Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 120

Terry Prosser

with Jane Revell and Jeremy Harmer

Terry Prosser with Jane Revell and Jeremy Harmer intermediate B Teacher’s Guide
Terry Prosser with Jane Revell and Jeremy Harmer intermediate B Teacher’s Guide

intermediate

B

Teacher’s Guide

Letter to you, the teacher

Hello – and a big welcome to Jetstream Intermediate, the course we’ve written to help your students learn English (and improve what they already know). We’ve used engaging and stimulating topics and activities so that, we believe, students will study successfully and enjoyably.

Our intention has been to blend the familiar (activities and exercises with which teachers and students feel comfortable) with some newer, different features which are intended to add extra depth and interest to the learning experience, for example:

Jetstream is thought-provoking. It gets students to think in a variety of different ways, not only about ideas, but also about the language itself;

• Because we live in a connected digital society, Jetstream often invites students to venture beyond the Student’s Book itself (if they can) and bring what they’ve found and enjoyed back to the classroom;

Jetstream presents a wide variety of people, cultural settings and topics – because learning how to communicate also means learning about the world we all live in;

• Above all, Jetstream encourages students to use the language they’re learning in a grown-up way that fits with our increasingly interconnected world.

The thinking behind Jetstream

Underlying everything in Jetstream are a number of principles that have guided us during the writing process. We believe:

• that what students bring to the learning experience (and the Student’s Book) is as important as what’s between the covers. That’s why students are often asked for their input, and to share (if they want) their stories, thoughts, reactions and opinions;

• that providing a range of stimulating topics – and, crucially, a repertoire of appropriately challenging activities – is the key to successful student involvement, and, therefore, learning;

• in providing students with a range of the most appropriate and useful vocabulary at this level – and offering them different ways of meeting, learning and practising that vocabulary;

• that grammar is important (of course!) and that students need to interact with it in enquiring and creative ways;

• in providing a range of stimulating and appropriate practice and production activities which both bolster students’ knowledge whilst at the same time giving scope for creativity and experimentation.

The Teacher’s Guide

As teachers ourselves, we know how busy and demanding a teacher’s life can be. That’s why Jetstream comes with a Teacher’s Guide which can take you through each lesson, step by step. There’s a wealth of support online, too, including extra material and

practice tests. However – and this is important to stress

– you don’t have to use any of this if you don’t feel like

it. It’s there in case you want it and find it useful, that’s all. But if you’re happy to ‘do your own thing’, that’s wonderful too. We believe that Jetstream allows you considerable flexibility if that’s what you’re after!

So this is Jetstream: a course designed to provide

students with a rich and rewarding learning experience;

a course which we believe is extremely enjoyable to teach with.

Have a good time and good luck!

Jane Revell and Jeremy Harmer

Contents

Letter to you, the teacher Jetstream Intermediate Student’s Book contents

4

Unit notes Unit 7

6

Unit 8

21

Units 7&8 Review

37

Unit 9

41

Unit 10

59

Units 9&10 Review

77

Unit 11

81

Unit 12

95

Units 11&12 Review

110

Tasks Teacher’s notes

113

Unit 7

114

Unit 8

114

Unit 9

115

Unit 10

115

Unit 11

116

Unit 12

116

Technique banks Using the video

117

Using memory games

118

Working with mixed-ability classes

119

CONTENTS

Jetstream Intermediate

   

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

UNIT 7

INTRODUCTION

Technological inventions

 

Listening: a museum audio guide

 

Technology rules?

LESSON 1

Optimism (adverbs of degree)

will be able to will future and future continuous hope

Reading: FE Smith’s predictions Listening: Thomas Frey’s predictions

Giving your opinion on various world topics Making predictions for the future

page 5

Futurology

LESSON 2 What they know

 

Future plans and predictions:

Reading : They’ve got your profile

Acting out a conversation in a computer shop

going to, will probably, present continuous, might

LESSON 3

On the road

Time adverbials

Listening: a conversation in a car

Describing a regular journey Writing a sat nav script

Losing skills

EVERYDAY ENGLISH VOCABULARY PLUS p69

Asking for and giving directions Cars Pedestrians Collocations

 
   

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

UNIT 8

INTRODUCTION

Compound nouns connected with films

 

Listening: a radio film show

Talking about the last film you saw

Film

page 13

LESSON 1 Who does what in films?

Jobs in films Adjectives to describe character

Neutral singular pronoun:

Reading: Jobs on a film set

Describing and guessing jobs Reporting what people said Acting out a film scene

they Reporting orders and requests

LESSON 2

Statistics

would and used to

Reading: Meet Bing!

Writing and filming a vlog about your life as a child

YouTubers

LESSON 3 I’m going to be a star.

Jobs and actions

Reporting what people say Reporting what people said

Listening 1: a conversation with a casting director Listening 2: a conversation with a friend

Writing and acting out an interview for a TV show

EVERYDAY ENGLISH VOCABULARY PLUS p60

Giving good and bad news

 

At the movies

Collocations

Wordbuilder

Weddings

REVIEW Units 7 & 8 page 21; Aspects of culture: Films

 
   

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

UNIT 9

The good, the bad and the ugly

INTRODUCTION

Buildings

   

Giving a talk about a beautiful building

LESSON 1

Materials

Passive (1): present and past simple Past participles

 

Giving a talk about a well- known building Acting out a short story

page 23

Beautiful buildings

LESSON 2 Should they be demolished?

Compound nouns for buildings

Passive (2): modals

Reading: Sky blue with white clouds

Talking about buildings you dislike Writing about an ugly building

LESSON 3

Building problems

have / get something done need

Listening: a conversation about a cowboy builder

Talking about work you’ve had done in your home Writing a poem

Cowboy builders

EVERYDAY ENGLISH VOCABULARY PLUS p61

Making and responding to a complaint Umbrella words Phrasal verbs: down

Wordbuilder: nouns from verbs; verbs with the prefix re-

Homophones

   

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

UNIT 10 A question of beauty

INTRODUCTION

Professions

     

LESSON 1 I wish …

Accidents

Wishes and regrets If only

 

Talking about things that have gone wrong Writing a poem

page 31

LESSON 2 Things would have been different.

 

Third conditional

Reading: Eris and the golden apple

Retelling a story from Greek mythology Talking about a myth or legend from your country

LESSON 3 It wasn’t easy.

 

be able to

Reading: Connections Listening 1: a conversation about a new pop star Listening 2: an interview about a Boston Bombing survivor Listening 3: a radio extract about a dancer

Retelling a survivor’s story Giving a short talk about an inspirational person

EVERYDAY ENGLISH VOCABULARY PLUS p62

Showing concern; Cheering someone up Gender-specific and gender-neutral words

Wordbuilder: verbs with mis-

Focus on: wrong

Phrasal verbs: back

REVIEW Units 9 & 10 page 39; Aspects of culture: Types of dance

 
   

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

Unit 11

INTRODUCTION

Board games

 

Listening: descriptions of games

 

Games and

temptation

LESSON 1

Compound nouns with game

 

Indirect questions

Reading: Some recent research findings Listening: street interviews about video games

Talking about video games statistics Writing a description and giving a talk about how to play a game

page 41

Playing games

LESSON 2

Describing food

Defining relative clauses

Reading: Self-control or clever thinking?

Giving a talk about your favourite food Talking about how to resist temptation

Temptation

LESSON 3

Running and walking

Making sentences into questions

Listening: an American radio play

Confirming information Preparing an argument to defend your opinion Persuading others to agree with your opinion

Cheating?

EVERYDAY ENGLISH VOCABULARY PLUS p63

Complimenting someone’s appearance

 

Crime and criminals

Crime verbs

Crime metaphors

   

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

UNIT 12 Survival and loss

INTRODUCTION

Emergency equipment Features in a landscape

 

Listening: a description of a night in the mountains

Retelling a story Describing your favourite landscape

page 49

LESSON 1 Why we forget

remember and forget

Past perfect review

Listening: three stories about forgetting things Reading: Why we forget. Why we get lost.

Talking about a time you forgot or lost something

LESSON 2 An unlikely rescue

Injuries

Non-defining relative

Reading: Jessica Bruinsma

Retelling Jessica’s story Talking about a time you were injured

clauses

LESSON 3

Conditions

Tense review

Listening: a conversation in Melbourne Reading: Songlines of the aboriginal people of Australia

 

Songlines

EVERYDAY ENGLISH VOCABULARY PLUS p64

Telling and reacting to stories

 

Injuries

Body metaphors (2)

Phrasal verbs: break

 

REVIEW Units 11 & 12 page 57; Aspects of culture: The law

 

Pages 68 – 73

Information gap activities

Pages 78 – 84

Grammar reference

Pages 74 – 77

and extra material Stories

Pages 85 – 91 Pages 92 – 93

Transcripts Pronunciation and irregular verbs

audio (on CD and mp3 online)

pronunciation activities

test your memory

similar or different to your language?

6 watch the video

EXPLORE ONLINEsimilar or different to your language? 6 watch the video extend your learning with online projects

extend your learning with online projects

VIDEO OPTIONvideo EXPLORE ONLINE extend your learning with online projects make a short film with your phone

make a short film with your phone or camera

7

Technology rules?

UNIT

FOCUS

GRAMMAR: will future and future continuous; hope; future plans and predictions; time adverbials VOCABULARY: technological inventions; optimism (adverbs of degree); on the road FUNCTION: asking for and giving directions

Introduction p5

Aims

The focus of this lesson is to introduce the theme of technology. Students are encouraged to think about when things were invented, then check their answers in a listening.

You first!

Students choose from the photos or think of other inventions. Do a quick survey and vote for the most popular invention.

1

Pre-teach the word obsolete (= not in use any more, replaced by something newer and better). Students work in pairs and draw timelines, arranging the inventions in chronological order. They then compare with other students to see if they agree. Don’t check their answers at this stage.

2

2 1.2 Play and pause the recording for

1.2

Play and pause the recording for

students to check their answers and timelines. You could also write the names of the inventions on slips of paper for students to arrange chronologically on a timeline as they listen. This varies learning styles and adds a kinaesthetic element to the activity.

Answer

cassette player: 1962 ATM: 1969 video cassette: 1971 mobile phone: 1973 IBM computer: 1981 CD-ROM: 1982 world wide web: 1989 iPod: 2001 smartphone: 2007 iPad: 2010

Transcript

Welcome to the Science Museum. We hope you will enjoy this audio guide.

1 You are looking at a cassette player. The first cassette player was invented in 1962.

The model you are looking at dates from

2

The first real ATM – often called a cash machine, or ‘hole in the wall’ – was installed by the Chemical Bank in Rockville Center in New York in 1969. They called it

a

‘docuteller’.

3

Video cassettes changed everything for TV and film viewers. They could record their favourite TV programmes and watch films

in their own homes. They first appeared in

 

1971.

4

The first mobile phone call was made in 1973 by Martin Cooper, then Vice President of the Motorola corporation. He took his phone onto the streets of New York. People were amazed. But his company wasn’t interested for ten years – they were more interested in their phones in cars.

5

The IBM PC – ‘PC’ stands for ‘personal

computer’ – first appeared in 1981. It was the first mass-market desktop computer.

6

It

wasn’t until 1982 that the first compact

discs were available, and at first they only stored audio data. Later, video and other data was included. CD-ROMs are still used, but increasingly people are using digital downloads …

7

The world wide web was invented by a man called Tim Berners-Lee, a software engineer, when he was working in a physics laboratory in Switzerland in 1989. The world wide web allows people to share information from computers all over the world using a system of coding …

8

You are looking at a first-generation iPod

the mp3 player that changed everything

for the music industry. It was introduced

by Steve Jobs, the CEO of Apple, in 2001. People weren’t very happy with it at first. But it became more and more popular and

is

now an iconic music …

9

The first smartphone was launched in 2007. The CEO of Apple, Steve Jobs, said at its launch, ‘Every once in a while a revolutionary product comes along that changes everything.’

10 Mobile computing really became popular when the iPad arrived in 2010. Apple was not the first company to try tablet computing, but the iPad was the first great success.

Tip: Try to vary activities so that students can move and touch things and focus on different learning styles. Adding sentence slips to arrange or word cards for language games adds a kinaesthetic element to lessons and keeps things interesting. It takes a bit more preparation, but pays off in terms of increased learner motivation and interest.

Culture notes

• Steve Jobs (1955–2011) was a pioneer in personal computing. He founded Apple in 1976 with Steve Wozniak; it has gone on to become one of the most successful companies of all time. He also helped to instigate the visual-effects industry, which resulted in the first fully computer- animated film, Toy Story, in 1995.

• Martin Cooper (1928–) is an American engineer considered the ‘father of the cell phone’. He and his wife, Arlene, have co-founded numerous successful communications companies, and he worked for Motorola for 29 years. In addition to pioneering the mobile phone, he was instrumental in expanding pager technology. He formulated the Law of Spectral Efficiency, which is now known as ‘Cooper’s Law’, and won the Marconi Prize in 2013.

• Tim Berners-Lee (1955–) is the English computer scientist credited with the invention of the world wide web. He is now the director of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), which oversees the web’s continued development. He is reputed to talk very fast, so much so that his colleagues supposedly asked him to speak in French to slow him down.

Background notes Students should be familiar with most of the items pictured, even in their archaic forms. The only two that they may not have come across are the video cassette and the

cassette player. The video cassette pictured is actually a small format developed for camcorders. More common were VHS cassettes for use in domestic VCRs (video cassette recorders). Both these and audio cassettes used magnetic tape, onto which analogue data was recorded. Sound and picture quality were relatively poor, and both formats soon became obsolete when digital recordings in the form of CDs and DVDs became available in the 1980s and 1990s respectively.

3 Play and pause the recording again so students have time to write notes. Encourage them to write abbreviations so they can note down information more quickly (eg 1st smart, S. Jobs, App 2007). They then write the answers in proper sentences, compare with a partner and add extra information.

Answers

1 Steve Jobs was the CEO of Apple. He introduced the iPod in 2001 and the smartphone in 2007. He described the smartphone as a ‘revoluntionary product’ that would ‘change everything’.

2 The first ATM was installed the Chemical Bank in Rockville Center in New York in 1969.

3 The first mobile phone call was made in 1973 by Martin Cooper, then Vice President of the Motorola corporation.

4 The world wide web was invented by Tim Berners-Lee, an English software engineer, in Switzerland in 1989.

5 The iPod is an mp3 player that was introduced by Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple, in 2001. People didn’t like it at first, but it became very popular.

6 CD-ROMs first appeared in 1982. Initially, they just had audio data, but then had video and other data. They are still used today.

4 Copy the mind map onto the board and elicit where broadband should go (connectivity). Students then arrange the other words in the correct place. You can point out that some words can go in more than one place.

MA You may prefer to do this as a whole- class activity, inviting individual students to come to the board to write the words in the correct place, consulting with their classmates if necessary. They can then brainstorm other lexical items to add.

5 If you didn’t do 4 as a whole-class activity, students should compare their mind maps in small groups and check together in feedback. They could also come to the board to complete the mind map.

Answers

operating system: Windows program*: Windows, Twitter, Facebook app: Twitter, Facebook mobile technology: mobile / cell phone hardware: desktop, laptop, monitor connectivity: broadband, cloud computing

* You could draw students’ attention to the fact that the American English spelling is always used in relation to computers.

Tip: It’s good to invite students to come to the board from time to time to brainstorm words with the class, write answers and play games. This movement sends oxygen to the brain and keeps them more active, alert and involved after a long time seated. It also creates more learner interaction and minimises your work too.

Extra idea: Dictate questions about modern technology for students to discuss with a partner. Get feedback and find out about their favourite devices, apps, social networking sites, etc.

What mobile devices do you have? Which is your favourite device? How often do you check your phone / tablet? Do you like social networking sites? Which ones do you use? What are the advantages / disadvantages of mobile technology?

Lesson 1 Futurology pp6–7

Aims

The focus of this lesson is predictions about the future. Students focus on the future simple and continuous in the Grammar section, and also learn adverbs of degree to describe their hopes and fears about the future.

You first!

Students think about their future life and what they’ll be doing in the future. To make it more interesting, set three future points, such as 2025, 2040 and 2060. Students write bullet notes rather than full sentences. This helps them speak more fluently rather than just reading sentences. They then walk around and talk to different partners. Encourage them to ask questions and use phrases like What about you?, What about by 2040?, Really?, Do you think so?, No way!, How come?. This creates more natural interaction, interest and conversation. Get their ideas and hopes in feedback.

Reading

1 Students read about the predictions and discuss them in pairs. You could also point out the use of be able to to express ability in the future: make up a crazy opinion about the future and write the sentence on the board with a mistake for students to correct.

Hey! Do you know what I think? I think people can drive flying cars in the future. – will be able to drive

Answers

The army already controls some things remotely using drones. We already grow food in laboratories. People already watch TV in colour and with good sound and see things on the other side of the world by satellite. Cures for some major illnesses have been developed. We already have supersonic air travel (Concorde was the first).

THINK
THINK

2 Students work in pairs or small

groups to discuss the questions. For questions 3 and 4, they should think of the advantages and disadvantages of working fewer hours and living longer.

Answers

1 Drones are the modern version of ‘army tanks with no crew’.

2 A scientist or a researcher

3 To introduce the topic, write the following quotation by Marcel Proust on the board. Elicit students’ ideas and personal opinions.

Man of imagination, you can find enjoyment only through regret or expectation, in the past or in the future. (Marcel Proust (1871–1922), Remembrance of Things Past)

Elicit what a ‘futurologist’ is (someone who predicts the future). Students read and talk about people they know who look back at the past or hope for the future. Which do they think is the better outlook?

Listening

4

GUESS
GUESS

Pre-teach words like swarmbots

(= lots of small robots that do complex tasks) and vacuum tubes (= high-speed travel by train in a tube). Students work in pairs and guess what Thomas Frey’s predictions are. Get their ideas in feedback.

5

5 1.3 Students listen to the recording

1.3

Students listen to the recording

and check their answers to 4. What things were interesting or surprising? Then play the recording again for them to write the predictions using the prompts.

Answers

1 There will be a lot of roads for driverless cars only.

2 Nano swarmbots will make our clothes. / Our clothes will be made from nano swarmbots.

3 We won’t go to the doctor any more.

4 We will be harvesting water from the atmosphere all the time.

5 A Chinese company will be operating regular flights to a space hotel.

6 Restaurants will print food.

7 We will be travelling around the world in vacuum tubes at more than 6,000 kilometres an hour.

Transcript

Here are some of the things that Thomas Frey predicts about the year 2030.

6

1

Restaurants will print food. They will do this with 3D printers.

2

We won’t go to the doctor any more. We will all have medical machines at home. They will check us out and they will tell us what to do – and they will treat us.

3

There will be a lot of roads for driverless cars only.

4

We will be travelling around the world on a regular basis in vacuum tubes. The speed? More than 6,000 kilometres an hour.

5

A Chinese company will be operating daily flights to a space hotel.

6

We will be harvesting water from the atmosphere all the time.

7

We will use swarmbots – nano swarmbots – (nano means very, very, very small) for our clothes. We will be able to change our clothes in a fraction of a second.

THINK
THINK

Students discuss Frey’s predictions in

pairs or small groups. You could also write the phrases below on the board so that students can use them in their conversations. Get feedback and ask students to explain their ideas and opinions. Highlight examples of good English and correct any small mistakes you heard.

Agree I agree. Absolutely! That’s for sure! It’s think he’s right. That’s so true.

Disagree I disagree. No way! Yeah, right! Not in a million years!

Extra ideas: Tell students that sometimes we put two words together to make one. This is called a ‘blend’ or a ‘portmanteau’. There are lots of them in English and swarmbot is just one of them! Write these pairs of words on the board for students to combine to make new words.

1

swarm + robot

2

breakfast + lunch

3

electronic + mail

4

information + entertainment

5

tiger + lion

6

chill + relax

7

worldwide web + seminar

8

work + alcoholic

9

stay + vacation

10

croissant + doughnut

Answers

1

swarmbot

2 brunch

3 email

4

infotainment

5 liger / tigon

6 chillax

7

webinar

8 workaholic

9 staycation

10 cronut

Students complete these sentences with the new words.

1

Have you tried one of those new

 

? They’re absolutely delicious.

2

I have to do a

for the students

next week.

3

John is always at the office. He’s a

 

complete

4

I’m so tired of travelling. I think I’ll just

have a

this summer.

5

Hi, Anna! Do you want to meet for tomorrow? We could go to the new café on River Street.

6

The zoo has bred quite a few

now.

7

This is so stressful! I’ve had about a

million to read them.

today. I haven’t got time

8

I love

shows like Animal Planet

and The Daily Show.

 

9

I wish I had

to clean this house.

It’s such a mess.

10

My daughter likes to comes home from school.

when she

Answers

1

cronuts

2 webinar

3 workaholic

4

staycation

5 brunch

6 ligers / tigons

7

emails

8 infotainment

9 swarmbots

10 chillax

video link Students can visit Thomas Frey’s website ‘The Futurist Speaker’ and see his talk: http://hello.

futuristspeaker.com/?gclid=CPDtup3R7MYCFfHJtA

od3EoMSQwatch.

They can also view it on YouTube at https://www.

youtube.com/watch?v=L98-v01idZ8.

Students watch the video and answer the questions with a partner.

Culture note Thomas Frey is the Senior Futurist at and founder of the DaVinci Institute, a ‘think tank’ based in Louisville, Colorado, in the USA. He frequently gives presentations and talks on his view of the future.

Extra idea: Write the following words and phrases on separate slips of paper:

skyscrapers, ships, data-storage centres, horses, trains, underwater cities, ultra-high- speed tube transportation, trans-Atlantic bridges, vertical farms, the Pyramids, the Great Wall, space rockets. Put students in pairs and give a set of slips to each pair. Play the video (or show it by data projector or interactive whiteboard); students put the slips in the order they see the items on them. It’s fast, so you’ll probably have to play the clip again!

Grammar

will future and future continuous;

hope

7 Students look at the grammar box, then answer the questions in pairs. Check answers, and tell students that, in practice, either tense can usually be used. Grammar is flexible and there’s often more than one possible answer. To emphasise the ongoing nature of something, we can use the continuous form, but we may not actually want to, so we can use the simple form instead. Competent language speakers use both.

Answers

1 will be doing (future continuous)

2 In sentences 3 and 4, the expressions on a regular basis and daily are used to emphasise the continuous nature of the activities.

MA To review or help weaker students in multi-level classes, write extra examples and check understanding using a timeline. This gives a clear visual clue to the function and meaning of the grammar.

I hope I’ll be living in a big house by the beach when I’m older.

will be living will live

past

now

future

• When am I thinking about? (the future)

• Is

it a short action or an action that lasts for

a

• Is

longer time? (a longer time)

it a continuous action? (yes)

• What do we call this verb tense? (the future continuous)

• When do we use it? (to describe a continuous action or action with duration happening in the future)

• Can I say ‘I hope I’ll live in a big house by the beach when I’m older’? (yes)

• Is the meaning similar or different? (similar)

• What do we call this tense? (the will future or future simple)

8 Students make predictions about the future using hope + will or will be doing.

Extra idea: Ask students to think about the future and what they hope for and dream of. Then tell them to think of a dream for:

• their family

• their country

• the world.

Tell them to discuss their dreams for the future with a partner. Remind them to use the will future and the future continuous. Check ideas in feedback.

Vocabulary

Optimism (adverbs of degree)

9 Students make phrases with the words. Give an example sentence in context to model the activity (eg I’m extremely pessimistic about England’s chances of winning the World Cup.).

MA Weaker students can just make collocations, but stronger students should include the words in full sentences.

10 Students put the adverbs in order. You could also draw a picture in steps or stages on the board to give a clear, visual clue.

Answers

not very, rather, quite, really, extremely

Note that rather and quite are pretty much synonymous, so if students have put them the other way around, that’s fine.

students have put them the other way around, that’s fine. 11 FINISH IT Students write personalised

11 FINISH IT

Students write personalised

sentences to review. You could also show

them that the adverb is usually stressed (eg I’m

really optimistic about

about

some repetition drilling.

, I’m rather negative

) and practise pronunciation with

Tip: Make things stand out visually for students by using different colours or by just writing in bigger letters to show things like sentence stress or the words or grammar you would like to focus on. It takes a few extra seconds to write, but students understand far more quickly, thus saving time in the long run.

Speaking

12

EVERYBODY UP!

Students explain their

feelings about world peace (they can read the example to get the idea), then stand in a line in the classroom to reflect the spectrum of opinion in the class, ranging from the most optimistic to the most pessimistic. Do the same for the other two topics, encouraging students to give reasons for their ideas. Encourage as much conversation as possible.

13

MINI-TALK

Students work in small groups

and make predictions about the future. Write the adverbs of degree and future forms on the board to help them and give them a few minutes’ thinking time to note down a few ideas before they begin. Choose the best talk to present to the whole class.

Lesson 2 What they know

pp8–9

Aims

The focus of this lesson is the comparison of be going to, the will future, modal verbs and the present continuous to make predictions. Students also learn about online advertising and the unsettling issue of data collection and behavioural selling.

You first!

Students discuss their feelings about online advertising and pop-ups when they’re using the computer. Do they read them? Is it interesting or annoying? Have they ever wondered why certain things are advertised on their screen?

Reading 1

1

Students read the title and look atcertain things are advertised on their screen? Reading 1 1 the photo. Ask who ‘they’ are

the photo. Ask who ‘they’ are (advertisers, market research companies) and what the photo represents (people being watched and

analysed). Check students’ ideas about the type of data they think is held about people.

2

Pre-teach the meaning of words like intend (= plan to do something), on-demand (= TV and video content you can select and watch any time) and account (= summary). Students read the first part of the article to see if their ideas about the type of data were correct.

 

Answers

age, nationality, occupation, residential status, family history, shopping habits, holiday destinations, travel, hobbies and interests, TV habits, annual income, commuting, eating out, pets, family, marital status

3

TAKEAWAY LANGUAGE

Students match

the words to make words and phrases.

MA Weaker students can read the article again to help them.

 

Answers

annual income, detached house, housemate, on-demand films, privately owned flat, takeaway, weekly shopping

 

Background note There are no rules to dictate whether word combinations like the ones in 3 are one word, two words hyphenated or two separate words. Often compounds start out as two separate words and gradually become one word, perhaps with a hyphenated stage in between.

4

Students compare their lives with Niki. Encourage them to use both of us and neither of us to describe similarities and differences, and to give extra information about themselves where there are differences, as in the example.

5

THINK
THINK

Students discuss the question with a

partner. You could also encourage them to use the phrases of certainty and uncertainty from Unit 6. Write these phrases on the board so they can include them in their conversations.

I’m certain / sure that

I know it’s I’m not sure.

It’s definitely

It must / can’t be

I think it’s

I definitely don’t know.

I have no idea. I haven’t a clue.

It’s possibly

It could / might be

Reading 2

6 Students read Part 2 of the article and check

if their ideas from 5 were correct. They then answer the questions in pairs.

Answers

1 They analyse what you buy at supermarkets.

2 There are cameras next to or behind adverts. The camera can tell your age, height and sex.

3 They know your browser history, which things you have looked at online. They also know how many Facebook friends you have.

4 They use the location service on your phone to know where you are and where you go.

7 Students guess the definitions through context, then check their ideas with a partner.

through context, then check their ideas with a partner. THINK 8 Students discuss the questions in
THINK
THINK

8 Students discuss the questions in

pairs. Get their opinions in feedback. Is it ever

a good thing? Can they think of other types of advertising?

Extra idea: Days of our Lives is a famous American soap opera that is well known for product placement. Play this clip from YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=gCh4gnIcJEM) and see if students can spot the advertising! What other films do they know that use product placement (eg James Bond films)?

Grammar

Future plans and predictions

9 Students look at the sentences and decide the level of certainty. You could also draw a scale on the board to present things in a visual way.

Answers

4, 2, 3, 1

10 Students underline the predictions and identify the tenses used. Check answers in feedback and elicit the differences in meaning. At this level, students have already learnt each tense, so this gets them to compare and review (we use present continuous for future arrangements, be going to for predictions made with present facts or evidence, and will future for distant predictions).

Answers

1 They know what you are doing next

week

future arrangements / plans)

(present continuous, used for

2 and what, if your plans work out, you’re going to do this evening. (be going to, used for intentions based on current evidence)

3 They know they know what you’ll probably be doing next year. (will future + probably, used for more distant predictions)

11 Students tell each other their plans and intentions using each of the future forms. Get some of their ideas in feedback and ask extra questions (eg Really? When? How certain is this? Sounds great, what will you do there?).

12 Students work in groups of four or walk around the room and share their ideas. Monitor and note down good ideas and sentences and small mistakes you can correct in feedback.

Tip: Always leave time for feedback if possible, as it’s helpful in different ways. Firstly, it gives natural closure to activities. It also helps you to check students’ answers, vocabulary or grammar, and praise or gently correct them (which is important to them too, because they like to know if they’re doing things right). However, the most important

thing is to leave time for a chat, really listen to them, take an interest in their lives and encourage them to speak in a personalised way.

Speaking

13

ROLE-PLAY

Put students in A+B pairs. Give

them time to read their role cards and think about what they’d like to say.

Extra idea: Students look around the room and notice things about other students and what they’re wearing. They then work in pairs. One student describes what someone in the class is wearing, eg type of clothes, style, colour, brand. Their partner has to guess who it is.

Lesson 3 Losing skills pp10–11

Aims

The focus of this lesson is time adverbials to describe future plans. Students also read and talk about the impact of modern technology and our loss of skills, and learn new vocabulary to give directions around town.

You first!

Students look at the photos and answer the questions. Ask extra questions (eg Have you ever flown in a really old plane? Did you feel nervous?).

Speaking

1 Check that students understand cockpits and ask them to describe the differences. How do they think these changes have affected the pilot’s job? Do pilots have to be more or less skilled these days?

2 Students read the lesson title ‘Losing skills’ and guess what the paragraph is about. They then read and check if their predictions were correct, then discuss the questions with a partner.

Listening

3

then discuss the questions with a partner. Listening 3 1.4 Check that students know what satnav

1.4 Check that students know what satnav

(= satellite navigation) and GPS (= Global Positioning System) are. Write some questions on the board and discuss them with students

(eg Do you use satnav? Do you like it? Why? / Why not? Have you ever had any problems with satnav? What happened?).

Students listen to the recording and answer the questions. Play and pause as necessary.

Answers

1 Three people: Paul, Ceri and Hilda (the satnav)

2 In a car

3 Paul and Ceri are probably married; Hilda is the voice on the satnav.

Transcript

ceri

Hurry up, Paul. We’re going to be late.

satnav In one mile, take the third exit from the

paul

roundabout. OK, I will. Thank you, Hilda.

ceri

Who’s Hilda?

paul

She’s the voice on my satnav. I think I

ceri

may have fallen in love with her! Don’t be so ridiculous.

paul

Just joking.

ceri

Paul, look, we can turn right here.

paul

No, we can’t.

ceri

Yes, we can. We’ll be there in about

paul

three minutes if we do. Hilda says we have to go on to the

ceri

roundabout. Hilda’s a satnav, Paul. She isn’t a real

paul

person, you know. But look, there’s a sign to where we want to go. Look. We just take the next turning on the right. But the satnav …

ceri

… says we have to go on to the

paul

roundabout. I know. I spent a lot of money on this system.

satnav In 500 yards, take the third exit from

ceri

paul

ceri

the roundabout. You’ve missed the turn now anyway. Yes, but Hilda … Oh, shut up about Hilda! If we listen to her, we won’t get there until the day after tomorrow.

Yes, but Hilda … Oh, shut up about Hilda! If we listen to her, we won’t
Yes, but Hilda … Oh, shut up about Hilda! If we listen to her, we won’t

satnav You are now approaching the

paul

roundabout. Take the third exit. She’s the latest thing. I rely on her

ceri

completely. It.

paul

What?

ceri

It. You rely on it. It’s a machine, not a

person. satnav In three miles, take the fourth exit from the roundabout.

paul

Oh! Now see what you’ve done!

have to do a U-turn.

ceri

What have I done?

paul

You distracted me. I took the wrong

ceri

exit from the roundabout. Now Hilda says we have to go on for three miles to the next roundabout and then we’ll

Paul! Turn Hilda off! I don’t care how

paul

much you love her! Use your memory. Use your eyes. Look at the street signs. But Hilda …

ceri

There is no Hilda, Paul. She’s a pre- recorded voice in a machine, and if you let her control your life, you’ll forget everything you ever knew. We can’t let machines take over our lives. You can’t let a machine take over your life.

satnav You are now approaching the roundabout …

Background note With many satnav systems, you can choose the voice that makes the announcements. These range from just male and female voices to a whole range of celebrities and cartoon characters.

4

Students listen and follow the route on the map. Play and pause the recording again

Students listen and follow the route on the map. Play and pause the recording again as necessary.

 

Answers

1 The route goes straight along the purple road past the first roundabout.

2 She wanted to turn right before the roundabout.

3 B

5

TAKEAWAY LANGUAGE

Students listen

again and identify the phrases and who said them. Play and pause the recording again if necessary; students then compare in pairs.

phrases and who said them. Play and pause the recording again if necessary; students then compare

Grammar

Time adverbials

6 Students underline the time adverbials. Elicit what time adverbials do (They describe when actions and things are done). You could also highlight how the word about is used with time adverbials (It’s vague language, when we’re talking about an approximate rather than specific time).

talking about an approximate rather than specific time ). 7 Explain to students that more than

7 Explain to students that more than one adverbial is possible in each sentence and have them look at the example. They write the sentences and check with a partner. Elicit that the time adverbial can also go at the beginning of the sentence, but that it needs a comma (eg By ten o’clock, we will be there).

it needs a comma (eg By ten o’clock, we will be there ). 8 Students write

8 Students write sentences using the time adverbials.

MA Stronger students can write more and vary the time adverbials.

9 Students share their sentences in groups of three and four and ask questions for more details.

Extra idea: Draw a stick man on the board. Tell the class, ‘This is John. He’s always late, but he always makes up bizarre excuses to explain why’. Students pretend they’re John and make statements using the time adverbials. They should ask each other questions and make up excuses. Write an example conversation on the board. You could also include reason clauses (because), phrases of obligation

(have to, need to) and purpose clauses (to get, in order to get) to review at the same time:

a I’ll be home by nine o’clock this evening.

b Why will you be so late?

a Because I have to go into town to get the car serviced. Get feedback and find out the funniest and craziest excuses.

Vocabulary

On the road

10 Students do the exercise in pairs. You could also show visuals to quickly check understanding (eg ‘What’s this?’ ‘It’s a motorway.’ ‘Yes, it is. Anyone know what we call it in American English?’ ‘A freeway or expressway.’).

Answers

path, lane, one-way street*, road, avenue, motorway

* The position of this in the sequence is debatable, as some one-way streets can be very narrow and others can be wide.

11 Students may not know the words, so they can look them up in their dictionaries or on their smartphones if necessary.

Answers

There are clear drawings of these on page 5 of the Workbook.

Speaking and writing

12 Students work in groups of three and four and use the phrases in the box to describe their journeys.

13 Play audio 1.4 again so that students notice the satnav phrases. They then write the satnav directions for their journeys.

14 Students discuss the questions together. Get feedback and check their ideas. Do a quick survey to find out their opinions about technology.

Extra idea: Put students in groups of three or four. Show them a picture of a teenager using a laptop or a tablet. What do they think about it? Then give them role cards. One is for a teenager, and the others

are for a parent / teacher / older person. Students read their card and then take a few minutes to think about their opinion and make notes. They then do the role play from the point of view on their card. This activity encourages students to think about things from someone else’s perspective and consider other ideas, opinions and feelings.

Possible role cards:

• You are a teenager. You love the internet, social networking and playing computer games. Think of reasons why spending a lot of time on your computer is a good thing.

• You are a parent. Your teenage son / daughter hardly ever speaks to you any more and he / she is always on social networks on the internet. Think of your opinion about teenagers spending so much time using computers and how it might be bad for studying and a healthy lifestyle.

• You are a teacher. You have mixed feelings about computers. You understand the advantages and disadvantages. Think of your opinion about teenagers spending so much time using computers.

• You are an older person. You don’t really understand why teenagers sit at home playing games and surfing the internet. Think of your opinion about teenagers spending so much time using computers.

EXPLORE ONLINE This can be done at home or in class using smartphones or tablets. Students find out about people who went through technology detox and turned off the internet. They can do a search for digital detox.

Take a break

Although it’s likely that students will have their phones switched off during class to avoid disruption, it’s unlikely that they’ve spent time taking stock of their surroundings like this. Try having a minute of complete silence for them to absorb their environment, then ask them what they saw / heard / felt.

Everyday English p12

Asking for and giving directions

1

Everyday English p12 Asking for and giving directions 1 1.5 6 Students watch the video or

1.5 6 Students watch the video or listen

to the recording and answer the questions. Play and pause as necessary.

Answers

1 The Museo del Barrio

2 She asks three people.

Transcript

1

dana

Oh, no. My phone just died. Excuse

man

me? Yeah?

dana

Do you know where the Museo del

man

Barrio is? No, sorry. No idea.

dana

Oh. Well, OK, thank you.

2

dana

Excuse me? Could you tell me

?

woman

Sorry, can’t talk. No time. … I’ll be there in five minutes, darling. I’m just

dana

leaving the gallery now. OK. Oops. Sorry.

3

dana

Excuse me.

jerome

Yes? Can I help you?

dana

Yes, please. I’m looking for the

jerome

Museo del Barrio. The Museo del Barrio? The Latin

dana

American one? Yes, that’s the one.

jerome

Oh, that’s easy. It’s on 5th Avenue.

dana

You’re quite close. It’s on 5th Avenue? No wonder. I

jerome

thought it was on 103rd Street. No, that’s the Museum of the City

dana

of New York. It’s a block away from there. From the Museum of the City of New

jerome

York? Yes, that’s right. Now listen, the best

dana

way is to go left from here and go one block to East 97th Street. Take a right … Take a right?

jerome

That’s right, and then 5th Avenue is five blocks away When you get there, turn right and keep going.

dana

jerome

dana

jerome

dana

jerome

dana

OK. It’s about six blocks then. The block after the Museum of the City of New York. You can’t miss it. How long of a walk is that? How long will it take to walk? About ten minutes? No, maybe 15. OK, thanks. Maybe I’ll jump into a cab. Oh, come on. You can walk! It’s not that far. You’re young! Hope you have a good time there. Not my ‘thing’, as they say. Not very keen on museums anyway, but when I do go to a museum … OK, sorry, gotta go. Thanks for your help.

as they say. Not very keen on museums anyway, but when I do go to a
as they say. Not very keen on museums anyway, but when I do go to a
as they say. Not very keen on museums anyway, but when I do go to a
as they say. Not very keen on museums anyway, but when I do go to a
as they say. Not very keen on museums anyway, but when I do go to a
as they say. Not very keen on museums anyway, but when I do go to a

2 Students watch or listen and write the conversation number.

Answers

1 Speaker 3

2 Speaker 1

3 Speaker 2

3 Students use the map to find out where the woman is when she has the conversations, then compare their answers in pairs.

Answers

The woman is at the hospital, on the corner of East 99th Street and 2nd Avenue.

EXPLORE ONLINE Students find out information about the Museo del Barrio (http://www.elmuseo.org) and the Museum of the City of New York (http://mcny.org) and report back in feedback. Ask extra questions to encourage speaking and personalisation (eg Would you like to go there? Why? / Why not? What kind of museums or exhibitions do you like?). They can also go to the Time Out – New York page at http://www.timeout.com/newyork/things-to-do and look at other museums and attractions.

4 Students work in pairs and match the phrases. Play the recording again for them to check their answers. Explain that take is followed by an article (Take a right) and turn is followed by the direction without an article (Turn right). If students are in the USA, they’ll probably hear the phrase Hang a right too!

Answers

1

h

2 e

3 c

4 b

5 d

6 a

7 i

8

g

9 f

5 Students complete the table with the questions and responses.

Answers

asking for directions Do you know where the museum is? How long will it take? I’m looking for the Museo del Barrio. giving directions Fifth Avenue is five blocks away. Keep right. Take a right. The best way is to go left from here and go one block to East 97th Street. Turn right. You can’t miss it.

6 Elicit the meaning of the American English words intersection (= crossroads) and gas station (= petrol station). Students then add the phrases to the table in 5. Explain that or so is another way of saying ‘about’ when we’re being vague and giving approximate amounts; about comes before the amount, or so comes after:

Keep going for about 500 metres. Keep going for 500 metres or so.

for about 500 metres. Keep going for 500 metres or so . P 7 1.6 Explain
P
P

7 1.6 Explain that the phrase Excuse me

has different meanings depending on the attitude of the speaker and the situation. Give students time to read the possible meanings.

Pre-teach words like cross (= annoyed, angry) and squeeze past (= move or get past with difficulty). Students listen to the conversations and match each example of Excuse me to the correct meaning.

match each example of Excuse me to the correct meaning. P 8 Play the recording again.
P
P

8 Play the recording again. Ask students

if they hear a difference in the way Excuse me is pronounced. Practise and repeat the pronunciation with the class. Students work in pairs, saying Excuse me in different ways. Their partner has to guess which meaning it is.

9 Students use the map and practise asking and giving directions. Encourage them to use the new phrases.

Tip: Although grammar and vocabulary can be taught, at the end of the day, it’s up to students whether they use it or not. Try to encourage them to use new words and phrases so that they develop and upgrade their vocabulary in every lesson.

10 Students follow the notes for the speaking activity. Model the activity and encourage them to use the new words and phrases in their conversations.

MA Stronger students could mark more than three places on their maps.

Vocabulary plus p59

Cars

1 Students do the matching in pairs. Check answers as a class.

Students do the matching in pairs. Check answers as a class. Extra ideas: Ask which words

Extra ideas: Ask which words are British English (high street, motorway, toll road) and which are particularly American English (freeway, expressway). Elicit the American English equivalent of high street (= main street) and toll road (= turnpike). You could also ask students to use their smartphones / tablets to find songs about roads and motorways (eg Telegraph Road by Dire Straits, The Road to Hell by Chris Rea, 2-4-6-8 Motorway by the Tom Robinson Band, Route 66 by Chuck Berry (and many others), Road to Nowhere by Talking Heads, Motorway by The Kinks).

2 Students discuss the terms in groups of three or four. Encourage them to talk about personal experiences of traffic problems. They should note that traffic congestion is uncountable.

They should note that traffic congestion is uncountable. 3 Read through the quiz quickly as a

3 Read through the quiz quickly as a class to check for any vocabulary problems (eg pedestrians, speed). Then put students into pairs or small groups to answer the questions. Feed back as a class. Did they find any of the answers surprising?

or small groups to answer the questions. Feed back as a class. Did they find any

4 In the same pairs / groups, students discuss the three questions. Choose one of the questions to open up to a class discussion.

Tip: Discussing an issue in smaller groups prior to a whole-class discussion should encourage weaker students to participate more, but make a particular effort to include them by asking for their opinions.

Pedestrians

5 Ask the class if they recognise the zebra crossing in the photo, and why it’s famous.

the zebra crossing in the photo, and why it’s famous. Extra idea: Encourage students to find

Extra idea: Encourage students to find an image of the Abbey Road album cover and find out more about it (eg Where is the white Volkswagen now? (In a museum in Germany) Who is the man standing on the pavement? (An American tourist named Paul Cole, who was unaware he was being photographed) Can you see the zebra crossing without going to London? (Yes – there is a webcam devoted to it at www.abbeyroad.com/crossingarchive) Why is Paul McCartney barefoot? (There are lots of theories about this, but the most likely explanation is that it was too hot!).

Culture note

The Beatles’ Abbey Road album was their

11 th studio album and was released on

26 September, 1969. The album cover features the four members of The Beatles walking across the zebra crossing outside the Abbey Road studios, where the album was recorded, and it has become one of the most famous and imitated images from popular music. It is the only Beatles album cover to show neither the artist’s name nor the album title; the cover designer, Kosh, claimed that these details were not necessary, as ‘they were the most famous band in the world’. The original idea came

from an idea sketched by Paul McCartney. The photo was taken on 8 August, 1969, at around 11.30; a policeman held up the traffic for ten minutes to allow the photographer to take the photo standing on a stepladder.

6 Students study the photo and select the things they can see.

Students study the photo and select the things they can see. Background notes A pedestrian crossing

Background notes

A pedestrian crossing is the general term

for anywhere you can cross – it may or may not have stripes. A zebra crossing has black and white stripes. A pelican crossing has a button you have to press to say if you can cross.

7 Students quickly match the American English phrases with their British English equivalents.

English phrases with their British English equivalents. P 8 2.26 Play the recording once for students
P
P

8 2.26 Play the recording once for

students to write the words, then play it again

for them to chant along.

Transcript

Street light, pelican crossing, phone booth, underpass, zebra crossing, footbridge, sidewalk, kerb. Traffic lights, pavement, pedestrian precinct, traffic lights, pavement, pedestrian mall. That’s where people go, and that’s the end, that’s all.

P
P

9 See how fast students can repeat the

chant, then ask them to do it backwards. This

is very difficult, so will probably cause some hilarity.

10 Students work in pairs to categorise the items in 6.

11 Ask students if they can tell you where the nearest phone box is, then

11 Ask students if they can tell you where the nearest phone box is, then ask them to discuss the questions in small groups. As a class, make a list of situations when a phone box might be useful.

Collocations

12 Give students a few minutes to complete the sentences. Get feedback and make a list of collocations with future on the board (see the text in italics in the sentences).

on the board (see the text in italics in the sentences). 13 Ask students for their

13 Ask students for their predictions about technology using the phrases on the board.

8

Film

UNIT

FOCUS

GRAMMAR: reporting orders and requests; would and used to; reporting what people say; reporting what people said VOCABULARY: jobs in films; adjectives to describe character; statistics; jobs and actions FUNCTION: giving good and bad news

Introduction p13

Aims

The focus of this lesson is to introduce the topic of films and to give students some of the vocabulary they need to discuss films and how they’re made.

You first!

Tell students that although film is generally a British English term and movie an American English one, in practice both terms are used almost interchangeably. Students talk about their cinema- going habits and their favourite movies in pairs or small groups.

1

GUESS
GUESS

Ask students if they recognise which

movie the photo at the top of the page is from (It shows Sir Ian McKellen as Gandalf in The Return of the King, the third part of the Lord of the Rings trilogy.) and if any of them have seen it. If possible, show students the movie trailer of the film at https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=r5X-hFf6Bwo. They should listen carefully to the clip and complete the sentences below, then compare their answers with a partner. Play the clip again if necessary.

What does your

(heart tell you?)

(you were born to be.)

Become who

All you have to decide is

(what to do with

the time that is given to you.) Ask students why they think the film is unique in class feedback.

2

2 1.7 Students listen to the recording and

1.7

Students listen to the recording and

check their answers.

Students listen to the recording and check their answers. Transcript announcer And now we go over

Transcript

announcer And now we go over to Bailey Churunwallah and Keiko Yamanachi for today’s edition of Movie News.

bailey

Welcome, movie goers. We’ve got a

keiko

great show for you today. But before we get going, let’s start

bailey

with some movie facts. Sure thing!

keiko

So, which movie has won the highest

bailey

number of Oscars in history? Er, now let’s see, Ben-Hur won 11.

keiko

Ben-Hur?

bailey

Yes, it was released in 1959 and it was

keiko

the most expensive movie ever made – up till then. It cost $17.5 million. It was directed by William Wyler and starred Charlton Heston. But it isn’t the only movie to win 11

bailey

Oscars, right? No, it isn’t. Titanic – directed by James

keiko

Cameron and released in 1997 – won 11 Oscars too, and it was the most expensive movie up to that time, too – $200 million! And the cast! Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet have never been better. But I reckon The Return of the King

bailey

the third film in the Lord of the Rings trilogy – beats them all. It won 11 Oscars too.

keiko

Yes, and that was the total of its

bailey

nominations. Eleven! And no other movie has ever done that – won everything it was nominated for. It was a triumph, wasn’t it? Released

keiko

in 2003, directed by Peter Jackson, with a cast including Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen, Cate Blanchett, Viggo Mortensen, Orlando Bloom. One of history’s great films. Let’s see if anything wins 11 Oscars this year!

3 Ask students what connects the films Ben-Hur, Titanic and The Return of the King. Play the recording again if necessary.

connects the films Ben-Hur , Titanic and The Return of the King . Play the recording

Background notes

• The Return of the King is the third film in the Lord of the Rings trilogy, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. They were all filmed in New Zealand and were based on the novels by JRR Tolkien. The film was directed by Peter Jackson and the cast included Elijah Wood, Sir Ian McKellen, Viggo Mortensen, Liv Tyler, Cate Blanchett, Orlando Bloom and Christopher Lee. It earned $1,119,929,521 at the box office worldwide and was only the second film in history to earn over $1 billion, making it the second-highest grossing film at the time. The film received many awards and accolades, including 11 Academy Awards, as well as four Golden Globes, five BAFTAs, two MTV Movie Awards and two Grammy Awards for best soundtrack. The film was also voted as No. 8 on Empire ’s 100 Greatest Movies of All Time.

• Ben-Hur is an American epic historical drama, directed by William Wyler, starring Charlton Heston and Stephen Boyd. At the time it was made in 1959, it had the largest budget ($15.175 million) and one of the biggest sets ever. More than 200 camels, 2,500 horses and 10,000 extras appeared in the film. Ben-Hur was the second-highest grossing film in history up to that point, after Gone with the Wind. It won a record 11 Academy Awards, three Golden Globe Awards and the BAFTA Award for Best Film. It made about $72.2 million at the box office on release and is still considered one of the best movies of all time. It remains to be seen if the 2016 remake starring Jack Huston and Morgan Freeman can better this.

• Titanic is a 1997 American epic romantic disaster movie, directed and written by James Cameron. It stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet, who fall in love aboard the ship during its ill- fated maiden voyage. The film made $2,185,372,302 at the box office and became the highest-grossing film of all time. It won 11 Academy Awards, four Golden Globes and three Grammy

Awards. The film’s soundtrack became the best-selling soundtrack of all time, and has sold over 11 million copies in the United States alone. Celine Dion’s recording of My Heart Will Go On (the love theme from Titanic) went to number one in many countries and is one of the best-selling singles of all time.

4 Students work in pairs and match the actors to the films. They then compare their answers; play the recording again if necessary.

Alternatively, put students in teams and tell them you’re going to show them photos of the movie stars and directors listed. As you lift each one up, they have to shout out which film they starred in or directed. The first team to get the correct answer wins a point. The team with the most points at the end wins the game.

Answers

Ben-Hur: Charlton Heston, William Wyler, $17.5 million Titanic: James Cameron, Kate Winslet, Leonardo DiCaprio, $200 million The Return of the King: Cate Blanchett, Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen, Orlando Bloom, Peter Jackson, Viggo Mortensen

EXPLORE ONLINE Students use their smartphones or tablets to search online for more information. You could ask them to look at the IMDb site (Internet Movie Database) at http://www.imdb.com. You could also create a natural information gap to encourage speaking and learner interaction. Put students in groups of three: student A reads about Ben-Hur, student B reads about Titanic and student C finds out information about The Return of the King. They then share information afterwards.

5 Students match words to make compound nouns. You can make more than one with some (eg co-star / film star / film extra / film critic / film set).

Read the compound nouns aloud; students then listen to the pronunciation and repeat together. Which word is stressed? (The stress is usually on the first word.)

Answers

action film, blockbuster, camera operator, character actor, co-star, co-writer, film star, film extra, film critic, film set, leading actor, leading lady, make-up artist, scriptwriter, sound engineer, story writer, story board

6

YOUR STORY

Students work in pairs or

small groups to talk about the last film they saw using the ideas in the box. Give them a few minutes to write quick notes first. Model the activity and encourage students to ask follow-up questions.

Tip: Encourage students to listen and respond to what their partner says, rather just take turns. This creates more interaction and dialogue instead of monologue, and results in more natural conversation.

2 Pre-teach words such as supervise (= watch someone to make sure things are done correctly) and construction (= building and making things). Students work in pairs to match the jobs and descriptions, then check answers in feedback. They probably won’t know all of them, so tell them to match the ones they know first and guess the others.

Answers 1 producer 2 camera operator 3 director of photography 4 editor 5 casting director
Answers
1 producer
2 camera operator
3 director
of photography
4 editor
5 casting director
6 set designer
7 foley artist
8 assistant
director
9 gaffer
10 location manager
Composer, costume designer, director,
scriptwriter and sound designer are not
described.

3 Students discuss which jobs they would most / least like to do. They should give reasons for their answers.

Lesson 1 Who does what in

Vocabulary 2

Adjectives to describe

films? pp14–15

character

Aims

The focus of this lesson is reported orders and requests. Students also learn adjectives to describe character and different jobs on a film set in the Vocabulary section. The Video option activity encourages students to film their own scenes and provides a natural context for speaking and practising reported speech.

You first!

Students discuss the question together. Do a quick class survey to find out who the aspiring actors are in the class! This also provides useful information for the Video option activity, as you can guide students towards their areas of interest and comfort.

Vocabulary 1

Jobs in films

1 Students look at the photo and write down as many jobs as they see. The team that gets the most words wins the game.

Suggested answers

Actor, director, camera operator, sound engineer, assistant director (The photo is not very clear, so accept any plausible answers.)

4 Students work in pairs to decide if the adjectives are positive or negative. They can use their dictionaries if necessary. Check together in feedback.

Answers

positive: calm, clever, decisive, easy- going, friendly, hard-working, intelligent, knowledgeable, polite, shy, tidy negative: grumpy, ignorant, indecisive, lazy, moody, nervous, rude, stupid, unintelligent, untidy

5 Elicit the meaning of the phrase more or less (= approximately). Students find possible synonyms and antonyms (opposites) from the box in 4.

Suggested answers

a) clever - intelligent; calm - easy-going; friendly - polite; grumpy - moody; stupid - unintelligent

b) clever - stupid; intelligent - unintelligent; knowledgeable - ignorant; calm - nervous; grumpy - easy-going; decisive - indecisive; tidy - untidy; hard-working - lazy; polite - rude

Tip: Tell students that a good way of increasing vocabulary and remembering words is to think of possible synonyms and antonyms when they learn a new word and to write these down too. Try to review recently learnt vocabulary regularly with quizzes, games and crosswords.

6 Students discuss their feelings

about the words. Check their ideas in feedback. Is there overall agreement, or at least a majority?

7 Having students act out the words rather than draw them has the advantage of getting everybody up and moving around after a long time seated. It’s also quicker and more dynamic. However, shyer or more artistic students may prefer to come and draw on the board, so tailor the activity to the student.

This can be done as a team game, with teams getting a point for each correct adjective guessed.

8 Students write a description of two film-related jobs using the character adjectives. They then read their sentences to their partner (without mentioning the job title!) and guess each other’s jobs.

9 Students describe the assistant director using the character adjectives in 4.

THINK
THINK

Alternatively, they rewrite the text with the character adjectives.

MA You may want to give weaker students this sentence starter: She was indecisive, but

Suggested answers

She was indecisive, but when, finally, she did decide she kept making stupid mistakes and she shouted at people and was rude when she realised. She was lazy and she never talked to people (except when she was shouting!). She was grumpy / moody.

Extra ideas: Students work in pairs and write down five adjectives to describe themselves. They then write five adjectives to describe their partner. They can use the adjectives from the Student’s Book, but if they use other adjectives, that’s fine too! They then look at their lists with their partner and compare the differences between how they see themselves and how other people see them. This is usually funny – but make sure you remind them to be kind! Students write a short description of themselves for a dating agency website, and describe their ideal partner using character adjectives.

Grammar

Reporting orders and requests

10

adjectives. Grammar Reporting orders and requests 10 1.8 Students listen and write down the people’s jobs.

1.8 Students listen and write down the

people’s jobs. Play the recording again if

necessary.

the people’s jobs. Play the recording again if necessary. Transcript 1 woman What’s the matter, Sheelagh?

Transcript

1

woman

What’s the matter, Sheelagh?

sheelagh The producer asked me to write a

woman

2

new version of the battle scene. So I wrote a new version. And she showed it to the director. And the director made some comments. So then, when she got the comments back from the director, she asked me to write it again. And again. I’ve rewritten the scene eight times now. Poor you.

man

You look a bit tired, Karl.

karl

Yes, I am.

man

Haven’t you been sleeping properly?

karl

No, it’s not that.

man

Then what?

karl

The director asked me to come up

man

with a good tune for the battle scene. And did you?

karl

man

karl

man

karl

man

karl

Well, I tried, but I couldn’t think of anything. Oh dear. So what happened, Karl? He told me to give him something soon – or else! Or else what? Or else he’d find someone else. What happened? I wrote a new tune. He found someone else!

– or else! Or else what? Or else he’d find someone else. What happened? I wrote
– or else! Or else what? Or else he’d find someone else. What happened? I wrote
– or else! Or else what? Or else he’d find someone else. What happened? I wrote
– or else! Or else what? Or else he’d find someone else. What happened? I wrote
– or else! Or else what? Or else he’d find someone else. What happened? I wrote
– or else! Or else what? Or else he’d find someone else. What happened? I wrote

3

tamako

I don’t know what to do.

man

What is it this time, Tamako?

tamako

Well, the director asked me to make

man

dresses for the ballroom scene like the ones in the paintings. The paintings?

tamako

Yes, he showed me paintings from

man

that time, so I made the dresses like that. So, no problem, then?

tamako

I wish!

man

I don’t understand.

tamako

Well, then he said he didn’t like

man

them. He asked me not to use bright colours. And?

tamako

And I said I was using the colours

man

from the paintings. Ouch!

tamako

Yes, so then he told me not to be

man

difficult. That was a week ago. He hasn’t called since. You need a cup of tea. Shall I make

tamako

you a cup of tea? Tea? Oh, yes, please. I could really do with some tea. Thank you very much.

11 Students look at the examples in the table and say what changes are made when reporting speech (asked / told me to is used, the pronouns change). Ensure students understand the difference between a request and an order (the order starts with an imperative); they then rewrite the sentences in reported speech. The sentences all come from the recording, so students should use the same genders for the pronouns.

MA Weaker students can look at transcript 1.8 on page 79 for help if necessary.

Answers

1 He asked me to come up with a good tune for the battle scene.

2 He asked me to make dresses for the ballroom scene like the ones in the paintings.

3 He asked me not to use bright colours.

4 He told me not to be difficult.

Extra idea: Ask extra questions to check students’ understanding of the grammar and help them to notice reporting verbs, infinitive forms and pronoun changes. Write the direct speech with the reported speech equivalent below. You could also show changes with different colours to help things stand out visually for students. Could you come up with a good tune for the battle scene? He asked me to come up with a good tune for the battle scene.

• Which sentence is spoken in the present? (the first one)

• Which one describes what someone else said in the past? (the second one)

• Which words show someone else said it? (He asked)

• What kind of word is asked? (a verb)

• What do we call a verb that reports what someone else said? (a reporting verb)

• What happens to the subject pronoun you? (It changes to me.)

• What happens to the verb come up with? (It changes to the infinitive with to.)

• Is there a question mark at the end of a reported question? (no)

Please don’t use bright colours. He asked me not to use bright colours.

• Are the sentences positive or negative? (negative)

• What word shows the first sentence is negative? (don’t)

• How does the negative change in reported speech? (Don’t changes to not.)

• What happens to the verb use? (It changes to the infinitive with to.)

12

Students focus on the form of the sentence and arrange the words in the correct order. Get feedback and correct if needed.

on their smartphones or tablets. Get feedback; students report back about what they were asked or told to do / not to do.

Answers a) 2 b) 6 c) 4 d) 3 e) 1 f) 5 Say can’t
Answers
a) 2
b) 6
c) 4
d) 3
e) 1
f) 5
Say can’t be used in the same way because it
doesn’t take a direct object (He said me
).

Speaking

13

Students complete the sentences in direct speech.

 

Suggested answers

a) Will you marry me?

b) Stop writing!

c) Please get out of the car.

14

Students change what they wrote in 13 into reported questions and orders and say what happened next.

MA Encourage stronger students to be inventive and add more details to make mini- stories.

 

Suggested answers

a) He asked me to marry him and I said yes.

b) She told us to stop writing, so we did.

c) He asked me to get out of the car, so I opened the door and got out.

 

Extra idea: Tell students to think of two things they were asked to do and two things they were told to do last week, and report them to a partner.

My sister asked me not to play my music so loudly. My friend told me not to forget the football game later in the evening.

15

Students work in pairs to exchange information about Boyhood and Girlhood. Despite the similarity of the titles, the films share no other obvious links.

16

VIDEO OPTION

Put students in groups of

three and assign roles. If you have to have one or two groups of four, there can be an assistant director, too. Students film the scene

Students walk around the room and share their movie clips with each other. They then vote for the best interpretation of the scene.

Extra idea: Play a short clip from a film like Titanic and tell students to write down what people say in direct speech. Check they’ve transcribed it correctly, then ask them to rewrite the sentences in reported speech.

Tip: One of the best and easiest ways to review reported speech is to do it naturally in class feedback at the end of activities, with students reporting back what their partner said. This practises the grammar in a natural context and also encourages students to listen carefully to each other during speaking activities.

Lesson 2 YouTubers pp16–17

Aims

The focus of this lesson is would and used to to describe past habits; students also practise vocabulary related to statistics and data. The Reading section includes an article on the popularity of YouTube and ‘vlogging’ (video logging), and students also get the chance to look back nostalgically at their lives and talk about things they did when they were a child.

You first!

Students discuss the questions about YouTube (or other online video sites) in pairs or small groups. Get feedback and ask more questions (eg What things do you like to watch on YouTube? How often do you use it? What kinds of videos have you uploaded? How many views did they have?).

Background note YouTube is a video-sharing website with its headquarters in San Bruno, California, United States. The service was created by three friends – Chad Hurley, Steve Chen and Jawed Karim – in February 2005. In November 2006, it was bought by Google for US$1.65 billion. The YouTube app is the

third most used application in the world and is available on almost all smartphones and other mobile devices. It’s estimated that over 300 hours of new videos are uploaded to the site every minute, and YouTube receives over 4 billion views each day. In addition, the site has enabled many independent video creators to upload their films and have thousands of followers from all over the world.

Reading

GUESS
GUESS

1 Students look at the photos and the

title of the article for clues, then guess about Bing and share ideas with a partner.

2 Students read and check if their predictions were correct. Set a time limit so they read for gist and don’t get stuck on unknown words (they’ll cover some of them in 4).

Answer

Bing is a vlogger who uploads videos to YouTube.

3 Students find out what the numbers refer to. You could also have them race against their partner to practise skim-reading skills.

Answers

1 The age when Chris started making comedy videos

2 His rating in the list of the most popular YouTubers

3 The number of followers he has on YouTube.

4 The number of followers he has on the Slomozovo channel

5 The number of followers Zoe has

4 This time, students practise inferring meaning from context by matching the definitions to vocabulary in the article. Encourage them to look for clues in the sentences.

Answers

1

coaching

2 released

3 platform

4

branching out

5 comedy

6 maverick

5

TAKEAWAY LANGUAGE

Students make

phrases and describe things they do ‘just for the fun of it’. Get their ideas in feedback.

6

THINK
THINK

Students discuss their ideas in

pairs and also come up with other new developments and things that have changed dramatically. You could also teach students the phrase game changer (= someone or something that changes a situation dramatically).

7

Students work in pairs to tell each other about one of the topics. Alternatively, make the activity into a game. Students insert a few incorrect facts into the conversation. Their partner has to listen and correct them (eg ‘Chris started making videos when he was 16. It was just when YouTube started in 2004

and

‘No! It wasn’t 2004! YouTube started in

2005.’).

 

8

Students cover the article and try to remember the answers to the questions. They then

Students cover the article and try to remember the answers to the questions. They then read again to check the answers.

to the questions. They then read again to check the answers. Background note Girl Online is

Background note Girl Online is the debut novel by English author and internet celebrity Zoe Sugg, released on 25 November, 2014, through Penguin Books. It is a romance and drama novel about a 16-year-old anonymous blogger and what happens when her blog goes viral. The novel is a New York Times

Best Seller in the Young Adult category. The book was the fastest-selling book of 2014 and it also broke the record for highest first-week sales for a debut author since records began. The novel has received positive reviews overall, though it has been criticised after reports suggested that the novel was actually ghost-written by the young-adult novelist Siobhan Curham.

EXPLORE ONLINE Students search for the story about Zoe’s book Girl Online and find out more. Get their ideas and opinions about the controversy afterwards.

Tip: In mixed-ability classes, it’s tempting to call on stronger students to answer and model language, but this can be counter-productive and lead to a lack of motivation for weaker students. Try to get voluntary responses if possible so that quiet and shy students aren’t put on the spot. Alternatively, take the time to walk around and monitor carefully. If you see that one of the weaker students has the correct answer, make a mental note of it and call on them in feedback. That way, when they give the correct answer, you can praise them and help build their confidence, which will encourage them to volunteer answers more in future.

Grammar

would and used to

9

SEARCH AND THINK

Students underline

examples in the text and discuss with a partner.

Answers

He and his friend Tom used to upload his videos onto this new platform. They would watch every video that he uploaded He would just talk to the camera about how he was feeling. That’s what YouTube vlogging used to be like. We all used to help each other. We would make our videos just for the fun of it. In the early days, groups of YouTubers and their fans used to get together and have fun.

and their fans used to get together and have fun. 10 Students read the examples and

10 Students read the examples and work out the difference between used to and would. Check their ideas in feedback.

MA Write example sentences on the board with time lines to make things clear and quickly check students understand. It’s also useful to show negative sentences, as these don’t have a final d, which is hard to detect in pronunciation (eg They didn’t use to make videos for money). Practise pronunciation with students so they notice and repeat the weak to in used to /juːs tə/ and the subject pronoun and would contraction (we’d).

and the subject pronoun and would contraction ( we’d ). Extra idea: Contrast the pronunciation and

Extra idea: Contrast the pronunciation and meaning of used to in sentences like these:

She used to go the cinema every weekend. /juːs tə/ Coconut shells can be used to make the sound of horse’s hooves. /juːzd tə/

Tip: Remember that students may be confused by this use of would. They’ve used it before to make polite requests

(eg I would like

conditional sentences to describe unlikely and hypothetical future events. Draw

a time line and highlight other clues in the surrounding content, such as past tense verbs and time expressions, to help them.

Chris and his friend Tom used to upload his videos onto this new platform.

) or with second

2005

now

• When is the sentence about? (the past)

past

XXXXXXX

future

past

What part of the sentence shows it is past? (used to)

Did Chris upload videos just once or many times? (many times)

Does Chris still upload videos in the same way? (no)

We would make our videos just for the fun of it.

XXXXXXX

2005

now

future

When is the sentence about? (the past)

What part of the sentence shows it is past? (would)

Did this happen just once or many times? (many times)

Do they still make their videos just for the fun of it? (no)

When do we use ‘used to’ and ‘would’? (to describe habits in the past that don’t happen or don’t happen so much any more)

Extra ideas: To introduce the topic, find pictures on the internet that compare life in the present and past. Show pictures of people looking at social networking sites on smartphones and computers and also

show children in the past playing outside, camping, walking in the countryside and reading books. Encourage students to talk about which was better and give reasons for their ideas and opinions. Tell students a story about when you were young, then ask them to write a short description (about 150 words) about the things they used to do. Ask students to hand them in. Choose one statement from each student and make a ‘Find someone

who

’ activity and hand it out. Tell

students to walk around the room and find people who used to do these things. When they find the person, the student signs their name next to the statement. This is a really learner-centred and personalised activity, as the ideas and content come from students.

11 Students remember things about their childhood. Give them time to make notes on each topic. Model the activity with ideas from your own experience.

12 Students work in pairs to tell each other about their childhood using used to and would. Encourage them to ask and answer questions naturally rather than just taking turns to speak (eg ‘Did you go on holiday much?’ ‘Yeah, we used to go about two or three times a year.’ ‘Where?’ ‘We would go to my grandparents’ cottage every summer.’).

Write Both of us used to / would

Neither of us would / used to

and encourage them to tell the rest of the class about differences and similarities they found.

and on the board

Vocabulary

Statistics

13 Elicit how to say the numbers, then practise and repeat together.

Answers

oh point three / zero point three / nought point three / point three three three point three thirty three hundred three hundred and nine three hundred and twenty-six three thousand three thousand five hundred three thousand five hundred and nine three million five hundred thousand

14 Students match the words and figures, then compare answers in pairs.

Answers

1 a quarter

2 a third

3 a half

4 two-thirds

5 three-quarters

6 four-fifths

7 thirty-three and a quarter per cent / thirty-three point two five percent

15 Students complete the sentences with figures (fractions or percentages). They should just guess, as there aren’t any definite answers. They then compare their ideas with a partner.

Extra idea: Students could try and find the correct answers online and see how close their guesses were.

Speaking and writing

16

VIDEO OPTION

Students think nostalgically

about the things they used to do when they were young and create a vlog with their smartphones or tablets. Encourage them to use used to and would. They can either upload their videos or walk around the room and share with each other. Get feedback and vote for the most interesting reminiscences.

Lesson 3 I’m going to be a

star. pp18–19

Aims

The focus of this lesson is reported speech to describe conversations in the past. Students also learn about different jobs and the kind of activities they do on a daily basis. The grammar is reviewed in a natural context when they interview each other about their jobs and share information with other students.

You first!

Students look at the picture of a restaurant and discuss the questions together. Elicit their ideas and experiences in feedback.

Listening 1

1

GUESS
GUESS

Students look at the picture and

guess the story in pairs. Check their ideas in feedback.

You could also explain that many famous movie stars did low-paid jobs to get by when they first moved to Hollywood. Brad Pitt famously worked in a restaurant, was a swimming-pool attendant and handed out flyers and adverts dressed in a chicken outfit! Many ‘wannabe’ actors never make it and survive on low-paid jobs.

2

2 1.9 Students listen to the conversation and

1.9

Students listen to the conversation and

check if their predictions were correct.

Answer

Dev gets a phone call telling him he has the lead part in a movie, so he quits his job.

Transcript

I don’t think I’ll ever get any work in this town. Oh, come on. I’m sure your time will come one day. No. I’ll spend my whole life waiting tables in restaurants like this. [phone rings] Hang on … Hey, it’s Melanie Ford. Melanie Ford? The casting director for that movie I told you about. emel Wow! Yes, remember I went for an audition. Yes, but you said … [to Emel] Ssshh. [Speaking on the phone] Hello. Dev Gupta here. [to Emel] She says they want me for the part! The lead part! Wow, that’s amazing! [Speaking on the phone] That’s great, Melanie. Can I call you Melanie? OK, Melanie. Thanks. I’ll be there. [to Emel] She says the filming starts in three weeks. She says my co-star is going to be someone really, really famous. [Speaking on the phone] But you can’t tell me who? It will? Oh wow! [to Emel] She says this will be my big break. [Speaking on the phone] Oh, OK. Yeah. Right. [to Emel] She says I can’t tell my friends about it for a few days. So why are you telling me? [Speaking on the phone] Yes, yes, OK. Yes. Thanks for calling. [to Emel] Wow, wow! I’m going to be famous. manager Dev! Stop talking on your phone and do some work. There are customers waiting. You know what? Too bad! I quit! I quit! Dev! Don’t be so stupid. I quit, OK? I’m going to be a star.

dev

emel

dev

emel

dev

dev

emel

dev

emel

dev

emel

dev

dev

emel

dev

3 Students choose five of the statements. They’ll have to read them all and consider if they can answer them in order to do this. They then listen and decide if their chosen statements are true, false or if there’s not enough information in the recording for them to say. They should correct the false statements.

MA Stronger students can choose more than five statements.

Answers

1 False (He doesn’t like it.)

2 Don’t know

3 True

4 Don’t know

5 Don’t know

6 False (She’s a casting director.)

7 False (He gets very excited, tells Emel all about it and quits his job.)

8 True

9 Don’t know (although Emel’s reaction implies that he might)

4 Students discuss together; check their opinions in feedback. Encourage them to use modal verbs to make predictions (eg He might regret

it

He’ll probably get the job

).

Answer

He means that he’s leaving his job right then without giving notice.

Grammar 1

Reporting what people say

5

Students answer the questions in pairs. Check their answers and highlight the differences in reported speech.

6

6 1.10 Students listen and write what Melanie

1.10

Students listen and write what Melanie

actually said. Play and pause the recording so they have time to write; they then compare answers with a partner.

time to write; they then compare answers with a partner. Transcript 1 She says the filming
time to write; they then compare answers with a partner. Transcript 1 She says the filming

Transcript

1 She says the filming starts in three weeks.

2 She says my co-star is going to be someone really, really famous.

3 She says this will be my big break.

4 She says I can’t tell my friends about it for a few days.

Take a break

Allow students to just wiggle their toes in their shoes, as some students may feel uncomfortable taking their shoes off. If any students play the piano or keyboard, encourage them to play an imaginary tune. Can anyone guess what they’re playing?!

Listening 2

7

Can anyone guess what they’re playing?! Listening 2 7 1.11 Students guess if Dev got the

1.11 Students guess if Dev got the part,

then listen and check if their predictions were

correct.

Answer

He didn’t get the part because the director thought he was too short.

Transcript

emel

Hi, Dev.

dev

Hello.

emel

You said you wanted to see me.

dev

Yeah.

emel

Well, here I am. You could look pleased

dev

to see me. You haven’t called for ages. Sorry. It’s just …

emel

What’s the matter? You’re going to be a

dev

film star. Not.

emel

Not?

dev

She said they wanted me for the part.

emel

I know.

dev

She said the filming started in three

emel

weeks. Yes, and that was four weeks ago. So,

dev

has it started? She said my co-star was going to be

emel

really famous. So who is it? Go on, Dev, tell me.

8

dev

She said it would be my big break.

emel

Shall we take a selfie?

dev

She said I couldn’t tell my friends about it

emel

for a few days. Ha-ha! You told me, didn’t you!

dev

Yes.

emel

Oh, for goodness sake, Dev, what’s got

dev