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DATABASE LIFECYCLE

MANAGEMENT EMERGES
TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE
COMPLEX DATA SITES:
2016 SURVEY ON DLM STRATEGIES

By Joe McKendrick, Research Analyst


Produced by Unisphere Research,
a Division of Information Today, Inc.
June 2016

Sponsored by
2

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Executive Summary��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������3

Growth and Complexity�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������4

Managing in the New Data Environment����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������8

Database Lifecycle Management--What Does It Look Like?��������������������������������������������������������11

Database Lifecycle Management--Benefits Seen�������������������������������������������������������������������������15

Conclusion��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������19

Demographics��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������20

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
3

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

A lot of attention has been spent on consolidation, automation n Today’s businesses may run on data, but when it comes to
and cloud, purportedly creating less demand for data managers supporting data operations, business leaders and executives
and DBAs. However, the opposite seems to be true. In fact, don’t understand how thinly stretched their database
there is a growing need for more database talent and expertise operations are. There is a disconnect between management
to manage growing complexity. A new survey of data executives, and the reality on the ground – 30% of managers believe they
managers and professionals finds this is part of an increasingly are hiring more staff with the skills required to reduce database
challenging data environment. environment complexity, but among DBAs only 9% believe
that to be the case.
The research, conducted by Unisphere Research, a division of
Information Today, Inc., covered issues facing today’s data shops. n There are many pressing challenges contributing to the
The 303 respondents represent a range of industries and company complexity of managing data environments, including
sizes. The survey, conducted among readers of Database Trends & keeping databases at current update or patch levels, testing
Applications, was sponsored by IDERA. new technologies and infrastructure solutions for databases,
addressing security issues, reducing or eliminating manual
Leading enterprises are turning to database lifecycle repetitive tasks and processes, meeting business SLA,
management (DLM) to address this complexity. DLM involves availability and performance expectations, and managing a
coordinated processes, tools, and people to optimize all aspects growing number of databases with little or no staff increase.
of the lifecycle of data including data architecture and modeling,
database design, performance monitoring, administration, n Nearly 80% of organizations now have a DLM initiative
security, storage, and archiving. Nearly 90% agree that the underway, but most are in the early stages. Close to 90% of
complexity of their database environment has increased over the these companies already are seeing a range of tangible business
past five years, while more than 45%, state these environments benefits as a result of their DLM efforts, including increased
have grown “significantly” or “extremely” more complex during data systems uptime, making data more highly available to end
this time.” users, increased confidence in the data, and more rapid
delivery of data to decision makers, more predictable IT
The following are key findings from the survey: expenses, and more rapid and frequent delivery of
applications.
n Database administrators and managers are stretched to the
limit. Complexity in database operations has grown On the following pages are results from this latest survey of
significantly, but more than 40% of organizations have data management practices.
not expanded the sizes of their data teams. Staff cutbacks are
even more pronounced within the largest organizations where
managing data stores arguably might be the most complex.

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
4

GROWTH AND COMPLEXITY

Database administrators and managers are stretched to the limit. Complexity in database operations has grown significantly,
but more than 40% of organizations have not expanded the sizes of their data teams. Staff cutbacks are even more pronounced
within the largest organizations where managing data stores arguably might be the most complex.

A substantial portion of enterprises are not adding staff to keep as Hadoop or data warehouse expansions, also is a driver among
up with database challenges. Despite the growth and complexity 45% of sites. (See Figure 3.)
of data, over 40% say the size of the team to support this trend
has not changed or has shrunk in the past five years. In addition, 89% agree that the complexity of their database
(See Figure 1) environments has increased over the past five years, while
46%, state these environments have grown “significantly” or
Among respondents reporting reductions in data staff sizes, “extremely” more complex during this time. This perception
the most prevalent reason is overall business cutbacks. Only of increased data complexity is shared across all job categories.
20% say they have achieved smaller data staffs by adopting smart (Figure 4.)
approaches – such as greater adoption of automated database
management tools, greater adoption of database consolidation Big data, data integration and security are key contributing
strategies, or taking on outside partners to help manage the factors to the complexity of today’s data environments. Two-
process. (See Figure 2.) thirds report data growth is increasing the complexity of their
jobs, while 60% also say their businesses have been expanding as
What’s driving growth among companies reporting increased well. A majority also see the rise of data integration requirements
database staffs? For the most part, companies have been across their enterprises as contributing to the complexity
expanding – adding more lines, more services, and increasing challenge, and close to half cite security issues. There is also a
transaction volumes. Sixty-one percent of sites experiencing disconnect between what DBAs are experiencing, versus their
staff growth say the growing volume of business necessitates management or IT counterparts. DBAs are more inclined to see
adding more data managers to their teams. The growth of data security requirements as a factor as well – 57%, versus 47% for
itself –exacerbated by big data – also is a contributing factor, the overall survey group. (See Figure 5.)
cited by half this group. The rise of new data frameworks, such

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
5

Figure 1: How has the size of your data management team changed over the
past five years?

Has grown more than 50%: 11% Don’t know/unsure: 6%

Has grown 26%-50%: 12% Has shrunk: 10%

Has grown 11%-25%: 15%

Has not changed in size: 31%


Has grown up tp 10%: 12%

Figure 2: Why has your data management team shrunk in size over the past five
years? (Among respondents reporting decreased staff size, as shown
in Figure 1.)

Budget restrictions or cutbacks from 62%


the business
Greater adoption of automated database 21%
management tools:
Greater adoption of database consolidation 21%
strategies:
More reliance on outside service providers: 21%
Changes in the business (such as merger or 21%
acquisition of company with overlapping skills):

Difficulty finding or retaining essential talent/ 18%


skills:
More data functions migrated to cloud: 3%

Other 8%
0 20 40 60 80 100
0 20 40 60 80 100

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
6

Figure 3: If your data management team has expanded over the past five years,
what has driven this growth?

Business growth – more customers, more 61%


transactions, more products/services:
Data growth: 50%

Expanded data functions/data environment 44%


(such as adding Hadoop, data warehouse):
Need for greater security or compliance 25%
management:
Movement to cloud databases: 23%

Don’t know/unsure: 14%

Other: 6%

0 20 40 60 80 100
0 20 40 60 80 100

Figure 4: To what degree has the complexity of your database environment
changed over the past five years?

All DBAs Execs/Mgrs Programmer/arch./cons.*

Extremely more complex: 6% 5% 6% 6%

Significantly more complex: 40% 36% 40% 42%

Somewhat more complex: 43% 48% 43% 45%

No noticeable change: 10% 9% 10% 7%

Less complex: 1% 0% 1% 0%

Don’t know/unsure: 1% 2% 1% 0%

*Programmers, architects, consultants, project managers

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
7

Figure 5: What has driven this increased complexity?

All DBAs Execs/Mgrs Prog.*

Data growth: 66% 78% 66% 68%

Business growth – more customers, more transactions, 60% 60% 60% 62%
more products/services:

More interconnectedness between data environments: 56% 52% 56% 56%

Increased security requirements: 47% 57% 47% 46%

Increased variety of data environment 40% 48% 40% 38%


(such as NoSQL, Hadoop):

Increased compliance or regulatory requirements: 40% 48% 40% 41%

Greater connectedness to cloud or external environments: 34% 34% 34% 38%

Rise of new client types/mobile computing access: 26% 22% 26% 24%

Don’t know/unsure: 2% 2% 2% 5%

Other 4% 1% 4% 3%

*Programmers, architects, consultants, project managers

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
8

MANAGING IN THE NEW DATA ENVIRONMENT

There are many pressing challenges contributing to the complexity of managing data environments, including keeping
databases at current update or patch levels, testing new technologies and infrastructure solutions for databases, addressing
security issues, reducing or eliminating manual repetitive tasks and processes, meeting business SLA, availability and performance
expectations, and managing a growing number of databases with little or no staff increase

There are many challenges that top data managers’ lists. Nearly Cloud represents a new way of managing data environments,
40% of data managers and professionals say they are having one which may relieve enterprise data shops of some of the
difficulty keeping up with database updates and patches, as well burdens of administration. For the movement to the cloud for
as simply being able to try out new technologies and approaches. mission-critical applications, the survey presents a mixed picture.
Security also ranks high on the list of challenges, as do efforts Many organizations seem to be still in experimentation or pilot
to squeeze out the manual processes which tend to slow things mode. The move to cloud computing, at least for mission-critical
down. (See Figure 6.) enterprise data (defined as more than 25% of their total data
stores), will be a slow one. Only 19% of data managers indicate
The challenge is to be able to look across enterprise datascapes they intend to move a significant portion of their enterprise data
and identify where potential issues may be arising – whether they to public cloud, while 26% intend to move to private or hybrid
come from databases themselves, or from other parts of the IT cloud environments. (See Figure 7.)
infrastructure.

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
9

Figure 6: What are your most pressing challenges in managing your


database environment(s)?

Keeping databases at current update or 39%


patch levels:
Testing new technologies and infrastructure 39%
solutions for databases:
Addressing security issues: 36%
Reducing or eliminating manual repetitive 36%
tasks and processes:
Meeting business SLA, availability and 34%
performance expectations:
Managing larger growing number of 33%
databases with little or no staff increase:
Determining related application issues: 30%
Predicting resource usage analysis and 29%
capacity planning:

Consolidating database resources and 29%


assets:

Validating and applying tuning solutions: 27%

Tracking system configurations for 20%


compliance or regulatory purposes:
Provisioning or refreshing test or 21%
development systems:
Accelerating diagnosis of database 22%
performance problems:

Log-file analysis for root cause analysis of 18%


failures:
None of the above: 3%
Other 1%

0
0 20 40 60 80
20 40 60 80 100
100

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
10

Figure 7: How much of your mission-critical enterprise data do you plan to


move to public cloud services?

26%
None:
18%

19%
Less than 10%:
16%

17%
10%-24%:
22%

10%
25%-49%:
13%

4%
50%-74%:
6%

4%
75%-99%:
4%

1%
100%:
3%

18%
Don’t know/unsure:
19%

00 20 40 60 80
20 40 60 80 100
100

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
11

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT -- WHAT DOES IT LOOK LIKE?

Nearly 80% of organizations now have a DLM initiative underway, but most are in the early stages.

Addressing the complexity of today’s multi-faceted enterprises that their DLM practices are just out of the gate, either being
and data environments requires different approaches, versus organized or applied inconsistently across their enterprises. (See
simply adding hardware and software, or attempting to lift Figure 9.) DLM is most well-developed at larger organizations
and shift operations to the cloud. DLM involves coordinated with more than 10,000 employees, with 40% of respondents
processes, tools, and people to optimize all aspects of the lifecycle having organized or comprehensive DLM efforts underway,
of data including data architecture and modeling, database versus 20% of smaller companies. (See Figure 10.)
design, monitoring, administration, security, storage, and
archiving. A majority report their efforts are typically part of application
lifecycle management (ALM) efforts, which may decrease the
Virtualization (42%) and automation (40%) are the top visibility of DLM. In addition, 40% indicate their DLM initiatives
pro-active options adopted by data managers to provide are part of an agile development process, in which solutions
some much-needed simplicity, followed by management and are developed incrementally, in tandem with the business. (See
configuration tools (38%). Nearly one-third report adopting Figure 11.) DLM may be instrumental in these other initiatives,
DLM methodologies to address growing complexity within their as it enhances the “ability to remain in step with the application,”
data environments. Interestingly, executives and managers were as one respondent pointed out. “All of our database changes
more likely to see configuration and management tools as their including data are handled through a change-control process and
best response to database complexity, while DBAs were more can be deployed or redeployed to a given environment relatively
likely to favor automation over virtualization. (See Figure 8.) easily.”

Today’s businesses may run on data, but when it comes to Fifty-three percent of data managers say their main type of
supporting data operations, business leaders and executives don’t engagement with DLM comes through data architecture and
understand how thinly stretched their database operations are. modeling, followed closely by optimization and improvements
Over 30% of managers believe they are hiring more staff with (52%) and performance monitoring (50%). This varies by
needed skills to reduce the complexity database environments, job role, however. DBAs are more likely to be involved with
but only 9% of DBAs agree. administration and maintenance (74%), followed by performance
monitoring (69%), while executive and managerial-level
How complete are DLM efforts at this time? Seventy-seven respondents are more focused on architecture and modeling
percent report being in various stages of DLM, with most in (67%), along with security and compliance (58%). Programmers
the early stages. Only 22% report being in a relatively advanced and architects are more likely to prioritize architecture and
state, in which their DLM efforts are either well “organized,” in modeling (54%), along with development and deployment
place and practice across the enterprise, or “comprehensive,” (51%). (See Figure 12.)
and integral to day-to-day business. Meanwhile, 56% indicate

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
12

Figure 8: What steps have you and your team taken in the past five years to
address or reduce the complexity of your database environment?

All DBAs Execs/Mgrs Prog.*

Migrated more databases to virtualized environments: 42% 50% 36% 47%

Incorporated greater automation for database functions: 40% 55% 36% 40%

Applied management and configuration tools: 38% 31% 44% 37%

Stepped up our database lifecycle management efforts: 32% 31% 31% 33%

Focused on consolidating data environments/centers: 30% 30% 35% 32%

Hired more staff members with needed skills: 24% 9% 31% 33%

Stepped up data governance: 22% 11% 34% 22%

Moved more database functions to cloud: 20% 13% 23% 20%

Increased user training: 16% 16% 19% 12%

Turned over more work to database service provider: 8% 11% 6% 6%

No proactive steps taken: 11% 8% 10% 8%

Don’t know/unsure: 6% 8% 2% 0%

Other 1% 1% 0% 0%

*Programmers, architects, consultants, project managers

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
13

Figure 9: Please describe how complete your database lifecycle management


(DLM) effort is at this time:

Don’t know/unsure: 4%
No organized DLM effort
at this time: 19% Comprehensive – DLM is an integral
part of our day-to-day business: 6%

Organized – DLM is in place and


Emerging -- just starting to practice across most data assets:
organize DLM efforts: 33% 16%

Maturing -- DLM efforts are spotty,


missing some elements: 23%

Figure 10: P
 lease describe how complete your database lifecycle management
(DLM) effort is at this time:

1-100 101-1K 1K-10k 10k+

No organized DLM effort at this time: 23% 25% 14% 13%

Emerging -- just starting to organize DLM efforts: 29% 37% 43% 20%

Maturing -- DLM efforts are spotty, missing 23% 24% 25% 22%
some elements:
Organized – DLM is in place and practice across 14% 12% 12% 27%
most data assets:
Comprehensive – DLM is an integral part of our 6% 2% 3% 13%
day-to-day business:

Don’t know/unsure: 6% 0% 4% 5%

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
14

Figure 11: I s your database lifecycle management effort aligned or affiliated


with any of the following initiatives that may also be taking place
within your organization?

Application lifecycle management: 51%

Agile development (any form): 42%

DevOps: 37%

Product lifecycle management: 33%

Quality management: 32%

Don’t know/unsure: 18%

Other 1%

0 20 40 60 80 100
0 20 40 60 80 100

Figure 12: P
 lease indicate your level of involvement in the following stages of
your database lifecycle management: (Total rating “4” or “5” on a
scale of 1 to 5, from 1=no involvement to 5=leadership role)
All DBAs Execs/Mgrs Programmer/arch./cons.*

Data architecture and modeling: 53% 43% 67% 54%

Optimization and improvements: 52% 67% 52% 49%

Performance monitoring: 50% 69% 46% 49%

Administration and maintenance: 48% 74% 43% 44%

Security and compliance: 47% 58% 58% 47%

Development and deployment: 45% 37% 43% 51%

Storage and archiving: 40% 49% 48% 37%

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
15

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT -- BENEFITS SEEN

Close to 90% of these companies already are seeing a range of tangible business benefits as a result of their DLM efforts,
including increased data systems uptime, making data more highly available to end users, increased confidence in the data,
and more rapid delivery of data to decision makers, more predictable IT expenses, and more rapid and frequent delivery of
applications.

DLM is already demonstrating a range of advantages to There is a wide disparity between which DLM processes have
enterprises employing the practice. Respondents say the greatest the most positive impact on IT performance versus business
impact so far has been on the administration and maintenance performance. The prime IT performance processes cited by
aspects of data management, with 55% rating their efforts highly 80% of respondents include patching and updating (86%), log
in this area. Performance monitoring also benefitted from DLM management (81%), and tracking IT assets (79%). In contrast,
(48%), followed by development and deployment, and security the processes having the most profound impact on business
and compliance (both tied at 47%). (See Figure 13.) performance include identifying business requirements (63%),
identifying internal data consumers (58%), and collaboration and
A total of 87% of data managers report a range of tangible workflow (56%). (See Figure 15.)
business benefits as a result of their DLM efforts. Fifty-seven
percent report increased data systems uptime as the leading More than half of survey respondents cite being able to better
benefit of DLM, while another 55% report that their efforts have identify and work with business requirements as the greatest
made data more highly available to end users. Confidence in the opportunity for DLM. Another 46% see DLM as a way to better
data itself is up at 38% of sites. (See Figure 14.) troubleshoot issues within their data environments, and perform
root-cause analysis. A similar percentage say data quality and
One respondent noted that the implementation of DLM testing can be better managed and accomplished through an
has resulted in “fewer silos of information, as we look across effective DLM effort. Forty-four percent also agree that security
cross functional areas and determine the best way to align and and compliance is enhanced with a DLM effort in place. (See
interconnect best of breed databases.” Figure 16.)

Another noted, “Database lifecycle management has mainly


allowed IT resources to be directed to other functions much
more efficiently for other equally critical line of business mission-
critical IT needs within an environment of reduced IT personnel.”

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
16

Figure 13: H
 ow effective are your database lifecycle management capabilities
at managing each of the following processes? (Total rating “4” or “5”
on a scale of 1 to 5, from 1=not effective to 5=highly effective.)

Administration and maintenance: 55%

Performance monitoring: 48%

Development and deployment: 47%

Security and compliance: 47%

Storage and archiving: 43%

Data architecture and modeling: 40%

Optimization and improvements: 35%

0 20 40 60 80 100
0 20 40 60 80 100

Figure 14: W
 hat tangible business benefits is your organization now seeing as
a result of your database lifecycle management efforts?

Reduced system downtime: 57%


Data is more highly available to end-users: 55%
Decision-makers have more confidence in the data: 38%
Data is delivered at a more rapid rate to decision-makers: 37%
More predictable IT expenses: 36%
Applications are delivered more rapidly and frequently: 31%
Auditing is completed more frequently or in less time: 23%
Increased revenues: 23%
Increased orders/sales: 12%
No tangible business benefits realized from our 5%
DLM at this time:
Don’t know/unsure: 12%
Other 1%
0
0 20
20 40
40 60
60 80 100
80 100

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
17

Figure 15: W
 hich database lifecycle management-related processes have the
greatest impact on IT operational performance, and which have the
greatest impact on overall business performance?

IT performance Business Performance

Patching and updating: 86% 14%

Log management: 81% 19%

Tracking IT assets: 79% 21%

Troubleshooting/root-cause analysis: 77% 23%

Tracking and analyzing database performance: 76% 24%

Monitoring for required changing: 75% 25%

Provisioning and rolling out new databases: 74% 26%

Change control: 67% 33%

Retiring/archiving of sunsetting data: 65% 35%

Assuring and managing security: 64% 36%

Documentation: 63% 37%

Continuous delivery: 56% 44%

Data quality and testing: 52% 48%


Assuring compliance: 52% 48%

Collaboration and workflow: 44% 56%

Identifying and involving “downstream” data consumers: 42% 58%

Identifying business requirements: 37% 63%

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
18

Figure 16: W
 hat are the most challenging areas to address with database life-
cycle management? (Total rating “4” or “5” on a scale of 1 to 5, from
1=not challenging to 5=extremely challenging)

Business requirements: 55%

Troubleshooting/root-cause analysis: 46%

Data quality and testing: 45%


Security and compliance: 44%
Database performance: 43%
Continuous delivery: 40%

Documentation: 39%

Retiring/archiving of sunsetting data: 39%

Testing and quality control: 38%

Collaboration and workflow: 35%


Patching and updating: 35%
Change control: 34%
New database implementations: 33%
Monitoring for required changing: 30%
IT assets: 24%
Log management:
21%

00 20
20 40
40 60
60 80
80 100
100

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
19

CONCLUSION

In today’s complex and high-pressure data environments, including increased data systems uptime, making data more
organizations are asking data teams to do more with less. Data highly available to end users, increased confidence in the
management challenges are growing in number and vying for the data, more rapid delivery of data to decision makers, more
same staff to manage them all, making for organizations that are predictable IT expenses, and more rapid and frequent delivery of
spread very thin. These organizations are looking to incorporate applications.
database lifecycle management initiatives into their processes, As one respondent put it, DLM has provided his company
but this seems like still a new thing and a slow roll in most shops, a “better understanding within IT of what data brings to the
amplified by a lack of staff and resources available to implement. table regarding impact on business operations -- business
In addition, there is a disconnect between what management architecture, IT operations, product management, development
teams believe, and the reality on the ground. and compliance areas. We can but hope this eventually migrates
Nearly 90% of organizations with DLM report a range of into the C-suite.”
tangible business benefits as a result of their DLM efforts,

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
20

DEMOGRAPHICS

Figure 17: What is your primary job title?

Database Administrator (DBA):  24%

Architect/Engineer (security, 15%


systems, data, etc.): 

Director/Manager of IS/IT or 13%


computer-related function:

Chief/VP 13%
(CIO, CSO, CTO, IT, IS, etc):

IT Consultant: 7%

IT Operations Manager:  5%

Programmer/Developer:  4%

Systems Administrator:  3%

Analyst/Systems Analyst:  3%

Manager of a business unit (other 3%


than computer-related function): 

Project Manager: 1%

Executive management level 1%


for the business:

Other 6%

0 20 40 60 80 100

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
21

Figure 18: Which of the following are your job responsibilities?

Optimization and improvements: 68%

Data architecture and modeling: 66%

Administration and maintenance: 65%

Performance monitoring: 59%

Development and deployment: 58%

Security and compliance: 56%

Storage and archiving: 46%

None of the above: 4%

Other: 3%

0 20 40 60 80 100

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
22

Figure 19: What is your primary industry?

IT Services/Consulting/System: 21%

Software/application development: 12%

Financial Services: 12%

Healthcare/medical/life sciences: 9%

Education (all levels): 8%

Government (all levels): 8%

Manufacturing: 7%

Utility/Telecommunications/Transportation: 7%

Business/consumer services: 5%

Retail/Distribution: 3%

Energy (oil, gas, etc): 2%

High-Tech manufacturing: 1%

Insurance: 1%

Non-Profit: 1%

Other: 3%
0 20 40 60 80 100

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
23

Figure 20: H
 ow many employees are in your entire organization? (Includes all
locations, branches, and subsidiaries)

1-100 employees: 26%

101-500 employees: 13%

501-1,000 employees: 7%

1,001-5,000 employees: 21%

5,001-10,000 employees: 8%

More than 10,000: 24%

0 20 40 60 80 100

Figure 21: How many employees are in your data management team?

1-5 employees: 43%

6-10 employees: 24%

11-25 employees: 17%

26-50 employees: 5%

51-100 employees: 4%

More than 100 employees: 7%

0 20 40 60 80 100

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.
24

Figure 22: How many employees are in your data management team?

All 1-100 101-1K 1K-10K 10K+

1-5 employees: 43% 77% 52% 30% 17%

6-10 employees: 24% 19% 27% 29% 20%

11-25 employees: 17% 4% 20% 24% 10%

26-50 employees: 5% 0% 2% 8% 10%

51-100 employees: 4% 0% 0% 8% 7%

More than 100 employees: 7% 0% 0% 0% 27%

DATABASE LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT EMERGES TO ADDRESS EVER-MORE COMPLEX DATA SITES was produced by Unisphere Research and sponsored by Idera.
Unisphere Research is the market research unit of Unisphere Media, a division of Information Today, Inc., publishers of Database Trends and Applications magazine and Big Data
Quarterly. To review abstracts of our past reports, visit www.unisphereresearch.com. Unisphere Media, 121 Chanlon Road, New Providence, NJ 07974; 908-795-3702.