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marieclaire.co.za

WELLNESS

WOULD YOU CHOOSE TO

LIVE

FOREVER?

Cosy winter getaways close to home

MAY 2018

25

OF THE BEST

fashion & beauty

TRENDS FOR WINTER

WHY DO WE CONTINUE TO CHASE HAPPINESS?

THE ROAD TO ROYALTY

MEGHAN MARKLE

The real story

What you should (REALLY) be eating

The Spirit of Travel

louisvuitton.com

ON THE COVER

32

REPORTAGE Shunned: a story of India’s sidelined widows

36

MEGHAN MARKLE From Hollywood darling to modern- day princess

56

INTERNATIONAL REPORT Is our obsession with happiness making us miserable?

61

@WORK The new rules for getting to the top

65

FASHION & BEAUTY How to pair this season’s top trends

98

WELLNESS Meet the modern immortality seekers

102

HEALTH Find out what you should actually be eating

TRENDS

20

SHOES FIRST The new generation of sneakers

21

TIME TRAVEL Nostalgic wardrobe updates

22

SUPERNOVA

Accessories get

the high-shine

treatment

23

WHITE WASH Snowy shades and cool accents

26

BEAUTY ED’S PICK Sheet masks for every skin concern

27

BEAUTY TREND

Skin-glazing

28 FIVE OF THE BEST Your winter face-savers

29 SKIN SOLUTIONS The latest beauty innovations

30 THE EDIT New arrivals in the beauty cupboard

IN

EVERY

ISSUE

12 EDITOR’S NOTE 126 HOROSCOPES

FEATURES

15

FILTER News and views from around the world

42

LOCAL REPORT The real facts about surrogacy

46

REAL LIVES

Does your

sex number

really matter?

50

PSYCH Why you should consider a judgement detox

52

LIFE

Minimalism:

the bene ts of living with only what you need

WELLNESS

106

HEALTH Getting to grips with your gut

108

WELLBEING The best self- help books out there

FASHION

86

FASHION 101 How to wear the season’s knits

92

FASHION INSIDER Catching up with Saint Laurent creative director Anthony Vaccarello

@PLAY

111

AGENDA

Who, what,

where, when

116

TRAVEL The cosiest local winter escapes

122

LIFE STORY

The inimitable,

unbeatable

Tina Turner

127

ON THE ROAD Riding in style, plus tips for long- distance trips

128

ABSOLUTE

ESSENTIALS

Lindiwe Müller-

Westernhagen

marieclaire.co.za

MAY 2018

WELLNESS

WOULD YOU

CHOOSE TO

LIVE

FOREVER?

25

OF THE BEST

fashion

& beauty

TRENDS FOR

WINTER

Cosy

winter

getaways

close to

home

WHY DO

WE CONTINUE

TO CHASE

HAPPINESS?

THE ROAD TO ROYALTY

MEGHAN MARKLE

The real story

R37.90 (incl VAT ) Namibia N$37.90

SOUTH AFRICA

What you should (REALLY) be eating

COVER CREDITS

photograph Christian Blanchard/ The Licensing Project

PHOTOGRAPH Niquita beNto

74

Red and ready

Find out how to work the colour of the season

PHOTOGRAPHS NIQUITA BENTO, ISTOCK, SUPPLIED

directors’ note

A cause for

S

H

O P

O U R

M

D AY

O T H E R ’ S W I S H L I S T. E TA I L S

D

ON P110.

COLL A B ORATIO N

CLARINS SOS

PRIMER IN

PEACH R400

A ’

NEW-SEASON

J

U

A

N

S

PICKS

SMASHBOX ALWAYS ON LIQUID LIPSTICK IN METALLIC MATTE SO JELLY R330

CHANEL COCO MADEMOISELLE EAU DE PARFUM INTENSE 100ML R2 465

A new season, no matter the weather, is exciting. In terms of fashion and beauty, it’s the birth of new trends, the celebration of looks from yesteryear

and, most importantly, a great excuse to detox and restock your wardrobe and beauty collection. Over the last decade in particular, followers of the fashion and beauty worlds have railed against what is expected, and instead have broken boundaries and challenged the norm. Individuality

is at the forefront of today’s aesthetic, while

trends remain the foundation for creativity and interpretation. Each new season, Marie Claire brings you the latest trend reports, edits of the best and boldest runway looks, and guidelines for how to wear what. The rest is up to you, the reader – the inspired inspirer. You see, it’s a team effort. So it’s only fitting then that for this month’s issue our fashion and beauty teams joined forces to create ‘New Mood’ on page 66, not only highlighting top trends but combining them – connecting the fashion and beauty dots to create bold head-to-toe looks. The shoot would not have been complete without

a dash of Dolce&Gabbana’s vintage prints; a few structured Afros; the latest Nicholas Coutts check prints, fresh off the runway; the most delicately sheer items courtesy of Prada; the coolest red patent puffer from H&M, paired with a striking winged glitter lid; and a hot-pink number from Burberry with lashes to match. We hope we’ve inspired you to try something new and colour outside the lines. In the end, it’s all about self-expression, having fun – and, of course, looking incredible.

Juana & Tarryn

xxx

‘NEW

MOOD’

BY

NUMBERS

TARRYN’S

NEW-SEASON

PICKS

 

MOSCHINO

SUNGLASSES

R3 500

SAFILO GROUP

COAT

R1 699

H&M

 

BOOTS

R20 700

LOUIS

VUITTON

2

SHOOT

DAYS

5

MODELS

216m 21

OF

WOOL

TRENDS

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F

B

U

B

B

LY

26 100

PAIRS

OF

SHOES

MAKE-UP

WIPES

12 MARIECLAIRE.CO.ZA MAY 2018

DOLCEGABBANABEAUTY.COM

marieclaire.co.za

JAN/FEB 2018

Beauty

BRAVE

LIPS,

LIPS,

BOLD

BOLD

GLOWING

GLOWING

NEW

AND

AND

SKIN

SKIN

KEEP

KEEP

TO COOL COOL

TO

TIPS

TIPS

YEAR

YOU(R)

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RELATIONSHIPS

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subject

for a touchy

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PLUS

WELLNESS YOUR 2018 GUIDE

FASHION

CAPSULE

WARDROBES

YOUR

TO FIT

Gwen

PERSONALITY

Stefani

B A N C G K E & T T H I N O G W H L E O R V E G R S O AV O E V D E H E R

O

MARKLE

MEGHAN

PHOTOGRAPHS GALLO/GETTY

mailbox

LETTER

OF

THE

MONTH

I was diagnosed with breast cancer in December 2017, and

had my mastectomy done on 12 February this year. While

recovering, the day after the operation, I paged through the

Jan/Feb issue of Marie Claire, and was greatly surprised to find the article on 3D breast prosthesis, and the wonderful work that’s being done by Nneile Nkholise to benefit underprivileged women

who cannot afford breast reconstruction. I applaud Marie Claire for promoting awareness, not only of breast cancer, but also of the consequences – both physical and psychological – of losing a or both breast/s. There really is hope of regaining one’s dignity again. Thanks must go to the author of the piece for writing such an insightful and informative article on an especially sensitive topic. – Ferouza Harker

The author of each month’s winning letter receives a year’s subscription to Marie Claire. Send your letters to abigail@assocmedia.co.za or tweet us @MarieClaireSA

FOR DAILY NEWS, VIEWS, FASHION AND BEAUTY POSTS, VISIT OUR WEBSITE

READ MORE Meet the trailblazers of trans rights.

L I S T E N

T O

OUR ULTIMAT E

T I N A

T U R N E R

PLAYLIST.

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNELS FOR MORE OF THE CONTENT YOU LOVE

14 MARIECLAIRE.CO.ZA MAY 2018

.CO.ZA

Have a look at Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s wedding timeline.

MARIE CLAIRE Deputy editor Lynette Botha lynette@assocmedia.co.za Lead managing editor Margot Van Zyl margot@assocmedia.co.za Art director Juan Geel juan@assocmedia.co.za Art editor Fatiema Johnson Copy editor Jocelyn Stiebel Freelance copy editor Jade Taylor Cooke Features writer Edwain Steenkamp Fashion director Tarryn Oppel tarryno@assocmedia.co.za Fashion assistant Danielle Viljoen Fashion intern Ahlume Monese Beauty director Juana Parathyras juana@assocmedia.co.za Beauty editor Ncumisa Makhonjwa ncumisa@assocmedia.co.za Online editor Abigail McDougall abigail@assocmedia.co.za Online content producer Afika Jadezweni Group beauty writer Helen Wallace Group beauty intern Kim Mockey

COMMERCIAL

Key accounts manager JHB Thalia Pallotta thalia@assocmedia.co.za Alyson Brown alyson@assocmedia.co.za Key accounts manager CT Jacelize Rust jacelize@assocmedia.co.za Advertising controller Quanita Rinquest quanita@assocmedia.co.za Digital support Taryn Ballentine taryn@assocmedia.co.za Print support Jorika Moore jorika@assocmedia.co.za

ASSOCIATED MEDIA PUBLISHING Chairman Jane Raphaely Chief executive officer Julia Raphaely Head of advertising & creative solutions Leigh Kinross Head of talent Kim van der Linden Head of HR Silke Rathbone Group brand director Emilie Gambade Head of digital & marketing Elrike Lochner Head of distribution & supply chain Marcus Newkirk Special projects manager Nicole Newman Marketing assistant Potego Mminele Marketing coordinator Claudell van Eeden Special projects manager Mushfieqah Kannemeyer Technical project manager Sam Christian Integrated project manager Dee Berry Head of creative studio Kat de Sarigny Creative Director Kassie Naidoo Creative studio producer/art buyer Cindy Comer Creative studio group art directors Victoria Meder, Janine Nel Campaign manager Kareesha Naidoo Creative studio designer Stacey Knipe, Nadine Williams Creative studio senior designer Jessica Cohen Creative studio head of copy Jaime Waddington Creative studio copywriter Celeste Jacobs Group digital communications manager Blue Masoka Digital assistant Simone Smit Digital traffic manager Nasheeta Khan Digital media & data strategist Marilize Nel Creative studio proofreader Kelly-May Macdonald Group picture video editor & photographer Valentina Nicol Financial manager Bianca de Jongh Senior accountant Marcellé Finnucane Accountants Lee-ancher Strauss, Angelene Facolyn Debtors controller Meagan Dowman Print production manager Paul Livingstone Print production assistant Shaakira Ajam Head of repro André Reinders DTP operator Michelle Saunders HR officer Natasha Nadia Marillier Driver/clerical assistant Trevor Goodall Office assistants Felicia Burt Head office receptionist Carol Geduld PA to CEO and chairman Janine Duncan

MARIE CLAIRE INTERNATIONAL

Executive director Laurence Hembert Deputy director (finance and development) Félix Droissart International editorial director Florence du Luart International chief editor Séverine Harzo International creative director Sylvie Halic International commercial director Véronique Depery International deputy commercial director Elisabeth Barbier Syndication director Thierry Lamarre Branded products director Fabrice Taupin

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For current print subscription offers: email subscribe@assocmedia.co.za or call 021 464 6240. Alternatively, you can get your digital fix and take your issue wherever you go by downloading the tablet edition at Marieclaire.co.za/subscribe

Marie Claire magazine is published monthly by Associated Media Publishing (Pty) Ltd, 80 Strand Street, Cape Town 8001. If you cannot find a copy in store, email marieclaire@assocmedia.co.za

Trademark ‘marie claire’ owned and registered in South Africa by Marie Claire Album, a French Société that has its registered office in Paris, France. Published under agreement by Associated Media Publishing (Pty) Ltd, 80 Strand Street, Cape Town 8001. All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material, including digital, in whole or part without written permission is strictly prohibited. No responsibility will be taken for unsolicited material. Use of trademark is strictly prohibited. Editorial contributions are welcome and should be sent to the features editor, Marie Claire, PO Box 3647, Cape Town 8000. All due care will be taken with material submitted, but the magazine and publishers cannot be held responsible for loss or damage. Every effort will be made to return contributions if a stamped, addressed envelope is included. Manuscripts are accepted on the understanding that Marie Claire reserves the right to edit, amend and abridge any manuscript accepted for publication. Marie Claire takes no responsibility for any errors in terms of any information published in the magazine.

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A division of Novus Holdings

filter

NEWS AND VIEWS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

INDONESIA

THE VIRGIN CONFLICT

Hopeful FEMALE SOLDIERS must still prove their VIRGINITY

S ince International Women’s Day in March, activists have renewed their efforts to stop the Indonesian government forcing women to prove their virginity before joining the

country’s armed forces. It was reported by Human Rights Watch

in Indonesia that since the ’60s, women wanting to enlist have been undergoing traumatic virginity tests, including the barbaric (and scientifically inaccurate) ‘two-finger test’ to determine whether or not a woman’s hymen is intact.

COMPILED BY EDWAIN STEENKAMP PHOTOGRAPHS GALLO/GETTY, MATTEL

INDIA

On track for empowerment

At first sight, Gandhinagar Station in Rajasthan doesn’t seem out of the ordinary. Except for one thing: it’s the only interstate train station in India staffed solely by women, from conductors and ticket sellers to the station master herself. That’s quite significant in this conservative country, where, in some rural areas, women are still seldom seen outdoors. Today, India has one of the fastest growing economies, but women have been largely excluded from it. However, over the last year, Indian women have made major strides in empowering themselves. From the first female fighter-jet pilots recently being inducted into the country’s armed forces, to an all-female sailing crew circumnavigating the world, it seems there’s nothing stopping India’s women now.

PAKISTAN

PAKISTAN WELCOMES ITS FIRST TRANSGENDER NEWS ANCHOR

In a landmark moment for marginalised identities in Pakistan, Marvia Malik has become the country’s rst transgender news anchor. In March, Pakistan’s Senate voted in favour of a bill that will protect the rights of transgender people, and allow its citizens to choose their own gender. Marvia is a journalism graduate who was working as a model before she received the good news from private broadcaster Kohenoor that she had landed the job. Although transgender people are still severely discriminated against in the country, this massive step forward will hopefully begin changing perceptions.

RWANDA

L E A D I N G

I N

R E P R E S E N TAT I O N ,

A N D

A F R I C A

E M P O W E R M E N T

TRANSPARENCY

Africa’s most powerful nations, including South Africa and Nigeria, are still struggling to make progress in closing the gender gap on the continent. Instead, Rwanda has taken the lead. According to the Global Competitiveness Report, the East African country is the best place in Africa to be a woman in terms of gender equality in industry and government. Rwanda was also one of the rst countries in the world to have more than half of its government run by women, with 64% of Parliament made up of women by 2015. Representation in government has meant that women are also more visible in other sectors in the country, including education and business.

GLOBAL

filter

Mattel honours some of history’s most important women

Mattel, the manufacturer of Barbie, has released a series of dolls celebrating some of history’s most remarkable women. The 14 new dolls form a part of the ‘Shero’ collection and, among others, you can now get your very own Amelia Earhart, Frida Kahlo and Katherine Johnson. Modern women are also celebrated, with Ava DuVernay and Misty Copeland forming part of the range, too. We’ve officially decided you’re never too old to start collecting dolls.

CELEBRATE AVON SOUTH AFRICA’S NO.1 FRAGRANCE BRAND

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PRODUCTION TARRYN OPPEL PHOTOGRAPH NIQUITA BENTO HAIR ALET VILJOEN / SNCM MAKE-UP RENEE DE WIT / GLOSS MODEL DAILI / TWENTY

trendstrends

SUNGLASSES

R46 000

DOLCE&GABBANA

So extra

ACCESSORIES are the easiest way to GAIN ACCESS to a new season’s trends

STYLING TARRYN OPPEL PHOTOGRAPH NIQUITA BENTO

VALENTINO

PRADA

#shoesfirst

R1 199

ALDO

R11 900

LOUIS

VUITTON

Strike up a friendship with neon brights, denim finishes and graphic motifs – your go-to trends this season

R1 399

SHELFLIFE

R549

TALLY WEIJL

R12 000

DOLCE&GABBANA

R2 199

PUMA SELECT

R2 799

ADIDAS

ORIGINALS

R699

MANGO

R759

ZARA

VALENTINO

d wallpaper

p

p

the past in modernised w

velvet and faux-fur finishes

prints, Embrace and a blast snakeskin, from

DRIES VAN NOTEN

PRADA

SUNGLASSES

R6 690

SUNGLASS

HUT

NECKLACE

R170 COLETTE

BY COLETTE

HAYMAN

 

DIOR WATCH

POR BHH

BOUTIQUE

BOOTS

R599

QUEENSPARK

BAG POR

DOLCE&GABBANA

EARRINGS

R1 900

PICHULIK

SHOES

R250

MRP

HEADBAND

R8 400

GUCCI

trends

BAG R999

CHARLES

& KEITH

FAUX FUR

STOLE R350

OLD KHAKI

ice-cold metallic accessories

and hardware to match

Take a shine to

with sharp lines

CHRISTOPHER KANE

CHRISTOPHER KANE

trends

SCARF

R399

ZARA

BOOTS R3 600 STEVE MADDEN

WATCH

R32 790

TUDORWATCH.

COM

SUNGLASSES

R599 PRIVÉ

REVAUX

EARRINGS

R180

TESSA

DESIGN

PRADA

SUNGLASSES

R3 290

SUNGLASS

HUT

SHOES R1 299 ALDO

BAG R1 699 CHARLES & KEITH

BAG R29 890 BURBERRY

BANGLE

R101 000

CARTIER

Make cool shades the hero, with blue and black

to make your item stand out

PRODUCTION DANIELLE VILJOEN, TARRYN OPPEL PHOTOGRAPHS COLLEEN MCNALLY/DIS PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS AHLUME MONESE, MORGANE BOURGEOIS STOCKISTS SEE P126

accents

SPORTMAX

CHANEL

trends

MOSCHINO SUNGLASSES R3 700 SAFILO

DKNY WATCH

GROUP

R1 999

WATCH

REPUBLIC

BAG R6 595 MICHAEL KORS

BOOTS R1 199 CHARLES & KEITH

BAG R67 800 GUCCI

COLLAR C

R199

ZARA Z

BERET R349

WITCHERY

SHOES POR

PRADA

GIGI HADID FOR VOGUE R1 590 SUNGLASS HUT

BAG R949

MANGO

PhotograPhs supplied

advertorial

A mother’s love

Indulge her this Mother’s Day with treats and treasures from Poetry that are as unique as she is

P oetry’s collection of gifts speaks to every type of woman. For the homemaker,

there are beautiful frames and luxurious throws. The hostess won’t be able to get enough of the hand-painted teacups and beautiful glassware. The trendsetter won’t go unnoticed with her pick of genuine leather bags, silk scarves and fine jewellery. And for the woman who simply deserves to be pampered, Poetry’s bath and body collection will have her relaxed and rejuvenated in no time. From beautiful crockery and tasty confectionary to luxurious accessories and genuine leather goods, you can be sure to find that something special from any Poetry store that will show her how much you really care. She’s done so much for you and for those around her; it’s time to treat her and let her know that she is loved and appreciated this Mother’s Day.

CloCkwise From toP leFt BAsil, sAGe And MinT CAndle R199, WhiTe lily And peony RooM spRAy R110; TAssel sTATeMenT eARRinGs R199; pinK-Gold TeACups R180 eACh; Billie MulTi-FunCTionAl Mini CRoss-Body leATheR BAG R899; MARBle pesTle And MoRTAR R160, Blue And Gold vAse (sMAll) R199, Gold sAlAd seT R299, Blue And Gold vAse R350; Rose GARdeniA BATh oil R120

For more information, visit Poetrystores.co.za or connect on social media.

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COMPILED BY NCUMISA MAKHONJWA PHOTOGRAPH ANDRÉ WEPENER/PIXEL LOUNGE

trends

1

2

WHAT IS K-BEAUTY?

Korean Beauty, or K-Beauty, refers to skincare trends from Korea, which focus heavily on skin nourishment. Sheet masks, in particular, have been Korea’s gift to the world. The lazy woman’s facial, these offer a range of bene ts, from removing impurities and reducing the appearance of ne lines, to offering intense hydration.

3

6

7

BEAUTY ED’S PICK

Oh,

S

H E ET !

DISCOVER K-BEAUTY-INSPIRED MASKS THAT ADDRESS AN ARRAY OF SKIN CONCERNS

26 MARIECLAIRE.CO.ZA MAY 2018

5

4

1. KISS AFRICAN BLACK SOAP PURIFYING BAMBOO FACIAL SHEET MASK R50 2. FOSCHINI HYDROGEL EYE MASK PATCHES R60 3. LEEGEEHAAM GLUTATHIONE BRIGHTENING MASK R70 4. FOSCHINI NON WOVEN BRIGHTENING & REVITALISING FACE MASK R40 5. SKIN REPUBLIC CHARCOAL PEEL-OFF FACE MASK R60 6. GLAMGLOW BUBBLESHEET OXYGENATING DEEP CLEANSE MASK R120 7. GARNIER MOISTURE BOMB TISSUE MASK R50

LOUNGE, ISTOCK

THE

PHOTOGRAPHS

WEPENER/PIXEL

MAKHONJWA

ANDRÉ

BY NCUMISA

LICENSING PROJECT,

COMPILED

glazed

OVER

Also referred to as glass skin, SKIN GLAZING is the new trend that replaces make-up with multiple layers of skincare

F orget finicky contouring and sculpted features using a litany of products. This new trend is pared-down and bare. Skin glazing focuses

on showing off healthy skin, rather than covering up imperfections, by substituting make-up for layered skincare. The result is a glossy, glass-like finish.

HERE’S

HOW

TO

DO

IT:

1 Prep your skin by double cleansing. Use [1] DERMALOGICA Precleanse Balm R660. Massage

it into the skin to dissolve surface residue. Follow with DERMALOGICA Special Cleansing Gel R850, which will remove any lingering impurities without stripping or drying the skin.

2 The next non-negotiable step involves seven layers of toner. Try Korean brand [2] KLAIRS

Supple Preparation Facial Toner R420. Using your fingers, pat on the first layer. Then massage the product gently into your skin and wait until it’s dry. Repeat this process another six times until all seven layers have been applied.

3 The secret to effective glazing is hydration, and when it comes to looking ‘lit from within’ there’s

no such thing as too much moisture. Start with a facial mist like [3] MARIO BADESCU Facial Spray With Aloe, Cucumber and Green Tea R250, and follow with a rich, collagen-boosting moisturiser such as SIX Sensational Skincare Age Reverse Moisturiser R753 or [4] LA MER The Renewal Oil R2 780, for soothing hydration.

1

2

3

4

trends

TIP

Regular exfoliation is a key step in achieving smooth skin. Opt for a chemical exfoliator with alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs), which loosen dead skin cells and re ne pores without irritation. Use it two to three times a week on damp skin. Try BIODERMA Sébium Exfoliating Purifying Gel R170. Using circular motions, massage the product into your skin for at least two minutes before rinsing it off.

COMPILED BY NCUMISA MAKHONJWA PHOTOGRAPH ANDRÉ WEPENER/PIXEL LOUNGE

trends

FIVE OF THE BEST

SUBZERO

Cold weather has a drying effect on the skin. These products offer long-lasting hydration

NUXE Crème Fraîche de Beauté 48HR Moisturising Cream R445 has anti-pollution properties that protect the skin from harmful toxins. The light texture is absorbed rapidly, providing instant moisture and 48-hour protection.

CLARINS SOS Hydra Face Mask R515 is a gel-cream face mask with Bryophyllum pinnatum (‘leaf of life’) extract, which quenches the skin and helps maintain its ideal moisture level.

28 MARIECLAIRE.CO.ZA MAY 2018

L’OCCITANE Body Fabulous Oil R475 is made with lipid-replenishing shea oil to hydrate, soften and prevent dryness.

DERMALOGICA Barrier Defense Booster R1 220 relieves dryness and reinforces the skin’s protective barrier against environmental factors.

LAMELLE Dermaheal Ultra Renewal Cream R1 620 is formulated with a lipid recovery base that has natural moisturising factors and a 24-hour moisture-lock system to suf ciently soothe dry skin.

COMPILED BY NCUMISA MAKHONJWA PHOTOGRAPHS NICOLAS MOORE, ANDRÉ WEPENER/PIXEL LOUNGE, ISTOCK

trends

IN

SALON

AT

HOME

DERMAPLANING

A

new technique

in

exfoliating,

dermaplaning, or skin shaving, requires

the use of a scalpel

to gently remove

dead skin cells and fine hair from the face. The procedure

is painless and takes

about 30 minutes to complete, with no downtime after the treatment. It’s not recommended for acne-prone or very sensitive skin. Benefits: It treats hyperpigmentation and improves the skin’s overall complexion and texture. It also reduces the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. Costs: One treatment can cost anything from R450 to R1 500. Try it at: Just Skin Aesthetic Clinic, Cape Town Justskinclinic.co.za

SKIN SOLUTIONS

TECH CARE

DERMA ROLLING

The process of derma rolling stimulates collagen production in the skin’s epidermis. The rollers contain hundreds of tiny needles ranging from 0.5 to 1.5mm in length, which create micro-injuries on the skin. This, in turn, results in rapid collagen and elastin production, tightening and plumping for a youthful complexion. Benefits: The increase in collagen improves a number of skin concerns including rosacea, stretch marks, hyperpigmentation and even hair loss. Cost: A derma-rolling kit can range from R450 to R1 600. Buy one at:

Hey Gorgeous

(nationwide)

Hey-gorgeous.co.za

CRYOTHERAPY

Cryotherapy, or fat-freezing, is a non-invasive, hyper-cooling treatment that reduces fat and destroys abnormal skin cells. It is

performed by cooling the body (or parts thereof) down to -140°C for increments

of

repeated a number of times over the course of an hour. Benefits: It can reduce pockets of fat by up to 40%, as well as destroying skin growths including warts, age spots and pre-cancerous and malignant lesions. The method also works for cellulite reduction and skin rejuvenation. Costs: R350 to R6 000, depending on the area of the body. Try it at: Body Renewal (nationwide) Bodyrenewal.co.za

THE BEAUTY INDUSTRY REGULARLY DELIVERS GROUND-BREAKING ADVANCES IN SKINCARE. HERE ARE THE MOST RECENT INNOVATIONS

FILORGA

LIFT-DESIGNER

ULTRA-LIFTING

SERUM

Filorga’s innovative

new tool is an ultra-lifting, anti- ageing serum that works on all skin types. Attached at the top of the bottle is a metal roller that assists the product to penetrate the deeper layers of the skin, stimulating the tissue, and tightening and plumping any lines. Benefits: The product is formulated with collagen and hyaluronic acid, anti-ageing agents that help smooth the skin and give it an immediate lifted effect. Cost: R1 095 Buy it at: Filorga South Africa Filorgasouthafrica.co.za

FILORGA LIFT-DESIGNER ULTRA-LIFTING SERUM R1 095

three minutes. The procedure can be

the

EDIT

OUR BEAUTY TEAM WEIGHS IN ON THE LATEST PRODUCTS TO ARRIVE IN THE BEAUTY CLOSET

CHANEL

LA CRÈME

MAIN R890

NCUMISA TRIES

I’m always on the go, so I love a hard-working product that I can keep in my handbag, like Chanel’s luxe new hand cream. It smooths and softens my skin while forming a protective layer that locks in moisture. The oval-shaped packaging ts perfectly in my hands and dispenses the product with one squeeze. Ncumisa Makhonjwa, beauty editor

SISLEY

PHYTO-LIP

TWIST IN

BERRY R607

YOUR LIPS WILL LOVE…

DIOR Addict Lip Glow is fast becoming a cult product. The balm comes in 10 new shades that are a gradation of pink to suit every

skin tone. It leaves lips with a velvety matte finish in

a soft pink flush.

ESTÉE LAUDER Pure Color Envy Matte Sculpting Lipstick is lightweight and creamy, gliding effortlessly on to the lips without drying them. SISLEY Phyto-Lip Twist is a glossy lip colour and balm in one. It’s formulated with

plant-based ingredients that hydrate, condition and give your lips

a plumped effect.

DIOR ADDICT

LIP GLOW

IN MATTE

RASPBERRY

R600

ESTÉE LAUDER PURE COLOR ENVY MATTE SCULPTING LIPSTICK IN DESIROUS R440

LOUNGE,

ANDRÉ WEPENER/PIXEL

MAKHONJWA

IMAXTREE, ISTOCK, SUPPLIED

COMPILED BY NCUMISA

PHOTOGRAPHS

T H E A N AT O M Y

OF J O H N VA R VAT O S A R T I S A N PURE

The newest addition to the John Varvatos collection, Artisan Pure, combines a revitalising blend of citrus and herbs with woody accents for a refreshingly crisp aroma. This masculine fragrance conveys the re nement of looking and feeling relaxed:

sophistication and luxury in its most natural form.

LA MER THE MOISTURIZING GEL CREAM R2 410

JOHN

VARVATOS

ARTISAN PURE

EDT 125ML

R1 499

trends

3

OF THE

BEST

WE ROUND UP THREE NEW PRODUCTS TO UP YOUR ANTI- AGEING GAME

1. SENSAI Cellular Performance Wrinkle Repair Essence R2 835 reduces fine lines and wrinkles, and is absorbed rapidly. 2. AVÈNE Sérénage Revitalizing Eye Balm R400 reduces puffiness and revitalises the eyes thanks to its powerful cellular anti-oxidant. 3. MINERALINE Time It! Anti-ageing Serum R245 reduces wrinkle depth on the face and neck while toning, firming and hydrating the skin.

1

2

3

BEAUTY BUZZ

La Mer’s new gel cream is a soothing moisturiser infused with the brand’s nutrient-rich Miracle Broth. A staple ingredient in all La Mer products, Miracle Broth is created by biofermenting a blend of sea kelp, calcium, magnesium, potassium, vitamins and natural extracts over the course of four months. The result? A cream that has the ability to truly transform the skin by deeply hydrating it and leaving it feeling refreshed.

reportage

The

Ci T y

of

Wido W s

Bereaved then cast out of their family homes, thousands of ostracised widows in india are forced to beg or become sex workers to survive. Many travel to vrindavan’s holy ashrams seeking food and shelter. what they find is safety and sisterhood…

words andrea tho M pson Photogra P hs sara hylton

W hen she first visited India in 2010, photographer Sara Hylton was shocked to discover women – young and old – dressed in white, begging on the streets. ‘When I looked into these women’s faces, I saw my own mother and felt compelled to explore them through my lens. They seemed so beautiful, and yet so ostracised, existing on the outskirts of society.’ Sara learned that each of these women was a widow who, on the day of her husband’s death, had given up wearing colour to signify a life of devotion to her late spouse and

to God. Due to the cultural tradition of marrying off teenage girls to men in their forties and older, it’s not unusual to find women in their twenties destined to live for decades under the shadow of widowhood, alone. The treatment of widows in parts of India is a topic that the government and many parts of society would rather ignore. Widows, sometimes at the hands of their own children, are immediately cast out of their homes after the death of their husbands, because of various Hindu superstitions that associate widowhood with bad luck (seeing a shadow of a widow in the street is believed to wreak havoc on your fortunes). Considering the central role they play in raising children and looking after the extended family as wives, this seems particularly unjust. Furthermore, a widow can never remarry; she must eat only small portions of bland food, live modestly and dress in white, so that she is easily recognisable as a woman in mourning. Educated Indians largely dismiss such rules as relics of another century, but they are still very much alive in many villages and conservative families.

Widowed women from Vrindavan celebrate the festival of Durga Puja in Kolkata, West Bengal. For the first time since becoming widowed, around 60 women participated in the celebration. Elsewhere, widowed women living in traditional Hindu communities are banned from participating in any religious ceremonies or celebrations.

‘THROUGH MY

PICTURES

I WANT TO HELP INDIAN

SOCIETY

ACCEPT THESE WOMEN JUST AS THEY ARE:

HUMAN

BEINGS’

above A room at the Chaitanya Vihar ashram in Vrindavan, where dozens of widows sleep, eat and live together. Residents store belongings under their beds and use the space beside them as cooking stations.

right (middle) Mayarani Dasi, 80 at the time, sits for a portrait at the Meera Sahabhagini ashram, home to more than 200 widowed women, mostly from the state of West Bengal. Dasi has lived at the ashram for over a decade and feels at peace there.

right (below) Residents of the Meera Sahabhagini ashram for widowed women in Vrindavan learn how to sew with the help of Sulabh International. The items that are made within the ashram are sold to local markets, providing the mostly illiterate widows a valuable skill and a small wage.

‘To me, the most sacred person

on Earth is my mother,’ says Sara.

‘I kept imagining her enduring the

abuse and neglect that many of these

women experience at every level.’ Many widows, traumatised by the humiliation of being cast out from the communities and families they love, are forced into sex work to survive. ‘Through my pictures I want to help reduce the stigma associated with widowhood, so that Indian society could accept these women just as they are: human beings.’

A two-year project followed,

capturing the widows’ struggles as well as their humanity and sense of sisterhood, as they share their

lives together in government- or charity-run ashrams. Many of the women in Sara’s photographs had sought refuge in a holy town called Vrindavan, in the state of Uttar Pradesh, where traditionally exiled widows travel thousands of miles to gather, following expulsion from their families. The city, considered holy by Hindus, is known as the ‘city of widows’ for its population of 20 000 bereaved women. ‘These women have nowhere else to go and come together initially due to terrible circumstances, but they find love and acceptance among one another,’ says Sara.

‘I will never forget their bravery

and resilience in the face of such adversity and rejection. They live together, pray together and, most importantly, they survive together. In many ways they have created a safe haven where they exist in this somewhat surreal world bonded by strength, hope and solace in their yearning for peace.’ Sara is working with local organisations, such as Maitri and Sulabh International (an NGO introducing 200 of Vrindavan’s illiterate widows to education), to help bring women’s rights and the welfare of widows to the forefront of India’s political agenda.

‘My hope is that all widows

will receive equal rights, free from victimisation or abuse. Theirs is

a story about the resilience and

strength of sisterhood, but it’s also

a story about how far we need to go

in our drive for female equality.’ mc

‘They live

TogeTher,

pray TogeTher and, mosT imporTanTly, They survive TogeTher… bonded by

sTrengTh,

hope and solace in Their

yearning

for peace’

A widowed woman performs her

daily prayers at sunset at the Meera Sahabhagini ashram. Widows live communally in ashram temples. They are expected to renounce all earthly

pleasures, wearing white as the symbol

of death, and subsisting on little food.

Girls as young as 11 and women as old as 107 are shunned by society, evicted from their homes, abused, neglected, sexually exploited and considered inauspicious. The majority of widows journey to Vrindavan to live out the remainder of their days with God.

reportage

T H E

M A K I N G

O F

A

MODERN

PRINCESS

WINDSOR CASTLE AWAITS, AND AS PRINCE HARRY PREPARES TO USHER IN A NEW, MODERN ERA FOR THE ROYAL FAMILY, ALL EYES ARE ON HIS GLAMOROUS BRIDE-TO-BE. ANDREW MORTON, THE FAMED BIOGRAPHER OF DIANA, PRINCESS OF WALES, REVEALS THE LIFE STORY OF MEGHAN MARKLE – FROM HOLLYWOOD TO HER ROYAL HIGHNESS

n 6 September 1997, Meghan

Markle, 16, and her friends watched the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales, tears coursing down their

cheeks at the poignant moment when the camera zoomed in on the royal coffin. Perched among the white flowers was an envelope bearing the word ‘Mummy’, containing Prince Harry’s last note to his mother. Diana’s death was a topic of

debate during a philosophy class

at Meghan’s high school, Immaculate

Heart, in Los Angeles. The discussion centred on the paradox of a young mother, a glamorous humanitarian in the prime of life, dying in the cruel banality of a car accident. After the discussion, Meghan and her friend, Suzy Ardakani, sat and watched old videos of the 1981 wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer. According to family friends, Meghan was intrigued by Diana not just for her style but also for her independent humanitarian mission. She saw her as a role model. Inspired by the Princess, she and Suzy collected clothes and toys for less privileged children. In fact, such was Meghan’s interest that Suzy’s mother Sonia even gave her a copy of my biography, Diana:

Her True Story, which remained on her bookshelves for the next few years. As her childhood friend Ninaki Priddy observed: ‘She was always fascinated by the royal family. She wants to be Princess Diana 2.0.’ Meghan was born on 4 August 1981. Her parents, Tom Markle and Doria Ragland, met on the set of the ABC drama General Hospital, where Doria was training as a make-up artist and Tom was well established as the show’s lighting director. Tom had been married once before and had two children, Tom Jnr and Yvonne. And in spite of the 12-year age gap – Doria was closer in age to his daughter than she was to him – the pair quickly fell for one another. For Yvonne, it was indifference, not dislike, at first sight. She resented the fact that Doria was taking her father’s focus away from her. When her friends came over to the house, she dismissed the presence of her father’s African- American girlfriend, referring to her, according to her brother, as ‘the maid’. When Doria arrived, everyone in the family was used to going their own way. Tom Snr worked every hour of the day and night, Yvonne was out clubbing with her friends, while Tom Jnr was smoking weed with his own crowd. Doria brought them together as a family. ‘The best way I can describe Doria is that she was like a warm hug,’ said a neighbour. When Doria found herself pregnant just a year after tying the knot, she and Tom couldn’t wait for the birth. The arrival of Rachel Meghan Markle transformed her father’s life. ‘He

was just so, so happy,’ Tom Jnr recalls. ‘He spent every single minute he could with her. My dad was more in love with her than anyone else in the world, and that included Doria. She became his whole life, his little princess.’

cover story

Tom, in his own quirky fashion, tried to impose a little discipline on the somewhat laissez-faire household in order to

protect his little ‘Flower’. He had always said to his son that if he and his friends wanted to smoke weed, they should do so only in the house, but this instruction changed with the arrival of the baby. On one occasion, Tom Jnr and his friends were smoking a spliff in the lounge while Meghan was in the nursery crying. His father announced loudly that he was going up to change her. Shortly afterwards, he reappeared carrying a full nappy. He joined the boys on the couch, took

a spoon out of his pocket, and started to eat the ‘contents’.

Grossed out, the boys fled the house. Only later did he reveal that he had substituted chocolate pudding into a fresh nappy.

It was his way of stopping the boys smoking weed when

Meghan was around.

That was about as far as discipline went. From the outside,

it seemed to be one big happy family, but bickering between

Tom and Doria had started. Tom was a workaholic and thought nothing of spending 80 or 90 hours a week on set. Doria had not signed up for this, dealing with his children, raising her own and kick- starting a career. And they were also living in a predominantly white neighbourhood where, because of her dark skin and Meghan’s light skin, people often thought Doria was the nanny. They often stopped her and asked, quite innocently, where the baby’s mother lived. There came a point when Doria decided that enough was enough and went back home to her mother, Jeannette. As

a family friend observed: ‘Doria is not a doormat, that much

I know. She spoke up for herself, protected herself and her

daughter fiercely.’ The couple split up when Meghan was just two years old, but did not divorce for another five years. Some people remarked on Tom’s bewilderment, not to say bitterness, that Doria had given their union so little time to prove itself. In 1983, Doria and Tom enrolled two-year-old Meghan at

a crèche in Little Red School House, an exclusive institution

favoured by the sons and daughters of LA’s showbiz elite. The school’s stage shows, watched by proud parents, were

a regular feature of the curriculum. In one, Meghan shared the lead in How The Grinch Stole Christmas. Unfortunately, her co-star came down with stomach flu hours before the show began, leaving her trying to memorise both parts. ‘That was the worst experience of my life, trying to learn your lines,’ Meghan told her co-star afterwards. Ironically, no one gave a thought to promote a little girl with an unkempt mane of blonde hair, thick glasses and an awkward manner lurking in the chorus. Her name was Scarlett Johansson, now one of the world’s highest-paid actors. By the time she was 10, Meghan was fiercely switched on and loved to debate an issue, taking part in discussions about racism in America, most notably after the notorious beating of Rodney King by LA cops in 1991. After school, Meghan often sat on the floor of the studio waiting for her father to finish

work on the raunchy comedy show Married… With Children. As she sat quietly studying, all kinds of ribald scenes were played out on set, some involving semi-nudity – hardly the normal after-school fare for a young schoolgirl. Around this time, unbeknown to Meghan, her father enjoyed a slice

of luck that meant he no longer had to work such a brutal schedule. In 1990, he won the California State Lottery, scooping $750 000 with five numbers, which included Meghan’s birth date.

As he still had outstanding financial matters concerning his divorce from Doria, he kept the win secret. But this duplicity proved to be his undoing. In order to avoid registering his name with the authorities, he sent an old friend from Chicago to pick up his winnings. The plan, according to Tom Jnr, backfired when his pal ended up swindling him out of the lion’s share of his fortune in a failed jewellery business. It was clear that Meghan’s dysfunctional family background and her parents’ subsequent divorce troubled her. ‘I know that was difficult for her,’ recalls a former teacher from her high school. ‘One parent over here, one parent over there, neither particularly fond of each other.’ The role of skilled diplomat, mediating between warring factions, taught Meghan

a valuable lesson: how to control her emotions. ‘She is very

poised,’ a school friend observes. ‘It could be hard for her.

Sometimes she felt she had to pick sides.’ There were other issues too, though she did not discuss

them publicly at the time. Fitting in was a constant concern. ‘We only ever saw her with Tom, never with the mum,’ said

a school photographer. Meghan was living with her father

during the week, as his home was within walking distance of the school. And so it came as a mild shock to members of faculty when they finally got to meet Doria. ‘Everyone thought Meghan was Italian because she was so light-skinned,’ one former teacher recalls. ‘Then we met her mother and realised she was biracial.’ At school, when she was rehearsing for a play, her father was always around. As an Emmy winner, he was roped into becoming the technical director for every school production Meghan was involved in. On 28 March 1996, she made her first solo singing performance, playing the secretary in the school’s production of the musical Annie. As one teacher recalls: ‘Meghan was a standout. She had charisma, no doubt.’ And then in 1998, she was made homecoming queen. The orthodontics she had during her high-school years had gradually adjusted her bucked gap-tooth grin, and now she was smiling widely without feeling self-conscious. She had some headshots taken to send out for auditions. As she was leaving for University in Chicago in the autumn, the best she could hope for was a day or two’s work on one of the music videos being shot around town. At Northwestern University, Meghan worked hard at making new friends. Now that she wasn’t under the watchful gaze of her mother, she started wearing heavier make-up and experimented with highlighting her hair. She joined the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority, which was full of girls who were considered ‘intelligent hot messes’. The sorority embraced her warmly and Meghan was eventually elected as its recruitment chair, responsible for bringing new girls into the fold. Of course, all the socialising did have a focus – the search for a boyfriend. More sophisticated and put-together than

most of her contemporaries, Meghan was seen as a cool catch. At Northwestern her first boyfriend was Steve, a chiselled, white, six-foot-five basketball player from Ohio. Her KKG sorority sisters were ‘impressed she’d snared a hottie’. ‘They made quite the pair,’ recalls a former classmate.

But the relationship was short-lived. Steve was committed to his sporting ambitions, while Meghan was a party animal who enjoyed staying out late. Meghan was working towards a double major in theatre and international studies, and in the summer she took an internship at the American Embassy in Buenos Aires. She knew that her uncle Mick Markle was employed as a specialist in communication systems for the US government – the talk in the family was that he worked for the CIA – so she approached him for help. Uncle Mick pulled a few strings, and even though she was late filing her application, her excellent academic record and her uncle’s influence got her in. In the Buenos Aires office, her day-to-day work was mundane

– filing, answering phones and drafting letters. But on

4 August 2002, the day of her 21st birthday, she was given permission to travel in the convoy that would pick up US finance secretary Paul O’Neill, who was making a whistle- stop tour to South America. It was a treat, but it rapidly turned into a terrifying ordeal. Argentina had recently defaulted on a $141-billion debt and neither the International

Monetary Fund nor the American government was in any mood to bail the country out. Though O’Neill was expecting

a bumpy ride, even he was perturbed when banner-waving

demonstrators surrounded the convoy. ‘I remember the arrival because protestors banged on my limo with their placards.

It was a memorable event,’ he later deadpanned.

The US Embassy was already on orange alert, not only because of the impending anniversary of 9/11, but also because of intelligence reports suggesting that Islamic militants could be setting up a network in South America. It’s easy to imagine how frightening Meghan would have found an angry mob of protestors attacking her car. The incident aside, she was committed enough to a career with

the State Department to take the three-hour Foreign Service Officer Test while in Argentina. It proved a stretch too far and Meghan failed. In any case, fate was pushing her into the world of entertainment. Not long after graduating in 2003, she got a call from Lindsay Jill Roth, her best friend from college, who was working in casting for a film called A Lot Like Love, starring Ashton Kutcher. She had snagged Meghan an audition for

a one-word role. ‘Can you say “Hi”?’ asked the director. ‘Yes I can,’ Meghan replied. ‘But I read the script and I really respond to this other character and I would love to

read for that.’ Naturally, the other character had a bigger role. Meghan didn’t get the role she pitched for, but she did get the smaller part. It was her start in acting. From there, it was

a scratchy hand-to-mouth existence, one experienced by

thousands of Hollywood hopefuls. Throughout, her motto was, ‘I choose happiness’, and she made a point to stay happy, getting together with friends over pizza and wine, taking yoga classes and going out as much as her budget permitted. One night, that budget took her to a dive bar in West Hollywood. A loud voice, tinged with a New York accent, caught her attention. More than six-feet tall, with reddish-blonde hair and blue eyes, Trevor Engelson had the air of a Matthew McConaughey-lite, although he was raised in New York and worked as a Hollywood producer and actor. He was a guy with an aphorism for every occasion. ‘Hope

cover story

is the greatest currency we have in this business,’ he told the

wide-eyed wannabe. True or not, it’s a great pick-up line. Meghan’s career was slowly chugging along. She had bagged a brief appearance on a sitcom, though to pay the

bills she worked as a hostess at a Beverly Hills restaurant and as a calligrapher. Like other girls doing the audition rounds, she had a gym bag containing the essential wardrobe for every possible part she may be called for. In 2006, she joined the US version of Deal or No Deal as

a ‘briefcase girl’ – one of 26 women holding cash ranging

from one cent to $1 million. The pay was $800 an episode and the show regularly recorded seven episodes a day. The

day began at 5:30am, as Meghan and the other briefcase girls gathered for hair, make-up and the final fitting for their skimpy outfits. A rack of matching ballgowns would arrive to be unceremoniously hacked to pieces so that the girls’ legs and décolletage were on full display. Meanwhile, Trevor had a film, License to Wed, in production, starring Robin Williams and Mandy Moore. Meghan secretly

hoped that there would be a role for her. It was to become a source of conflict for the couple, with Meghan disappointed that Trevor didn’t try harder to include her in some of his

productions. A few years later, in 2009, when he was named in the Hollywood Reporter as one of the ‘Next Gen 35 Under 35’, he could finally afford to give Meghan a few crumbs from his groaning pile of scripts. He found her

a small role in Remember Me, a

9/11-themed melodrama, starring the British heart-throb Robert Pattinson. She was still taking auditions in 2011, when she received a call from her agent, telling her that she had been cast

in the pilot for the series Suits, and would begin filming in New York that autumn. By now, Meghan was engaged to Trevor. With the pilot and talk of a TV series, the omens were looking good. As her half-brother, Tom Jnr, told me: ‘Meg was on her way

up.’ The only downside was that she would have to take a five-hour flight if she were to see her Hollywood-based fiancé. But as she and Trevor caught planes like others hailed taxis, the sacrifice was going to be worth it. A month before their nuptials in Jamaica, Meghan knew Suits had been picked up for a second season, a cause for celebration but also uncertainty as, once more, the newlyweds would be long-distance commuters. They would see each other only every two or three weeks when she could come back from the set in Canada. The wedding would be

a rare opportunity to let their hair down. With the ocean as a

backdrop, the couple recited vows they had written themselves, promising to love and care for each other. ‘It was such a

moving wedding,’ recalled one of the bridesmaids. ‘I started crying the moment I saw her in her dress.’ The celebration ended with a rousing chorus of the traditional Jewish Hava Nagila, sung while the bride and groom were lifted up in chairs above their guests’ heads. There were also numerous

parties and beach wheelbarrow races. After the wedding, Meghan flew to Toronto to settle back into her life, filming for nine months. Of course, the couple kept in touch over FaceTime and Skype, but it was wearing being apart, especially through the long, grey Canadian winter. All too soon, cracks began to appear in their marriage. What once endeared now irritated. A self-confessed perfectionist, Meghan had tolerated Trevor’s scattered approach to life for years. He was notorious for arriving late, his clothes rumpled, his hair dishevelled. Meghan, who once said she couldn’t imagine life without Trevor by her side, was now building a new world for herself alone. While she saw her star rising, her husband’s career was treading water. With no new projects in sight and with Suits on hiatus, Trevor took Meghan on

a cycling trip to Vietnam. It didn’t help that he became sick with food poisoning. Their escape to exotic locales, which once provided a backdrop for their love, only served to highlight the distance between them. He was not the only one experiencing the Meghan chill. Her friends in LA noticed the change

THE MARRIAGE ENDED SO ABRUPTLY THAT MEGHAN SENT HER WEDDING AND ENGAGEMENT RINGS BACK TO TREVOR BY REGISTERED POST

in her now that she was on her way up. She no longer had the time for mates she had known for years, cancelling lunches at short notice or expecting them to rework their own schedules to accommodate the busy life of a rising star. A networker to her fingertips, she seemed to be recalibrating her life, forging new friendships with those who could develop her career. Nevertheless, everyone expected Trevor to keep her feet planted on the ground. So her Californian friends were shocked when she announced the end of their two-year marriage in 2013. It was such a bolt from the blue

for Trevor that, even at a distance of five years, he can barely contain his anger. ‘I have zero to say about her,’ he has said to inquirers. Trevor went from cherishing Meghan to, as one friend observed, ‘feeling like he was a piece of something stuck to the bottom of her shoe’. A wealthy entrepreneur friend claimed the marriage ended so abruptly that Meghan sent her wedding and engagement rings back to Trevor by registered post. Another confirmed that the decision to end the marriage was made by Meghan and that it had come ‘totally out of the blue’. Meghan’s stock and standing were rising with each season of Suits, which was now the highest-rated American television show for viewers aged 18 to 49. She was invited to film premieres and to host Hollywood charity galas, she launched

a clothing line and became friends with a host of celebrities,

including the tennis ace Serena Williams. She advocated for the UN and undertook meetings at the World Bank and the Clinton Foundation. As her celebrity status rose, so did her price tag. She was learning that she could charge a fee just for turning up. Meghan’s rate? Upwards of $20 000. Meghan was also now the central character in a novel, What Pretty Girls Are Made Of, written by her ‘bestie from the westie’, Lindsay Roth. It had taken her five years to pen the

Photogra P hs Christian BlanChard / the liCensing ProjeCt

jaunty novel based on the exploits of her heroine, Alison Kraft, who grows up wanting to be an actress and struggles to nail auditions. It was, of course, a thinly disguised portrait of Meghan during her lean years in the Noughties. Lindsay sent

a copy of her amusing trifle to Kate Middleton at Kensington

Palace, her accompanying card informing the Duchess of Cambridge that, in her eyes, she was the definition of ‘prettiness’. Lindsay then proudly posted the pro forma thank-you note from the Duchess’s office online. Sometimes timing is everything. As Meghan nestled back in her seat in preparation for landing at Heathrow Airport in June 2016, she had love and marriage on her mind. The actress was returning from a hen weekend for Lindsay on the Greek island of Hydra. She had a week’s work in London

– promoting Suits and attending Wimbledon as a Ralph

Lauren brand ambassador. On 1 July, at Soho House, Meghan and Harry met, reportedly introduced on a blind date by Violet von Westenholz, a Ralph Lauren PR executive and friend of the princes. As they say in the movies, they had each other at ‘Hello’. She was immediately sensitive to him, aware that this was a man who, beneath the banter and surface chatter, was looking for a safe harbour. The question she

asked herself after that first intoxicating meeting was could she provide it – and all that entailed. The couple enjoyed back-to-back dates before she had to fly back to Toronto. Meghan’s Instagram account gave away just a little: on 3 July, she posted a picture of two Love Hearts sweets that bore the message ‘Kiss me’. Next to the photograph, Meghan posted:

‘Love Hearts in London’. When Harry asked if she would be interested in joining him on safari for a few days in August – mere weeks after their first meeting – she found herself saying: ‘Yes, please.’ Diaries were consulted, days were agreed, plans were made. The last full day she had in London she spent at Wimbledon, where she sat in the players box with Vogue editor Anna Wintour and her niece. As she was watching her friend Serena Williams thrash the Russian Svetlana Kuznetsova, it began to rain. Meghan was wearing a simple but expensive black suede Ralph Lauren dress. Anna offered the actress her woollen cardigan to protect the suede from the rain. Once play resumed, Anna recovered her cardigan and Serena eased her way through to the last eight. Though she was nursing the biggest secret of her life, Meghan was focused on the action, standing to applaud her friend’s masterful play.

cover story

However, courtside photographers were more focused on Anna Wintour than Meghan. One photographic agency placed her under the heading ‘incidental people’. Not for much longer. There may have been a slight raising of eyebrows inside the royal palaces when the news percolated through that Prince Harry was taking yet another girlfriend on a safari holiday to Botswana. Those who monitor these things would have noted that this was his seventh holiday in Botswana with the fourth female companion to join him. The problem with these romances was that once he arrived back in Britain, the HRH tag got in the way of building an honest, workable commitment. Harry’s previous serious relationships with Chelsy Davy and Cressida Bonas floundered because they couldn’t cope with being in the spotlight. Meghan and Harry needed their romance to be private, at least long enough for them to decide if their relationship was going to succeed in the long run. Meghan had to ask herself if she was in love with the man or the position, and if she loved the man could

she cope with the position? For his part, Harry had fallen for

a (slightly) older, biracial divorcee from

California. He didn’t need any reminding of the chaos and bitterness caused by the last American to marry a member of the royal family. The trick was in planning and timing. Jet lag – not the paparazzi – became their main enemy. When they compared diaries it was clear that, if anything, Meghan was the busier of the pair. Even before Harry came into her life she was often up till the small hours scouring the internet for inspiration for her lifestyle blog. Now she was going to be stretched even further – Meghan would often arrive in Toronto and go straight to the Suits set to start filming. Upon his return to London, Harry was soon back in the royal routine. In the last

weekend in September, Meghan travelled to Ottawa, the Canadian capital, to attend her second One Young World Summit. Speaking without notes, she told a women’s equality forum about the time she had confronted the creator of Suits concerning the fact that there were too many scenes that opened with her character, Rachel Zane, emerging naked from a shower dressed only in

a towel. It was sexist, it was unnecessary, it was stopped. Her

complaint came years before the rebellion about the way women were treated by Hollywood in the light of the Harvey Weinstein scandal and the subsequent #MeToo campaign. Meghan’s exposure at the conference was a reminder to Harry, if any were needed, that he was dating a very special woman. She arrived in London shortly afterwards for a reunion with the Prince. As the watchword was privacy, they stayed at his modest grace-and-favour home, in the grounds of Kensington Palace. Best remembered now as the place where thousands of people laid flowers in 1997 in memory of Diana, the Palace is probably the most exclusive village in Britain, home to an assortment of royals, including the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and their children, courtiers and

retired staff. Like any village, it feeds on a diet of gossip and rumour, but for the most part what happens in Kensington Palace stays inside Kensington Palace. If Meghan was expecting to be sleeping in a palace, she was sadly disappointed; Harry’s home of Nottingham Cottage was smaller than her own place in Toronto – and with lower ceilings. In summer, it has the feel of being in the heart of the English country village, which perhaps explains why the first thing Harry did when he moved in was to install a hammock in the garden. It had the virtue, also, of being private and secure. It is here, as schedules permitted, that they began living together, quietly, secretly, unobtrusively. Eighteen unconventional months of courtship later, and it was time to take things to the next level. But first Harry had to ask the head of state for her permission. If he had come to see Granny a few years ago, when he had an unenviable reputation as an angry drunk with poor judgement, it would have been doubtful that the Queen would have agreed to him marrying a mixed-race divorced American actress. ‘It would have been a grim, unhappy, confrontation,’ a former senior royal official told me. Just as it was when she had to put her foot down in

1995 over her sister, Margaret, marrying the divorced Group Captain Peter Townsend. If anything, Harry’s transformation over the past few years has, together with the union between Prince William and Kate Middleton, secured the future of the monarchy. Harry’s impeccable behaviour when representing the Queen abroad and his commitment to the Invictus Games have been noted by the sovereign. As a courtier told me: ‘The Queen trusts her grandsons. She has confidence in them in a way that she never has had with her eldest son. They have established themselves as being in touch with the public. William and Harry have star

quality, and are believable and authentic heirs to the monarchy.’ In November 2017, the couple arrived at Buckingham Palace. They were escorted along the seeming miles of red carpet to the Queen’s sitting room. Meghan had quietly anticipated this moment. A few months before, she had made secret excursions to Rose Tree Cottage, a little slice of England in the suburbs of LA. It sells a plethora of British goodies, but the centrepiece of the emporium is the serving of afternoon tea. Meghan was there not only to buy gifts, but also, perhaps, for a rehearsal. It is where she learnt to crook her finger as she held her cup and saucer and sipped her earl grey.

During their one-hour meeting with Her Majesty, Meghan witnessed first hand the genuine respect and love Harry feels for his grandmother. ‘She is an incredible woman,’ she said afterwards. With a flurry of barks from the Queens corgis and a final curtsy, Harry and Meghan bade their farewells. Not long after, their engagement was announced. mc

Harry didn’t need any reminding of tHe bitterness caused by tHe last american to marry a member of tHe royal family

Extracted from Meghan: A Hollywood Princess by Andrew Morton.

LET’S

TALK

ABOUT

SURRO

42 MARIECLAIRE.CO.ZA

MAY 2018

GACY

Kim K, Tyra Banks, SJP and Lucy Liu have all used SURROGATES to have babies. But beyond the glitz and glamour of Hollywood, what’s the REAL DEAL WITH THIS PROCESS, and what are the outcomes for all those involved? AFIKA JADEZWENI investigates

local report

O ne of the most biologically fascinating things about women is our ability to carry new life – to bring

another human being into the world. However, not every woman can share in this experience. For some, pregnancy is not an option. Aside from the nausea, fatigue and non- negotiable cravings that come with the nine-month task of growing a human, there are other, far more severe physical downsides to being an expectant mother. Reproductive health complications can be so severe as to become life-threatening – for both the mother and baby. The good news is, those who have aspirations of becoming parents shouldn’t be deterred just because biology isn’t on their side. The first successful surrogacy was documented in the US in 1986, resulting in the birth of Melissa Stern, aka Baby M. Within the past decade, celebs including Kim Kardashian, Tyra Banks, Nicole Kidman and Sarah Jessica Parker have brought surrogacy into the spotlight as a saving grace for those who want to reproduce but are unable to. Their involvement has helped to normalise a process that was once so taboo; women expecting a child via a surrogate would often fake their own pregnancy. We’ve also come a long way since the time when any celeb who did choose to go the surrogacy route would be lambasted by tabloids as too vain and superficial to put their own body through the strain of pregnancy. Today, there is greater sensitivity around the issue,

PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY STOCK

local report

and someone like Kim K – who suffered from placenta accreta during her first pregnancies, a condition that involves the placenta growing too deeply into the uterine wall, making it difficult and dangerous to shed after birth, as it could potentially lead to fatal haemorrhaging – was celebrated for her decision rather than attacked. But surrogacy isn’t just for A-listers; there are many South African women who have experienced success with surrogacy too. The first local case was in 1987, when 48-year-old Pat Anthony acted as a surrogate for her 25-year- old daughter, Karen Ferreira-Jorge. Karen had had a hysterectomy after complications during the birth of her first son. Four of her eggs, fertilised using her husband’s sperm in a lab, were implanted into Pat’s uterus, who went on to give birth to triplets – two boys and a girl.

we

asked

you

Would you be a surrogate?

14%

for a close frieNd or familY member

11%

Yes, for aNYoNe iN Need

Who Can use a surrogate?

On paper, anyone who can prove their medical need to use a surrogate may embark on the process. However, it is also stated in South African law that any child resulting from a surrogacy procedure must have a direct genetic link to one of the commissioning parents. This law has come under fire recently as being unconstitutional, as it precludes certain people from achieving parenthood via surrogacy. For example, one woman who brought her case to the Pretoria High Court is single and unable to fall pregnant by IVF due to the poor quality of her eggs. She wishes to use a donor egg and sperm, and have a child via a surrogate. The Pretoria High Court ruled in her favour, agreeing that the law as it stands violates her right to equality and human dignity. However, the Constitutional Court ruled against her.

We’re lookIng for a surrogate, noW What?

Vitalab does not recruit surrogate mothers, so the woman carrying your child must be a family member, friend or even a colleague – so long as it is someone who has your best interests at heart. Calista reiterates the fact that this is not a pecuniary process,

67%

Never

8%

for a celebritY

• You lead a healthy lifestyle in keeping with that of a mother-to-be • You are not HIV+ and do not have any other STDs

Do surrogates

get paID?

In South Africa, only so-called ‘altruistic surrogacy’ is allowed. According to Section 301 of the Children’s Act of 2005, a surrogate is not permitted to receive payment for the process, except for reasonable compensation for medical expenses and any related loss of income.

so it’s important that your surrogate is someone who has some sort of emotional investment in you. This also makes sharing in the emotional journey of a pregnancy more accessible.

Can I afforD thIs?

The procedure is not paid for all at once, as various costs are allocated for different services over the period. In total, according to Calista, you’re looking at between R200 000 and R250 000. This includes all clinic fees, psychological testing and counselling, expenses incurred by the surrogate (paid by the commissioning couple) and attorney fees. mc

Find

out

more

If you have been considering a surrogacy programme, or have any other fertility-related questions, then visit Vitalab in Sandton, Johannesburg. Alternatively, you can visit the Infertility Awareness Association of South Africa’s website, Ifaasa.co.za.

CA lis TA

H A R dwi C k ,

 

T H e

m A R k e T i n G

What legal steps

m A n A G e R

O f

 

Do I neeD to take?

J

O b u R G

fe RT ili T y

Extensive legal agreements

C

lini C Vi TA l A b ,

need to be in place in

G

i V es

us

T H e

f u l l

a surrogacy situation, to

l

O w-d O wn:

protect all parties involved.

Can I be a surrogate?

In fact, legally, no

In order to be considered a viable surrogate for Vitalab, you must be a South African citizen between the ages of 21 and 45 years old. Secondly, you have to be employed, as surety that you are not undertaking the process for financial gain. Once you have ticked these boxes, the clinic will conduct a full medical screening to ensure that:

fertilisation is allowed to be carried out before a surrogate agreement has been confirmed by the High Court of South Africa. Extensive psychological evaluations of both the surrogate and the commissioning couple are required by the court. If you would like some more detailed information on the entire

• Your uterus is capable of carrying a pregnancy to term • Your BMI is within a healthy range (no higher than 29)

legal procedure, contact Adele van der Walt via Medicallaw.co.za. She specialises in medical negligence and surrogacy agreements.

44 marieclaire.co.za MAY 2018

WHAT

I

S

YOUR

SEXEX NUNU

ONE of these women has slept with 100 PEOPLE, and another, only one.

real lives

WORDS LOLLIE BARR PHOTOGRAPHS JA S O N IERACE/RELOAD AGENCY

MBMBER?

They explain why their sex lives are so much more than a scoreboard

KATHRYN

NAIR, 36, MOTIVATIONAL

SPEAKER

‘After my mother passed away, my father, younger brother and I moved countries. It was a massive culture shock for a

16-year-old. While my new peers were like typical teenagers,

I had an old-fashioned attitude to sex and relationships that

was already deeply embedded: nothing sexual happens before you’re married. Unless you’re a guy – then it’s a judgement-free

zone when it comes to your sexual exploits.

‘My family is originally from Fiji. In our culture, parents are blamed for a child’s bad behaviour. After we lost my mother,

I was determined to be a good girl for my dad. I considered

him my best friend. I was 18 when I met my future husband. He was the first person I kissed and within three months we were married. Our sex life was great, even after having four daughters in quick succession. Every few months, we’d treat ourselves to a hotel for a sex date. It didn’t even occur to me that I was missing out by only sleeping with one person. Emotionally, though, I knew we were drifting apart, and he was becoming more controlling. ‘We separated last year. I’m single now, but I still hold the same values I did as a teenager. I won’t have sex until I’m married again. It’s just the way I’ve been brought up. I don’t judge anybody who has sex out of wedlock but, personally, I don’t want to be used by a man for sex. I couldn’t imagine opening up my feelings or showing my body to a man I wasn’t married to. At this rate, I’ll be single for a long time.’

48 MARIECLAIRE.CO.ZA MAY 2018

BRITTANY

LEE, 21, BARBER

‘I was young when I started dating boys, and I chose each one for his car or bank account. They were always much older than me, but I’d lie about my age. I didn’t really care about them, but I liked being bought things. Sex seemed like a fair trade to get what I needed from them. But not love. Growing up in a chaotic family, I learned that if you love, you have a weakness. ‘Things changed when girls started to notice me. I realised I was a lesbian at about 16, although I’ve never labelled myself as gay or straight. Women brought my defences crumbling down, in friendships and relationships. My first meaningful relationship was with a girl. We lived and worked together for three years, but the spark died. My second lasted only weeks, but my love for her was incomparable. I was 21 and it was the first time my heart was completely broken. ‘Since then, I’ve had many short-term relationships with women – I’ve now slept with double the number of women that I have men. It’s been a roller coaster, never being able to find just what I’m looking for. I’m still learning who I am and who I want to be. I’m dating a woman now, and it feels like a fire has been lit underneath my soul. I don’t think I could ever recover from this one.’

STYLING MONICA RUSSELL HAIR AND MAKE-UP STEPH LAI/RELOAD AGENCY

K E Z I A H

27, STUDENT

‘When I have sex with

a man, there needs to be

an intellectual and emotional connection but the relationship

doesn’t necessarily have to be monogamous. With the majority of my lovers, apart from one, commitment hasn’t

been a factor, but we’ve shared

a profound level of intimacy

with each other, and I have trusted them. I’m not in any way polyamorous, I just haven’t met the person I want to settle down with and commit to yet. Just because I haven’t met the right person, I don’t feel I should have to miss out on making love. Casual sex doesn’t appeal to me, as I’m too paranoid about STDs. I’ve met lovers through

A LY C E ,

friends or out and about. I have to feel a real connection with

a man to want to go to bed with him, but I have to fall in love to imagine a future with someone. ‘My parents divorced early. I think that made me realise

I wanted to be with someone who was good for me, as well as

right for me. I want to make the right decision and not slip into

a relationship for the sake of it. While there may be a perception

that because I’m not committed, there must be something wrong with me, it’s not true. I’ve been in a relationship and I’ve been in love, so I know what it feels like to invest every ounce into bettering yourself and shaping your life to fit with another person. That’s why I’m prepared to wait for the right person to come along.’

REBECCA

CHANDLER, 35, WRITER

‘I don’t believe my body is just a vessel for procreation. I haven’t been lucky enough to find the person I’m going to settle down with, but why should

I have to abstain from pleasure because I’m single? I’m still young, and I’m

free, so why not? I deserve intimacy and affection just as much as the next person. Outside of three long-term relationships, I’ve averaged only eight

lovers per year. I’ve never been beholden to sex, or to the people with whom

I have experienced it. Sex is often looked upon as this taboo, or comes with

an expectation of what should happen after you’ve made love. I’m all for dropping that expectation and just enjoying each other. Sex should be a fun, positive interaction between healthy, consenting adults who respect each other.

‘I’ve travelled the world alone three times and met people I wouldn’t ordinarily; people with whom I was open to making a connection with, when perhaps

I wouldn’t have in a more conventional lifestyle. I explore intimacy with people

I find beautiful, attractive and alluring – mentally and/or physically – and if

that was then to develop into a more meaningful relationship, then wonderful. If not, that’s fine, too. I am driven by love just as much as the next person. But that’s not always possible. ‘I’ve had sex with a number of my already close male friends, and have had sex with people who have become close friends. There have been rare and notable exceptions, but ultimately the only reason for awkwardness is if there were different expectations. Sometimes you need to have the uncomfortable adult conversations to develop a deeper understanding of one another and move into the next phase of your relationship with love and respect.’

real lives

K R I S T Y

22, RETAIL

R O B E R T S O N ,

WORKER

‘I didn’t have friends in high school; kids bullied me about my weight. Even my father made derogatory comments about my body.

I had zero confidence. Then, when I was

almost 18, I lost my virginity. The sex was mediocre, but surprisingly, it gave me a

jolt of new-found self-confidence. I started to think that I should love myself a little bit more. It motivated me to start eating healthier and exercising, and I started losing

a bit of weight. I hadn’t ever had a boyfriend, and then suddenly, guys were interested in me. Sex made me more confident in myself. ‘It was overwhelming at the start, and then

I started hooking up with a few people. The

more I did it, the better I felt about myself. It gave me the body confidence I needed. Some people go to the gym or for a run to feel good. Sex was what made me feel good.

I loved the endorphins – they cleared my

head of negative self-talk. I was labelled a “slut” in my small town, but I owned the title. Having sex isn’t something that I should be ashamed of. The double standard – that it’s fine for men but not women – annoys me. ‘I’ve come to love my body, and I’m now sexually confident. I’ve had two long-term relationships, and when I’m dating someone

I’m completely monogamous. I recently started a new relationship and I’m happily exclusive again.’ mc

Stop making negative assumptions about others (including what they think of you), says CHARLOTTE PHILBY

Time for a

JUDGEME

detox

PHOTOGRAPH STOCKSY

A m I judgemental?

Of course not. I’m

an open-minded,

self-confident

and modern woman with respect for other people and myself. But look again. Note the way I flick through my social media feeds and subconsciously decide whether or not a post is worthy of my validation; see how I absentmindedly scan my phone for articles

I might click on or dismiss. We have become a society that decides within seconds

whether to swipe left (yes please) or right (no thanks). Our fast-paced, hyper- connected world means all of us are making ever- more – and ever-faster

– judgement calls, online and

IRL. But what is this doing to our emotional health and the quality of our decision- making? Because of the volume of choices we have to make, clinical psychologist Dr Jessamy Hibberd says we simply can’t do everything with our full attention. ‘We have to be on autopilot for much of our daily routines,’ she says. ‘Otherwise, our mind would go into overdrive.’ The important thing, she explains, is to make informed decisions

NT

about where to focus your attention. ‘Finding ways to pre-filter information, be it signing up to specific, filtered news stories or limiting time on social media (or not using it), can be really useful.’ Hardly a week rolls by without new research cropping up that shows the damaging effects our addiction to smartphones is having on our mental health.

The Huffington Post has declared that ‘smartphones are ‘the new cigarettes’, and while statistics for South Africa aren’t available, around two-thirds of people polled in the UK have admitted they would feel lost, unhappy or anxious

without their phones. But, while our constant connectedness encourages judgement – internal and external – the tendency to compare ourselves to others is nothing new. Terri Apter is an acclaimed UK psychologist and author. She explores the toxic impact of blame in her new book, Passing Judgement: The Power Of Praise And Blame In Everyday Life. Terri says, ‘In the ’50s, [American social psychologist] Leon Festinger realised that comparison was an important measure of self appraisal. We ask ourselves, “How do I measure up to the people around me?”’ In order to make ourselves more resilient when responding emotionally to other people’s seemingly perfect lives on social media, Terri reminds us, ‘This perfection is linked not to reality, but to highly selective user profiles that would never stand up to face-to-face scrutiny. When the information we have is corrupted by brevity, glamour and pretence, our judgements are not only wrong, they are worthless.’

NO MORE

NEGATIVITY

Chartered psychologist Gill Bond explains how to kick old habits and ditch judgement for good:

1 Do some life planning. Think about when you

have made constructive judgements in the past, as opposed to purely negative ones. How can you use this information to ensure you don’t make snap judgements in future.

2 Do you need to declutter your social group?

As you reduce negative in uences, positive ones will arrive because the space has been created for them. Start by streamlining your social media and unfollowing the accounts that make you feel bad.

3 Make a list starting with ‘I am’, then look

at which statements are positive and which are negative. Where do the negative ones come from? Are they realistic? Can you use the positive ones to practise a little more self-love?

Social media has also been the hub of movements such as #nojudgement, #metoo and #solidaritea in recent months, calling for more honest conversations around everything from mental health to sexual abuse, and the rise of parenting movements that preach solidarity over polarity. While the current mood is all about saluting our differences and finding unity within them, Gabrielle Bernstein, a motivational speaker and life coach, and the author of Judgement Detox, argues that we still have a long way to go. ‘I struggle with judgement every day. I judge strangers

psychology

for divergent political views, acquaintances on social media for the comments they make, and I judge the way people discipline their children. I also judge myself for just about everything.’ In her book, Gabrielle defines judgement as ‘separation from love’. ‘Judgement is the number- one reason we feel blocked, sad and alone. Our popular culture and media place enormous value on social status, looks, racial and religious separation, and material wealth. We are made to feel less than, separate and not good enough, so we use judgement to insulate ourselves from the pain of feeling inadequate, insecure or unworthy,’ she says. Low self-esteem, argues chartered psychologist Gill Bond, is hazardous in terms of our ability to make meaningful decisions. ‘The lower the self-esteem you have, the more clouded your thinking is, and the more you will be unable to judge situations and people in order to make good decisions for yourself,’ she says. Comedian Lizzie Allan suffered years of feeling inadequate, before taking radical steps to change her life. ‘Throughout my teens,

I felt all kinds of wrong,’

she says. ‘I unconsciously rejected myself. It was

painful to always try to see myself through other people’s eyes and what they might think about me.’ Lizzie took the time

to forgive herself for past misdemeanours, and to focus on self-love, living

a fulfilled, contented life.

‘When I’m connected in a place of inner peace and love, I know in my heart we are all equal. In this place, judgement falls away.’ mc

life

52 marieclaire.co.za May 2018

PARED

DOWN

From capsule wardrobes to the KonMari method and the tiny-house movement, MiniMalisM is one of the prevailing moods of our time. taylor roberts finds out whether having less is the key to a more fulfilling life

M ention ‘minimalism’ and most people’s first thought is of a sleek, Scandi-inspired living space, or some Pinterest

image of a vintage clothing rail offering

a dizzying choice of three identical white

shirts and one shift dress. Yes, minimalism can encapsulate decor and fashion, but as a concept it goes far deeper than aesthetics. At its heart, minimalism is about prioritising. It’s not

a process of stripping away for the sake

of stripping away, but about removing the extraneous in order to create space (literally and figuratively) for those things you really want in your life. ‘Minimalism is intentionality,’ says Joshua Becker, the founder of Becomingminimalist.com and the author of several books on the topic, including The More of Less: Finding the Life You Want Under Everything You Own. ‘It is marked by clarity [and] purpose. Minimalism is the intentional promotion of the things we most value and the removal of everything that distracts us from [those things]. As a result, it forces improvements in almost all aspects of your life.’ So, ironically, minimalism is about having more, not less: more time, more space, more money, more travel, more friends over for dinner – in short, more of whatever brings meaning into your life. And therein lies the other important aspect about minimalism: it’s about you. While certain tenets (owning less stuff, for example) are universal, the end result of minimalism looks different for everyone. There is no one-size-fits-all minimalist living space, no prescription for what you should do with your resources once you’ve jettisoned all the physical and emotional ballast. You get to decide what living your best life looks like, which is what the philosophy is all about. Minimalism is about consciously building a life with only those things you love and need, and letting go of everything that no longer serves you. It can be a deeply personal process, as only you know how to apply the idea of living with less to your own context in a way that works for you. Living minimally is not about deprivation but rather freedom, happiness and, ultimately, creativity, as a simplified life gives your inner creative the time and space to really flourish. The most liberating aspect of minimalism is that you can apply the philosophy of quality over quantity to

social commitments, friendships, tech habits, goals and even your thoughts. ‘A place for everything, and everything in its place’ may sound like the home of a

Stepford wife, but you wouldn’t scoff at it when you’re running 15 minutes late and can’t find your keys. Minimalists don’t waste time looking for things, and aren’t slaves to their environment. For instance, there should be a word for that specific irritation you feel when you’re vacuuming

a room and have to stop every 30 seconds

to move something. Less stuff means fewer hours spent cleaning, dusting, shifting, washing, folding and organising, and more time actually enjoying your home. There’s

a reason galleries are generally quite spare spaces; it puts the focus squarely on the art. The same goes for a minimalist home.

A decluttered aesthetic lends weight to

everything that is there, allowing your taste or passions to shine through. Minimalists never suffer from CHAOS, AKA, Can’t Have Anyone Over Syndrome.

If your secret dream is to entertain more,

start by curating a home that doesn’t make you cringe when someone drops by unexpectedly. One way to embrace minimalism is to avoid buying into the ‘storage myth’ – an

expensive fix for a problem that started with our being too good at buying things in the first place. Stop worshipping at the altar of storage ‘solutions’. By carefully squirrelling away your stuff, you easily forget about the things you have. You may end up buying duplicates, or never using or getting any joy from an item. No matter how neat your storage, you’re still just rearranging excess stuff rather than simplifying your possessions. ‘When I downsized to a smaller living space, I moved the things I didn’t immediately need but felt I couldn’t part with into a storage facility,’ says Jade Cooke, a Cape Town writer. ‘A year and

a half later, I emptied it, and ended up

donating or selling everything that was in there. I didn’t miss or need any of it, but

sacrificed nearly R1 000 a month for 18 months, just holding on to it all. I could have gone on holiday with that money.’ Minimalism can extend to your wardrobe too. Stick to high-quality, co-ordinating basics. When you limit what you wear to only those items that you feel comfortable and confident in, getting dressed becomes an exercise in self-love. It also saves you money: capsule dressing – like minimalism in general – is

Become a minimalist

There is no shortcut:

before you can start your minimalist journey, you have to declutter. We drank the KonMari Kool-Aid on this one and found that it actually works.

1 Declutter in the following order:

clothes, books,

papers, komono (basically miscellaneous items that don’t fit into the other categories, from your stapler to your garden hose) and sentimental items.

2 Sort one category at a time. Gather every item in the

category you’re working on from every room in the house and make a big pile. Don’t cheat and go room by room; you need to be confronted with how much stuff you have.

3 Hold each item in your hands and engage with it

emotionally. Does it spark any feelings of joy? Yes? Keep it. No? Thank it for its service (we’re not kidding) then toss or donate it. Keep your focus on the items you’re keeping, and the life they’re helping you build, rather than on the things you are discarding.

4 Find a place for everything you’ve decided to keep,

and make sure each item returns to its home after you use it.

PhotograPhs BAUERSYNDICATION.COM, AUMAGAZINEFEATURES.CO.ZA

life

intended to break the cycle of mindless consumerism. Quality over quantity means you know what you have, you actually wear everything in your closet, and you’re less likely to crave that short-term dopamine hit of handing over your credit card in exchange for something new. It also makes it easier to pinpoint your personal style, which means you’re unlikely to fork out for an outfit that you decide you hate a week later, and never wear again. A minimalist’s closet

limiting what you wear to items you feel comfortable in makes getting dressed an exercise in self-love

INSPIRATION

IS

A

CLICK

Project 333 ‘Simple is the new black’, according to devotees of this website. Project 333 is a community of capsule dressers living in 33 items each for three months at a time.

Bemorewithless.com/project-333

jessica rose williams British lifestyle and travel blogger Jessica knows all about the pros of living with less. Her home is an homage to minimalism, and her carry-on capsules alone are worth the click. Jessicarosewilliams.com

54 marieclaire.co.za

May 2018

has breathing room, allowing you to ‘page through’ clothes easily – no more standing in front of your clothes complaining that you have ‘nothing to wear’. Decision fatigue is a real thing; having a limited number of options makes getting dressed every morning much, much easier. Plus, fewer clothes result in less laundry. Caroline Rector has been dressing with less since 2014, and helps others to do the same through her blog, Un-Fancy.com. She advises readers to pare down their wardrobe to 37 items. She’s talking strictly clothes and shoes here – your 37 items don’t have to include jewellery, workout-wear, accessories, handbags, swimsuits, pyjamas, items you wear when lounging around the house, or underwear. (Of course, less is more with these items too.) ‘It’s not about getting obsessed with a number though,’ says Caroline. ‘If 37 isn’t your thing, then find a number that’s right for you.’ If, during the sorting stage, you come across something that you love but it doesn’t fit into the season you’re dressing for, like a Melton coat in summer, store it for a future capsule. The same goes for something that’s on your ‘maybe’ pile but you can’t part with. Box it up and revisit it in three months. If it doesn’t go into your next capsule, say goodbye. Wear only those 37 items for three months (a season). Don’t go shopping again until the final two weeks of the three months, during which you’re allowed to plan your next capsule and shop for anything you need that’s missing. mc

AWAY

style Bee Lee Vosburgh popularised the 10x10 challenge – wearing 10 items for 10 days. She’s big on using capsule dressing to encourage her readers to shop with careful consideration. Stylebee.ca

the

happiness

myth

Is our relentles s pursuit of happIness makIng us miser able? Jade Tayl or Co oke fInds out why we need to stop chasing the big h

international report

South Africa was ranked

105

out of 156 countries in the UN’s World Happiness Report 2018.

Finland, Norway and Denmark are the top three happiest countries in the world, with the USA at number 18, UK at 19 and our neighbours Namibia, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Botswana at 119, 123, 144 and 146 respectively.

‘E ver since happiness

heard your name,’

wrote the 14th-

century Persian poet

Hafez, ‘it has been

running through

the streets trying

to find you.’

What a delightful image, and what a reassuring thought – that we as humans could simply go about our lives, safe in the knowledge that somewhere out of sight, happiness is about to catch up and introduce itself. Of course, Hafez didn’t know what the world would be like 628 years after his death. Could he ever have imagined that we’d become so impatient, we’d turn the tables on happiness and chase it through the streets instead? Because that’s basically what we’re doing. Happiness – that wholly subjective,

completely abstract concept – has become the goal of the modern age. Suddenly, it’s no longer enough to be financially successful, healthy, and socially, spiritually and sexually fulfilled. We’re now also constantly asking ourselves, ‘But am I happy?’ If the answer isn’t a resounding yes, we begin to hunt happiness, as though it’s an achievement

– a loyalty tier we reach after completing

a certain number of hours of yoga and

gratitude journalling, something we can attain and then sit back and enjoy for the rest of our lives. (Spoiler alert: it’s not.)

Ruth Whippman, a Brit who relocated to California, was so taken aback by the US’s obsession with ‘achieving’ happiness, she began researching this phenomenon and published her 2016 bestseller, The Pursuit of Happiness: Why are we driving

PHOTOGRAPHs the lICeNSING PROJeCt

international report

ourselves crazy and how can we stop?. ‘Happiness has become the overachiever’s ultimate trophy,’ she writes. ‘A modern trump card, it outranks professional achievement, social success, friendship, family and even love. Its invocation deftly minimises others’ achievements (“Well, I suppose she has the perfect job and a gorgeous husband, but is she really happy?”) and takes the shine off our own.’ The cruel joke of the modern human condition is that the more we probe our own personal happiness levels, the less happy we’re likely to feel. The great 19th century philosopher John Stuart Mill probably said it best: ‘Ask yourself whether you are happy, and you cease to be so.’ ‘It’s one of the key aspects I work on with my clients – to stop chasing the idea of happiness,’ says Kerstin Waddell of Be Happy Life Coaching in Cape Town. ‘The constant striving, accumulating, comparing, and seeking of external validation is only adding to their unhappiness.’ Kerstin cites the work of Dr Russ Harris, whose book The Happiness Trap shows the ways in which misleading pop-psych ideas of happiness are contributing to stress, anxiety and depression. According to Russ, we get stuck in the happiness trap as a result of three major myths:

Myth #1

Happiness is the natural state for human beings. ‘The normal state for a human being is an ever-changing flow of emotions. Emotions are like the weather. You wouldn’t say the natural state for the weather is a warm, spring, sunny afternoon. It’s natural that in winter it’s going to be colder, and in summer it’s going to be hotter. And so it is with our emotions,’ says Russ. ‘Life is a mixed bag of experiences,’ adds Kerstin. ‘Loss and pain are inevitable. They’re part of our humanness.’

THE

POLITICS

OF

Myth #2

Happiness is as simple as ‘feeling good’.

If this is your notion of being happy, then

there’s no such thing as lasting happiness, ‘because how long does a good feeling last?’ says Russ. ‘Think of the happiest day of your life. How long did a state of pleasure or contentment last before there was some frustration, disappointment, anxiety or irritation?’ He believes we need to throw out the idea of ‘feeling good’ and redefine happiness as living a life that is ‘rich, full and meaningful’ – which includes the full gamut of human emotion.

Myth #3

If you’re not happy, you’re defective.

If we’re being honest, who hasn’t

entertained a mental picture of their ideal happier self, sailing through life calm and collected, never feeling stressed, angry, hurt, cynical or irritated? But blocking out what internationally acclaimed psychotherapist Miriam Greenspan dubs ‘dark’ emotions is definitely not the path to happiness. ‘People think there is something wrong with them when they don’t feel happy,’ says Kerstin. ‘Miriam talks about “emotion phobia” – the way dark emotions not only feel bad, but we have also come to think we are bad to feel them, that they are signs of spiritual inferiority or personal inadequacy. Dark emotions have become pathologised, shaming those who feel anything but happy as ill and defective. But every emotion fulfils

a positive purpose. What if they’re just a

different language we’re misinterpreting? What if they’re trying to teach us something? ‘When we avoid dark emotions, they pile up and become ever more intrusive, until you respond. If you try to numb them, you end up numbing the light emotions too, and turn yourself into a robot. Therefore you may as well invite them to tea and listen to what they’re trying to tell you.’ mc

HAPPINESS

In 2012, the UN began publishing its annual World Happiness Report, the idea being that governments and organisations can use insights from the report to inform policy-making decisions. ‘Increasingly, happiness is considered to be the proper measure of social progress and the goal of public policy,’ say researchers.

It’s not a new idea though. The UN’s seemingly forward-thinking report has its roots nearly half a century ago in the Kingdom of Bhutan. In 1971, that tiny Buddhist nation pioneered the idea of using Gross National Happiness (GNH), rather than GDP, as an indicator for a country’s success.

58 marieclaire.co.za

may 2018

HOW TO FEEL B E T TER

1

Stop interacting

with your

happiness like a five- year-old asking ‘Are we there yet?’ on

a road trip.

2 Sketch out what a ‘rich, full and

meaningful’ life would look like for you, then begin taking practical steps towards living that way. Happiness will come and go as a by-product of that kind of life, along with all the emotions that inhabit a well- rounded existence.

3 Tap into your dark emotions, rather than blocking them

out. What in your life

is causing you to feel

the dark emotion? ‘How we interpret experiences can

either be liberating or add more suffering to your life,’ says Kerstin Waddell of Be Happy Life Coaching

in Cape Town. ‘It’s

not a matter of “everything happens

for a reason” but rather “Things

happen. Let’s try to make sense of them in a way that

is liberating”.’

4 Forget about ‘as soon as’ thinking.

We’ve all been there – the high from getting the promotion or losing those five kilos doesn’t last, and you’re soon waiting around for the next ‘as soon as’. ‘What we’re actually

doing is pushing our happiness into the future. And so, we will always find ourselves wanting and never satisfied,’ says Kerstin.

ESCAPE TO DECADENT INDULGENCE

A FLAVOUR FOR EVERY MOMENT

@work

YOUR GUIDE TO CAREER SUCCESS

2018’s

RULES

FOR

SUCCESS

HOW TO STAY ON TOP OF YOUR GAME IN A CONSTANTLY CHANGING CAREER LANDSCAPE

@work

S hirley Zinn commands a room. She knows the ins and outs of business but, most importantly, she really knows people. Shirley has been a trailblazer in the human

resources space for more than 10 years and continues to be one of the most insightful experts in the industry. She’s the author of the acclaimed book Swimming Upstream: A Story of Grit

and Determination to Succeed, and sits on the board of several companies, including Sygnia and Woolworths. With the economy still struggling to recover after the slump of 2017 and

the political upheaval of the beginning of 2018, we caught up with Shirley to speak about weathering the storms, and implementing new rules for success. ‘In the workplace, we’re facing a lot of change at the moment,’ Shirley tells me, ‘and because of the current economy, we’re facing uncertainty too. These challenges require us to continue upskilling, learn to influence our outcomes, make informed decisions and make compelling cases for a course of action. We need to execute and implement our actions on time and within budget, all while continually adapting to

a

changing environment. This

is

the new normal.’

A lot of people are still set in their ways. After all, most of us were taught at the beginning of our careers that experience is the most important thing on your CV. Shirley agrees to an extent, but warns against being constrained by old rules: ‘The way we used to do things simply won’t work anymore. These days, we have to go even further than upskilling; now it’s all about problem-solving, critical thinking, communication and innovation.’ Growing up in the Cape Flats, Shirley saw how difficult life was for most of the people around her. She was pushed by teachers and mentors who inspired in her a desire to succeed, and as a result she encourages women to find similar influences.

‘We all have a story, with adversity, setbacks, tragedy and disappointments, but we have to pick ourselves up and continue to climb the many hills that

62 MARIECLAIRE.CO.ZA MAY 2018

‘NOW IT’S ALL ABOUT

PROBLEM-SOLVING, CRITICAL THINKING, COMMUNICATION

AND INNOVATION’

– SHIRLEY ZINN

make up life. Make excellence a habit in all that you do and never spend time talking about your work – rather let the quality of your work speak for itself. Along the way, find mentors and learn from them. Never, ever stop learning.’

And on the other side of the court? Shirley says that your employer has to meet you halfway, especially these days, as more and more Millennials enter the workplace. Millennials bring

a whole new dynamic to the workplace

and this has to be taken into account

if companies wish to stay relevant

and competitive. ‘There’s no space for archaic rules,’ she says. ‘Companies need to embrace new ideas of what an employee is. Banning social media at work, giving people outdated job titles and boxing people into contrived organisational charts will lead to losing talent.

Companies need to have a social conscience, with ethical behaviour and transformational leadership.’ Most importantly, Shirley urges the importance of living an integrated life. ‘Your professional performance

is determined by your health and

wellbeing. Be mindful of your body;

listen to it.’ mc

WORDS JO SULLIVAN PHOTOGRAPHS TRUNK ARCHIVE, SUPPLIED

@work

#PowerWomen

WOMEN AT THE TOP OF THEIR GAME SHARE THEIR TIPS TO GET TO – AND STAY AT – THE TOP

KATLEHO

MAGWAZA

Fitness coach/blogger

Katleho’s tness journey is one of the most inspirational out there and her Instagram is lled with encouraging videos and insightful tness tips. With tens of thousands of men and women following her, she’s kept a cool head but says that the road to this point hasn’t always been easy. ‘Gender bias is a huge issue in my industry. Male coaches are preferred over females for sponsorships or endorsements. Women are just not supported enough.’ This instilled in her a sense of determination. ‘I’ve allowed myself to be a lifelong learner, and I surround myself with a small circle of people who truly encourage me.’ katlehomagwaza

BARBARA

MALLINSON

Founder of online education platform Obami

Barbara says her decision to open her own business was a process going back as far as childhood. ‘There was a series of events, like selling lemonade and Christmas cards as

a child.’ Soon after varsity, Barbara

became tired of the bureaucracy she was experiencing in the working world, and knew it was only a matter of time before she would strike out on her own. ‘Running your own

business is emotional,’ says Barbara.

‘I can’t count the number of times

I’ve considered packing it all in.’ But driven by the best advice she’s ever

got – ‘if it’s not scary, it’s not worth doing’ – Barbara has grown Obami to be one of the frontrunners in online education. ‘As clichéd as it sounds,

it takes blood, sweat and tears,’ she

says. ‘If it wasn’t for that, I would be

in a very different place right now.’ barbsMall

JADE

H Ü BNER

Model/actor

Jade has always been motivated by a love of acting, singing and

presenting, but in one of the toughest industries in the country, it takes balance to keep it all together. She says that she’s worked on being patient and kind, especially when everyone looks for faults in your work, and above all to respect yourself. ‘One of the biggest challenges in the industry is weight,’ Jade says. ‘They kept telling me I was too fat or too muscular, but

I knew I was healthy and I was not

willing to compromise on that. It’s important to respect your body, and to know your worth.’ The best piece of advice she’s ever received? ‘Don’t expect everything to be handed to you, and never take anything personally.’

jadehubner

JANE

RAPHAELY

Publisher/entrepreneur

At every turn in your life, don’t take

the easiest option, but the most exciting and challenging.’ These are the words that Jane has kept close to her heart throughout her career.

It was her tutor at the London School

of Economics who gave her this

golden advice, and she follows it to this day. ‘The way lies upward, not just onward,’ she says. JaneRaphaely

SECHABA

Presenter/DJ

Working towards a place of emotional wellbeing is important to Sechaba G.

‘I spend as much time as I can with

my husband and my son; they’re my

therapy! I’ve also tried working from

home more.’ Seeking a mentor when you’re ready to transition in your

career is important, she says. ‘Having

a mentor is never a bad idea.’ She

counts consistency and the ability to adapt as two of the most valuable keys to success.

G

sechabag

THE BEGINNING

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LIFT

OFF

The countdown to WINTER has begun. Be inspired by the NEW SEASON’S hottest fashion and BEAUTY TRENDS

PHOTOGRAPH NIQUITA BENTO

T h e

h o tt e s t

 

f

a s h i o n

t r e n d s

f

o r

t h e

n e w

s

e a s o n

j o i n

f

o r c e s

w i t h

y o u r

b e a u ty r e g i m e for a head-to-

a p p r o a c h to dressing

t o e

P R O D U C T I O N TA R RY N O P P E L & J UA NA PA R AT H Y R A S P h OTO g R a P h s Niq U i TA B ENTO

We first saw feathers at the Saint Laurent show at SS18 Paris Fashion Week, and they add an undeniable element of glamour. Sweep a gel eyeliner in feathered strokes across the lids for a statement eye. Repeat the liner on the inner corners of your brows for extra flair. Try NYX Professional Makeup Jumbo Eye Pencil in Cobalt R95

Coat R50 950, tRouseRs R24 400, shoes R14 450 all Prada

Simple and chic, polka dots pop on nails. Dubbed the ‘Dotticure’, this manicure is a firm favourite on the Instagram scene because of its wearability. Plus you don’t need a steady hand for this style of nail art – while it can be delicate and precise, you don’t necessarily need to follow a strict pattern.

Left Top R659, TRouseRs R879 boTh Zara; blazeR R869 topshop; TRench R3 760 KLûK CGDt; bag R499 Country roaD; shoes R250 Mrp

riGht shiRT R249 h&M

70 MARIECLAIRE.CO.ZA

MAY 2018

Strobing has been reinvented with metallic, kaleidoscopic finishes that present a youthful and edgy twist to the trend. Keep it modern by blending the colour across the ear into the hairline. TRY Huda Beauty 3D Highlighter Palette in Summer Solstice R1 250

BLOUSE R23 350, SKIRT R20 150, SOCKS R3 200, SHOES R23 350 ALL PRADA

Inspired by the late ’80s and early ’90s, structured Afro cuts have made a comeback. Working with your texture and length, you can either shape your Afro into soft round domes or change it up with sharp edges.

DRESS R39 000, SUNGLASSES R33 690, EARRINGS R11 000, BAG R37 000 ALL DOLCE&GABBANA

Inspired by celebrated catwalk make- up artist Pat McGrath’s love affair with glitter, this twinkling- red cat eye is a statement look. Make it work best by priming your lids so the glitter doesn’t shift, and wearing nude skin and lips. Try NYX Professional Makeup Face & Body Glitter in Red R240

jacket R1 199 H&M; blazeR R9 800, tRouseRs R4 600 both Max Mara; jeRsey R1 499 Country road; belt bag R699 aldo; tights R49 Falke; Public DesiR shoes R579 zando

Curls are big

– and getting

even bigger. A mid-length cut makes defining curls easier, giving them the right amount of bounce. Avoid heat, and work

a curl definer

into wet hair, allowing it to air

dry. Finger-comb or shake out your curls to loosen them and create extra volume. Try Moroccanoil Curl Defining Cream R510

Left blazer r1 699, boots r659 both Zara; trench r1 999 topshop; jersey r529 h&M; skirt r3 200 NichoLas coutts; belt r150 GLitterati

riGht pullover por Zara; jersey r529 h&M

78 marieclaire.co.za May 2018

When Pucci’s lead make- up artist Inge Grognard layered lashes with green, white, blue, pink and orange mascara, everyone followed suit.

This season, it’s our favourite way to wear pink

– dramatically

layered on to

the lashes for

a full, thick

finish, and best complemented

with a hint of pink on the lips. Try MAC In Extreme Dimension Mascara in Work

It Out R162

left scarf r339 Zara

right Dress r19 190 Bur B erry

80 marieclaire.co.za May 2018

Get creative with your liner with this flower-petal inspired look. We channelled Anna Sui and her love of florals for this pretty, abstract eyeline. Sweep on a bold colour in two short strokes across your lid. Dust the same shade in the middle of your lips for a touch of colour on your pout. Try 3INA The Cream Eyeshadow R160 in 316

Dress r899 H&M ; Project bomber jacket r160 MRP

Inspired by natural hair guru Charlotte Mensah and by Afro hair threading, a wrapped gold thread allows you to create a three- dimensional look right from the scalp. The length of the hair or ponytail determines the simplicity or complexity of the style.

Daberechi wears shirt POr, jeans POr bOth calvin Klein Jeans; jersey r439 Zara; bOOts r1 999 Green cross

anyon wears cOat r1 099 Zara; jacket r3 299 G-star raw; jeans r1 699 calvin Klein Jeans; shOes r1 099 superGa

PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS DANIELLE VILJOEN, NCUMISA MAKHONJWA, AHLUME MONESE, MORGANE BOURGEOIS MAKE-UP RENEE DE WIT/GLOSS HAIR ALET VILJOEN/SNCM POLKA DOT MANICURE MINELL/ MINELLIART USING GELLYFIT MODELS ANYON/FUSION, MARIAMA/FUSION, DAILI/TWENTY, OLIVIA/BOSS, DABERECHI/BOSS STOCKISTS SEE P126

Intricately braided hair graced the runways this season. The key is to embrace individuality in texture, colour and shape. We added length, texture and colour by braiding wool and thread into the hair from the root.

left Olivia wears jacket R1 499 tOpshOp; ShiRt R8 795 versace; SkiRt R2 400 ted Baker; bag R779 Zara; bootS R2 299 steve Madden

daili wears jacket R13 599 scOtch & sOda; ShiRt R799 tOpshOp; tRouSeRS R799 h&M

right jacket R1 699 Zara

fashion 101

CLOSECLOSECLOSE

KNITKNITKNIT

Ease into the season in BRIGHT and PASTEL HUES, exaggerated knits and fluid silhouettes

STYLING DANIELLE VIL JOEN PHOTOGRAPHS IAN ENGELBRECHT / ONE LEAGUE CREATIVE MANAGEMENT

86 MARIECLAIRE.CO.ZA MAY 2018

The knitted dress

INVEST IN A SIMPLE, SLEEK SILHOUETTE, THEN DOUBLE UP ON PRINTS BY LAYERING IT UNDER A CHECK COAT

COAT R1 499, DRESS R779 BOTH ZARA; SCARF R699 COUNTRY ROAD; RING POR FAMKE; SOCKS FROM R90 FALKE; BOOTS R1 199 CHARLES & KEITH

fashion 101

The turtle neck

UP THE ANTE ON THIS CLASSIC BY PAIRING IT WITH A TREND PIECE LIKE CHECK TROUSERS

TURTLE NECK R529, EARRINGS (BOTTOM) R99 BOTH H&M; TROUSERS R799 TOPSHOP; EARRINGS (TOP) R700 PICHULIK; NECKLACE R450 FAMKE; SOCKS FROM R90 FALKE; BOOTS R1 199 CHARLES & KEITH

88 MARIECLAIRE.CO.ZA MAY 2018

The crew neck

LAYER YOUR CREW OVER AN ALTERNATE NECKLINE, AND PAIR WITH COMPLEMENTARY TEXTURES SUCH AS SUEDE AND FAUX FUR

JACKET R1 299, SKIRT R439 BOTH ZARA; POLO NECK R479 TOPSHOP; CREW NECK R599 POETRY; RING POR FAMKE; SOCKS FROM R90 FALKE; BOOTS R629 TALLY WEIJL

The

hooded

knit

LET THIS SEASONAL ITEM SPEAK FOR ITSELF BY LAYERING IT UNDER THE MUST- HAVE JACKET OF THE SEASON

JACKET R1 499 TOPSHOP; KNIT R659 ZARA; EARRINGS R99 H&M

PRODUCTION DANIELLE VILJOEN PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANT THEODORE HAIR & MAKE-UP KELLY PAITAKI/GLOSS ARTIST MANAGEMENT USING CHANEL MAKE-UP AND KEVIN.MURPHY FOR HAIR MODEL JANKE DU TOIT/BOSS MODELS STOCKISTS SEE P126

The

oversized

knit

BALANCE DRAMATIC NECKLINES AND LONGER-LENGTH SLEEVES WITH A PENCIL SKIRT

KNIT R1 499 COUNTRY ROAD; SKIRT R429 H&M

fashion 101

The cable knit

A CLASSIC REINVENTED

OPT FOR FRINGED AND

CABLE DETAILING PAIRED WITH TROUSERS IN

A ROOMY SILHOUETTE

KNIT R659 ZARA; TROUSERS R899 H&M; EARRINGS R99 H&M; BOOTS R629 TALLY WEIJL

The striped knit

TAKE ORDINARY TO EXTRAORDINARY BY LAYERING A STRIPED JERSEY OVER ANOTHER WITH SIMILAR HUES

KNIT R550 OLD KHAKI; KNIT R279 (UNDERNEATH) FOREVER 21; VOGUE SUNGLASSES R1 590 SUNGLASS HUT

DARK

ROMAROMAROMA

SAINT L AURENT CREATIVE DIREC TOR ANTHONY VACCARELL O

TALKS TO MARIE CL AIRE

ABOUT ‘BAD TASTE’, THE ROMANCE OF BLACK, AND WHY SHORT SKIRTS DON’T SPELL SEX

NCENCENCE

fashion insider

W hen Anthony Vaccarello, 35, arrived at the helm of Saint Laurent in early 2016, he had huge shoes to fill

– and several pairs. Not only is Monsieur

Yves Saint Laurent one of the sainted icons of French fashion, but Anthony’s predecessor at the house, Hedi Slimane, had built a feverish following all of his own, with his grungy, alt take on glamour infused with indie-music inspirations. The Italian-Belgian Anthony ran his own label for eight years (currently on hiatus) following a stint at Fendi. He later designed the Versus line for Versace, between 2014 and 2016, before taking up the reins at Saint Laurent. He’s known for a purer form of straight-up sexiness – still rock ’n’ roll, but Champagne to Slimane’s tequila shot, if you will. Two seasons later, and his fierce, spotlight-craving woman is carving out a new era for Saint Laurent with her slouchy, crystal-encrusted boots and 80s-influenced swagger.

What was your first reaction when you were asked to be the creative director of Saint Laurent?

I had turned down offers over the past few

years, but this one was just impossible to say

no to. The odd thing is, while working on the first collection, I didn’t feel any pressure at all. It’s only when I arrived at the venue and saw the giant YSL neon logo hanging from the crane in the middle of Paris that

I finally realised what kind of icon I now have in my hands.

What’s your first memory of Yves Saint Laurent?

I’m a kid from the MTV generation, so music and video clips were my first education – no grandmother dressed in Saint Laurent for me. My first memory of Yves was his iconic collaboration with [photographer] Helmut Newton.

What are the similarities and the differences between you and Yves Saint Laurent?

I love Monsieur Saint Laurent’s subversive

approach to clothes, his dark romanticism with a hint of perversity. Through his work and images, you can feel how much he loved and respected women. That could be seen as a similarity I guess… But I can’t think about myself in comparison with him; I’m listening to my instinct.

‘Fashion is not art, but it takes an artist for it to move forward,’ said Saint Laurent. What do you think about that?

For me, fashion is an escapist fantasia.

WORDS JESS WOOD PHOTOGRAPHS GALLO/GETTY

fashion insider

‘PEOPLE WILL ALWAYS TALK ABOUT SAINT LAURENT.

THIS IS THE POWER OF THIS BRAND’

Even if you cannot afford something, you want to have it. Sometimes, I prefer that to being realistic and answering to commercial demands. It’s good to have both. If fashion’s only about commerce and realness, it becomes narrow.

Was it a difficult decision to give up your own label?

This is the only brand for which I would have given up my own label. I wanted to be completely focused on Saint Laurent, and put myself fully into it, so it was a natural decision.

Saint Laurent was an innovator who was never afraid of causing a scandal. Are you like that?

I am not looking for any scandal. I am doing

what I believe in and I think Saint Laurent was

doing the same. What has been defined as a

‘scandal’ could be considered a public reaction to what was new and unusual for that time.

I have noticed now that whatever you do or

don’t do, people will always talk about Saint Laurent. This is the power of this brand.

‘There is not one black but many blacks,’ said Saint Laurent. Why do you both share this obsession for a non-colour colour?

Black is just perfect. I will change black only when they invent a new black.

How did you cope with the legacy of the many creative directors who have preceded you?

I grew up admiring all those designers. To me, their work

is also part of the history of the house. I am not going to

ignore their bodies of work, but I am not here to imitate them, either.

Your style is often described as ‘sexy’. Do you think that’s reductive or do you like it?

I never deliberately design a dress to be sexy. To me, a

short dress is more about freedom and personality than being attractive. It’s a modern way of dressing; it can be

androgynous but never vulgar. The truth is, fashion has become quite a sexless territory; it’s as if sex is dirty or

a threat, which it’s not.

What’s your attitude to social media?

It can be overwhelming sometimes, but it has brought great changes in the way we see beauty or humanity.

94 MARIECLAIRE.CO.ZA MAY 2018

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT What is considered to be a raunchy, provocative Saint Laurent SS17 ad campaign; the iconic crystal-encrusted boots from the FW18 collection; another image from the SS17 ad campaign.

I am really embracing it because it helps me to pursue the tradition of strong images that is part of the Saint Laurent DNA. Think about the incredible pictures by Helmut Newton and Guy Bourdin, for example.

Your ad campaigns focus a lot on sex. Do you agree?

I don’t see my campaigns as sexual. It is not a tactic,

there’s no marketing. It’s my expression of freedom. As I said, strong images are part of the Saint Laurent culture. This house has had its fair share of controversy, like the launch of Opium perfume [featuring naked images of the designer himself] and the 1971 couture collection that was branded a ‘[sex worker] wardrobe’. Add the sexless tendencies of the fashion industry and the increasingly intolerant time we live in – it’s the perfect recipe for trouble at the slightest bit of flesh.

What’s the borderline between ‘good’ and ‘bad’ taste?

I like carefully walking the line between good taste and bad

taste. I don’t think Saint Laurent himself liked the idea of ‘good taste’. It has to have a twist somehow. You can wear something that could be wrong and still be chic. The failure, that crack that shows emotion, that’s where the real chic lies.

What are your plans for the future?

Who knows! Life is unpredictable. mc

*DATA FROM THE US AS REPORTED BY AIS PHOTOGRAPH THE LICENSING PROJECT

wellness

WELL,

WELL,

WELL

Your holistic guide to new-age wellbeing

DID YOU KNOW? It takes 90 minutes for your metabolism to return to normal after a stress-related fight- or-flight response*.

wellness

who wants to live

forever?

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From blood transFusions to experimental nootropics, ‘life extensionists’ Will stop at nothing to hack the code oF liFe – all to reach the end goal: living Way past 100, or even Forever

W hat if you could hit the pause button on ageing? Or live to 120 without feeling a day over 80? More radical still, what if you could cheat death? Would you do it? ‘Life extensionists’ would. That’s the

name modern immortality seekers go by, and devotees range from those who’d like to live cognitively and physically healthier lives into old age, to the more extreme, who ardently believe humans can, and should, overcome death the same way we’ve overcome, say, smallpox or tooth decay. Overall, the movement is growing – especially among the tech set and Goop enthusiasts. The pitch for immortality is everywhere: from supplement brands spieling nootropics (‘brain drugs’) to Ambrosia, a Silicon Valley start-up charging baby boomers [around R96 000] for blood transfusions from under-25s. It’s all part of the booming wellness industry, which has become a roughly US$3.7-trillion market. The field of ageing research has advanced significantly. Scientists have discovered specific longevity genes that select for long lives, lifestyle adjustments that statistically improve your chances of living longer, and new ways in which existing drugs – the diabetes medication Metformin, for instance – can influence rates of ageing. At the forefront, Australian expat scientist David Sinclair, of Harvard and the University of New South Wales, is on track to deliver an anti-ageing drug by 2023. The breakthrough comes with the finding that a boost of a vitamin called NMN, a precursor to the essential coenzyme NAD, resulted in much younger-looking mice with repaired DNA. ‘It takes hundreds of millions of dollars to make a drug and prove that it works safely,’ says David, who is currently running human clinical trials for the molecule. With a lesser burden of proof, biohackers have been quick to piggyback the