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Ruth Jimack

with Jane Revell and Jeremy Harmer

Ruth Jimack with Jane Revell and Jeremy Harmer upper-intermediate Teacher’s Guide

upper-intermediate

Ruth Jimack with Jane Revell and Jeremy Harmer upper-intermediate Teacher’s Guide

Teacher’s Guide

Contents

Jetstream upper-intermediate Student’s Book contents

3

Introduction Letter to you, the teacher

7

Jetstream upper-intermediate components

8

Jetstream approach – a summary

9

Unit overview

12

Unit notes Unit 1

25

Unit 2

42

Units 1&2 Review

62

Writing skills: Module 1

66

Unit 3

68

Unit 4

85

Units 3&4 Review

100

Writing skills: Module 2

102

Unit 5

104

Unit 6

123

Units 5&6 Review

140

Writing skills: Module 3

144

Unit 7

146

Unit 8

164

Units 7&8 Review

178

Writing skills: Module 4

181

Unit 9

183

Unit 10

197

Units 9&10 Review

212

Writing skills: Module 5

214

Unit 11

216

Unit 12

232

Units 11&12 Review

247

Writing skills: Module 6

250

Tasks Teacher’s notes

252

Unit 1

255

Unit 2

255

Unit 3

256

Unit 4

256

Unit 5

257

Unit 6

257

Unit 7

258

Unit 8

258

Unit 9

259

Unit 10

259

Unit 11

260

Unit 12

260

Technique banks Using the video

261

Using memory games

262

Working with mixed-ability classes

263

Ensuring learner autonomy and using technology

263

CONTENTS

Jetstream upper-intermediate

   

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

UNIT 1

INTRODUCTION

     

Talking about the meaning of names.

Beginnings

LESSON 1

Collocations

Time and tense review 1:

Reading: The Angulo Family

Talking about the concept of ‘home’ Writing an essay on the concept of ‘home’

page 7

Breaking free

present simple, present continuous, present perfect, past simple, past continuous

LESSON 2 How (not) to learn a language

keep

Time and tense review 2:

Reading 1: The enigma of language

the sound /ɔː/ Listening: a conversation about The Jungle Book Reading 2: Rudyard Kipling

P
P

Talking about language acquisition and the best ways of learning a

language Writing a story about a childhood event

past simple, past perfect, present perfect simple, present perfect continuous

LESSON 3

Emotions

Time and tense review 3:

Listening: a radio programme about music and life

Talking about the future Talking about music that has meant a lot to you in your life

Life soundtrack

going to, will future, present continuous for future, present simple for future, future perfect, future continuous

EVERYDAY ENGLISH 6

Expressing disappointment and joy

 
P
P

the different meanings of you know

   

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

UNIT 2

INTRODUCTION

Hobbies and

   

Talking about different learning styles

Come to your senses!

activities

         
 

LESSON 1

Toys

Relative clauses

Talking about different toys and how they affect learning Describing childhood toys Writing an opinion essay

page 17

Hands on!

Manual activities

LESSON 2 Paint the town red!

Expressions with

Hedging: making cautious statements

Listening: a conversation about colour associations Reading: Colour and how it affects us

Talking about two paintings Talking about colours and how they affect people Giving a presentation on colour

colours

 
P
P

/r/ sound

 

LESSON 3

Music

 

Listening 1: vox pops about music preferences Listening 2: a radio interview about ‘car-aoke’ Reading: poem The Sound Collector

Talking about different music styles and the music you listen to Talking about sounds you like Writing a poem about sounds

Sounds interesting?

Sounds

Verb patterns 1: cause and effect

EVERYDAY ENGLISH

Talking about advantages and disadvantages

 
P
P

changing meaning through intonation

REVIEW Units 1&2 page 27; Aspects of culture: Cat cafés and other ideas

   

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

UNIT 3

INTRODUCTION

Collocations with

   

Talking about languages

Watch your

language

language!

         
 

LESSON 1

Loan words lend, borrow, loan Roots of English

Comparison: quite a lot more, X times as many, the most, by a long way

 

Comparing statistics of world languages

page 29

Worldwide words!

P
P

plurals with the sound /ʤɪz/

 

Expressions with

Modal verbs

Reading: People, curb your enthusiasm Listening: a talk by a life coach on limiting language

Thinking about how often we use the word love Writing a report Analysing the poem Chivvy Talking about how adults and children communicate

LESSON 2 Say what you mean!

can’t

LESSON 3

 

Cleft sentences

Reading: Popular favourite words

Talking about the most beautiful words in English Writing a story about words Conducting a survey about words Writing a report

Favourite words

EVERYDAY ENGLISH 6

Expressing preferences

 
P
P

using intonation to convey preferences

 
   

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

UNIT 4

INTRODUCTION

Everyday phrases from war and boxing

 

Listening: a museum audio commentary

 

Conflict and

resolution

   
         
 

LESSON 1

 

Adverbs and adverb phrases

Reading: extract from War Horse

Talking about war memorials Giving a presentation about a national event

page 39

Remembering war

LESSON 2

Hearing and listening About war

Gerunds and

Reading 1: extracts from Dispatches Reading 2: No place for a lady

Acting out an interview Writing a journalist’s report of a war or battle

War stories

participles

 
P
P

diphthongs /eɪ/, /aɪ/, /əʊ/

Writing an essay about war

LESSON 3 It’s not fair!

Arguments

Future in the past

Listening: a conversation between school boys and a teacher Reading: West-Eastern Divan Orchestra

Writing a blog post about conflict resolution

EVERYDAY ENGLISH

Strengthening opinions with examples and adverbs

 
P
P

sentence stress and intonation

 

REVIEW Units 3&4 page 49; Aspects of culture: Words that are difficult to translate

   

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

UNIT 5

INTRODUCTION

Fiction genres

   

Discussing opening lines of books Talking about books you have read

Telling tales

page 51

LESSON 1 Once upon a time …

 

Narrative tenses

Listening 1: opening lines and a summary of a story Listening 2: the end of a traditional story

Talking about the seven basic plots of stories Writing a well-known story in your own words

LESSON 2 Responses to reading

Opinions

somewhere,

Reading 1: extract from Stephen King thriller Under the Dome Listening: readers’ opinions of Under the Dome word stress on positive and negative opinions Reading 2: review of Under the Dome

P
P

Writing and presenting a commentary for a video trailer Group story-telling Writing a book review

everything, etc

 

LESSON 3 How to write – and how not to!

 

’d = had and would

Listening 1: a conversation about the rules of writing Reading: extract from The Maltese Cat Listening 2: information about writing, speaking and editing

Talking about writing, speaking and editing Writing a bad beginning to a short story

EVERYDAY ENGLISH 6

Agreeing; Politely disagreeing stress and intonation in polite disagreements

P
P
 
   

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

UNIT 6 The nature of sport

Introduction

Sports and activities

 

Listening: sports commentaries

Defining the idea of ‘sport’

Lesson 1 Two by two

Ways of liking and not liking

Articles

Reading: The boat race

Researching information about a sporting event Writing a description of a sporting event

page 61

 

Hobbies and activities

Verb patterns 2:

Reading 1: Men in trunks Listening: a review of the film Men who swim Reading 2: A different kind of ball game

Talking about a hobby you do regularly Giving a presentation of an unusual sport Writing a description of an unusual

Lesson 2 Sink or swim?

verb + -ing form, infinitive or that clause

P
P

consonant clusters

sport

Lesson 3 This is fun?

Prepositions and verbs of movement

Phrasal verbs

Reading: Welcome to the world of mud running Listening 1: a conversation about a mud run Listening 2: advice for doing a mud run

Designing a mud run course Writing an online press announcement for a mud run

EVERYDAY ENGLISH

Expressing views

 
P
P

changing sentence stress to change meaning

 

REVIEW Units 5&6 page 71; Aspects of culture: National sports

   

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

UNIT 7

INTRODUCTION

Actions associated with heroes and villains

   

Acting out favourite lines from films

Heroes and

villains

page 73

LESSON 1 What makes a good baddie?

Adjectives to describe villains

Reporting verbs and their patterns

Reading: How jokey is the Joker these days? Listening: a talk about Catwoman

Writing about your favourite villain Giving a presentation of your favourite villain

LESSON 2

Adjectives to describe heroines Nouns with more than one meaning

would and used to Modal verbs:

Reading 1: A potted history of women in Hollywood Reading 2: a review of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Listening: an interview with a biographer of Stieg Larsson

Writing a paragraph about men or women in films Talking about a present that had a great influence on you Writing and presenting a video clip about your favourite character as a child

Homemaker or

 

troublemaker?

speculating about

 

the past

LESSON 3 Unsung heroes and heroines

   

Reading: summary of The Motorcycle Diaries Listening 1: a conversation about The Motorcycle Diaries changing syllable stress in nouns and adjectives Listening 2: a conversation about Harriet Tubman

P
P

Talking about different biopics and what they have in common Writing a script for an event in a biopic

EVERYDAY ENGLISH 6

Making confident and tentative statements

 
P
P

American v British English pronunciation; changing stress patterns on verbs and nouns

   

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

UNIT 8 This land is my land

INTRODUCTION

Migration

 

Reading: descriptions of prominent Americans Listening: four short biographies

Talking about the population of your country Investigating your family tree

page 83

LESSON 1 We are one

How we walk

Reason and result clauses

Reading: This land is your land

Writing about a big concert Writing a verse for a song about your country

LESSON 2

Collocations

Purpose clauses

Reading 1: Opening doors or building fences? Reading 2: A long way from home

Acting out a conversation with an immigrant Debating for or against the motion that immigration does more harm than good

A

controversial issue?

LESSON 3 The modern city

How countries are organised

Contrasting ideas

Listening: people talking about their city word stress in longer words

P
P

Talking about citizenship classes

EVERYDAY ENGLISH

Giving a presentation pausing for punctuation

P
P
 

REVIEW Units 7&8 page 93; Aspects of culture: Folk heroes

   

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

UNIT 9 Getting away from it all

INTRODUCTION

     

Talking about isolated places

LESSON 1 The call of the wild

 

Passives 1 – tenses

Reading: two descriptions of people living in remote places

Writing an email in reply to an online ad Finding out about earthships

page 95

LESSON 2 The best job in the world?

Requirements for

Tag questions Passives 2 – modal verbs

Listening: an interview for an unusual job Reading: The best job in the

Talking about an unusual job description Creating a video application for a job Talking about your ideal landscape Writing a tweet about your ideal landscape

a job

Geographical features

 
P
P

vowel sounds

 

world?

LESSON 3

The planets

 

Listening 1: vox pops about going to Mars Listening 2: people giving reasons for not wanting to go to Mars Reading: I promised to love her, no matter what

 

A

single to Mars!

Writing a description of a planet Giving a presentation of a planet

EVERYDAY ENGLISH 6

Asking for and giving permission

 
P
P

intonation in polite requests

   

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

UNIT 10

INTRODUCTION

Water

   

Finding out about clever environmental solutions

The environment

Crossings

Man-made things

 

page 105

LESSON 1 A tale of two bridges

Bridge

It is + adjective / noun + to

Reading: Blowing up bridges isn’t easy!

Acting out a public meeting to discuss a new airport

LESSON 2

Wet and dry

Sequencing events Modifying adjectives showing degrees of enthusiasm using quite

P
P

Reading: Three environmental pioneers Listening: a conversation about collecting water from the air

Giving a talk about drought prevention and problems Writing an essay on drought and its problems

Environmental pioneers

LESSON 3

Waste

just

Listening: a conversation about unusual ways of improving the environment

Talking about the advantages and disadvantages of recycling Writing an essay on the truth about recycling

Doomed?

EVERYDAY ENGLISH

Suggesting, agreeing and refusing

 
P
P

changing intonation for refusing or agreeing

REVIEW Units 9&10 page 115; Aspects of culture: Celebrating the seasons

   

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

UNIT 11

INTRODUCTION

The seven ages of man

 

Mini-story Part 1

 

Getting older

page 117

LESSON 1 Will it be too late?

Success

Zero and first conditionals

Reading: Have you missed the boat? Mini-story Part 2

Acting out an interview for a local paper

LESSON 2

Verbs for thinking contrasting /s/ and /ɵ/ sounds

P
P

Second conditional

Reading 1: Reach for the sky Mini-story Part 3 Reading 2: extract from The One Hundred Year Old Man who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared Mini-story Part 4

Thinking of ideas for a project to help children Writing a letter to your local government Talking about the idea of escaping from real life

Changing lives

Third conditional

LESSON 3 Life is short

 

wish / if only Mixed conditionals

Listening 1: If I had my life over Listening 2: people talking about things they wish they had done differently in their 20s Mini-story Part 5

Deciding what five things you have to do before you die Writing a description of something you’d really like to do

EVERYDAY ENGLISH 6

Wishing someone well

P
P

intonation used when making a list

 
   

VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR

READING AND LISTENING

SPEAKING AND WRITING

UNIT 12

INTRODUCTION

Collecting money

 

Listening: raising money for charity

Choosing a charity you’d work for or raise money for

Doing things

together

LESSON 1 All together now!

 

Review 1: conditionals and cleft sentences Review 2: reported speech

Reading: descriptions of two different flash mobs Listening: a conversation about flash mobs

Talking about organising a flash mob performance Writing an announcement for a flash mob performance

page 127

Surprise

LESSON 2 Can you help me?

Collocations

 

Reading 1: Want financial help? Ask your friends! Reading 2: A woman and a donkey

Giving a talk about a personal project Writing about crowdfunding Thinking of ideas to celebrate a country Writing an essay called Celebrating my country

The countryside

Review 3: verb tenses and forms

LESSON 3 The great chilli cook-off

 

Review 4: questions stress and intonation in questions

P
P

Reading: For the love of chillies Listening: a meeting of contestants for a chilli cook-off

Acting out a meeting Creating and taking part in a quiz about Jetstream upper-intermediate

EVERYDAY ENGLISH

Asking for information, clarification and confirmation

 
P
P

making statements into questions

REVIEW Units 11&12 page 137; Aspects of culture: Respect for older people

Pages 139 – 151 Pages 152 – 163 Pages 164 – 175

Transcripts Writing skills Grammar reference

Letter to you, the teacher

Hello – and a big welcome to Jetstream upper- intermediate, the course we’ve written to help your students learn English (and improve what they already know). We’ve used engaging and stimulating topics and activities so that, we believe, students will study successfully and enjoyably.

Our intention has been to blend the familiar (activities and exercises with which teachers and students feel comfortable) with some newer, different features which are intended to add extra depth and interest to the learning experience, for example:

Jetstream is thought-provoking. It gets students to think in a variety of different ways, not only about ideas, but also about the language itself;

• Because we live in a connected digital society, Jetstream often invites students to venture beyond the Student’s Book itself (if they can) and bring what they’ve found and enjoyed back to the classroom;

Jetstream presents a wide variety of people, cultural settings and topics – because learning how to communicate also means learning about the world we all live in;

• Above all, Jetstream encourages students to use the language they’re learning in a grown-up way that fits with our increasingly interconnected world.

The thinking behind Jetstream

Underlying everything in Jetstream are a number of principles that have guided us during the writing process. We believe:

• that what students bring to the learning experience (and the Student’s Book) is as important as what’s between the covers. That’s why students are often asked for their input, and to share (if they want) their stories, thoughts, reactions and opinions;

• that providing a range of stimulating topics – and, crucially, a repertoire of appropriately challenging activities – is the key to successful student involvement, and, therefore, learning;

• in providing students with a range of the most appropriate and useful vocabulary at this level – and offering them different ways of meeting, learning and practising that vocabulary;

• that grammar is important (of course!) and that students need to interact with it in enquiring and creative ways;

• in providing a range of stimulating and appropriate practice and production activities which bolster students’ knowledge whilst at the same time giving scope for creativity and experimentation.

The Teacher’s Guide

As teachers ourselves, we know how busy and demanding a teacher’s life can be. That’s why Jetstream comes with a Teacher’s Guide which takes you through each lesson, step by step. There’s a wealth of support online, too, including extra material and practice tests. However – and this is important to stress – you don’t have to use any of this if you don’t feel like it. It’s there in case you want it and find it useful, that’s all. But if you’re happy to ‘do your own thing’, that’s wonderful too. We believe that Jetstream allows you considerable flexibility if that’s what you’re after!

So this is Jetstream: a course designed to provide students with a rich and rewarding learning experience; a course which we believe is extremely enjoyable to teach with.

Have a good time and good luck!

Jane Revell and Jeremy Harmer

7

Jetstream upper-intermediate components

For the student:

Student’s Book

The Student’s Book contains 12 units, each consisting of an introductory page plus three lessons and an Everyday English section at the end.

It also contains the following:

• a two-page Review unit after every two units

• a comprehensive grammar reference section

• complete transcripts for the audio

• a comprehensive writing reference section.

Workbook with audio

The Workbook contains 12 units of six pages – three pages covering the Grammar, Vocabulary and Listening from the lessons in the Student’s Book, a double-page spread with a Reading section, and one page for Vocabulary plus and Everyday English.

It also contains the following:

• a Review quiz after every two units

• a Check your progress test after every two units

• a ‘do-it-yourself’ dictionary listing the key vocabulary (with phonetics) for each unit and space for students to write their translations or definitions.

E-zone

The e-zone is an online resource for students and teachers containing:

• the video for all the Everyday English pages

• a cloud book – an interactive version of the Student’s Book, including all video and audio

• cyber homework – interactive activities covering grammar, vocabulary, reading, listening and dialogues. They’re assigned by the teacher in a virtual classroom and have automatic feedback. (They can also be used in self-study mode – see below.)

• mp3 audio files

• online training – pronunciation exercises, exam practice (Cambridge FCE, TOEFL, IELTS and TOEIC) and cyber homework in self-study mode (extra practice)

• CLIL projects.

For more information on the e-zone, see page 11.

For the teacher:

Teacher’s Guide with class audio CDs

The Teacher’s Guide contains full teaching notes for each unit, including all transcripts, keys and useful background and cultural information, plus extra ideas for early finishers and mixed-ability suggestions. Three class audio CDs contain all the listening material for the Student’s Book. The Teacher’s Guide also contains the following extra material:

• one task per unit with accompanying teaching notes

• three ‘technique banks’ giving ideas in the following areas:

Using the video Using memory games Working with mixed-ability classes

Interactive book for whiteboards DVD-ROM

E-zone

Full access to the students’ area plus:

• the video for all Everyday English pages

• mp3 audio files

• downloadable Teacher’s Guide with answer keys

• Helbling placement test

• Testbuilder containing 12 unit tests covering grammar, vocabulary, functions and the four skills and six progress tests.

Jetstream approach – a summary

Motivation

Research shows that motivation is key to learning; to learn, students need to be interested! Jetstream has been written to be highly motivating for students, and includes the following:

• interesting and relevant topics

• stimulating and often thought-provoking photos

• lots of personalisation activities where students are encouraged to talk about themselves

• communicative activities which give students a real purpose for completing a task

• highly motivating tasks throughout the Student’s Book, and also a bank of photocopiable tasks in the Teacher’s Guide

• at least one Song / Poem / Video / Music / Film Link in every unit which encourages students to use their English in a fun and less formal way

Everyday English pages at the end of every unit which provide immediately useful conversations practising different functions, including short video clips

• plenty of games and game-like activities.

Grammar

Grammar is an important element in Jetstream. It’s dealt with in the following way:

• It’s introduced gradually – each of the three main lessons in a unit usually has a grammar point. This enables the grammar to be introduced step-by-step, practised and easily absorbed.

• It’s revised in the Review units that occur after every two units.

• The grammar for a lesson is introduced in context. The grammar form is highlighted and students are given activities where they deduce the form and meaning.

• Activities are realistic and meaningful.

• A clear and straightforward grammar reference section at the end of the Student’s Book explains each lesson’s grammar.

Vocabulary

It’s increasingly recognised that vocabulary is just as important as – or perhaps even more important than – grammar when learning a language. Jetstream has a high vocabulary input so that students can understand, speak, read and write with ease. Stimulating and unusual pictures and motivating activities ensure students absorb the vocabulary easily, and there’s plenty of practice. Most of the three main lessons in each Jetstream unit have a vocabulary component. In addition, there’s a section focusing on phrasal verbs in many of the Review units which revises common phrasal verbs in context.

Reading

The main reading focus in Jetstream is usually in Lesson 2 of each unit, but there are often other shorter reading texts elsewhere. There’s a variety of high-interest text types – real- life stories, articles, quizzes, blogs, etc. Where possible, texts are based on real people, places and events.

• Activities develop students’ ability to scan a text for its general meaning and guess meaning from context.

• Texts, whether in the form of human-interest articles or fictional stories, are absorbing and memorable and a key way of learning and practising language.

Other sections that provide very short, high- interest texts for additional reading comprehension relevant to the topic are:

Song / Poem / Video / Music / Film Link

Did you know?

The Aspects of culture section in the Review units also provides additional reading matter. It offers interesting and practical information on different cultures and should lead to stimulating discussions.

Writing

Regular short Writing sections in the Student’s Book provide guided writing practice through a variety of tasks. The core writing course, however, is to be found at the back of the book, which includes two full pages of guided writing tasks per module. In this writing development course, students cover the following areas:

• an essay

• a formal letter or email

• a report

• a review

• an informal email

• an article giving advice.

There are reminders of useful expressions and other language features: linking words, indirect questions, etc. Check it! sections allow students to review and improve their work.

Listening

The main listening focus in Jetstream is usually in Lesson 3 of each unit, but there are often short listening activities elsewhere. The Everyday English page provides further listening practice in the form of functional dialogues. To train students in useful and relevant listening skills, the listening texts reflect a variety of real-life situations, including conversations, interviews, talks, reports and radio programmes. The transcripts of the listening texts can be found at the back of the Student’s Book for students’ reference and are also reproduced with the relevant activity notes in the Teacher’s Guide.

Speaking

For many learners of English, speaking is the most important language skill. There are speaking activities at all stages of a lesson in Jetstream:

• At this level, activities are carefully designed so that students can express themselves freely without making a lot of mistakes.

• The main speaking section of a lesson generally has longer speaking activities than earlier in the lesson.

• The photos, cartoons, listening and reading texts all provide stimulating platforms for speaking activities.

You first! at the start of some lessons uses a short question to get students engaged with the lesson topic immediately.

Everybody up! sections encourage students to stand up and move around the class, interacting with each other to find out information.

• The Link and Did you know? sections in the main units, and the Aspects of culture sections in the Review units, also provide platforms for stimulating discussions.

• The photocopiable tasks in the Teacher’s Guide provide further communicative practice.

Pronunciation

Short pronunciation activities in one lesson of each unit and in the Everyday English sections provide clear practice of some common areas, including:

• specific sounds

• word and sentence stress

• intonation.

In addition, students are encouraged to listen to and repeat the main vocabulary groups throughout the book.

Consolidation and review

Consolidation of recently acquired language and regular revision are crucial to learning. After every two units, there’s a Review unit that revises key language from these units. Each Review unit contextualises the language through reading and sometimes listening texts. There are also grammar exercises and writing and speaking tasks. The Workbook provides further practice, testing and extension of the language in a unit. In addition, after every two units in the Workbook, there’s a Review quiz. This is followed by a Check your progress test.

Online resources – available on e-zone

Online resources – available on e-zone HELBLING Placement Test Designed to give students and teachers of

HELBLING Placement Test Designed to give students and teachers of English a quick way of assessing the level of a student’s knowledge of English grammar and usage.

Online training

Resources and interactive activities for individual student access. Includes:

• exam practice

• pronunciation

• all exercises from the cyber homework in self-study mode.

Cloud book An interactive version of the Student’s Book and Workbook, where students can access all audio and video content at the click of a mouse or touch of a screen. Students can complete the activities, check their results and add their own notes.

the activities, check their results and add their own notes. Cyber homework Interactive activities assigned to
the activities, check their results and add their own notes. Cyber homework Interactive activities assigned to
the activities, check their results and add their own notes. Cyber homework Interactive activities assigned to

Cyber homework Interactive activities assigned to students by their teacher within an online virtual classroom. Results and feedback are automatically given when the deadline fixed by the teacher has been reached.

when the deadline fixed by the teacher has been reached. Projects Open-ended tasks on both cultural

Projects Open-ended tasks on both cultural and global themes, where students can embed other resources such as web links or files and share them with the teacher and their class.

How to integrate an LMS (a Learning Management System) into your teaching

Initial assessment

Assessment

System) into your teaching Initial assessment Assessment HELBLING Placement Test > 1 6 2 5 3

HELBLING Placement Test

Initial assessment Assessment HELBLING Placement Test > 1 6 2 5 3 4 > > Lesson
> 1 6 2 5 3 4 > >
>
1
6
2
5
3
4
>
>
Placement Test > 1 6 2 5 3 4 > > Lesson enrichment • Resources •

Lesson enrichment

Test > 1 6 2 5 3 4 > > Lesson enrichment • Resources • Videos

• Resources

• Videos

• Interactive book for whiteboards

• Teacher downloads

Planning

book for whiteboards • Teacher downloads Planning Scope & sequence Teacher’s Guide Exam practice

Scope & sequence Teacher’s Guide

Exam practice

Testbuilder

Class routine

Student’s Book

Workbook

Virtual class and self-study practice

Book Workbook Virtual class and self-study practice • Projects • Online training • Cyber homework •

• Projects

• Online training

• Cyber homework

• Student downloads

Unit overview

Unit overview Look ahead Most of us like to know where we’re going before we set

Look ahead

Most of us like to know where we’re going before we set out! This section is designed to give students a general idea of each unit (or, in the case of Unit 1, the whole book), to draw them in and engage their interest. Giving them the big picture before they embark on the detail really helps motivation.

before they embark on the detail really helps motivation. Video option Students think or find out

Video option

Students think or find out about – and / or take a photo of – something related to the lesson. After writing and / or making notes, they record a short piece to camera using their smartphones or tablets (like a video blog). They can then share their video clip with other students or upload it to a video-sharing site such as YouTube if they want.

Guess

Asking students to ‘guess’ answers before reading or listening to information not only gets them to interact, it also frees them up from having to know the ‘right’ answer and thus inhibiting their response. In addition, it prepares them for the text and gives a valid reason for reading or listening to something – to see if they were right. For this reason, it’s very important not to confirm if students are right or not in their guesses. Just say things like Hmm or That’s interesting or Possibly, etc and let the text provide the answers. These exercises are similar to Predict ones, but involve more guesswork, rather than ideas based on evidence.

involve more guesswork, rather than ideas based on evidence. Search and think These exercises invite students

Search and think

These exercises invite students to look through a text that they’ve recently read or listened to, in order to find particular grammatical structures (or sometimes categories of vocabulary) and think about how they’re used or what they mean, before going on to practise them in further exercises.

Everybody up!

This is a chance for students to move around the classroom and use specific language in a controlled way to get information from other students. This kind of short, intensive practice can be very lively and also very rewarding if students succeed in completing the task using the language resources available to them. In addition, it allows them

to interact with lots of different people. The act of physically getting up and moving around

is also mentally refreshing; being

physically active helps us to learn. Students may naturally find that they engage in longer conversations than the activity requires. If time allows, this is good and enjoyable practice for them. However, it’s a good idea to set a time limit for this type of activity.

a good idea to set a time limit for this type of activity. Did you know?

Did you know?

These are very short, interesting pieces of information related to the theme of the lesson. The section can usually be done at any point in the lesson. The teacher’s notes sometimes suggest ways of exploiting it, but if students want to know more, they can be encouraged to search online.

Link

Each unit contains at least one Link section, featuring a song,

a poem, a piece of music, a film

or a video clip which relates to themes and topics in the lesson. These sections utilise students’ natural interest in these things to motivate them and transfer the topic language to a new context. The tasks give them the opportunity to listen to / read / view the material and then research online to answer some questions or do a short associated activity. They then bring the information back to the class, which should often stimulate lively discussions. There’s a natural mixed-ability element: more competent students will be able to take it further than those who are less competent.

You first! You’ll find a You first! box on the large photos at the beginning

You first!

You’ll find a You first! box on the large photos at the beginning of many of the lessons. It has a triple purpose. Firstly, to engage students and get them saying something immediately. Secondly, to allow students to use what they already know and boost their confidence. And thirdly, to give you an idea of what and how much they already know so that you can target your teaching much more effectively. What if your students don’t respond at all? That’s fine. Now you know. Just move on and start to teach them something.

Memory This symbol represents your brain! Memory is a crucial component in learning anything and
Memory This symbol represents your brain! Memory is a crucial component in learning anything and

Memory

This symbol represents your brain! Memory is a crucial component in learning anything and it’s like a muscle: the more you exercise it, the stronger it’ll be. These simple games ask students to remember a variety of things: vocabulary items, facts from an article and so on. But you can do a lot more activities than the ones suggested here (see page 262). And remember that the more you get students to exercise their memory in English, the more it’ll serve them in other aspects of their life as well.

it’ll serve them in other aspects of their life as well. Explore online This is an

Explore online

This is an opportunity for students to go beyond the page and find out

more about some aspect of the topic:

a sort of mini project. They should

do the research online, make notes and report back, working either alone or in pairs. You may want to set this up in the classroom by suggesting possible websites or just by eliciting suggestions for words and phrases to type into the search engine. As with

the Link feature (see page 14), there’s

a natural mixed-ability element to this section.

there’s a natural mixed-ability element to this section. Think This is used to signal a creative

Think

This is used to signal a creative or critical-thinking exercise. Students are asked to work something out for themselves, give their opinions or comments or use their creativity, rather than find an answer directly on the page. A simple example might be where a text describes a problem at work and students are invited to come up with solutions. Encouraging students to think creatively means they increase their engagement with the material. The increased alertness enhances their learning capacity. With these sections – as indeed with many others – it’s a good idea to give students a chance to look at the material and think about (or even write down) their ideas individually (for say 30 seconds) before they start talking to each other. Some students are quick thinkers and talkers, while others need more time. Giving them ‘thinking time’ evens it out a little.

Take a break Apart from providing tiny practical texts to read, these sections are there

Take a break

Apart from providing tiny practical texts to read, these sections are there to help students unwind from time to time. Why? Because, quite simply, we don’t learn well when we’re stressed; we learn best when we’re relaxed. These little exercises give students the opportunity to switch off for a few moments, in order to recharge their batteries and come back to the task in hand with renewed energy!

If it’s a piece of advice, talk about it with students. If it’s a physical exercise, students can read it and follow the instructions. Do it there and then in the classroom if you can. Then you can use it again and again, whenever it’s useful (see, for example, page 45 of the Student’s Book, where students are asked to imagine themselves in

a relaxing place).

Grammar reference

There’s a useful grammar reference at the back of the Student’s Book. Each main grammar point from the grammar boxes throughout the book has a relevant section in the grammar reference.

the book has a relevant section in the grammar reference. P Pronunciation The pronunciation activities appear
P
P

Pronunciation

The pronunciation activities appear in one lesson of every unit of the Student’s Book, plus the Everyday English section. At upper-intermediate level, there’s work on stress and intonation, as well as sounds, as these can often pose problems for students. All the pronunciation activities are recorded so that students can hear the correct sounds or stress.

Finish it
Finish it

These exercises are personalisation tasks where students complete short sentence stems with their own information or ideas, and then compare with other students (often in an Everybody up! activity).

Predict

Students use different elements (photos, titles, questions, etc) to predict what’s in a text. The idea is to motivate them to engage with the material; to give them a very good reason for reading or listening to see if they were right!

reason for reading or listening to see if they were right! Listening This symbol tells you

Listening

This symbol tells you that there’s recorded material that goes with the activity. This can either be a full listening text or it might be listening to check answers and / or hear the correct pronunciation, as here. Full transcripts are given in the back of the Student’s Book.

Your story Students generally enjoy personalising what they’ve just learnt; these exercises ask them to

Your story

Students generally enjoy personalising what they’ve just learnt; these exercises ask them to think about some aspect of the lesson as it relates to them personally, and then share their ‘story’ with other members of their group.

6 Video The main conversation in the odd- numbered Everyday English sections appears on video,
6 Video The main conversation in the odd- numbered Everyday English sections appears on video,

6 Video

The main conversation in the odd- numbered Everyday English sections appears on video, which provides extra contextualisation for the functional language. (If you don’t have the video or prefer not to use it, then just play the audio version.) See also Using the video on page 261.

Everyday English

This section provides practice in the everyday functional language that students need when interacting with people, such as making suggestions, giving advice, discussing opinions and so on.

Takeaway language

These exercises are optional. They pull out useful everyday expressions from a text or dialogue and present them for students to think about and ‘take away’ and use themselves.

Mini-talk

Students write down their ideas in answer to questions relating to the lesson and then shape them up into a short talk, using digital presentation media where appropriate. They then present their talk to a (small) group of other students.

Review Six Review units revise key language from the preceding two units, using a reading

Review

Six Review units revise key language from the preceding two units, using a reading text as the main presentation.

units revise key language from the preceding two units, using a reading text as the main
Aspects of culture Each of the Review units finishes with an Aspects of culture section.
Aspects of culture Each of the Review units finishes with an Aspects of culture section.

Aspects of culture

Aspects of culture Each of the Review units finishes with an Aspects of culture section. This

Each of the Review units finishes with an Aspects of culture section. This is often an opportunity to reflect on how people do things differently (or not!) in different parts of the world and how we can begin to be sensitive to these differences and act accordingly. There’s usually a short reading text with a task or questions, often leading to a discussion and

a comparison with the students’ own culture(s).

Role-play

Students are given a scenario / roles / questions, often based on

a dialogue they’ve just heard, and

are asked to script a short scene for themselves, which they then act out. The level of support given can be adapted to suit students’ abilities, ranging from allowing them to look at the original text as they work to completely reinventing the conversation off the top of their head.

Phrasal verbs

This section appears in many of the Review units and provides a short text that both revises and extends phrasal verbs that students already know and introduces new ones in context.

A final word

The features new to Jetstream, which occur throughout the units, are informed – in a gentle way – by some of the key principles of Holistic Learning (sometimes called Accelerated Learning*):

1 We learn with our body as well as our mind:

they are connected. Hence the value we attach to bringing more physical activities into the classroom and paying attention to students’ physical well-being.

2 Different learners prefer different kinds of input. Some people learn more with their eyes, some more with their ears and some more with their bodies and movement. We aim to provide a variety of activities to reflect these preferences.

3 What we learn with emotion, we tend to remember best. We hope to engage students’ emotions through the use of stories, songs and games – and making them laugh.

4 Our memory is very powerful … and we can make it work even better. The reason for all the little memory-training games is to give students practice in using their memory, and aid their learning.

5 People know a lot already – more than they think. Good teaching and good material can help to make students aware of what they already know and boost their confidence.

6 People are different. Some people are more outgoing and sociable, while others are more introspective and reflective. The former readily enjoy interacting with others, while the latter often prefer to work on their own. They usually welcome time to think on their own too, before being asked to participate in an activity. As teachers, we need to try to cater for these differences.

*The roots of Accelerated Learning go back to the Bulgarian educator, Georgi Lozanov, who developed something called ‘Suggestopaedia’ in the early 1960s. Helping learners feel comfortable, relaxed and confident meant that they were able to absorb and remember more information more quickly. That’s it in a nutshell!

1

Beginnings

UNIT

FOCUS

GRAMMAR: time and tense reviews (the past, present and future) VOCABULARY: collocations; keep ; emotions FUNCTIONS: expressing disappointment and joy

Introduction p7

Aim

The focus of this lesson is to give students the opportunity to get to know each other and to introduce the unit through the topics of statues, names and origins.

You first!

There are You first! boxes at the beginning of many lessons in the Student’s Book. They have three goals:

firstly, to engage students and get them saying something immediately; secondly, to allow students to use what they already know and boost their confidence; and thirdly, to give you an idea of what they already know so that you can target your teaching much more effectively. Students can say as much or as little as they want. For more information about these exercises, see the Introduction, page 15. For this one, students look quickly at the four photos and establish that all of them show statues of people. Then elicit answers to the You first! question from a selection of students, encouraging other students to say whether they agree or disagree with the suggestions, and why.

1

GUESS
GUESS

When you see

GUESS
GUESS

in front of an

instruction, it means students can talk about what they think the answers are, but they don’t have to know for sure. For more information about these exercises, see the Introduction, page 13. Students talk about the questions in pairs. Compare answers as a class to see if there’s consensus.

2

2 1.2 Play the recording for students to check their

1.2

Play the recording for students to check their

answers to 1. Pause after each section to establish which statue the speaker was talking about (1 D, 2 C, 3 B, 4 A). After the whole recording, students compare answers with a partner. Check as a class. Then have students talk in pairs about which statue they like best and why. You could also have a quick class vote for the most popular statue.

also have a quick class vote for the most popular statue. Transcript We asked four people
also have a quick class vote for the most popular statue. Transcript We asked four people

Transcript

We asked four people to describe their favourite statues – statues that mean something to them.

1 One of my favourite statues of all time – really

– is at Morecambe Bay, a seaside town in

northern England. It’s the figure of a dancing man – one arm and one leg raised. The man

is Eric Morecambe, a British comedian who,

with his partner Ernie Wise, used to have a show on British TV. One night, their show had

27 million viewers – nearly three-fifths of the entire population! Eric and Ernie – as people called them – always used to end their TV show by dancing to a tune called Bring Me Sunshine and that’s why the statue is dancing. Morecambe wasn’t Eric’s real name. He chose

it because that’s where he was from! He was

a keen birdwatcher too, and that’s why the

statue has a pair of binoculars.

2 I love the statue of Juliet in Verona, in Italy. It’s in the garden of Juliet’s house, and people come in their hundreds of thousands to visit

– which is weird, because Juliet wasn’t a real

person at all! She’s a fictional character – Juliet Capulet – from William Shakespeare’s

play Romeo and Juliet, one of the most

famous plays ever written. But even though

she never lived, people write letters to her and

they touch the statue for good luck. Recently,

they had to replace the statue because all that touching damaged the original. As I said, it’s weird, but I love it all the same!

3 I got a huge surprise the other day. I was in Brisbane in Australia, outside the parliament building. And there she was – Queen Elizabeth the Second. A young Queen Elizabeth the Second. It surprised me, because

a lot of people in Australia don’t want her to

be the official head of the state – they want

a republic, a country without a monarchy.

But it’s a great statue, I think, and what I like about it is that the Queen is carrying a purse, and that’s funny. Why? Because in real life,

the Queen never carries money around with

her!

4 I was in Atlanta, Georgia – in the USA – a few months ago, and I went to visit the

tomb of a hero of mine, the civil rights leader Martin Luther King. And right there is a statue known as the Behold Statue. It shows

a typical African naming ceremony, when a

father (or an elder) holds the baby up to the sky and says: ‘Behold the only thing greater than yourself.’ At the bottom of the statue are the words ‘Dedicated to the memory of Dr Martin Luther King Junior for his moral courage and nobility of spirit’. I thought the

whole thing was so moving. I love that statue.

3 Give students a minute to look at the words and phrases and see if they can remember which of the four statues they refer to. Play the recording again;

students check in pairs, taking it in turns to explain how each word or phrase is connected to one of

the statues.

how each word or phrase is connected to one of the statues. Extra idea: Ask additional

Extra idea: Ask additional questions about

the information in the recording to check more

detailed comprehension (eg A Why is the statue called the Behold Statue? B What surprised the speaker about the statue of Queen Elizabeth? What did the speaker think was funny? C Why did the statue have to be replaced recently?

D How popular was the TV comedy show

‘Morecambe and Wise?’ Why is the statue dancing?).

If students seem interested, they could research more information about one of them for homework.

4 This a fun activity which helps students to learn

each other’s names at the beginning of the course.

If students already know each other’s first names,

you

could do this with their surnames, which they

will

probably be less familiar with. Give students a

few minutes to think of a city beginning with each letter of their name, and explain that they should say them in jumbled order. Then ask students in random order to say the cities; the rest of the class has to work out the name. If the class is very large, you could divide students into two or more large groups for this activity.

5 Give students a few minutes to prepare answers to the questions about their given name(s) and their nicknames (if this isn’t embarrassing for them). Encourage them to rehearse how they’re going to say the information in their heads first. During this preparation stage, go round the class monitoring and assisting where needed.

Extra idea: For extra support, present an example to the class first, before they move on to 6:

My name’s Liliana. Well, actually it’s Ana Liliana, but my parents just call me Liliana. Most of my friends shorten it to Lili. I think it means something like ‘the lily flower’. My parents chose it for me because my grandmother had the same name. I’m proud to share my name with her. She’s awesome!

6 Divide the class into groups of about five or six to tell each other about their names.

EXPLORE ONLINE The Explore online exercises give students the opportunity to go beyond the page and find out more about some aspect of the topic for themselves, on their computer, smartphone or other mobile device. The online research can be done individually, or in pairs or groups, either in the classroom or at home. If it’s done at home, you can set it up in the classroom beforehand by suggesting possible websites or by eliciting suggestions for words and phrases to type into the search engine.

Tip: Students often enjoy using their smartphones for online searching, so encourage them to find out information on the internet. If it’s in English, it’s useful extra reading practice; if it’s in their own language, it’s also useful, as it gets them to translate into English.

7

EVERYBODY UP! EVERYBODY UP!

When you see in front of an instruction, it

means that this is a chance for students to move around the classroom and use the language they’ve learnt. This kind of short, intensive practice can be very lively and also very rewarding if students succeed in completing the task using the language resources available to them. For more information about these exercises, see the Introduction, page 14. Students think about the question, then walk

around the room comparing names and reasons with as many other students as they can. After five or ten minutes, round off by eliciting any similarities between names and reasons that students have discovered.

Tip: Set a fixed time limit for this kind of activity. This will encourage students not to waste time. You may want to introduce an agreed signal for indicating the end of walk-around activities that everyone recognises and which avoids raising your voice, since these activities can be noisy, for example switching the lights on and off or raising your hand.

8

LOOK AHEAD

When you see in front of an instruction, it

LOOK AHEAD

means that students can take a quick look through the pages of the unit or book to react to certain items or make predictions. This is a normal part of the reading process and helps to build up anticipation and interest in the lessons that follow. For more information about these exercises, see the Introduction, page 12. Encourage students to flick through the whole book and share their reactions to specific items that catch their eye.

Extra ideas: Write these questions on the board; students compare their answers with a partner:

1 What do you hope you will have achieved by the end of the course?

2 What do you hope it will be like to learn in your group?

3 How do you think you will feel when the course is over? Students write a letter to themselves about their answers to the questions above, put it in a sealed envelope and give it to you to deliver when the course finishes.

Lesson 1 Breaking free pp8–9

Aims

The focus of this lesson is to revise present and past tenses, use collocations with home, and put together a story from shared extracts.

You first!

Students work in groups to compare with each other the main rules their parents imposed when they were children. After a few minutes, encourage the class as a whole to summarise. (Ask: What were the most common rules you’ve talked about? Were there any unusual rules you’ve heard about?) You could also ask if they felt the rules were reasonable or unreasonable.

Reading

GUESS
GUESS

1 Students look at the photo and guess the

answers to the two questions. Elicit answers from a selection of students, but don’t confirm whether the answers are correct or not at this point.

2 Give students about 30 seconds to read text A and find out what is strange about the story.

to read text A and find out what is strange about the story. Extra idea: Students

Extra idea: Students suggest what possible explanations there might be for why Mukunda and his siblings haven’t left the apartment before, and why he wore the mask.

3 Explain that the mystery will be solved by reading the other texts (B–F), but that for now, students are each going to read only one other text. Put them in groups of five and make sure that within each group they each choose a different letter (B–F), corresponding to one of the texts. Pre-teach the term maiden name (= the surname a woman had before she got married and changed it).

Tip: If the number of students doesn’t divide exactly into groups of five (one student per text B–F), you could have fewer in the group but give stronger students two texts each. Alternatively, you could have more in a group and double up weaker students on the same text so that they can help each other.

MA Pair weaker students with stronger ones to help them with the text.

Give students about 30 seconds to read their text, then ask them to tell each other in their groups the key information from what they’ve read. While they’re reporting, walk round and monitor to make sure they’re not simply reading out their text, but conveying the main information as far as possible in their own words. Give assistance at this point only if requested.

When they’ve all reported the contents of their texts, each group works together and uses the combined information to answer the three questions.

Extra idea: Give students five minutes to read the texts they haven’t read, and ask

Extra idea: Give students five minutes to read the texts they haven’t read, and ask additional questions to check comprehension of the whole story. Write the questions on the board while they’re reading:

B How did the filmmaker meet the boys? (She was walking along First Avenue in New York when she saw them walking together. She ran after them.)

C What was the origin of the children’s names? (They are Sanskrit names.) Are any of them in contact with their father? (Only one – Bhagavan)

D Why did the children stay in the apartment almost all the time? (Because their father thought the outside world was dangerous and wanted to protect them.)

E What happened to Mukunda when he left the apartment by himself? (He was arrested because he was wearing a mask.) Why did he initially refuse to speak to anyone? (Because his father had told him not to talk to strangers.)

F What happened to the film about the boys? (It won a prize at a film festival.)

Background note

It’s important to realise that the story is told in

bits, not in a linear fashion (ie one section does

not follow on from another). This isn’t a text broken up into six sections; they’re independent extracts which, when they’re shared, form the basis for the construction of a story in whatever sequence students want. Reading is being used for a different purpose than the usual beginning–middle–end format. It’s one

of the many ways we read, eg when we read about the same story in different newspapers or magazines.

4 Students work in pairs to figure out the meaning of the words and phrases in blue in the texts. Encourage them to deduce the meaning from the context, but allow them to check in a dictionary to confirm their guesses.

Tip: Encouraging students to work out the meaning of words and phrases from context is extremely useful, since it’s a real-life skill which will enable them to read all kinds of texts without necessarily knowing the meaning of vocabulary they’ve not come across before.

the meaning of vocabulary they’ve not come across before. 5 This activity encourages students to compare

5 This activity encourages students to compare their own personal reactions to the Angulo family story with those of their classmates. Students work in pairs and follow the instructions. Give them a few minutes to do the sentence writing, dictating, comparing and rewriting. Then, as a class, elicit sentences from a selection of pairs to see how similar or different they are.

EXPLORE ONLINE This can be done in class if you have internet access, or for homework, with the sharing taking place in the next lesson. You could either let students choose which topic they’d like to research or, to facilitate group sharing in the next lesson, you could share out the topics so that each one is covered by approximately the same number of students.

6

VIDEO OPTION

When you see in front of an instruction, it

VIDEO OPTION

gives students the chance to make a short film on their smartphones using the language and topic they’ve been studying. For more information about these exercises, see the Introduction, page 12. Give students a few minutes in class to brainstorm ideas for movies and characters.

MA Students could do this in pairs and interview each other in the video.

Grammar

the present and the past

1 Students match the tense names and descriptions, then check with a partner.

Time and tense review 1:

then check with a partner. Time and tense review 1: MA Elicit from the class and

MA Elicit from the class and write on the board an example of affirmative, negative and question forms of each of the tenses, with a regular and an irregular verb (eg play, go) for the benefit of weaker students.

2 Address this question to the class as a whole. Then elicit or provide a simple example (eg She goes into the kitchen and sees a mouse. It’s running across the floor to the fridge, etc).

Answer

The present simple and present continuous are also used instead of past tenses to tell stories, jokes and anecdotes and to summarise the plots of films, books or plays.

3 Give students a few minutes to find examples of the tenses in texts A–F, then compare with a partner.

Answers

present

opens, lives, walks, is, goes, walks, do [you] do, make, calls, is, has, says

simple

present

is wearing, is using

continuous

present

has chosen

perfect

past simple

ran, was, ran, looked, talked, asked, said, replied, was, met, was, fell, got, was, had, gave, believed, kept, left, didn’t know, existed, was, earned, lived, had, was, saw, received, arrested, was, stayed, loved, was, interacted, was, started, became, filmed, learnt, won

past

was walking, was scaring

continuous

4 For the competition, give students a fixed time limit, eg five minutes, to write in their notebooks as many sentences as they can about a visit to the cinema, answering the four questions. Explain that they

should use as many past and present verb tenses as possible.

Stop students when the time’s up and tell them to swap their sentences with another student. They should count up the number of (correctly used) instances of past and present tenses, giving a total for each tense and an overall total. Assist if requested to confirm whether a tense is correctly used or not. Then compare scores as a class, both for each tense and for total verb tenses. The winner(s) should read out their accounts to the class.

Vocabulary

Collocations

1 Explain that the same word can fill the gap in each line. Give students a minute to think what it could be.

each line. Give students a minute to think what it could be. MA If students are

MA If students are struggling to find the answer because the sentences are incomplete, encourage them to look at the word(s) immediately before and after each gap. This will help them to identify the collocations.

Once the answer is established, go through the different collocations, checking that students know their use and meanings.

Tip: Encourage students to always write new words and phrases down in their vocabulary books. If they don’t have one, encourage them to get one and look back at new language on a regular basis to help to develop their vocabulary.

2 This checks the grammatical composition of the collocations. Give students a minute to decide in pairs.

the collocations. Give students a minute to decide in pairs. Speaking and writing 1 Give students

Speaking and writing

1 Give students a short time to write down five or more words. Encourage them to think of personal associations with home rather than words from the lesson.

2 Students compare their words with a partner, explain their choices and ask for explanations of their partner’s choices.

3 Still in pairs, tell students to ask, answer and discuss the questions. Monitor pairs, assisting if needed. Then explain that they should use these four questions as the basis for a short essay about their home. Elicit in what order they would use the points, to establish a rough plan, and set the writing of the essay for homework. Suggest an approximate length, eg 100–120 words.

MA You could give weaker students a shorter word length, eg 70–100 words.

Lesson 2 How (not) to learn a language pp10–13

Aims

The focus of this lesson is to revise past tenses and practise phrases using the verb keep. Students also find out about films concerning cases of children brought up in seclusion, explore ideas about language acquisition, and learn about The Jungle Book.

You first!

Students ask and answer the question in small groups. They then compare and find out who speaks the most languages in the class.

Reading and speaking

GUESS
GUESS

1 Explain that the three photos on page

10 are stills from a film. Students work in pairs and discuss what they think the film might be about. Collect feedback from a selection of pairs, but don’t confirm the answer at this point.

2 Give students five minutes to read the article to check their guesses.

five minutes to read the article to check their guesses. Tip: Giving students a time limit

Tip: Giving students a time limit for reading and a simple task encourages them to read quickly for main ideas and not get distracted by unnecessary details and unfamiliar words.

Extra idea: Ask two additional questions:

1 What are the names of the other two films mentioned? (Mockingbird Don’t Sing and The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser)

2 How are all three films connected with

the title of the article? (They are all about people who lived without human contact or language in childhood, and deal with how we learn language.)

language in childhood, and deal with how we learn language.) 3 This symbol shows that this

3 This symbol shows that this is a memory game – the first of many in the book. Memory is an important part of learning anything, and the more we exercise our memory by playing these kinds of game, the better it will be.

Put students in pairs to try to remember the answers to the questions without looking back at the article. To prepare students for question 3, you may need to teach / elicit the meaning of mock to enable them to work out what a mockingbird is. Then they read the article again to check their answers.

is. Then they read the article again to check their answers. Extra idea: Ask additional questions

Extra idea: Ask additional questions about the article to bring out more details on the

questions in 3:

1 When was the boy found? How old was he? (In 1798 when he was ‘a pre-adolescent boy’)

2 Who was the kind individual? (A doctor named Jean Marc Gaspard Itard)

3 When and where was the girl found? (In California in 1970) How old was she? (13 years old) Where had she been kept? (In a single room with no human contact)

4 When and where did this take place? (In Germany in the 19th century) How old was Kaspar when he was found? (17 years old) Where had he been kept? (In a cellar)

5 Where does she live now? (In an adult care home) How good are her language skills? (Not very good – she can use a few words and phrases, but not connective grammar)

6 Who should have helped her? (The state and government agencies)

4 Give students a few minutes to scan through the article to find the words, then check answers in pairs.

5 Students work in pairs to discuss the meaning of the concepts, then check as

5 Students work in pairs to discuss the meaning of the concepts, then check as a class.

discuss the meaning of the concepts, then check as a class. 6 Give students a few

6 Give students a few minutes to find examples in the article, then discuss with a partner why they’re mentioned. Check as a class.

with a partner why they’re mentioned. Check as a class. 7 P 1.3 This symbol shows
with a partner why they’re mentioned. Check as a class. 7 P 1.3 This symbol shows

7

P
P

1.3

This symbol shows that this exercise

focuses on pronunciation. Write caught, short, more, law and bought on the board. Ask students how they’re pronounced and establish that, despite the very different spellings, they all have the same vowel sound: /ɔː/. Give students a few minutes to read the article again and find all the words that have this sound. Then play the recording for them to check their answers.

Discuss any words that students think should also be included, and remind them that not all or spellings have this sound. If they’re unstressed, the sound is likely to be /ə/, as in for most of her 13 years, for centuries, etc.

8

P
P

Put students in groups and give them two

minutes to list as many other words with the /ɔː/ sound as they can. Monitor this activity and note any difficulties students have in distinguishing this sound from other vowel sounds, or if there’s a particular spelling which is causing difficulties. When the time is up, groups do a word count and the group with the most words writes their list on the board. (One student says the words out loud while another writes them on the board.) If there are any mistakes in either pronunciation or spelling, encourage the rest of the class to identify them. Ask members of other groups to say any words in their own lists that are not in the list on the board.

MA Put a mixture of students with good and less good pronunciation in each group so that the stronger ones can help sort out uncertainties.

 

Extra idea: If students are having difficulty distinguishing /ɔː/ from certain specific other sounds, you could do some minimal-pair repetition, focusing on those sounds, eg pot– put–port, cock–cook–cork, cod–could–cord; call–coal, hall–whole, law–low, ball–bowl, etc. Write them on the board too, so that students see the spelling.

9

THINK
THINK

When you see

THINK
THINK

in front of

an instruction, it means students should think about ideas on their own for a moment before

they talk to other students (think–pair–share). This type of exercise often asks students to be imaginative or creative, or to work something out. For more information about these exercises, see the Introduction, page 16.

Check that everyone is clear what the questions at the end of the article are – if necessary, refer students back to the article (line 40 to the end) – and establish that the questions in these paragraphs are all connected with the final summarising question at the very end of the article (What is the best way to learn a foreign language?). Put students in groups to discuss these questions for five minutes, then ask a student from each group to report their ideas to the class.

Tip: Keep group sizes relatively small (a maximum of five students) to ensure that everyone has a chance to contribute to the discussion. If students are particularly reticent to speak (or some are much more talkative than others), give each student a number of counters; each time they contribute to the discussion, they have to ‘spend’ one of their counters. Once they’ve used them all, they can’t say any more until everyone in the group has spent their counters.

Extra idea: You could ask students to write a paragraph or two on what they believe, or what their group decided, is the best way to learn a foreign language.

Grammar

Time and tense review 2: the past

1

SEARCH AND THINK SEARCH AND THINK

When you see in front of an instruction

in a grammar or vocabulary exercise, it indicates that students need to go back through a reading text or transcript to find particular examples of language. For more information about these exercises, see the Introduction, page 13.

Give students time to find the 14 verbs in the first three paragraphs of the article on page 10 (ie lines 1–37) and write the past forms used. Then they should match them with the descriptions. Check as a class.

should match them with the descriptions. Check as a class. 2 Give students another few minutes
should match them with the descriptions. Check as a class. 2 Give students another few minutes

2 Give students another few minutes to match the descriptions A–D with the tense names.

to match the descriptions A–D with the tense names. 3 This focuses on the difference in

3 This focuses on the difference in usage between the present perfect simple and present perfect continuous. Point out that both forms are correct in the examples given and that the time frame is the same. Give students a moment to think, then elicit (or if necessary explain) the answer.

MA Stronger students in the class should be able to explain this very clearly, so give them the chance to do so.

explain this very clearly, so give them the chance to do so. Extra idea: To clarify

Extra idea: To clarify the present perfect simple / continuous difference, write a few sentences with verb tenses missing on the board and ask students to decide which tense would be most appropriate: present perfect simple or present perfect simple.

(wait) for you for ages. Where are

1 I

you? (have been waiting)

2 I

(just / finish) my homework. Now I

can go out. (have just finished)

3 How long

(you / try) to contact Peter?

(have you been trying)

4 That dog is covered in mud! What (it / do)? (has it been doing)

5 (see) that film twice already. (have

I

seen)

4

FINISH IT

When you see

FINISH IT

in front

of an instruction, it indicates a personalisation exercise where students complete short sentence stems with their own information. For more information about these exercises, see the Introduction, page 19.

Put students in pairs and give them a few minutes to complete the sentences in their own words, in two different ways. Encourage them to use their imagination. Monitor the pairs and assist if required.

5

EVERYBODY UP!

Tell students to walk around

the room asking questions to find people who fit the descriptions in their sentences from 4. Encourage them to ask further questions to find out more details.

MA For the benefit of weaker students, elicit the question forms to match the sentences, eg Have you ever …?, beforehand.

Tip: To encourage maximum interaction, monitor the activity without interfering, but discreetly encourage students to move on if they get stuck with the same student for too long.

Take a break

These sections are there to help students take a break from studying from time to time. You’ll find a simple Take a break exercise in every unit, usually one that’s easy to do in the classroom – but feel free to do one at any time. For more detailed information about the Take a break sections, see the Introduction page 17. Allow students time to think of relaxing words, create a short poem and recite it to their partner.

Tip: Play some very relaxing, quiet, unintrusive background music to create a relaxed and pleasant atmosphere for these activities.

Vocabulary

keep

1 Tell students to look back quickly at the article on page 10 to find the phrases and answer the questions.

on page 10 to find the phrases and answer the questions. 2 Elicit any phrases with

2 Elicit any phrases with the verb keep that students know and write them on the board. Students then work in pairs to do the exercise. Encourage them to pool their knowledge to complete the sentences, then check as a class. For each one, make sure that students understand the meaning of the phrase.

sure that students understand the meaning of the phrase. MA Ask stronger students or early finishers

MA Ask stronger students or early finishers to list other phrases with keep that they know (eg keep your hair on, keep quiet, keep an appointment, keep a diary, keep something back, keep in with someone, keep yourself to yourself, keep up appearances).

3 Address this question to the whole class.

appearances ). 3 Address this question to the whole class. 4 Give pairs five minutes to

4 Give pairs five minutes to write their conversation. Tell them to aim to try to include as many phrases with keep as possible.

5 Give students a few minutes to memorise their conversation and act it out. Ask for one or two pairs to volunteer to act out their conversation in front of the class, from memory.

MA You could let students who are less confident do theirs with the ‘script’.

who are less confident do theirs with the ‘script’. Extra idea: Ask students to record or

Extra idea: Ask students to record or video their conversations and share them with the class online. This is likely to be more popular with students than acting out in front of the class.

Listening

1 Address the question to the whole class and invite suggestions. Don’t confirm the answer at this point, but the photo on the page should give a clue.

at this point, but the photo on the page should give a clue. 2 1.4 Play

2 1.4 Play the recording for students to check. Then elicit what students already knew about The Jungle Book – many students will have read the book or comics as children or seen one of the films.

The Jungle Book – many students will have read the book or comics as children or

Transcript

grandpa Now this is the law of the jungle, as old and as true as the sky, and the wolf that shall keep it may prosper, but the wolf that shall break it must die. tim What on earth are you talking about, Grandpa? grandpa The law of the jungle. From The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling. tim Rudyard Kipling! I haven’t heard his name in ages. grandpa He was a great writer – especially children’s stories. Like The Jungle Book. You remember The Jungle Book? tim Well, we used to watch that old Disney cartoon when we were kids. grandpa About Mowgli and his friends. tim Who’s Mowgli? Oh, wait, yes, he’s the boy who lives in the jungle. And the wolves bring him up as if he is one of them – as if he was a wolf cub. grandpa Yes, that’s it. Akela is the wolf leader. tim And they sing songs like The Bare Necessities. grandpa No, not in the original story. That cartoon, the one that was made in 1967 – well, it’s just a cheerful little thing for kids, but it’s not like the original stories. They were special. tim But Mowgli is the boy who grows up with a family of wolves? grandpa Yes. And they protect him from the tiger Shere Khan. Shere Khan wants to kill the little boy. But in the end, Mowgli defeats the tiger with the help of his animal friends, but only just. tim Isn’t there a bear? I remember a bear! grandpa Yes, well, there’s Baloo the bear, and he’s the teacher of the wolves, and he’s the one who teaches Mowgli the law of the jungle. And Bagheera is the black panther who helps Mowgli when he’s in trouble. And then there’s Kaa the python, and he rescues Mowgli from the Bandar-log when he’s … tim Slow down, Grandpa. I haven’t the slightest idea what you are talking about. grandpa The Bandar-log – they’re the monkeys who capture Mowgli. But Kaa rescues him. I loved The Jungle Book when I was a boy. tim What’s made you think of The Jungle Book now? grandpa What’s made me think about it? Oh yes, I was reading on my tablet about the two new films. Two! That’s funny, isn’t it. Disney Pictures have their new version of The Jungle Book and Warner Brothers have something called The Jungle Book: Origins, I think it is. It’s incredible. That book is responsible for so many films and plays and television series and radio programmes. It was written over 120 years ago. tim Wow! Amazing! grandpa Kipling was a great writer. He knew a lot

about animals and the jungle. And the stories in The Jungle Book are about more than just that. They’re about life and society, that kind of thing. tim Maybe I should read some of his stuff. grandpa Yes, why don’t you? Do you some good! tim Look, sorry, Grandpa, but I have to go. grandpa Go? But you’ve only just arrived.

3 Explain the activity and show the example in the book, then play the recording again. Students work in pairs to write sentences using the three boxes. Check by asking pairs to take it turns to read out an answer each.

by asking pairs to take it turns to read out an answer each. 4 Students complete

4 Students complete the lines from the poem. If necessary, help them with the meaning of the verb prosper (= succeed in life financially and grow strong and healthy). Play the first bit of recording 1.4 again for students to check their answers. Explain that this is the beginning of a poem in The Jungle Book that explains the rules and obligations of wolves living in a pack. To check students understand the meaning, ask them to rephrase it in simple English (eg These rules are very old and wise, and following the rules will lead to success in life, but breaking them will lead to death).

to success in life, but breaking them will lead to death ). EXPLORE ONLINE Encourage students

EXPLORE ONLINE Encourage students to search online at home for information about recent film versions of The Jungle Book, find reviews and watch trailers or video clips. Then encourage them to share their opinions in class.

Reading 2

1 Ask students to give you their impressions of Rudyard Kipling from the photo of him. Elicit or explain the meaning of the term Victorian authors (= British authors who wrote in the reign of Queen Victoria, ie 1837–1901) and give students a few minutes to read the information about Kipling, answer the questions, then check the information in pairs.

answer the questions, then check the information in pairs. 2 Students can work individually to find

2 Students can work individually to find the words or phrases in the text.

work individually to find the words or phrases in the text. 3 Put students in pairs
work individually to find the words or phrases in the text. 3 Put students in pairs

3 Put students in pairs and make sure they have their books closed to tell each other what they can remember.

Speaking and writing

1 To set the ball rolling, you could tell the class a short anecdote about your own childhood. Then give students a couple of minutes to think individually about their own childhood story and make notes of the key points.

2 Students work in pairs to tell their stories to each other. Monitor and make a note of any common problems. When they’ve finished, you can use some of their mistakes for a quick error-correction activity.

3 Ask students to look at the paragraph outline and check that they agree this would be a suitable plan for the written version of their story. You could ask them to write the story in class or for homework. Suggest a word length of about 150 words.

MA Weaker students could be given a shorter length, eg about 100 words.

Tip: Suggesting an approximate length for writing helps students to have a better idea of what is expected.

Poem link Students look up the poem and discuss the questions in pairs or small groups.

the poem and discuss the questions in pairs or small groups. Culture note Kipling’s famous poem

Culture note

Kipling’s famous poem If was published in 1910 and was originally addressed to his son. It’s seen as a set of good qualities that are recommended for the development of a ‘good’, virtuous human being. Although now rather dated, and arguably less relevant in our competitive modern world, it’s still considered to have an important message for people in general. The main characteristics that the poem recommends are that people should be humble, patient, calm, rational, truthful, dependable and persevering. They should continue to have faith in themselves when others doubt them, they must put up with misfortunes without complaining, be prepared for and not be affected by the lies and hatred of wicked people, and should expect that their own words may be twisted and used for evil.

Lesson 3 Life soundtrack

pp14–15

Aims

The focus of this lesson is to revise tenses used to express future time and expand vocabulary about emotions.

You first!

Put students in small groups to discuss the question and compare answers.

Tip: Walking around the room, listening and noting any good sentences and mistakes you hear, is a good way of gaining an insight into things you might need to practise and review. It also offers ideas for future lessons and enables you to highlight good language to the rest of the class in feedback.

Listening

1

GUESS
GUESS

Students look at the photos and

think about the question as a whole class. Elicit suggestions from a selection of students.

2

2 1.5 Play the recording for students to check

1.5

Play the recording for students to check

their ideas.

Answer

They talk about music that’s been important in their lives.

Transcript

presenter And now it’s time for this week’s edition of Life Soundtrack, where we invite guests to talk about music that has been part of the soundtrack of their lives. This week, our guest is trumpet player Sally Omabaya. Sally, welcome. What is the first track you’ve chosen? sally My first track is a song that always makes me feel sentimental. It’s called Only Remembered. My dad used to sing it with his mates when they all came over to the house for a party or something. It’s about who’s going to remember us when we are gone – we’ll only be remembered for what we have done. [song extract] My dad had learnt it with his singing colleagues in the folk clubs in Birmingham. It’s a great big beautiful old tune, and the message is one that I can agree with. It’s what we do in life that matters. [song extract] I remember as a young girl sitting on the stairs and listening to my dad and his friends all singing. It was like listening in to a secret meeting or something! He recorded it himself a few years ago, multi-tracking his own voice at least four times. Since he died, I have listened to it quite a lot. I reckon I’ll still be listening to it when I’m old and grey! It just makes me happy. [song extract] presenter Thank you. That’s lovely. And what’s your second track? sally My second track is something I first heard when I was at music college. I went to a choir concert, and suddenly they sang this extraordinary thing. I was absolutely overcome with emotion. Boom. Instant! It was like the craziest techno electronic trance music gone wrong, except that it was real voices and it started with music by Johann Sebastian Bach, one of the greatest composers who ever lived. [music extract] It’s called Immortal Bach and it was written by a Norwegian composer called Knut Nystedt – if ‘written’ is the right word! Nystedt takes a tune by Bach and then he slows down all the different lines so that some of the performers start singing at half speed, some at quarter speed, some at normal speed. All the notes

are Bach’s but you forget that as all the slowed- down lines cross over each other, and what the piece does is somehow make the music timeless, time-less, so Bach is somehow immortal by the time it has finished. The sound goes on and on in its weird, sad, poignant, lonely way. [music extract] Apparently Nystedt wrote it after the death of his daughter, so that would explain it. That’s where the sadness comes in, I reckon. My favourite version so far is by the violinist Steve Bingham. He multi-tracks all the different lines on his violin. I can’t imagine how he did it. I think it’s amazing. [music extract] We’re going back into the studio in a couple of months to make a new album. That’s me and my band The Worthies. It’ll be our fifth album. We’ll be recording about 70 minutes of music, and we’re thinking of including Immortal Bach, amongst other pieces. We’re hoping to release the album in time for our world tour. We’re going to play in ten different countries, I think it is. By the end of August next year, we will have done about 60 dates! Can you imagine! We start the tour in January in London and we finish it here, too. What I love about Immortal Bach is that at the very end all the musical lines merge again and there is peace. Acceptance. Amazing. presenter It’s beautiful, thank you.

3 Put students in pairs to answer the questions from what they remember of the recording. Then ask if anyone knows either of the pieces of music, and what they think of them.

either of the pieces of music, and what they think of them. 4 Give students time

4 Give students time to read through the questions and check they understand that they’ll need to use some of the names more than once. Then play the recording again for them to do the exercise. Have them check answers in pairs before checking as a class. For question 1, ask what phrase Sally used to express strong emotion and write it on the board (I was absolutely overcome with emotion). Also allow Knut Nystedt as an answer if students can justify their choice (eg by saying that he felt very strongly about the death of his daughter).

students can justify their choice (eg by saying that he felt very strongly about the death

5

Do the first question together with the class as an example. Students then work in pairs to make their four questions. Check as a class and write the correct questions on the board. Accept any correct variations of the suggested answer key.

MA Stronger students could be given six or eight questions to write instead of four.

Tip: Asking students to choose four out of the nine items is a useful tool for helping them to feel more in control of their learning. They still have to read all the items and assess them to make their choice.

to read all the items and assess them to make their choice. 6 TAKEAWAY LANGUAGE TAKEAWAY

6

TAKEAWAY LANGUAGE TAKEAWAY LANGUAGE

When you see in front of an

instruction, it indicates a focus on colloquial language that’s not featured elsewhere. For more information about these exercises, see the Introduction, page 21.

For this one, give students a minute to complete the phrases. Then check they understand their meaning and use.

phrases. Then check they understand their meaning and use. Grammar Tense and time review 3: the

Grammar

Tense and time review 3:

the future

and use. Grammar Tense and time review 3: the future 1 1.6 Play the recording for

1 1.6 Play the recording for students to write what Sally says using the verbs in the box. Then let them check their answers from the penultimate paragraph of transcript 1.5 on page 139 of the Student’s Book.

of transcript 1.5 on page 139 of the Student’s Book. Transcript We’re going back into the

Transcript

We’re going back into the studio in a couple of months to make a new album. That’s me and my band The Worthies. It’ll be our fifth album. We’ll be recording about 70 minutes of music, and we’re thinking of including Immortal Bach, amongst other pieces. We’re hoping to release the album in time for our world tour. We’re going to play in ten different countries, I think it is. By the end of August next year, we will have done about 60 dates! Can you imagine! We start the tour in January in London and we finish it here, too.

2 Establish that all the verb forms in 1 refer to future time, although they use a variety of different forms. Students match the sentences with the meanings, then check in pairs. Then check as a class, writing each verb form on the board and eliciting the tense names. Point out that future forms are often interchangeable (eg going to and future simple for future plans), so the choice is not always clear-cut.

interchangeable (eg going to and future simple for future plans), so the choice is not always
3 This exercise practises the use of the various future forms. Students work individually, then

3 This exercise practises the use of the various future forms. Students work individually, then compare their answers in pairs. Ask them to explain the reason for their choices.

MA Weaker students could refer to the grammar reference section to help them with this exercise.

grammar reference section to help them with this exercise. 4 YOUR STORY When you see in
grammar reference section to help them with this exercise. 4 YOUR STORY When you see in

4 YOUR STORY

When you see

in front of an instruction, it indicates that students have an opportunity to personalise the language by talking about a situation that they’ve been in that is similar to the one they’ve just read about or listened to. For more information about these exercises, see the Introduction, page 20.

YOUR STORY

Give students a minute or two to write their own sentences, then another minute to compare their sentences in pairs. Monitor and assist if necessary.

Vocabulary

Emotions

1 Ask students which of the phrases in the box Sally used in the recording to describe how she felt (overcome with emotion) and what provoked that emotion (hearing Immortal Bach for the first time). Go through the phrases in the box with the class and make sure they understand them. Students do the exercise individually, then compare answers in pairs. Point out that about to (as used in item 2 – about to explode) is another way of referring to the future.

to explode ) is another way of referring to the future. Extra idea: Ask students questions

Extra idea: Ask students questions to

encourage them to apply the phrases to their own experience:

1 When and why do people hide their emotions?

2 Can you remember a time when someone you know was overcome with emotion?

3 What kind of emotions can be overwhelming, and when?

4 How does having pent-up emotions affect you?

5 Is it always a good thing to show your emotions?

2 Ask if anyone has seen the movie Inside Out. Ask – or if nobody knows, explain briefly – what it’s about (see Background note below). Give students a few seconds to look at the picture and identify the emotions.

Extra idea: Ask students if they think they’re good personifications of the emotions. You could focus on the colours used and ask, for example, if blue is associated with sadness in all cultures.

example, if blue is associated with sadness in all cultures. Background note Inside Out is a

Background note

Inside Out is a Disney / Pixar animated movie released in 2015. It’s about the adventures and emotions of an 11-year-old girl, Riley, whose world changes when her family moves house from the mid-west of the USA to San Francisco. Her experiences and feelings are presented from the point of view of her changing emotions, represented by the animated characters in the picture.

3 Divide the class into groups and give them a time limit to work on their emotions word map. They can help each other and use dictionaries to check the meaning of the words in the box and to add words of their own. When the time’s up, they pass their maps on to another group to compare.

Tip: Give each group a large piece of paper or card and marker pens for drawing their maps. Then the maps can be displayed on the board / walls, and students can look at all of them. This makes it more fun and encourages sharing of ideas.

4 This is a fun activity and provides an opportunity for students with strong visualisation skills to shine, while at the same time practising vocabulary. You could do it as a class game. You (or a volunteer) draw the first one on the board, and the first student to guess the emotion correctly has the next turn to draw. Alternatively, it could be done in groups of four to five students.

Speaking and writing

in groups of four to five students. Speaking and writing 1 MINI-TALK When you see MINI-TALK

1 MINI-TALK

When you see

MINI-TALK

in

front of an instruction, this is a chance to get students talking and writing more. However, giving a talk to the whole class can be intimidating, so if they prefer, they can just do it for a small group. For more information about these exercises, see the Introduction, page 21.

Give students time to read the instructions and prepare their talk. Walk around and offer help and useful language as needed. Students then give their presentations in small groups.

2 This encourages students to be active listeners. At the beginning of the presentations, remind students to note down ideas for questions while they’re listening, then make sure time is allowed at the end of each presentation for the questions to be asked and answered.

Tip: Encourage students to ask questions that the speaker should be able to answer, for example about the speaker’s experience or opinions. They should not be tests of knowledge designed to catch the speaker out!

Everyday English p16

This page provides practice in the functions that students need when getting around in English and interacting with people. The main conversation in the odd-numbered units has a video which provides extra contextualisation and is fun to watch. (See page 261 for suggestions on exploiting the video.) If you don’t have the video or prefer not to use it, then just play the recording.

Expressing disappointment

1

GUESS
GUESS

Allow a short time for students to make

guesses about the photos and compare ideas with a partner. Tell them they’ll find out the answers in the video / recording that they’re going to watch / listen to.

2

2 1.7 6 Decide whether you’re going to use

1.7

6 Decide whether you’re going to use

the video or simply play the recording (you may not have the video or the necessary video equipment).

Students watch or listen to the first part of the conversation. Play and pause as necessary.

first part of the conversation. Play and pause as necessary. Ask a couple of questions to

Ask a couple of questions to check comprehension of the basic situation in the conversation, eg What did Charlie want? What happened? Was he surprised? Why? / Why not? (He wanted to play as a musician at a gig in the East Village, but he wasn’t accepted. He was surprised because he thought his practice session went well.)

Transcript

dana Hey, Charlie! charlie Oh, hi, Dana. dana Wow, Charlie. What’s wrong? You look bummed. charlie Yeah, well, it’s just that I didn’t get this gig I was really hoping for. dana What gig? You mean the one down in the East Village? charlie Yeah. It seemed really promising, you know? And I practised forever. I think they really liked my stuff – at least, that’s what they said. dana I thought so, too. I remember when you came back from the practice session and you seemed really happy about it. charlie I was! I thought it all went down so well. But I guess I was wrong. dana I’m sorry, Charlie. That’s horrible. charlie Thanks. Yeah, well, it’s a real bummer. I’m just really disappointed it didn’t work out. I mean, I really liked the guys I was jamming with and we had a good thing going. It sounds lame, but I really had my heart set on this working out. On top of everything, it was pretty good money, too! dana Yeah, I remember you said that. I know it’s hard. And I’m sure it seems really unfair, but I bet something else will come up. I mean, you know how this kind of thing goes – you think you’ve missed some great opportunity and then something else comes along that you never expected. charlie Yeah, you mean one door closes and another one opens. dana Pretty much. charlie I guess that’s a better way to look at it. I just wish they had told me sooner, since I stopped looking for another gig when I thought that one was in the bag. dana You always have to have a backup, Charlie. You know that! Nothing’s ever for sure. But don’t worry. Something will work out.

3

Ask who said these phrases from the dialogue (Charlie). Allow students a minute to try to express them in other words, then invite suggestions.

4

Allow students a few seconds to decide in pairs, then get feedback.

5

TAKEAWAY LANGUAGE

Explain that this

exercise focuses on four very colloquial phrases that were used in the dialogue, and that they would only be used in very informal situations. Students work in pairs to match the phrases from the conversation with the meanings. If possible, play again the parts of the conversation where they appear so that students can hear them again in context.

6

Play the video / recording again for students to focus on finding the two reasons.

7

P
P

1.8

Write the sentence on the board and

 

play the recording twice for students to hear the intonation pattern clearly. Get feedback and mark the intonation with an arrow.

8

P
P

1.9

Play the recording for students to

focus on the intonation used on the words you know. Show on the board the arrows to write for rising and falling intonation. Pause after each sentence and replay it for students to focus on the intonation. Note that intonation can be very subtle; it’s more important for students to hear and copy the variations than to ‘correctly’ identify the ups

and downs.

than to ‘correctly’ identify the ups and downs. 9 Play the recording again, pausing after each

9

Play the recording again, pausing after eachthan to ‘correctly’ identify the ups and downs. 9 sentence, for students to practise the intonation.

sentence, for students to practise the intonation. They can say it all together, but address their partner in pairs so it feels more natural.

but address their partner in pairs so it feels more natural. Expressing joy 10 1.10 6

Expressing joy

partner in pairs so it feels more natural. Expressing joy 10 1.10 6 Play the recording

10 1.10 6 Play the recording / video once. Check the answer and ask a couple more questions to check basic comprehension of the situation, eg What is Dana’s news? When is she going to start? How does she feel about it? (She’s got an internship with an online food company, starting in a couple of weeks. She’s very happy / excited, etc.)

in a couple of weeks. She’s very happy / excited, etc.) Transcript dana Actually, I’ve got

Transcript

dana Actually, I’ve got some good news. charlie Oh, yeah? What’s that? dana Well, I just heard that I got that internship with that online food company! charlie Really? Wow! Wasn’t that the one you really wanted, with that lady who does food boxes or something like that? dana Exactly! Yeah! I’m really excited about it. charlie I bet. I’m very happy for you, Dana. dana Thanks, Charlie. I think I’m supposed to start in a couple of weeks. That should give me some time to catch up on my graduate work. I can’t wait to start, actually! charlie Man, you’re going to be busy. Will you still have time for your old friends? dana Come on. Of course I will, Charlie! This is just something I’ve always wanted to do. charlie I know. Good for you, Dana. dana It’ll work out for you, too, Charlie. I know it. We’ll both be doing our dream jobs before you know it. charlie If you say so

11 Students work individually, completing the extract, then compare their answers in pairs. Then play the conversation again for them to check answers.

Extra idea: Students take the parts of Dana and Charlie and read the dialogue. 12

Extra idea: Students take the parts of Dana and Charlie and read the dialogue.

12 Elicit opinions from the class.

and read the dialogue. 12 Elicit opinions from the class. 13 Students guess, then check in

13 Students guess, then check in a dictionary or online. Confirm the meaning of the expression, then give students time to think and make notes about their situations.

14 Students work in groups of three or four to talk about their disappointing situations. Encourage them to use the phrases from 2, 3 and 11 in their accounts. Monitor groups as they practise and discreetly make a note of common problems.

Tip: To avoid discouraging students from expressing themselves, don’t interrupt pair– or groupwork unless something is going badly wrong.

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Come to your senses!

UNIT

FOCUS

GRAMMAR: relative clauses; hedging: making cautious statements; verb patterns1: cause and effect VOCABULARY: toys; manual activities; expressions with colours; music; sounds FUNCTIONS: talking about advantages and disadvantages

Introduction p17

Aims

The focus of this lesson is to introduce the unit topic of the senses and to encourage students to start thinking about how the different senses relate to learning and doing various activities.

You first!

Students look at the four photos to establish what each one actually shows, then discuss the questions in pairs or small groups. Write some extra questions on the board (Name the senses. Are there five or six senses? Or more? Which senses do you associate with each of these photos, and why? Are any senses not represented?) and encourage students to discuss them too. Get feedback from the class and establish if the class as a whole shows any general trends in their preferences.

MA For the benefit of weaker students, you could write on the board the basic five senses (hearing, sight, smell, taste, touch).

1 Students do the quiz individually. Make sure they’ve read the white note explaining what each of the numbers 0–4 means, and point out that there isn’t just one answer each time – they should write a number in every box.

Assist with vocabulary difficulties if students ask (eg uncluttered, figure-hugging, fidget), but encourage them to guess meanings before you supply an explanation.

MA Weaker students could do the quiz in pairs and help each other with vocabulary.

2 Students add up their scores, then compare in a small group and try to work out together any implications of their scores.

Background note

The answers relate to different sensory preferences:

a) visual

b) auditory

c) kinaesthetic (feeling, touch and movement)

Make sure that students understand that these are tendencies and preferences, not hard-and- fast categories. This theory, which comes from

NLP (Neuro Linguistic Programming), should not be about pigeon-holing / categorising people; it’s about degrees of preference, and how to exploit that and develop new areas and to give people more choices. The next three lessons take each of the three featured senses (sight, hearing and touch) in turn and explore each one a little.

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hearing and touch) in turn and explore each one a little. 3 1.11 Play the recording