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Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Faculty of Humanities School of Education Unit Outline EDPR3004 Cultural Contexts in Primary Education Semester 1,

Unit Outline

EDPR3004 Cultural Contexts in Primary Education Semester 1, 2018

Unit study package code:

EDPR3004

Mode of study:

Internal

Tuition pattern summary:

Note: For any specific variations to this tuition pattern and for precise information refer to the Learning Activities section.

Credit Value:

Pre-requisite units:

Workshop: 1 x 2 Hours Weekly

This unit does not have a fieldwork component.

25.0

EDPR2003 (v.0) Professional Studies in Managing Learning Environments or any previous version

OR

309310 (v.0) Professional Studies and Managing Learning Environment 225 or any previous version

OR

EDUC2000 (v.0) Inclusive Education or any previous version

OR

EDSC3002 (v.0) Pedagogies for Inclusivity or any previous version

Co-requisite units:

Nil

Anti-requisite units:

Nil

Result type:

Grade/Mark

Approved incidental fees:

Information about approved incidental fees can be obtained from our website. Visit fees.curtin.edu.au/incidental_fees.cfm for details.

Unit coordinator:

Title:

Dr

Name:

Brad Gobby

Phone:

+618 9266 3795

Email:

Brad.Gobby@curtin.edu.au

Location:

Building: 501 - Room: Level 4

Consultation times:

By appointment

Teaching Staff:

Administrative contact:

Name:

Administrative Enquiries

Phone:

+618 9266 2158

Email:

EducationStudents@curtin.edu.au

Location:

Building: 501 - Room: Level 3

Learning Management System:

Blackboard (lms.curtin.edu.au)

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Acknowledgement of Country

We respectfully acknowledge the Indigenous Elders, custodians, their descendants and kin of this land past and present. The Centre for Aboriginal Studies aspires to contribute to positive social change for Indigenous Australians through higher education and research.

Syllabus

This unit examines social, cultural, linguistic, and economic forces which impact on classroom practices and student learning outcomes. The unit requires analysis of the characteristics of classrooms and schools that reduce the effects of inequalities through curriculum choices and pedagogical practices. This unit emphasises the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers associated with student diversity including consideration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in primary school classrooms.

Introduction

What are the significant influences shaping the organisation of education, the practices of teaching and learning, and the educational experiences and outcomes of student learning? What does a sociological perspective bring to our understanding of these influences? This unit introduces you to concepts and perspectives that develop your understanding of the contextual dimension of schooling in Australian society. Education must be understood in relation to the factors beyond the educational setting that shape how education and learning is thought about, acted upon and enacted. An increasingly culturally and linguistically diverse population of students is requiring educators to think differently about their ideas and practices. Increasing intervention in education through government policy and programs, such as NAPLAN and increased school choice, are exerting a range of problematic effects on schools. These developments relate to a wider set of changes occurring to government and society, called neoliberalism. This unit encourages you, as a matter of urgency and professional responsibility, to engage with these issues and a range of other forces shaping how educators think and act, as well as the experiences of children and students. Through post-structuralist and critical theoretical lenses, you will be challenged to think about schooling, teaching and learning as practices inextricably situated in and shaped by social, economic and political relations. You should complete the unit with a toolkit of concepts and notions that enable you to critically and powerfully interpret and negotiate the phenomena of teaching and learning in contemporary Australia.

Unit Learning Outcomes

All graduates of Curtin University achieve a set of nine Graduate Attributes during their course of study. These inform an employer that, through your studies, you have acquired discipline knowledge and a range of other skills and attributes which employers would value in a professional setting. Each unit in your course addresses the Graduate Attributes through a clearly identified set of learning outcomes. They form a vital part in the process referred to as assurance of learning. The learning outcomes notify you of what you are expected to know, understand or be able to do in order to be successful in this unit. Each assessment for this unit is carefully designed to test your knowledge of one or more of the unit learning outcomes. On successfully completing all of the assessments you will have achieved all of these learning outcomes.

Your course has been designed so that on graduating you will have achieved all of Curtin's Graduate Attributes through the assurance of learning processes in each unit.

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Faculty of Humanities School of Education
 

On successful completion of this unit students can:

Graduate Attributes addressed

1

Examine and evaluate current international and national education policy trends

1 Examine and evaluate current international and national education policy trends
1 Examine and evaluate current international and national education policy trends
1 Examine and evaluate current international and national education policy trends

2

Interpret and describe current cultural and social patterns in Australia

2 Interpret and describe current cultural and social patterns in Australia
2 Interpret and describe current cultural and social patterns in Australia
2 Interpret and describe current cultural and social patterns in Australia

3

Develop a critical perspective of difference and diversity and their significance to education

3 Develop a critical perspective of difference and diversity and their significance to education
3 Develop a critical perspective of difference and diversity and their significance to education
3 Develop a critical perspective of difference and diversity and their significance to education

4

Evaluate strategies that support inclusive student engagement and learning for children from diverse backgrounds, such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

engagement and learning for children from diverse backgrounds, such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students
engagement and learning for children from diverse backgrounds, such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students
engagement and learning for children from diverse backgrounds, such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

5

Formulate an informed perspective on an educational issue

5 Formulate an informed perspective on an educational issue
5 Formulate an informed perspective on an educational issue

Curtin's Graduate Attributes

Apply discipline knowledge Thinking skills Information skills

Apply discipline knowledge

Apply discipline knowledge Thinking skills Information skills

Thinking skills

Apply discipline knowledge Thinking skills Information skills

Information skills

(use analytical skills to solve problems)

(confidence to investigate new ideas)

    Learning how to learn
 
    Learning how to learn
 
    Learning how to learn

Learning how to learn

Communication skills

Technology skills

(apply principles learnt to new situations) (confidence to tackle unfamiliar problems)

International perspective Cultural understanding Professional Skills

International perspective

International perspective Cultural understanding Professional Skills

Cultural understanding

International perspective Cultural understanding Professional Skills

Professional Skills

(value the perspectives of others)

(value the perspectives of others)

(work independently and as a team) (plan own work)

Find out more about Curtin's Graduate attributes at the Office of Teaching & Learning website: ctl.curtin.edu.au

Learning Activities

There are some expectations regarding studying this unit.

All students are expected to engage in the content and activities of the unit. You are expected to prepare for the weekly topics by: reading the topic information on Blackboard including viewing videos and links in Blackboard, and reading the essential and recommended readings. You should take notes of your reading. These should be completed prior to attending your workshop (or online collaborate sessions if being offered). Many of the readings and activities are from the essential textbook.

Attendance at workshops for on-campus students: you are expected to attend 90% of the workshops. If you are unable to attend your workshop you should inform your tutor prior to the session via email. The workshops are an opportunity to clarify, discuss, share and expand on the topic readings and ideas. Some workshop time is allocated for to prepare and complete your assessments. The online discussion board is available for you to share your ideas with other students. Not engaging with the readings, workshops and discussion board will make the completion of the assessment items more challenging.

You will receive feedback on your progress in this unit through assessment feedback, rubrics, tutor feedback and comments on the discussion boards.

Learning Resources

Library Reading List

The Reading List for this unit can be accessed through Blackboard.

Essential texts

The required textbook(s) for this unit are:

l Gobby, B. & Walker, R. (2017). Powers of Curriculum: Sociological Perspectives on Education. Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

(ISBN/ISSN: 9780190303709)

Online resources

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

l Gobby, B. & Walker, R. (2017). Powers of Curriculum: Sociological Perspectives on Education. Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

(ISBN/ISSN: 9780190303709)

Assessment

Assessment schedule

Task

Value %

Date Due

Unit Learning

Outcome(s)

Assessed

Report

1

50 percent

Week: Week 6 Day: Monday 2 April Time: 23:59 WST

1,2,5

Essay

2

50 percent

Week: Week 15 Day: Monday 4 June Time: 23:59 WST

3,4,5

Detailed information on assessment tasks

1.

Report

There are three options to choose from:

Option 1

Many education systems are experiencing the effects of neoliberal policies/programs. Your task is to use at least 8 unit readings (the essential and extended readings) from Topics 1-5 and other credible sources to write a report into the topic of neoliberalism and school education. You must demonstrate a critical awareness of ‘neoliberalism’ and its effects in the field of education.

Word count: 2000-2500. This includes all text (headings, in-text citations, captions and direct quotes). It excludes the Reference list.

Option 2

Many education systems are experiencing the effects of neoliberal policies/programs. Your task is to create an informative and engaging 8-10 minute investigative podcast (with a written transcript) for the ABC on the topic of neoliberalism and school education. You must use at least 8 unit readings (the essential and extended readings) from Topics 1-5 and other credible sources. See the unit’s Backboard site for more information about file size and type.

Option 3

School choice, privatisation and marketisation have been a part of education policy for some time in Australia. While some people believe private schooling offers a 'better education' than public education, others claim that the benefits to students are not so clear and that other factors shape learning outcomes.

Conduct your own investigation into the link between private schools and educational performance using the My School website to compare schools. Your research question is: Is there a clear link between private or selective schooling and high academic results, or are there other factors at play? You must use at least 8 unit readings (the essential and extended readings) from Topics 1-5. In addition to using these readings, you can use other credible sources.

Word count: 2000-2500. This includes all text (headings, in-text citations, captions and direct quotes). It excludes the Reference list.

Notes:

l

Additional information about and requirements of these assessments are outlined on the Blackboard site. Please read before commencing your assessments.

l

Using fewer than 8 unit readings from Topics 1-5 may result in a fail for this assessment.

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

2.

Essay

This assessment has two components. You must submit both components.

Part 1 (45 marks):

Write an essay in response to the following:

Teaching and learning is inextricably related to its social, cultural, economic and political context. Therefore, Raewyn Connell (2009, p. 224) argues that educators need to see themselves as intellectual workers and this requires them to possess a ‘depth of knowledge about the culture, and a practice of critical analysis.’ Write an essay in support of Connell’s assertion.

You must use at least 8 unit readings (the essential and extended readings) from Topics 5-10. Using fewer than 8 unit readings from topics 5-10 may result in a fail for this assessment.

Word count: 2000-2500. This includes all text (headings, in-text citations, captions and direct quotes). It excludes the Reference list.

In addition to using the above required unit readings, you may also use other readings from the unit and other credible/scholarly sources.

Part 2 (5 marks):

Produce a digital artefact that communicates the main ideas of your essay to an audience of teachers. You may create PowerPoint slides, a Prezi, an info-graph using Piktochart or Glogster, a concept map using Inspiration/Popplet, or similar.

Note:

l Additional information about and requirements of these assessments are outlined on the Blackboard site. Please read before commencing your assessments.

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Pass requirements

Please refer to Curtin University’s Assessment and Student Progression Manual for full details of all policies and procedures associated with assessment at Curtin. Each of your tutors and Unit Co-ordinators is obliged to observe this policy.

In order to pass this unit, all assessment tasks must be submitted and an overall mark of 50% or more must be achieved. It is not essential to pass all assessments, although the overall Unit Learning Outcomes must be achieved in order to pass a unit.

Successful submission means that:

l

If the assessment task comprises discrete components, such as:

¡ three components of a portfolio, involving separate tasks addressing different aspects of the Unit Learning Outcomes

¡ discrete sections such as test results and a report

¡ mandatory accompanying documentation such as a Parental Consent Form

then all components must be provided for the assessment to be deemed as submitted. Late penalties will apply until the complete assessment is submitted.

l

The electronic file must be readable. It is a student’s responsibility to ensure that assessments are complete and have been successfully uploaded in a readable format. You are advised to check that your file can be opened and that all sections are present and readable. Please seek assistance if you experience technical problems.

Students are strongly advised to ensure work is backed up to a separate, retrievable location, as extensions are unlikely to be granted for last-minute computer failure.

Resubmissions

A student who has received a fail grade (less than 50%) for an assessment, but achieves at least 40% of the possible mark for an assessment that was handed by the due date, will be offered the opportunity to resubmit. Please note that:

l

the maximum mark a resubmission can be awarded is 50% of the possible mark (for example, 25/50)

l

only one assessment resubmission per unit is possible.

l

the resubmitted work must be received by the due date.

Due dates include the standard published due dates, the resubmission due date advised by Unit Co-ordinators, and any dates negotiated through pre-approved assessment extensions.

Fair assessment through moderation

Moderation describes a quality assurance process to ensure that assessments are appropriate to the learning outcomes, and that students work is evaluated consistently by assessors. Minimum standards for the moderation of assessments are described in the Assessment and Student Progression Manual, available from policies.curtin.edu.au/findapolicy/

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Late assessment policy

This ensures that the requirements for submission of assignments and other work to be assessed are fair, transparent, equitable and that penalties are consistently applied.

1. All student assessments are required to have a due date and time specified on this Unit Outline.

2. Students will be penalised by a deduction of ten percent per calendar day for a late assessment submission (e.g. a mark equivalent to 10% of the total allocated for the assessment will be deducted from the marked value for every day that the assessment is late). This means that an assessment worth 20 marks will have two marks deducted per calendar day late. Hence if it was handed in three calendar days late and given a mark of 16/20, the student would receive 10/20. An assessment more than seven calendar days overdue will not be marked and will receive a mark of 0.

Assessment extension

A student unable to complete an assessment task by/on the original published date/time (e.g. examinations, tests) or

due date/time (e.g. assignments) must apply for an assessment extension using the Assessment Extension form

(available from the Forms page at students.curtin.edu.au/administration/) as prescribed by the Academic Registrar. It

is the responsibility of the student to demonstrate and provide evidence for exceptional circumstances beyond the

student's control that prevent them from completing/submitting the assessment task.

The student will be expected to lodge the form and supporting documentation with the unit coordinator before the assessment date/time or due date/time. An application may be accepted up to five working days after the date or due date of the assessment task where the student is able to provide an acceptable explanation as to why he or she was not able to submit the application prior to the assessment date. An application for an assessment extension will not be accepted after the date of the Board of Examiners' meeting.

Please note: The School of Education manages assessment extensions through a centralised lodgement system. All applications should be submitted to EducationStudents@curtin.edu.au

To facilitate this process and ensure you receive the outcome of your application as quickly as possible, please use the form found in the “Help” folder of your unit’s Blackboard site. You will need to go to the Student Support Section titled “Essential Forms, Policies and Processes”.

All assessment extensions are governed by the guidelines contained in the Curtin University Student Assessment and Progression policy. Assessment and Student Progression Manual

Fair and Accurate Assessment

The assessment in all units is subject to stringent assessment moderation processes, whereby academic staff work collaboratively to calibrate expectations and review a cross-section of submitted work to remain calibrated and confer on borderline grade or failing work. In no circumstances is only one academic staff member involved in the assessment of student work across a unit.

Any student who genuinely believes that assessed work has been unfairly or inaccurately marked, or that their final unit grade is inappropriate, has the right to request a review of the mark or final result. If this review process is unable to resolve the issue, a formal assessment appeal may be lodged.

It is expected that most situations will be able to be resolved without the need for a formal appeal.

l

Step 1 – Initial Request for Review by marker or unit co-ordinator. This informal review will be to check that marking was accurate and complete and may or may not involve a re-marking of the whole work. Marks cannot be reviewed downwards as a result of this informal process.

l

Step 2 – Formal Appeal. If the informal review fails to satisfy the student that their work has been fairly and accurately assessed, a formal appeal can be lodged on the relevant form and submitted to the Head of School. Students will be expected to provide full details of:

¡ Their perceived basis for the appeal – for example, where in their work they believe they have demonstrated a higher level of attainment

¡ The informal review process that has been engaged in and the outcome of any dialogue with tutors and Unit Co-ordinators.

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

It is important to be aware that formal assessment appeals must be lodged within ten working days of the result for

the assessment task or final grade for the unit being released. Please read the Assessment and Student Progression Manual carefully for further information concerning appeals against assessment decisions.

Deferred assessments

If your results show that you have been granted a deferred assessment you should immediately check OASIS for

details.

Supplementary assessments

Supplementary assessments, if granted by the Board of Examiners, will have a due date or be held between 11/07/2018 and 25/07/2018 . Notification to students will be made after the Board of Examiners’ meeting via the Official Communications Channel (OCC) in OASIS.

It is the responsibility of students to be available to complete the requirements of a supplementary assessment. If your results show that you have been granted a supplementary assessment you should immediately check OASIS for details.

Reasonable adjustments for students with disabilities/health circumstances likely to impact on studies

A Curtin Access Plan (CAP) is a document that outlines the type and level of support required by a student with a

disability or health condition to have equitable access to their studies at Curtin. This support can include alternative exam or test arrangements, study materials in accessible formats, access to Curtin’s facilities and services or other support as discussed with an advisor from Disability Services (disability.curtin.edu.au). Documentation is required from your treating Health Professional to confirm your health circumstances.

If

you think you may be eligible for a CAP, please contact Disability Services. If you already have a CAP please provide

it

to the Unit Coordinator at the beginning of each study period.

Referencing style

The referencing style for this unit is APA 6th Ed.

More information can be found on this style from the Library web site:

Privacy

As part of a learning or assessment activity, or class participation, your image or voice may be recorded or transmitted by equipment and systems operated by Curtin University. Transmission may be to other venues on campus or to others both in Australia and overseas.

Your image or voice may also be recorded by students on personal equipment for individual or group study or assessment purposes. Such recordings may not be reproduced or uploaded to a publically accessible web environment. If you wish to make such recordings for study purposes as a courtesy you should always seek the permission of those who are impacted by the recording.

Recording of classes or course materials may not be exchanged or distributed for commercial purposes, for compensation, or for any other purpose other than personal study for the enrolled students in the unit. Breach of this may subject a student to disciplinary action under Statute No 10 – Student Disciplinary Statute.

If you wish to discuss this please talk to your Unit Coordinator.

Copyright

The course material for this unit is provided to you for your own research and study only. It is subject to copyright. It

is a copyright infringement to make this material available on third party websites.

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Academic Integrity (including plagiarism and cheating)

Any conduct by a student that is dishonest or unfair in connection with any academic work is considered to be academic misconduct. Plagiarism and cheating are serious offences that will be investigated and may result in penalties such as reduced or zero grades, annulled units or even termination from the course. Assessments under investigation will not be given a mark until the matter is concluded. This may result in the unit grade being withheld or a grade of Fail Incomplete (F-IN) until a decision has been made by the Student Disciplinary Panel. This may impact on enrolment in further units/study periods.

Plagiarism occurs when work or property of another person is presented as one's own, without appropriate acknowledgement or referencing. Submitting work which has been produced by someone else (e.g. allowing or contracting another person to do the work for which you claim authorship) is also plagiarism. Submitted work is subjected to a plagiarism detection process, which may include the use of text matching systems or interviews with students to determine authorship.

Cheating includes (but is not limited to) asking or paying someone to complete an assessment task for you or any use of unauthorised materials or assistance during an examination or test.

From Semester 1, 2016, all incoming coursework students are required to complete Curtin’s Academic Integrity Program (AIP). If a student does not pass the program by the end of their first study period of enrolment at Curtin, their marks will be withheld until they pass. More information about the AIP can be found at:

Refer to the Academic Integrity tab in Blackboard or academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au for more information, including student guidelines for avoiding plagiarism.

Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Expectations

Curtin students are expected to have reliable internet access in order to connect to OASIS email and learning systems such as Blackboard and Library Services.

You may also require a computer or mobile device for preparing and submitting your work.

If you are having technical difficulties submitting your assessment (e.g. via Blackboard/Turnitin) please contact HUM- EDLTS@curtin.edu.au with your student ID, Unit Code and the details of the assessment you are trying to submit.

For general ICT assistance, in the first instance please contact OASIS Student Support:

For specific assistance with any of the items listed below, please contact The Learning Centre:

l

Using Blackboard, the I Drive and Back-Up files

l

Introduction to PowerPoint, Word and Excel

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Additional information

Student Support

Learning Centre

l Comprehensive support for many aspects of students’ learning is offered through face to face and online resources via the Learning Centre http://unilife.curtin.edu.au/learning_support/learning_centre.htm

Uni English

l This website has been designed to support students whose first language is not English. The Curtin University UniEnglish website contains English language resources, activities, support information, and links to diagnostic assessment tests. http://unilife.curtin.edu.au/learning_support/UniEnglish.htm

Counselling

l All Curtin students are entitled to access Curtin Counseling for free, confidential and professional services. This includes online students who may require individual counselling for personal, psychological, or study-related issues (although please note that the counselling service is not the appropriate avenue for pursuing assessment queries or debates). http://unilife.curtin.edu.au/health_wellbeing/counselling_services.htm

Enrolment

It is your responsibility to ensure that your enrolment is correct - you can check your enrolment through the eStudent option on OASIS, where you can also print an Enrolment Advice.

Student Rights and Responsibilities

It is the responsibility of every student to be aware of all relevant legislation, policies and procedures relating to their rights and responsibilities as a student. These include:

l

the Student Charter

l

Values and Signature Behaviours

l

the University's policy and statements on plagiarism and academic integrity

l

copyright principles and responsibilities

l

the University's policies on appropriate use of software and computer facilities

Information on all of the above is available through the University's "Student Rights and Responsibilities" website at:

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Student Equity

There are a number of factors that might disadvantage some students from participating in their studies or assessments to the best of their ability, under standard conditions. These factors may include a disability or medical condition (e.g. mental illness, chronic illness, physical or sensory disability, learning disability), significant family responsibilities, pregnancy, religious practices, living in a remote location or another reason. If you believe you may be unfairly disadvantaged on these or other grounds please contact Student Equity at eesj@curtin.edu.au or go to http://eesj.curtin.edu.au/student_equity/index.cfm for more information

You can also contact Counselling and Disability services: http://www.disability.curtin.edu.au or the Multi-faith services:

It is important to note that the staff of the university may not be able to meet your needs if they are not informed of your individual circumstances so please get in touch with the appropriate service if you require assistance. For general wellbeing concerns or advice please contact Curtin's Student Wellbeing Advisory Service at:

Recent unit changes

Students are encouraged to provide unit feedback through eVALUate, Curtin's online student feedback system. For more information about eVALUate, please refer to evaluate.curtin.edu.au/info/.

To view previous student feedback about this unit, search for the Unit Summary Report at

To view previous student feedback about this unit, search for the Unit Summary Report at https://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/student/unit_search.cfm. See https://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/info/dates.cfm to find out when you can eVALUate this unit.

Recent changes to this unit include:

With the inclusion of the prescribed textbook, some changes have been made to unit readings and topics.

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Faculty of Humanities School of Education

Program calendar

Week

Begin

Topics

Activities

Assessments

Date

Orientation

 

19

 

Orientation Week

February

 

1.

 

26

Neoliberalism & its effects

Unit readings & Blackboard resources & activities

 

February

2.

5 March

Accountability & performativity

As above

 

3.

12

March

Markets & school choice

As above

 

4.

19

March

Competition & reforming school practices

As above

 

5.

26

March

Responsibilisation: reforming parents and inequality

As above

 

6.

2

April

Tuition Free Week

Assessment 1 Due:

 

Monday 2 April, 23:59 WST

7.

9

April

Critical pedagogies for social justice

Unit readings & Blackboard resources & activities

 

8.

16

April

Unpacking childhood & growing up

As above

 

9.

23

April

 

Tuition Free Week

10.

30

April

Class & differentiating achievement

Unit readings & Blackboard resources & activities

 

11.

7

May

Gender, sexuality & binary thinking

As above

 

12.

14

May

Cultural diversity

As above

 

13.

21

May

Special event

Special event & assessment preparation

 

14.

28

May

Reflection & review

Reflection, review, consultations and assessment preparation

 

15.

4

June

Study Week

Assessment 2 Due:

 

Monday 4 June 23:59 WST

16.

11

June

 

Examinations

17.

18

June

 

Examinations