the
How Do I Find Books? library guide for additional options.

George, D., & Mallery, P. (2016). IBM SPSS statistics 23 step by step: A simple guide
and reference (14th ed.). New York, NY: Routledge.

Maxwell, J. (2013). Qualitative research design: An interactive approach (3rd ed.).


Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Optional Articles

Use Journal and Book Locator to see if the library has access to the full text of an article.
If the full text is not available, try using Interlibrary Loan to obtain a copy.

Library

Rosnow, R. L., & Rosenthal, R. (1996). Computing contrasts, effect sizes, and
counternulls on other people's published data: General procedures for research
consumers. Psychological Methods, 1(4), 331–340.

Optional Internet Resources

Please note that URLs change frequently. While the URLs were current when this course
was designed, some may no longer be valid. If you cannot access a specific link, contact
your instructor for an alternative URL. Permissions for the following links have been
either granted or deemed appropriate for educational use at the time of course
publication.

Lane, D. M. (n.d.). HyperStat online statistics textbook. Retrieved from


http://davidmlane.com/hyperstat

Lynda.com. (2013). R statistics essential training with Barton Poulson. Retrieved from
http://www.lynda.com/R-tutorials/R-Statistics-Essential-Training/142447-2.html

Optional Audiovisual Media

Dr. Johnson's PSY 293/294 Vids. (Producer). (n.d.). PSY 294: G*Power tutorial (t-tests)
[Video]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVBwhJ9gonQ

Statisticsfun. (Producer). (n.d.). How to calculate a two way ANOVA using SPSS.
[Video]. Retrieved from http://youtu.be/6Hmauags3VA

The Doctoral Journey. (Producer). (n.d.). SPSS tutorial: One way ANOVA [Video].
Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYn5Jv7Gh4s

The Doctoral Journey. (Producer). (n.d.). SPSS tutorial: Repeated measures ANOVA
[Video]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6T6dvrwDe_U