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Unit Outline

Week 1

Lesson 1.1

Lesson 1. 2 Time Zones

Lesson 1. 3 Daylight Saving

Lesson 1. 4 UTC and IDL

Lesson 1. 5 International time zones

Latitude and

Longitude

     

Outcomes:

- locate points on Earth’s surface using

- calculation of times and time differences

- solve problems involving time zones in Australia and in neighbouring nations, making any necessary allowances for daylight saving

- solve problems involving Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) , and the International Date Line (IDL)

- find time differences between two places on Earth using recognised international time zones

-

Assessment

MS11-

3,

latitude,

around the world

MS11-

4,

longitude or

- review using

MS11-

9

position

units of time,

MS11-

10

coord inates with a globe, an atlas and digit al technologies, for example, a smartphone or GPS device

converting between 12- hour and 24- hour clocks and calculating time in tervals

 
 

task1

Week 2

Lesson 2. 1 Time tables

Lesson 2. 2 Travelling and Phone usage

Lesson 2. 3 Revision

Lesson 2. 4 Unit Exam

Lesson 2. 5 Feedback

 

- review how to interpret timetables, for example,

- solve practical problems, for example, travelling east

- revision of topic

-

Assessment

-

Assessment

task: Unit

task 1

-

sample

Exam

feedback

Outcomes:

problem

MS11-

3,

bus, train and

and west,

solving and

MS11-

4,

ferry

incorporating

preparation to

MS11-

9

timetables,

time zones, or

exam

MS11-

10

and use them to solve problems

internet and phone usage across time zones, or the timing of events broadcast live from states of countries between different time zones

Unit Assessment - General Mathematics- Working with Time

Name:

Student Number:

Class:

Date

Submitted:

WHERE ON THE EARTH IS THE FAMILY GUY!!!

Date Submitted: WHERE ON THE EARTH IS THE FAMILY GUY!!! Assessment task: The Family Guy has

Assessment task: The Family Guy has arranged the trip to Australia. As always, the family has not obeyed the rules and gone out of control. Now, all of them have been lost except Lois. To find them she has to make great plan. She finds out that everyone had gone to different countries around the world. Thank God everyone had their phones with them. That makes easy for her to communicate with all.

To start her perfect mission to find all of the rest, she draws a chart that would give her accurate time to ring everyone. She points out importance of giving both 12- hour time and 24- hour time with day. She also planned to mark on the world map where each person along with dog are for location.

Since you are very kind person and expert with calculations of time you have offered help Lois to complete the chart and find everyone. Some important hints for you:

- you are required to complete on week 2 Friday and hand it.

- representation of information and correct calculations are significant

- Right 300 words reflection of your experience through helping Lois with her mission

Some useful resources for you to use:

World Time Differences http://www.whitepages.com.au/wp/search/tools.jhtml World Atlas site http://worldatlas.com/aatlas/world.htm

Differences http://www.whitepages.com.au/wp/search/tools.jhtml World Atlas site http://worldatlas.com/aatlas/world.htm

Where on the earth is the family guy?

Lois is in Sydney, Australia

Lois is in Sydney, Australia
Lois is in Sydney, Australia
Lois is in Sydney, Australia
Lois is in Sydney, Australia
Lois is in Sydney, Australia
Lois is in Sydney, Australia
Lois is in Sydney, Australia
Lois is in Sydney, Australia

STEWIE

MEG

CHRIS

PETER

GLEN

BRIAN

CARTER

HERBE

IS IN….

               

IF MARGE

               

RINGS AT

10:00 AM

ON A

MONDAY

EACH ERSON TO BE CONTACTED AT 11 AM AT THEIR TIME ZONE

LOIS

LOIS

LOIS

LOIS

LOIS

LOIS

LOIS

LOIS

EXPECTED

EXPECTED

EXPECTED

EXPECTED

EXPECTED

EXPECTED

EXPECTED

EXPEC

TO CALL

TO CALL

TO CALL

TO CALL

TO CALL

TO CALL

TO CALL

TO CA

AT

AT

AT

AT

AT

AT

AT

AT

TIME ZONE

               

DIFFRERENCE

(BEHIND OR

AHEAD)

LOIS HAS ARRANGE THE LAWYERS TO HELP OUT. EACH LAWYER WILL CALL FROM SYDNEY AT 1:45 PM ON A TUESDAY. WHAT TIME WILL EACH OF THEM EXPECT TO BE RINGED?

               

Assessment Rubric for Where on the Earth are the ‘Family Guy’?

(Preliminary Hsc General Mathematics MS- M2 Working with Time)

Criteria

Developing 0- 5 / 15

Proficient 6- 10 /15

Advanced 11- 15 / 15

Effort

Shows very little effort, attempt to solve and shows insufficient work

shows sufficient effort, solutions efficiently shown and shows adequate work

Shows significant effort, Solutions clear and shows completed work

Results and marking the map

Do not provides results, and unmarked map

Provides satisfactory results and well - marked map

Provides mostly correct results and sustainably marked map

Understanding and use of resources

Shows little understanding of topic, use of resources lacking

Shows sufficient understanding of topic good use of resources

Shows conceptual understanding, substantial use of resources

Reflection

Demonstrates little reflection and no evaluation

Demonstrates

Demonstrates s ignificant reflection and evaluation

satisfactory

reflection and

 

evaluation

 

Limited perceptions, not sufficient justification

Well justified understanding of concepts and perceptions

Deep understanding of key concepts provided

HSC

ASSESSMENT TASK 4

2017

Mathematics General 2

General Instructions

Reading time – 5 minutes

Working time – 45 mins

Write using black or blue pen

Black pen is preferred

Board-approved calculators may be used

A formula and data sheet is provided at the back of this paper

In Questions 6 - 10, show relevant mathematical reasoning and/or calculations

Name:

 

Class:

 
 

Marks

 

Total

MC

6

7

8

9

10

Weight – 15% of internal assessment Total marks –

Section I

5 marks

Attempt Questions 1-5

Allow about 10 minutes for this section

Section II

25 marks

Attempt Questions 5-10

Allow about 35 minutes for this section

Section I

5 marks Attempt questions 1-5 Allow about 10 minutes for this section

Use the multiple-choice answer sheet for Questions 1-5.

 

Marks

1 Point X on the Earth’s surface has coordinates (69°S, 12°E), while point Y is at (8°S, 12°E).

1

The distance between X and Y is:

 

A

61 M

B 77 M

C 3660 M

D 4620 M

2 At a point on the Earth’s surface, the coordinates are (45°N, 135°W). The standard

1

time at this point would be:

 

A

GMT −3

B GMT +3

C GMT −9

D GMT +9

3 is 11.00 am Tuesday at a point X with coordinates (32°S, 90°W). At a point, Y, with

It

1

coordinates (51°N, 120°E), what is the time if daylight saving time applies at Y?

A

9.00 pm Monday

B 10.00 pm Monday

C

1.00 am Wednesday

D 2.00 am Wednesday

- 8 -

4

1

Adelaide is located at (35°N, 139°E) and Yokohama is located at (35°S, 139°E). What is

the di stance between Adelaide and Yokohama to the nearest kilometre? (Assume the radius

of Earth is 6400 km.)

A

559 km

B 3910 km

C 7819 km

D 15 526 km

5 What is the time difference between locations at (43°S, 20°E) and (58°S, 65°E)?

A

4 h

B 3 h

C 2 h

D 1 h

1

Section II

25 marks Attempt questions 6-10 Allow about 35 minutes for this section

Answer the questions in the spaces provided.

Your responses should include relevant mathematical reasoning and/or calculations.

Extra writing space is provided at the end of this booklet. If you use this space, clearly indicate which question you are answering.

 

Marks

Question 6 (5 marks)

a.

Hobart is located at (42°S, 147°E) and Port Moresby is located at (9°S, 147°E).

i. Describe the relative positions of these cities on the Earth’s surface.

1

ii. What are the coordinates of a point half-way between these cities?

2

b.

The coordinates of Dublin are (53°N, 6°W). What are the coordinates of Hamburg if it is 16° due east of Dublin?

2

- 10 -

Question 7 (5 marks)

Marks

Kingston is located at (17°N, 76°W). Jakarta is located at (6°S, 106°E).

i. What is the difference in latitude between Kingston and Jakarta?

ii. What are the coordinates of a point 20° due south of Kingston?

iii. What are the coordinates of a point 80° due east of Jakarta?

- 11 -

1

2

2

 

Marks

Question 8 (5 marks)

2

a.

Molly flew from Sydney (34ºS, 151ºE) to Chittagong (22ºN, 91ºE). Her plane left

Sydney at 8.30 a.m. Thursday (Sydney time), stopped for 4 hours in Singapore and

arrived in Chittagong at 1 p.m. Thursday (Chittagong time). What was the total flyin g

time?

b. Andrew is planning a trip from Townsville (GMT +9.5) to Hong Kong (GMT +8).

 

I. What is the time and day in Hong Kong if it is 7.30 a.m. on 5 June in Townsville?

1

II. A flight leaves Townsville at 7.30 a.m. and flies non-stop to Hong Kong. The flight

2

is in the air for 7 hours. What time and day does the flight arrive in Hong Kong?

- 12 -

Question 9 (5 marks)

Marks

a. The standard time in Dubbo is based on the 149°E meridian and for Fremantle the

116°E meridian.

I. Isabella is in Dubbo and rings a friend in Fremantle at 8 p.m. on a Saturday. What day

and time is it in Fremantle?

II. Isabella caught a plane, at 8 p.m. on a Saturday, from Dubbo to Fremantle. The travel

2

2

time for the trip was 5 hours. What is the time when Isabella arrives in Fremantle?

b. The time zone in New Zealand is GMT +12 while in Turkey it is GMT +2. Calculate

the time difference between New Zealand and Turkey.

- 13 -

1

Question 10 (5 marks)

A diagram of Earth’s surface is shown oppo site.

k s ) A diagram of Earth’s surface is shown oppo site. Marks a. What is

Marks

a. What is the latitude and longitude of point A?

1

1

b. What is the latitude and longitude of point B?

c. What are the coordinates of a point 60 o due south of point A?

2

d. What are the coordinates of a point 10 o due east of point B?

1

End of paper

- 14 -

Section II Extra writing space If you use this space, clearly indicate which question you
Section II Extra writing space
If you use this space, clearly indicate which question you are answering.

FORMULAE AND DATA SHEET

FORMULAE AND DATA SHEET

Asse ssment Task 2 Topic Test Marking Guideline

Section I Answres to multiple choice questions - 1 mark each

Questions

Answers

1

C

2

C

3

D

4

B

5

A

Section II Question 6 (a)(i)

Criteria

Marks

Provides correct solution

1

Sample Solution

Locations of the Hobart and Port Moresby are on the 147 o E meridian of longitude. Hobart (42 o S) is further south than Port Moresby (9 0 S).

Question 6 (a)(ii)

Criteria

Marks

Provides correct calculation

1

Correct answer

1

Sample solution:

Latitude = 42 + 9

2

= 25.5

Coordinates of the halfway point are (25.5 o S, 147 o E).

Question 6 (b)

Criteria

Mark

Provides correct solution process

1

Shows correct result

1

Sample solution:

Same latitude as Dublin 53°N Longitude is 6°W + 16° = 10°E Hamburg’s coordinates are (53°N, 10°E).

Question 7 (i)

 

Criteria

Mark

Provides correct answer

1

Sample solution:

Latitude difference = 17 +6 =23

Question 7 (ii)

 

Criteria

Mark

Provides correct answer

1

Sample solution:

Located on the 76° west meridian of longitude. Coordinates 3°S, 76°W

Question 7 (iii)

 

Criteria

Mark

Provides correct answer

1

Sample solution:

Located on the 6° south parallel of latitude. Coordinates 6°S, 174°W (186˚E)

Question 8 (a)

Criteria

Mark

Provides correct solution process

1

Shows correct result

1

Sample solution:

Longitude difference = 151 91 = 60

Time difference = 60×4 = 240 min (or 4h)

Chittagong Sydney 91˚E 151˚E West – East +
Chittagong
Sydney
91˚E
151˚E
West –
East +

Time in Chittagong

= = 4.30 a.m. Thursday

-

8.30

4h

Travelling time

(1.00 p.m. = 4.5 h

=

-

4.30 a.m.)

-

4h

Question 8 (a)(I)

Criteria

Mark

Provides correct solution process

1

Shows correct result

1

Sample solution:

Longitude difference = 151 91 = 60

Time difference = 60 × 4 = 240 min (or 4h)

Question 8 (b)

 

Criteria

Mark

Provides correct answer

1

Sample solution:

Time in Hong Kong

=

6 a.m.

+

7 h

= 1 p.m.

5 June

Question 9(a)(I)

Criteria

Mark

Provides correct solution process

1

Shows correct result

1

Sample solution:

Longitude difference = 149 - 116 = 33

Time difference = 33×4 =132 min (or 2h 12 min)

Fremantle Dubbo 116˚E 149˚E West – East +
Fremantle
Dubbo
116˚E
149˚E
West –
East +

Time in Fremantle

=

= 5.48 p.m. Saturday

8.00

-

2h 12min

Question 9(a)(II)

 

Criteria

Mark

Provides correct answer

1

Sample solution:

Longitude difference = 149 - 116 = 33

Time difference = 33×4 =132 min (or 2h 12 min)

Fremantle Dubbo 116˚E 149˚E West – East +
Fremantle
Dubbo
116˚E
149˚E
West –
East +

Time in Fremantle

=

= 5.48 p.m. Saturday

8.00

-

2h 12min

Question 9(b)

 

Criteria

Mark

Provides correct answer

1

Sample solution:

12 – 2 = 10

Question 10(a)

 

Criteria

Mark

Provides correct answer

1

Sample solution:

Latitude is the angle north or south of the equator (0 o ). Point A is on the equator. Longitude is the angle east or west of the Greenwich meridian (30 o E). Point A is at (0 o , 30 o E).

Question 10(b)

 

Criteria

Mark

Provides correct answer

1

Sample Solution:

Latitude is the angle north or south of the equator (50 o N). Longitude is the angle east or west of the Greenwich meridian (0 o ). Point B is on the Greenwich meridian.

Point B is at (50 o N, 0 o ).

Question 10(c)

Criteria

Mark

Provides correct answer

1

Correct producer

1

Sample solution:

Point A is on the equator (0 o ) hence the required point is 60 o S. It has the same longitude as point A (30 o E).

Point is at (60 o S, 30 o E).

Question 10 (d)

 

Criteria

Mark

Provides correct answer

1

Sample solution:

Point B is on the Greenwich meridian (0 o ) hence the required point is 10 o E. It has the same latitude as point B (50 o N).

Point is at (50 o N, 10 o E).

Justification

The preliminary HSC Working with Time component is designed with consideration of the Quality Teaching model for the purpose of achieving the NSW Mathematics General Stage 6 Syllabus (2017) outcomes. In this unit students learn to interpret and justify calculations of time, including time differences in Australia and the World. The unit has been planned to enhance learning outcomes through diverse learning and teaching activities which aim for high student engagement and firm understanding of the topic with the use of real world applications. This paper will provide an analysis of the unit outline, lesson plan, one alternative assessment task and one exam paper along with marking rubrics.

The unit outline is scaffolded based on Bloom’s taxonomy, with the aim of building procedural knowledge. It focuses on enhancing knowledge building with prior lessons being used as a foundation to establish knowledge of following lessons. The unit spreads over two weeks which covers 10 lessons and provides a number of key concepts and hints which will facilitate deeper knowledge of students. According to Gray and Waggoner (2002), knowledge is stated as the deepest level of the Taxonomy and students are required to attain knowledge academically and practically, instead of memorising the information. Building conceptual understating of students was the preliminary purpose in the unit plan preparation. One HSC style exam paper is arranged to measure the learning outcomes for this unit. Moreover, alternative assessment tasks are prepared for students to develop deep understanding of previous lessons and easily adapt to next lessons in an engaging way. These assessments have been prepared based on Kulm’s (2013) advice that alternative assessment tasks lessen the pressure of profound contents and help avoid limitations regarding high order thinking. Therefore, preparation of the unit outline has been done with the consideration of boosting students’ conceptual understanding of the content.

The lesson plan forming the second component is focused on calculation of time, time differences around the world and revision of time unit use as well as calculating time intervals. Lesson plans enriched with several learning and teaching activities allow students to relate the topic to real world and understand the necessity learn. As it is stated in the preparation process of the unit outline, building conceptual knowledge of students was also primary in the lesson plan designing. First learning and teaching activity to assist students’ conceptual knowledge was asking ‘Why’ after any response to any given question. According to Darragh (2015) asking questions and listening to students’ answers is an efficient technique to activate students’ thought process and enhance engagement. Furthermore, Weber (2005) sates that students are expected to be able to provide explanations of their reasons including why the methodology they used is mathematically appropriate. The second technique utilised was showing videos which signify connections to

concepts of mathematics and comprehend links to the social world allow them to build higher level mathematical knowledge with reasoning. It is also aimed to help students with learning disabilities and students with visual cognitive abilities.

Assessment of student outcomes are achieved with the constructive questions during the class which help the teacher recognise student engagement. HSC style exam paper and the alternative assessment task which include real-life connections and applications further determine student comprehension level. Although, HSC questions are designed with high expectations that encourage student’s achievement (Skiiling, Bobis, & 2010), it does not provide an effective measurement of students’ higher order thinking (Klum, 2013). Alternative assessments give students freedom and flexibility with the use of tables, charts and pictures. Additionally, it shows them the applicability of their knowledge along with achieving a high level engagement. For example, in the alternative assessment task designed to find the lost ‘Family Guy’ members, student are required to determine different locations and time zones and make calculations based upon the differences. Stilmann, Brown and Galbraith (2010) points out the importance of such mathematical modelling by stating “classes applying Mathematical modelling provide various opportunities for mathematical thinking, knowledge search and experiences in the understanding judgement and interpretation of problem’. Therefore, assessments tasks are a significant tool in teaching and learning practices.

In conclusion, the main focus of the various components developed was students’ academic process with an emphasis on developing their conceptual understating and attaining high level engagement. Important frameworks like Bloom’s taxonomy and mathematical modelling were utilised in the preparation process of learning activities which will enable students to achieve the outcomes of the syllabus and carry their understanding of the concepts beyond the classroom through recognising their application in real life situations.

References

New South Wales Education Standards Authority. (2017). Mathematics General Stage 6 Syllabus Programming Advice. Retrieved from

http://syllabus.nesa.nsw.edu.au/mathematics-standard-stage6/content/1226/

Darragh, L. (2014). Asking Questions and Performing Mathematics Identity. Mathematic Research Article , 175-182.

Education

Gray, C. K. & Waggoner E. J. (2002) Multiple Intelligences Meet Bloom's Taxonomy, Kappa Delta Pi Record, 38(4), 184-187, doi: 10.1080/00228958.2002.10516371

General Maths Wikispaces. (2017). Spherical Geometry. Retrieved from https://general - maths.wikispaces.com/file/view/spherical_geo_notes.pdf

Kulm, G. (2013). Back to the future: Reclaiming Effective Mathematics Assessment Strategies. Middle Grades Research Journal , 8(2), 1-10. Retrieved from

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/258698322_BACK_TO_THE_FUTURE_Reclaiming_Effective_

Mathematics_Assessment_Strategies

Skilling, K., Bobis, J., Martin, K. J., Anderson, J., Way, J. (2016). What secondary teachers think and do about student engagement in the mathematics. Mathematcs Education Journal , 1-23. doi: 10.1007/s13394-016-0179-x

Stillman, G., Brown, J.& Galbraith, P. (2010). Researching Applications of Mathematical Modelling in Mathematics Learning and Teaching. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 22(2), 1-6.

Tatar, E., Akkaya, A. & Kagizmanli, T., B. (2014). Using dynamic software in mathematics: the case of reflection symmetry. International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 45(7), 980-995, DOI: 10.1080/0020739X.2014.902129

Weber, K. (2005). Students' Understanding of Trigonometric Functions . Mathematics Education Research Journal , 17(3), 91-112