Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 72

INTRODUCTION ON MARKETING

The automobile industry of India is one of the most booming and dynamic
industries. Every home in India possesses two wheeler or four wheeler. There is no
segment of the society that not been touched by the auto mobile revolution.

Today auto mobile industry is a thriving industry with thousands of companies


competing neck to neck, working tirelessly to roll out better models of two wheelers
that will prove to be big hits with customers.

Differentiation is the main aspect where manufactures have to concentrate


while they differentiate their product with the competitors, they have to identify their
customer needs and want to develop two wheelers that would match exactly to the
customer needs and want to develop two wheelers that would match exactly to the
customer requirements.

Today India was the second manufacture of the two wheeler in the world. It
stands next only to china in terms of the two wheelers reduced and sold. In India two
wheelers industry have been growing steadily over the years. It had grown by ten
percent during the 2002-2003. The host of factors is at play driving the industry sales
up. Some of them are changing customer performance, new product launches, shorter
replacement cycle, customer finance scheme for instance, 35 to 45% two wheelers
sales are probably financed through such scheme.

Until 1980, geared scooters dominated the two wheeler market in India so
much so that their sales equated the combined states of motor cycles and mopeds.
However, things started changing in 80s.to day the customer preference has shifted
from scooters to motor cycles. In the motor cycles segment TVS is the third largest
two wheelers manufacturer in India and it is the one of the premier automobile
company in India. It has been facing several competitions from Hero Honda, escorts
and LML and in particular BAJAJ auto limited. In short the company the competition
among the motor cycles has become in terms of attributes like durability, comfort
ability, fuel efficiency, low maintenance and particularly good after sales service.
1
In order to stay of the entire competition, it is of prime importance that customer
satisfaction is given the most importance. Companies needs to get inside the head of
their customer they need to produce what the latter wants and expects. Thus customer
surveys are changing segment.

To satisfy the customer now a day’s every organization are taking so many
measures retain their customer and to satisfy their customer. Those measures are
providing better quality products at a reasonable price levels, delivery of products in
time, guidelines to how to use that produces before purchases, after sales service etc.

This study have been conducted keeping in mind that the retaining of the
customers of the automobile industry can be possible through providing he better after
sales service to their customers vehicles. TVS people were identified the importance
of the sales service satisfy their customers. So they are providing best service to the
customers.

Need and scope

Customer satisfaction can be considered as one of the key factors and


indicators of company’s future profits. In auto mobile business it is the most important
key factor. This is because the two wheeler are subject to problems due to poor
maintenance, accidents and other reasons. Hence, customer depends upon the
company for good after sales service. In other words, people buy two wheelers from
the company which offer satisfactory after sales service. In the new of the above, an
attempt was made to examine the customer satisfaction with Kusalava Motors (TVS
two wheelers) after sales service.

This was an attempt to identify the satisfaction of the customers with Kusalava ‘TVS’
after sales service.

Scope

This study focus on various aspects relating to identify the levels of the
customers satisfaction towards Kusalava TVS two wheelers for this number of
criteria’s like product quality, price, after sales service competitor strategy and

2
analysis etc. have been 104 customers have been interviewed on the above grounds
and various statistical tools have been used for analyzing the data.

OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

The main objective of this study is to identify the customer satisfaction regarding
kusalava motors, Vijayawada, the secondary objectives of the study are;

1. To understand the importance of customer satisfaction in Kusalava


Motors.
2. To understand customers opinion on TVS motor products.
3. To know the expectations of customers about from the dealer.
4. To analyse the impact of ofter sales service on customer satisfaction.
5. To offer suggestions for improvements in service thereof.

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

The basic principles involved in marketing research have been adopted in the
overall methodology. The following methodology has been used for meeting the
requirements.

1. Defining the objectives


2. Developing the information sources
3. Collecting the information
4. Analysis of the information
5. Recommendation
6. Conclusions

3
Data collection

Data collection is a term used to describe a process of preparing and collecting


the data.

The process of data collection is to obtain information to keep on record, to


make decisions about important issues, to pass information one to others.

The analysis of the project was done based on the available information. The
data has been collected in the following ways.

1. Primary data
2. Secondary data

Primary data

Primary data is one which is collected by the investigator for the purpose of
specific inquiry or study. Such data is original in character and is generated by surveys
conducted by individuals or research institutions.

1. Interview Method
It establishes face to face communication. It shows systematic. It is an oral and
verbal communication. This method is adopted when personal opinion or view
point are too gathered as a part of data.
2. Observation Method
In this method the data is collected though observation. In this method the
observer applies his sense organs to note down whatever that he could observe in
the field and related these data to explain some phenomenon.
3. Questionnaire Method

In this method a pre printed list of questions arranged in sequence is used to


elicit response from the respondents.

4
Secondary data

When an investigator uses the data which has already been collected by others,
such data is called secondary data. The secondary data can obtained from journals,
reports, government publications, publication of professional and research
organizations and so on.

 Internal sources
 External sources

Internal sources

The data which is gathered from inside the organization is known as internal
sources. They are different sources there. They are company records, manual and
reports.

External Sources

The data which is gathered from outside of the organization is called external
sources. They are articles from journals, magazines, reference of books in the college
library and related websites.

Sample size

The sample size of the present study is 104 respondents of customers. They are
take on the basis of random sampling, and collected the primary data from the
respondents using the questionnaire.

1.1 The following are the limitations of the study,


1. The accuracy of the analysis and conclusion drawn entirely depends up to the
reliability of the information provided by the respondents.
2. Due to fast changing marketing environment, the analysis may not hold good
for a long time.
3. Some people were not interested to discuss their views.

5
INDUSTRY PROFILE

The Automotive industry in India is one of the largest in the world and one
of the fastest growing globally. India manufactures over 17.5 million vehicles
(including 2 wheeled and 4 wheeled) and exports about 2.33 million every year. It is
the world's second largest manufacturer of motorcycles, with annual sales exceeding
8.5 million in 2009. India's passenger car and commercial vehicle manufacturing
industry is the seventh largest in the world, with an annual production of more than
3.7 million units in 2010. According to recent reports, India is set to overtake Brazil to
become the sixth largest passenger vehicle producer in the world, growing 16-18 per
cent to sell around three million units in the course of 2011-12. In 2009, India
emerged as Asia's fourth largest exporter of passenger cars, behind Japan, South
Korea, and Thailand.

The Indian automotive industry consists of five segments: commercial


vehicles; multi-utility vehicles & passenger cars; two-wheelers; three-wheelers; and
tractors. With 58, 22,963 units sold in the domestic market and 4,53,591 units
exported during the first nine months of FY2005 (9MFY2005), the industry
(excluding tractors) marked a growth of 17% over the corresponding previous. The
two-wheeler sales have witnessed a spectacular growth trend since the mid nineties.

Evolution of Two-wheeler Industry in India

Two-wheeler segment is one of the most important components of the


automobile sector that has undergone significant changes due to shift in policy
environment. The two-wheeler industry has been in existence in the country since
1955. It consists of three segments viz. scooters, motorcycles and mopeds. According
to the figures published by SIAM, the share of two-wheelers in automobile sector in
terms of units sold was about 80 per cent during 2003-¬04. This high figure itself is
suggestive of the importance of the sector. In the initial years, entry of firms, capacity
expansion, choice of products including capacity mix and technology, all critical areas
of functioning of an industry, were effectively controlled by the State machinery. The

6
lapses in the system had invited fresh policy options that came into being in late
sixties. Amongst these policies, Monopolies and Restrictive Trade Practices (MRTP)
and Foreign Exchange Regulation Act (FERA) were aimed at regulating monopoly
and foreign investment respectively. This controlling mechanism over the industry
resulted in: (a) several firms operating below minimum scale of efficiency; (b) under-
utilization of capacity; and (c) usage of outdated technology. Recognition of the
damaging effects of licensing and fettering policies led to initiation of reforms, which
ultimately took a more prominent shape with the introduction of the New Economic
Policy (NEP) in 1985.

However, the major set of reforms was launched in the year 1991 in response
to the major macroeconomic crisis faced by the economy. The industrial policies
shifted from a regime of regulation and tight control to a more liberalized and
competitive era. Two major results of policy changes during these years in two-
wheeler industry were that the, weaker players died out giving way to the new entrants
and superior products and a sizeable increase in number of brands entered the market
that compelled the firms to compete on the basis of product attributes. Finally, the
two-¬wheeler industry in the country has been able to witness a proliferation of
brands with introduction of new technology as well as increase in number of players.
However, with various policy measures undertaken in order to increase the
competition, though the degree of concentration has been lessened over time,
deregulation of the industry has not really resulted in higher level of competition.

A Growth Perspective

The composition of the two-wheeler industry has witnessed sea changes in the
post-reform period. In 1991, the share of scooters was about 50 per cent of the total 2-
wheeler demand in the Indian market. Motorcycle and moped had been experiencing
almost equal level of shares in the total number of two-wheelers. In 2003-04, the share
of motorcycles increased to 78 per cent of the total two-wheelers while the shares of
scooters and mopeds declined to the level of 16 and 6 per cent respectively. A clear
picture of the motorcycle segment's gaining importance during this period is exhibited

7
by the Figures 1, 2 and 3 depicting total sales, share and annual growth during the
period 1993-94 through 2003-04.

Demand Drivers

The demand for two-wheelers has been influenced by a number of factors over the
past five years. The key demand drivers for the growth of the two-wheeler industry
are as follows:

 Inadequate public transportation system, especially in the semi-urban and rural


areas;
 Increased availability of cheap consumer financing in the past 3-4 years;
 Increasing availability of fuel-efficient and low-maintenance models;
 Increasing urbanization, which creates a need for personal transportation;
 Changes in the demographic profile;
 Difference between two-wheeler and passenger car prices, which makes two-
wheelers the entry-level vehicle;
 Steady increase in per capita income over the past five years; and
 Increasing number of models with different features to satisfy diverse
consumer needs.

While the demand drivers listed here operate at the broad level, segmental demand
is influenced by segment-specific factors.

TVS MOTOR COMPANY

TVS Motor Company is the third largest two-wheeler manufacturer in India


and one among the top ten in the world, with annual turnover of more tha billion in
2008-2009, and is the flagship company of the USD 4 billion TVS Group.

TVS Motor is the third largest two-wheeler manufacturer in India and ranks
among the top ten globally. It is the first company in the world to be honoured with
The Deming Prize for Total Quality Management. The company was the first in India
to launch 2-seater 50cc moped and 100cc Indo-Japanese motorcycles. At present TVS
Apache, TVS Victor, TVS Scooty, TVS Centra and TVS Fiero are the popular bikes
in Indian market.

8
TVS Motor Company registers 16% growth in July '11 sales

TVS Company ProductsMopeds

1. TVS Champ
2. TVS XL Super
3. TVS XL Hd

All these products are so popular in the rural area especially in south and they hold
80% of the market in this segment.

Further Details

 Engine
The bike sports the same 109.7cc engine from Jive which produces maximum
power output of 8.4bhp with a handsome torque output of 8.3 Nm
 Detachable Rear Seat
The rear seat here serves two purposes. One, it carries the regular pillion; two, it is
detachable to perform the task of a carrier or a hook to a host of things like
vegetables/fruits, milk cans and other raw materials etc
 Shock
Max 4R comes with regular Telescopic suspension at the front. However, as
against the dual shockers on our regular bikes, this bike becomes the first Indian
motorcycle to sport four shock absorbers at the rear two on either side. This type of
a configuration is kept to enhance as much of load carrying capability as it can.
Surprisingly, TVS claims this bike to a payload capability of 200 heavy kilograms!
 Better Brakes
MAX 4R comes with a bigger brake setup of 130mm to boost the braking
capabilities of the bike.
 Durability
This bike also comes equipped with specially reinforced spokes, wheel &
indicator guards, and lesser fiber parts to augment durability as much as possible.
 Stability
It also has been endowed with a longer wheelbase and wider 3.0 inch rear tire

9
to ensure better grip on the muddy Indian roads in the rural parts of the country.
Max 4R also comes with an ‘Easy Center’ stand to facilitate easy operation of the
stand even if the motorcycle is loaded with heavy stuff.
 Price
The bike has been priced at an ex showroom price of Rs 37,590 in Indore, MP
which would translate into an on road price of roughly in the range of Rs 40-
41,000 which makes it one very VFM (Value For Money) quotient.

TVS Star Sport

TVS brand has become quite popular during the last couple of years and obviously
the company wanted to leverage on the popularity ride. Almost 75% of the company’s
bike sales come from the star brand. Yet another star that’s born recently is the TVS
Star Sports that comes in 2 versions. The base version Sport comes in two colors;
Carbon black and jet red, and alloy wheels. The deluxe version comes with fuel gauge
and double-toned sporty chrome graphics in about 3 colors; black, blue and silver

If you want me to review the performance of TVS Star, let me tell you that the
Sport bike comes with 99.7cc engine and it gives a peak power of 7.5bhp. Similar to
its older brother Star City the Sport comes with one down-tubed chassis and a four-
speed gearbox. The suspension has the same looks as that of the Star City, but the rear
one comes with 5 steps adjustable stroke that is just a little longer than the Start City.
Sport comes with alloy wheels and what makes it different from City is that a new
face-lifted silencer (a matte silencer and a chrome heat shield with dual pod cluster).

10
COMPANY PROFILE

KUSALAVA MOTORS (P) LTD

The Kusalava Motors was established by the Ch.Kusalava Rao in the year 1981
company is involved in the activity of trading 2 Wheelers and 4 Wheelers, it is the
official dealer for TVS Motor Bikes (Earlier known as TVS SUZUKI) and Hyundai
Cars in the cities of Vijayawada, Guntur, Ongole, Bhimavaram and Gudivada.

Kusalava TVS is the monopoly dealer in the Krishna district it has 4 sub branches in
the Vijayawada(Labbi pet, Currency Nagar, Bhavani Puram, Knur) and it also has
many associated dealers throughout Krishna district.

Kusalava Hyundai is the dealers for Hyundai motors India ltd.it has dealer ship
in the (Krishna district, Guntur district, West Godavari district, Prakasam district)

QUALITY

Six Sigma

A method or set of techniques, Six Sigma has also become a movement


focused on business process improvement. It is a quality measurement and
improvement program originally developed by Motorola that focuses on the control of
a process to the point of ± six sigma (standard deviations) from a centerline, or put
another way, 3.4 defects per million items. A Six Sigma systematic quality program
provides businesses with the tools to improve the capability of the business processes.

Total Productive Maintenance

Total Productive Maintenance, shortly termed as TPM, is the concept


originated and developed by Japan Institute of plant Maintenance (JIPM) Tokyo, since
late sixties. JIPM-TPM is the key for the operational excellence for many Japanese
companies.

TPM means to achieve high level of productivity, through total


participation of all people inside the organization and then developing self -managing

11
abilities in people and practices. Productivity, in JIPM-TPM means increasing
production and reducing cost simultaneously.

TPM is based on zero-loss concept viz., zero break downs, zero accidents, zero
defects etc., primarily to achieve high reliability/flexibility of equipment and reduce
costs through minimizing wastage of man hours, raw material, power, tools etc.

JIPM-TPM paves way for an excellent planning, organizing, monitoring and


controlling practices through a unique 8-pillars method. JIPM-TPM provides an easy
way of developing activities through its TPM promotion organization involving 100%
of employees on continuous basis.

Kusalava had kicked off the TPM initiative across the organization on July 3rd
2006. The eight pillar activities via Daily autonomous maintenance by operators,
Planned maintenance, Quality maintenance, Education and training, Health, Safety
and environment, Individual improvement, Development management and Office
TPM are being implemented across the company. It had already started achieving
excellent results in Productivity, Quality, Cost, Delivery, and Safety & Morale.

Objectives

 Develop, introduce and maintain environmental management systems across


the company to meet the company standards as well as statutory requirements
for environment. Verify compliance with these standards through regular
auditing.
 Assess environmental impact of all its activities and set annual improvement
objectives and targets and review these to ensure that these are being met at the
individual unit and corporate levels.
 Reduce Waste, conserve Energy and explore opportunities for reuse and
recycle.

PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES OF KUSALAVA MOTORS

The promotional activities carried and adopted by Kusalava motors are


12
1. Advertising in news papers
2. Demos
3. Mega demos
4. Test rides
5. Exchange offers
6. Hording and wallpapers

Service offered

Other then the promotional activities Kusalava motors is under the quality service
connection.

In addition to the above service, Kusalava motors offer the following additional
service.

The organization offer three ‘free service’

It arranges finance through Kusalava Motors and though other finances’ like.

 HDFC
 ALF
 SRIRAM FINANCE
 FULTRON INDIA

Customer Satisfaction

13
Thus, consumers form judgments about the value of marketing offers and make
their buying decisions based upon these judgments. Customer satisfaction with a
purchase depends on the product’s performance relative to a buyer’s expectations. A
customer might experience various degrees of satisfaction. If the product’s
performance falls short of expectations, the customer is dissatisfied. If performance
matches expectations, the customer is satisfied. If performance exceeds expectations,
the customer is highly satisfied or delighted.

But how do the buyer’s form their expectations? Expectations are based on the
customer’s past buying experiences, the opinions of friends and associates, and
marketer and competitor information and promises. Marketers must be careful to set
the right level of expectations. If they set expectations too low, they may satisfy those
who buy but fail to attract enough buyers. In contrast, if they raise expectations too
high, buyers are likely to be disappointed.

For example, Holiday Inn ran a campaign a few years ago called “No
Surprises”, which promised consistently trouble-free accommodations and service.
However, Holiday Inn guests still encountered a host of problems, and the
expectations created by the campaign only made customers more dissatisfied. Holiday
Inn had to withdraw the campaign.

Still, some of today’s most successful companies are raising expectations and
delivering performance to match. That companies embrace total customers are
satisfaction. For example, Honda claims “One reason our customers are so satisfied is
that we aren’t”. And Cigna vows “We’ll never be 100 percent satisfied until you are,
too”. These companies aim high because they know that customers who are only
satisfied will still find it easy to switch suppliers when a better offer comes along. For
example, a study by AT&T showed that 70 percent of customers who say they are
satisfied with a product or service would still be willing to switch to a competitor. In
contrast, customers who are highly satisfied are much less ready to switch. One study
showed that 75 percent of Toyota buyers were highly satisfied and about 75 percent
said they intended to buy a Toyota again. Thus, customer delight creates an emotional

14
affinity for a product or service, not just a rational preference, and this creates high
customer loyalty.

Today’s winning companies track their customers’ expectations, perceived


company performance, and customer satisfaction. However, customer satisfaction
measures are meaningful only in a competitive context.

For example, a company might be pleased to find that 80 percent of its customers say
they are satisfied with its products. However, if a competitor is attaining 90 percent
customer satisfaction and aiming for 100 percent, the company may find that it is
losing customers to the competitor. Thus, companies must monitor both their own and
competitors customer satisfaction performance. Marketing describes the ways in
which companies can track customer satisfaction.

Although the customer-centered firm seeks to deliver high customer


satisfaction relative to competitors, if does not attempt to maximize customer
satisfaction. A company can always increase customer satisfaction by lowering its
price or increasing its services, but this may result in lower profits. In addition to
customers, the company has many stakeholders, including employees, dealers,
suppliers, and stock holders. Spending more to increase customer satisfaction might
divert funds from increasing the satisfaction of these other “partners”.

Delivering Customer Value and Satisfaction


Customer value and satisfaction are important ingredients in the marketer’s
formula for success. But what does it take to produce and deliver customer value? To
answer this, we will examine the concepts of a value chain and a value delivery
system.

Value Chain
Michael Porter proposed the value chain as the major tool for identifying
ways to create more customer value. Every firm consists of a collection of activities
performed to design, produce, and market, deliver, and support the firm’s products.
The value chain

breaks the firm into nine value-creating activities in an effort to understand the
behavior of costs in the specific business and the potential sources of competitive

15
differentiation. The nine value- creating activities include five primary activities and
four support activities.

The primary activities involve the sequence of bringing materials into the
business (inbound logistics), operating on them (operations), sending them out (out
bound logistics), marketing them (marketing and sales), and servicing them (services).
The support activities occur within each of these primary activities.

For example, procurement involves obtaining the various inputs for each
primary activity- only a fraction of procurement is done by the purchasing department.
Technology development and human resource management also occur in all
departments. The firm’s infrastructure covers the overhead of general management,
planning, finance, accounting, and legal and government affairs borne by all the
primary and support activities.

Under the value-chain concept, the firm should examine its costs and
performance in each value creating activity to look for improvements. It also should
estimate its competitor’s costs and performances as benchmarks. To the extent that
firm can perform certain activities better than its competitors, it can achieve a
competitive advantage.

For example, a credit department might attempt to reduce bad debts by rising
credit standards; meanwhile, sales people get frustrated and customers must buy
elsewhere. A distribution department might decide to save money by shipping goods
by rail; meanwhile, the customer waits. In each case, individual departments have
erected walls that impede the delivery of quality customer service.

To overcome this problem, companies should place more emphasis on the smooth
management of core business processes, most of which involve inputs and cooperation
from many functional departments. Among other things, these core business processes
include the following

Product development process All the activities in identifying, researching, and


developing new products with speed, high quality, and reasonable cost.

16
 Inventory management process All the activities involved in developing and
managing the right inventory levels of raw materials, semi finished materials,
and finished goods so that adequate supplies are available while avoiding the
costs of high overstocks.
 Order-to-payment process All the activities involved in receiving orders,
approving them, shipping the goods on time, and collecting payment.
 Customer service process All the activities involved in receiving to reach the
right parties within the company to obtain service, answers, and resolutions of
problems.

Successful companies develop superior capabilities in managing these and other


core processes. In turn, mastering core business processes gives these companies a
substantial competitive edge. For example, one of Wal-Mart’s great strengths is its
superiority in handling the inventory management and order flow process. As
individual Wal-Mart stores sell their goods, sales information flows not only to Wal-
Mart’s head quarters but to Wal-Mart’s suppliers, who ship placement goods to Wal-
Mart stores almost as far as the products move off the shelf.

Value Delivery System


In its search for competitive advantage, the firm needs to look beyond
its own value chain and into the value chains of its suppliers and distributors, and
ultimately, its customers. More companies today are “partnering” with the other
members of the supply chain to improve the performance of the customer value
delivery system. For example, Campbell soup operates a qualified supplier program in
which its sets high standard for suppliers and chooses only the few who are willing to
meet its demanding requirements for quality, on-time delivery, and continuous
improvement. Campbell then assigns its own experts to work with suppliers to
constantly improve their joint performance.

Similarly, Honda has designed a program for working closely with its suppliers
to help them reduce their costs and improve quality. For example, when Honda chose
Donnelly Corporation to supply all of the mirrors for its U.S. – made cars, it sent

17
engineers swarming over Donnelly’s plants, looking for ways to improve its products
and operations. This helped Donnelly reduce its costs by 2 percent in the first year. As
a result of its improved performance, Donnelly’s sales to Honda have grown from
$5million annually to more than $60million in less than 10 years. In turn, Honda has
gained an efficient, low-cost supplier of quality components. And as a result of
Honda’s partnerships with Donnelly and other suppliers, Honda customers benefit
from lower cost, higher quality cars.

An excellent value delivery system connects jeans maker Levi Strauss with its
suppliers and distributors. One of Levi’s major retailers is Sears. Every night, through
electronic data interchange (EDI), Levi’s learns the sizes and styles of its blue jeans
that sold through Sears and other major outlets. Levi’s then electronically orders more
fabric from Milliken Company, its fabric supplier. In turn, Milliken relays an order for
more fibbers to Du Pont, the fibber supplier. In this way, the partners in the supply
chain use the most current sales information to manufacture what is selling, rather
than to manufacture based on potentially inaccurate sales forecasts.

As companies struggle to become more competitive, they are turning,


ironically, to greater cooperation. Companies used to vies their suppliers and
distributors as cost canters, and in some cases, as adversaries. Today, however, they
are selecting partners carefully and working out mutually profitable strategies.
Increasingly in today’s market place, competition no longer takes place between the
value delivery systems created by these competitors. Thus, if Levi Strauss has built a
more potent value delivery system than Wrangler or another competitor, it will win
more market share and profit.

Retaining Customers
Beyond building stronger relations with the partners in the supply chain,
companies today must work to develop stronger bonds and loyalty ultimate customers.
In the past, many companies took their customers for granted. Customers often did not
18
have many alternative suppliers, or the other suppliers were just as poor in quality and
service, or the market was growing so fast that the company did not worry about fully
satisfying its customers.

A company could lose 100 customers a week but gain another 100 customers
and consider it sales to be satisfactory. Such a company, operating on a “leaky bucket”
theory of business, believes that there will always be enough customers to replace the
defecting ones. However, this high customer churn involves higher costs than if a
company retained all 100 customers and acquired no new once.

THE COST OF LOST CUSTOMERS


Companies must pay close attention to their customer defection rate and under
take steps to reduce it. First, the company must define and measure its customer
retention rate. Then, the company must identify the causes of customer defection and
determine which of this can be reduced or eliminated.
The company needs to prepare a frequency distribution showing the percentage
of customers who defect for different reasons. Not much can be done about customers
who leave the region, or about business customers who go out of business. But much
can be done about customers who leave because of shoddy products, poor service, or
prices that are too high.

Companies can estimate how much profit they lose when customers defect
unnecessarily. For an individual customer, this is the same as the customer’s lifetime
value. For a group of lost customers, a major transportation firm estimated the profit
loss as follows: The Company had 64,000 accounts. It lost 5 percent of its accounts
(3,200 accounts) this year as a result of poor service. The average lost account
represented $40,000 in lost revenue. Therefore, the company lost 3,200 X $40,000 =
$128,000,000 in revenue. Given its 10 percent profit margin, the company lost
$12,800,000 unnecessarily in a single year.

The Key Customer Relationship Marketing

19
Relationship marketing involves creating, maintaining, and enhancing strong
relationship with customers and other stake holders. Increasingly, marketing is
moving awayfrom a focus on individual transactions and toward a focus on building
value-laden relationships and value delivery networks. Relationship marketing is
oriented more toward the long term. The goal is to deliver long term value to
customers, and the measure of success is long term customer satisfaction. Relationship
marketing requires that all of the company’s departments work together with
marketing as a team to serve the customer. It involves building relationships at many
levels-resulting in high customer loyalty.

We can distinguish five different levels of relationships that can be


formed with customers who have purchased a company’s product, such as an auto
mobile or a price of industrial machinery.

 Basic The company salesperson sells the product but does not follow up in
anyway.
 Reactive The salesperson sells the product and encourages the customer to cal
whenever he or she has any questions or problems.
 Accountable The salesperson phones the customer a short time after the sale to
check whether the product is meeting the customer’s expectations. The sales
person also solicits from the customer any product improvement suggestions
and any specific disappointments. This information helps the company to
continuously improve its offering.
 Proactive The sales person are others in the company phone the customer from
time to time with suggestions about improved product use are helpful new
products.
That a company’s relationship marketing strategy will depend on how many
customers it has and their profitability. For example, companies with many low
margin customers will practice basic marketing. Thus H. J. Heinz will not phone all of
its ketchup buyers to express its appreciation for their business. At best, Heinz will be
reactive by setting up a customer information service. At the other extreme, in markets
with few customers and high margins, most sellers will move toward partnership

20
marketing. Boeing, for example, will work closely with united airlines in designing its
airplanes and insuring that Boeing airplanes fully satisfy United’s requirements. In
between these two extreme situations, other levels of relationship marketing are
appropriate.
What specific marketing tools can a company use to develop stronger customer
bonding and satisfaction? It can adopt any of three customer value building
approaches: financial, social, or structural.

Financial Benefits
The first value building approach relies primarily on adding financial benefits
to the customer relationship. For example, airlines offer frequent-flyer programs,
hotels give room upgrades to their frequent guests, and supermarkets give patronage
refunds.
Procter and Gamble recently offered a unique money-back guarantee on its
Crest toothpaste in an effort to build a long term bond with customers. P&G advertises
a toll-free number customer can call to join the Crest money-back guarantee program.
It then supplies dental patients with evaluation forms that they take to their local
dentists. Dentists check for cavities and tartars build up.
After using crest for six months, buyers returns to the dentist for another check
up. Those who haven’t improved can receive a refund on the money they spent on
crest. Beyond assuring customers that crest delivers value, this promotion helps P&G
build a customer data base containing the dental his-Tories of families that sign up.
Using this data base, P&G can expand its relationships with customers by offering
additional related products and services to them.

Social Benefits
Although such programs and other financial incentives build customer preference,
they can be easily imitated by competitors and thus may fail to differentiate the
company’s offer permanently. The second approach is to add social benefits as well as

21
financial benefits. Here company personnel work to increase their social bonds with
customers by learning individual customers’ needs and wants and then individualizing
and personalizing their products and services.
For example, Ritz-Carlton employees treat customers as individuals,
not as nameless, faceless members of mass market. Whenever possible, they refer to
guests by name and give each guest a warm welcome every day. They record specific
guest preferences into the company’s customer database, accessible by all hotels in the
world wide Ritz chain. A guest who requests a foam pillow at the Ritz in the Montreal
will be delighted to find one waiting in the room when he or she checks into the
Atlanta Ritz months later.
To build better relationships with its customers, during the summer of
1944 Saturn invited all of its almost 700,000 owners to a ‘Saturn Homecoming’ at its
manufacturing facility in Spring Hill, Tennessee. The two-day affair included family
events, plant tours, and physical challenge activities designed to build trust and a team
spirit. Says Saturn’s manager of corporate communications, “the Homecoming party
is another way of building relationships, and it shows that we treat our customers
differently than any other car company”.

Structural Ties
The third approach to building strong customer relationships is to add
structural ties as well as financial and social benefits. For example, a business
marketer might supply customers with special equipment or computer linkages that
help them manage their orders, pay roll, or inventory.
McKesson Corporation, a leading pharmaceutical wholesaler, as
invested millions of dollars in its electronic data inter change (EDI) system to help
small pharmacies manage their inventory, their order entry, and their shelf space. As
another example, Federal Express uses its power ship program, which it offers to more
than 20,000 customer companies, to keep its best customers from defecting to
competitors like UPS. It provides power ship customers with free computers linked to
Federal Express headquarters. Customer firms can use the machines to check the
status of their own Federal Express packages or those that they ship for their

22
customers. To further enhance its relationships with important customers, Federal
Express polls, 1,000 of its power ship customers each month seeking ways to improve
service to them.
Relationship marketing means that organizations must focus on
managing their customers as well as their products. At that same time, although many
companies are moving strongly toward relationship marketing, companies don’t want
relationships with every customer. In fact, there are and undesirable customers for
every company.

ideally is continually seeking feedback to improve customer satisfaction. Customer


satisfaction provides a leading indicator of consumer purchase intentions and loyalty.
Customer satisfaction data are among the most frequently collected indicators of
market perceptions. Their principal use is twofold.

1. Within organizations, the collection, analysis and dissemination of these data


send a message about the importance of tending to customers and ensuring that
they have a positive experience with the company’s goods and services.

2. Although sales or market share can indicate how well a firm is performing
currently, satisfaction is an indicator of how likely it is that the firm’s
customers will make further purchases in the future. Much research has focused
23
on the relationship between customer satisfaction and retention. Studies
indicate that the ramifications of satisfaction are most strongly realized at the
extremes. On a five-point scale, individuals who rate their satisfaction level as
“5” are likely to become return customers and might even evangelize for the
firm. (A second important metric related to satisfaction is willingness to
recommend. This metric is defined as "The percentage of surveyed customers
who indicate that they would recommend a brand to friends." When a customer
is satisfied with a product, he or she might recommend it to friends, relatives
and colleagues. This can be a powerful marketing advantage.) Individuals who
rate their satisfaction level as “1,” by contrast, are unlikely to return. Further,
they can hurt the firm by making negative comments about it to prospective
customers. Willingness to recommend is a key metric relating to customer
satisfaction.

Construction (Measuring Customer Satisfaction)


Organizations need to retain existing customers while targeting non-customers.
Measuring customer satisfaction provides an indication of how successful the
organization is at providing products and/or services to the marketplace.

Customer satisfaction is measured at the individual level, but it is almost


always reported at an aggregate level. It can be, and often is, measured along various
dimensions. A hotel, for example, might ask customers to rate their experience with its
front desk and check-in service, with the room, with the amenities in the room, with
the restaurants, and so on. Additionally, in a holistic sense, the hotel might ask about
overall satisfaction “with your stay.”

As research on consumption experiences grows, evidence suggests that


consumers purchase goods and services for a combination of two types of benefits:
hedonic and utilitarian. Hedonic benefits are associated with the sensory and
experiential attributes of the product.
Customer satisfaction is an ambiguous and abstract concept and the actual
manifestation of the state of satisfaction will vary from person to person and

24
product/service to product/service. The state of satisfaction depends on a number of
both psychological and physical variables which correlate with satisfaction behaviors
such as return and recommend rate.

The level of satisfaction can also vary depending on other options the customer
may have and other products against which the customer can compare the
organization's products.

The usual measures of customer satisfaction involve a survey with a set of


statements using a Liker Technique or scale. The customer is asked to evaluate each
statement and in term of their perception and expectation of performance of the
organization being measured. Their satisfaction is generally measured on a five-point
scale.

Customer satisfaction data can also be collected on a 10-point scale. Regardless


of the scale used, the objective is to measure customers’ perceived satisfaction with
their experience of a firm’s offerings. It is essential for firms to effectively manage
customer satisfaction. To be able do this, we need accurate measurement of
satisfaction. Good quality measures need to have high satisfaction loadings, good
reliability, and low error variances. In an empirical study comparing commonly used
satisfaction measures it was found that two multi-item semantic differential scales
performed best across both hedonic and utilitarian service consumption contexts.

According to studies by Wirtz & Lee (2003), they identified a six-item 7-point
semantic differential scale (e.g., Oliver and Swan 1983), which is a six-item 7-point
bipolar scale, that consistently performed best across both hedonic and utilitarian
services. It loaded most highly on satisfaction, had the highest item reliability, and had
by far the lowest error variance across both studies. In the study, the six items asked

25
respondents’ evaluation of their most recent experience with ATM services and ice
cream restaurant, along seven points within these six items: “please me to displeased
me”, “contented with to disgusted with”, “very satisfied with two very dissatisfied
with”, “did a good job for me to did a poor job for me”, “wise choice to poor choice”
and “happy with to unhappy with”.

A semantic differential (4 items) scale (e.g., Eroglu and Michelet 1990),


which is a four-item 7-point bipolar scale, was the second best performing measure,
which was again consistent across both contexts. In the study, respondents were asked
to evaluate their experience with both products, along seven points within these four
items: “satisfied to dissatisfied”, “favorable to unfavorable”, “pleasant to unpleasant”
and “I like it very much to I didn’t like it at all”.

The third best scale was single-item percentage measure, a one-item 7-point
bipolar scale (e.g., Westbrook 1980). Again, the respondents were asked to evaluate
their experience on both ATM services and ice cream restaurants, along seven points
within “delighted to terrible”.

These results suggest that more careful pretesting would be prudent should
these measures be used. Finally, all measures captured both affective and cognitive
aspects of satisfaction, independent of their scale anchors. Affective measures capture
a consumer’s attitude (liking/disliking) towards a product, which can result from any
product information or experience.

On the other hand, cognitive element is defined as an appraisal or conclusion


on how the product’s performance compared against expectations (or exceeded or fell
short of expectations), was useful, fit the situation, and exceeded the requirements of
the situation.

Benefits of Customer Satisfaction

26
Benefits of Customer Satisfaction
Customer Profitability, Customer Satisfaction, Service Provider, Vendor Add.
Customer satisfaction is valued highly in almost every commercial organization.
Especially large firms spend an enormous amount of money on customer satisfaction
programs. Therefore, an important question is: What are the benefits of customer
satisfaction for the supplying company?

A common assumption is that satisfied customers are more loyal in the


sense that they stay in a longer relationship with the supplier. However, marketing
research has proven that this linkage is not always so strong and that it largely
varies by customer segment and industry.

Therefore, vendors and service providers should not rely on such effect, also
because the stand-alone value of customer loyalty is not very clear as I will outline
in one of my future posts.

A much clearer benefit of customer satisfaction seems to be a


positive effect on willingness to pay and price sensitivity (per item but also in terms
of overall spending).So, if customer satisfaction has a price-related value, the
question then is

27
 What influences customer satisfaction?

Product quality
Well, one important driver in both consumer and business settings is
product or service quality. In addition, for business customers the following
attributes related to vendor performance have an impact on customer satisfaction:

Sales representative performance


This includes the ability of sales representatives and account managers
to address customer issues, to understand key strategic issues of the customer, to
know the customer business processes, to be easily reached, and to provide
information on current market conditions. Interesting here is that a longer
relationship between the account manager and the customer has an additional
positive effect and can compensate for weaker performance in the other areas.

Product line
This relates to the breadth of the product line portfolio and the ability to
deliver a comprehensive solution.

Responsiveness
This means the time between an addressed inquiry or issue and the response by the
sales representative, the time to resolve issues, and the ability to provide quote
responses in time

Delivery
This relates to the vendor’s ability to deliver the solution in the agreed time
and quality. It also includes the degree of matching committed and delivered
functionality and features as well as the ability to provide flexible delivery options.

28
Revenue and Margin
For cloud product vendors additionally important, but not crucial,
criteria for customer satisfaction are the revenue and margin that your products
generate for the customer (who in this case acts more as a channel partner).

Another two key findings are:

1. Negative performance has a greater impact on overall satisfaction than does


positive performance

2. The link between customer satisfaction and willingness to pay is non-linear, so


that from a certain point on increasing satisfaction does not translate into higher
willingness to pay

The combination of these two suggest to focus more on avoiding customer


dissatisfaction than on investing too much in customer satisfaction. To maximize
overall satisfaction, attribute performance should be optimized, not maximized. For
any given factor, negative performance should be eliminated first before focusing
on positive performance. Also, it is important to always monitor customer
satisfaction, so you can react early enough and balance your measures.

29
Since you want exploit higher willingness to pay also for higher prices, you
need to create customer satisfaction already in the pre-sales phase as well. For that it
is very important to both enable the customer to trial your product or service before
the actual purchase and to have an excellent product presentation highlighting all the
benefits without setting false expectations.

1. Encourage Face-To-Face Dealings


This is the most daunting and downright scary part of interacting with
a customer. If you’re not used to this sort of thing it can be a pretty nerve-wracking
experience. Rest assured, though, it does get easier over time. It’s important to meet
your customers face to face at least once or even twice during the course of a
project.

My experience has shown that a client finds it easier to relate to and work with
someone they’ve actually met in person, rather than a voice on the phone or
someone typing into an email or messenger program. When you do meet them, be
calm, confident and above all, take time to ask them what they need. I believe that
if a potential client spends over half the meeting doing the talking, you’re well on
your way to a sale.

2. Respond To Messages Promptly & Keep Your Clients Informed


This goes without saying really. We all know how annoying it is to wait days
for a response to an email or phone call. It might not always be practical to deal
with all customers’ queries within the space of a few hours, but at least email or
call them back and let them know you’ve received their message and you’ll contact
them about it as soon as possible. Even if you’re not able to solve a problem right
away, let the customer know you’re working on it.

A good example of this is my Web host. They’ve had some trouble with server
hardware which has caused a fair bit of downtime lately. At every step along the
way I was emailed and told exactly what was going on, why things were going
wrong, and how long it would be before they were working again.

30
They also apologized repeatedly, which was nice. Now if they server had just
gone down with no explanation I think I’d have been pretty annoyed and may have
moved my business elsewhere. But because they took time to keep me informed, it
didn’t seem so bad, and I at least knew they were doing something about the
problems. That to me is a prime example of customer service

3. Be Friendly and Approachable


A fellow Site Pointer once told me that you can hear a smile
through the phone. This is very true. It’s very important to be friendly, courteous
and to make your clients feel like you’re their friend and you’re there to help them
out. There will be times when you want to beat your clients over the head
repeatedly with a blunt object – it happens to all of us. It’s vital that you keep a
clear head, respond to your clients’ wishes as best you can, and at all times remain
polite and courteous.

This may not be too important when you’re just starting out, but a clearly
defined customer service policy is going to save you a lot of time and effort in the
long run. If a customer has a problem, what should they do? If the first option doesn’t
work, then what? Should they contact different people for billing and technical
enquiries? If they’re not satisfied with any aspect of your customer service, who
should they tell?

There’s nothing more annoying for a client than being passed from person to
person, or not knowing who to turn to. Making sure they know exactly what to do
at each stage of their enquiry should be of utmost importance. So make sure your
customer service policy is present on your site — and anywhere else it may be
useful.

4. Attention to Detail (Also Known As ‘The Little Niceties’)


Have you ever received a Happy Birthday email or card from a company you
were a client of? Have you ever had a personalized sign-up confirmation email for
a service that you could tell was typed from scratch? These little niceties can be
time consuming and aren’t always cost effective, but remember to do them.

31
Even if it’s as small as sending a Happy Holidays email to all your customers, it’s
something. It shows you care; it shows there are real people on the other end of that
screen or telephone; and most importantly, it makes the customer feel welcomed,
wanted and valued

Anticipate Your Client’s Needs & Go out Of Your Way to Help Them Out
This is easier said than done! However, achieving this supreme level of
understanding with your clients will do wonders for your working relationship.

Take this as an example: you’re working on the front-end for your client’s exciting
new ecommerce endeavor.

You have all the images, originals and files backed up on your desktop
computer and the site is going really well. During a meeting with your client he/she
happens to mention a hard-copy brochure their internal marketing people are
developing. As if by magic, a couple of weeks later a CD-ROM arrives on their
doorstep complete with high resolution versions of all the images you’ve used on
the site. A note accompanies it which reads:

Large-scale copies of the graphics I’ve used on the site. Hopefully you’ll be
able to make use of some in your "Hi, you mentioned a hard-copy brochure you
were working on and I wanted to provide you with ochre."

Your client is heartily impressed, and remarks to his colleagues and friends
how very helpful and considerate his Web designers are. Meanwhile, in your office,
you lay back in your chair drinking your 7th cup of coffee that morning, safe in the
knowledge this happy customer will send several referrals your way.

Honor Your Promises


It’s possible this is the most important point in this article. The simple
message: when you promise something, deliver. The most common example here is
project delivery dates.

Clients don’t like to be disappointed. Sometimes, something may not get


done, or you might miss a deadline through no fault of your own. Projects can be late,
technology can fail and sub-contractors don’t always deliver on time.

32
Top 7 Strategies to Increase Customer Satisfaction & Loyalty
Many businesses have evolved over the last decade into a more web-based
industry. The result of this transition is that consumers seeking to buy something now
have more options than ever before. In turn, businesses are experiencing the
challenge of increased competition and, in some cases, less business.

Certainly with repeat business and referrals being the bread and butter for many
businesses – and undoubtedly essential to anyone in business – being able to satisfy
clients becomes ever more important. Naturally, the more satisfied a client is, the
more loyal that person will feel for years to come. It doesn’t take expensive gifts to
make a client happy either. Here are seven ways to help you increase your customer
satisfaction and create client loyalty.

1. Respond quickly – or at least within a reasonable time frame. The majority of


people these days expect a response back from their inquiry within a reasonable
time frame. Whether it would be an email or phone call, a prospect or client,
it’s important to set up an effective communication system and make time out
of your busy schedule to respond. It’s critical to be available to your customers’
schedules and not the other way around.

2. By doing so, you are proving that you care about them as a client and will take
care of their needs. If you find yourself in a situation where you have not
responded promptly, it still makes sense to respond with an apology for your
tardiness.
3. Ask how your clients would like to be responded to. One way to increase
customer satisfaction is to communicate with clients through their preferred
method. For online consumers, email is the standard method. This allows them
to maintain the anonymous status which is important to online consumers.
Even when consumers provide a telephone number, they may be surprised
when you contact them by phone. If you decide to place a call, take into
consideration that it is a more personal and perhaps invasive action. Prepare
notes or a list of questions beforehand to ensure you cover all your points and
maximize the time. By contacting people in their preferred method, you will

33
most likely have a better chance of reaching them with that reasonable time
frame, communicating effectively and achieving your goals.

4. Create a positive website experience. Once visitors lands on your website or


landing page, you have about 10 seconds to capture their attention. People will
judge your site quickly and determine whether they’d like to give you the
opportunity to earn their business and be their Realtor. With an attractive
layout, some photos, your contact information clearly laid out on the home
page, you’re off to a good start. When you start providing additional
information on your website about your market area, like neighbourhoods,
schools, other points of interest, you begin to increase the value of your site.
You will give people a reason to come back and they’ll tell others about it, too.
A blog is an easy and effective tool to communicate with readers. There you
can post market information, daily updates, and any opinions that may help
educate visitors.

5. Personalize and customize. Everything you do once you connect with an


Internet consumer should come across customized for the client. The Internet
allows people flexibility and anonymity but once they reach out for
information, they expect high quality customer service. Templates are an
important tool to saving you time, but never forget to tailor several components
to suit your client. People are becoming wiser and more Internet-savvy, so
they’ll be able to see.

6. Think from the customer’s point of view. Buying something is an important


and often emotional decision in a person’s life. Consumers will generally select
someone whom they feel will take care of their needs best. Show that you are
on their side, listen to their requirements and preferences and respond in a way
that demonstrates or conveys that you consider them a close acquaintance or
friend. Think from the customer’s perspective. This simple rule applies to any
marketing initiative. Seeing things from the customer’s perspective will help
keep their experience a positive one.

34
7. Educate your clients. Side by side with setting expectations, a common sense
to working successfully in challenging markets is to educate clients and to
better manage expectations of the customers. Having facts, documentation,
news, blogs, etc. to provide to your clients will help them understand where
you are coming from and validate your points.

Print out white papers or articles and have them readily available for
handing out to clients. Being an expert in your market is paramount to building
trust and, in turn, clients – and it’s your responsibility to understand and be able
to convey the difference to help educate them.

8. Conduct surveys and track results. Surveys can prove to be a valuable tool and
source of information. You can set up surveys to go to clients in the beginning
of a relationship after you first meet a client, in the middle of a longer term
transaction period, and/or at the very end when the transaction is finalized. Find
out what clients like or dislike about you and/or your offered services. Analyze
their answers to find out what you can improve about your approaches and
methodologies. Keep results so that down the road you can analyze metrics
about how your business has evolved and have the ability to chart a course of
action based on empirical knowledge, not just guess work. Statistics and data
will help you make wiser decisions about your business.

Customer

1. If you have a lousy product or service, good luck selling it. There’s a reason
the AMC Pacer and Chevy Vega aren’t around anymore. No amount of
aggressive PR or marketing can save a product or service that just plain stinks.
The consumer has to be happy with the quality of a product, at least to the
“you get what you paid for” level. If you pay $350 for Bose’s Quiet Comfort
noise-canceling headphones, you’re going to reach a level of quality that’s at
the top rung. If you settle for the $20 headphones at Wal-Mart, don’t expect
them to muffle the sound of an airplane engine, or the baby that’s sitting in the
seat behind you.

35
2. Separation Anxiety In any market, there’s usually more than one of the
same products, perhaps dozens. Tide, Biz, Cheer, Gain. The grocery store
laundry aisle is stocked with laundry detergents, all seemingly the same
product in a different package. Customer service may not work when choosing
detergent, but word of mouth certainly plays into customer satisfaction. If a
product is the best one among several identical products, then it’s necessary to
separate it from the rest, through marketing, customer service and good-old
fashioned product quality.

3. website contact information No search engine optimization No business,


then. The age of the Internet has made finding products and services a snap.
What used to take minutes of flipping through a phone book now takes
seconds on the Web. Emailing and searching for products and services on the
Internet has become such a central reference point, companies have invested
millions in making sure access is extremely easy. Because, if it takes a Web
surfer more than a few frustrating minutes to maneuver a site, they’re gone.
Customers are satisfied when there are no barriers, or at the very least, limited
barriers to access a service. Remember the phrase, “banking hours?” The
competition made the banks step up and stay open later on weekdays and even
open their doors on weekends. Work weekends? That’s something that would
have made the banking industry shudder 20 years ago.

4. At Face Value When a product or service costs more, but is worth it, its
value becomes acceptable to the consumer. When a consumer always buys
Nike, Sony or goes for the $100 massage over the $35 one, the positive
features of the products or service should outweigh the cost, creating a strong
sense of good value.“I would happily pay more if necessary to have great
customer service,” said Barry L. Brown, President of a Florida-based
consulting firm. “Great customer service is rare these days. I drive 30 minutes
to a particular location for a car wash and oil change when there are several
within five minutes of my house. The difference? Great customer service. ”A
Nice Atmosphere ask any sensible person and they’ll tell you that given the

36
same product or service, they would rather shop at the place that offers a clean,
safe and well-organized environment. Lowe’s knew this and capitalized on it
when going up against hardware’s 2,000-pound gorilla, Home Depot. The
North Carolina chain carried out extensive customer research and discovered
that women initiate 80% of home-improvement decisions. So Lowe’s decided
to do what Home Depot wasn’t doing, make its stores brighter, cleaner and
more shopper-friendly. When you need a power drill that’s the same brand and
the same price, the store that’s psychologically more inviting will win out
every time. That’s why Lowe’s now has 1,375 stores in 49 states, and ranks
42nd on the Fortune 500 list.

5. The Waiting Game When it takes 20 minutes to get your Bloom in’ Onion
at Outback or the Christmas Amazon delivery comes on Dec. 27, the timing
aspect of customer satisfaction is shot. When products and services miss their
delivery milestones, customers start to see red. If they’re waiting at the
restaurant, they tend to think there’s not enough staff working. If their
products are late in the mail, then someone mishandled their order.

6. Excuses don’t fly when customers are counting on a service. One example is
the dreaded time window. When the cable/repair guy says he will be there
between 9 and 1, and doesn’t show, that tends to boil the blood of any
customer. In a society that demands instant results for everything from food to
foreign policy, a good business has to keep the wait time to a minimum

7. Company has a commitment to tell the truth. Hiding facts, figures and
excessive small print doesn’t go far when it comes to customer satisfaction. If
a company doesn’t stand by its product, or hassles the customer when a refund
or exchange is in order that will stick. When something goes wrong with a
product or service, if the supplier goes above and beyond the call of duty in
taking responsibility, the end result is often that the customer is so impressed
with the supplier’s response, it negates the original problem.

8. Hold on to what you’ve got repetition when it comes to customers is a good


thing. When a company keeps a customer, it’s more profitable than finding

37
a new one. As early as the 1980s, the American Consumer Association found
that it was five times more expensive to win a new customer than to keep an
existing one. That’s a major windfall for companies. Brands like Apple and
Starbucks know that the stronger the bond customers have with their products,
the longer the relationship will last.

9. You’re in Good Hands; Hopefully There’s a reason Allstate’s “You’re In


Good Hands” slogan has worked for so long. Customers like to know that a
company cares. Corporations face a constant image problem, being portrayed
as soulless fat cats interested in squeezing out as much profit as possible.
When oil companies, drug makers and insurers reap billions in profits while
consumers pay more and more for their products it makes people mad.
Campaigns to show that the company cares are critical to keep customers
satisfied. When customers are informed, and feel that their opinion matters,
they are more satisfied.

10. Tech Isn’t Just for Geeks Technology means more than a fancy Flash
website. In order to satisfy customers, companies have to keep up with the
latest technological advances or suffer the consequences. Change is never
easy, but business as usual isn’t a viable alternative anymore. Technology can
help small and mid-size companies look like big companies by improving the
quality of the purchasing experience without adding staff to the payroll.

38
SWOT Analysis
Major Strengths
1) Premium rates are increasing and so are commissions

2) The variety of products is increasing.

3) Prospects expect more services from their brokers

4) Flexibility in payment of premium

5) Flexibility in investment option.

6) Open office structure.

7) Competitive environment.

Major Weaknesses
1) Insurance companies are often slow to respond to changing needs.

2) There is an increasing trend of financial weakness among the companies.

3) There are more competitors for agencies to compete with banks and Internet players

Opportunities
1) The ability to cross sells financial services is barely being tapped and can still be
developed by collaborative efforts.

2) Technology is improving to the point that paperless transactions are available.

3) The client's increasing need for an "insurance consultant" can open new ways to
service the client and generate income.

Threats
1) The increasing cost and need for insurance might hit a point where a backlash with
occur.

2) Government regulations on issues like health care, mold and terrorism can quickly
change the direction of insurance. Increasing expenses and lower profit margins will
hit hard on the smaller agencies and insurance companies.

3) Increasing expenses and lower profit margins will hit hard on the smaller agencies
and insurance companies.

39
4) Increasing in the number of private players in the market.

Factors Responsible for the Likely success of Insurance Companies


Several factors are responsible for the likely success of the various Insurance
companies in general; viz.

The A change in the attitude of the population

An open and transparent environment created under the IRDA.

1. A well-established distribution network.

2. Trained professionals to build and sell the product.

3. A more rational approach to the investment criteria

4. Encouragement of newer and better products.

5. A stringent accounting practice to prevent failures amongst the insurers.

6. A level playing field at all stages of development in the sector for all the players.

7. Core & secondary benefits of an insurance product

40
DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

The data after collection has to be processed and analyzed in accordance with
the outline laid down for the purpose at the time of developing the research plan.
Technically speaking, processing implies editing, coding, classification and tabulation
of the collected data with the goal of highlighting useful information, suggesting
conclusions, and supporting decision making. Interpretation refers to the task of
drawing inferences from the collected facts after an analytical or experimental study.
It is a search for broader meaning of research findings.

Data interpretation can be defined as applying statistical procedures to analyze


specific facts from a study or body of research. Data interpretation questions are a part
of many standardized tests. Interpretation of the data has become a very important and
essential process, mainly because of some factors like it enables the researcher to have
an in-depth knowledge about the abstract principle behind his own findings, the
researcher is able to understand his findings and the reasons behind their existence,
provides a very good guidance in the studies relating to the research work.
Two major concepts in Data Interpretation are;

 The effort to establish continuity in research through linking the results of a


given study with those of another.
A study has been made on the employees of Kusalava Motors, Vijayawada in
order to ascertain different aspects of employee engagement, interpreted on the basis
of their opinion. An attempt has been made in this chapter to present a comprehensive
picture of the analysis of opinions of employees of Kusalava Motors, Vijayawada
regarding employee engagement. Employee plays a significant role in influencing the
effective functioning of an organization. The quality of services by the organization
and the consequent image or good will created the eyes of public at large depends on
the efficiently with which the personnel perform the tasks.

41
Reason for preferring TVS Brand

Table no: 4.1

Particulars No of respondents Percentage


Good mileage 37 36%
Durability 25 24%
Economical 31 30%
Safety 11 10%
Total 104 100%

Graph no: 4.1

No. of Respondents
10%

36%
Good Mileage
Durability
30%
Economical
Safety

24%

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that among 104 respondents 36% of respondents
prefer TVS brand for good mileage, 24% for durability,30% for economical and 10% of
respondents prefer for safety precautions. From the above analysis it can be concluded that
majority of the respondents are preferring TVS for good mileage and economical.

42
Product attributes motivated them to purchase TVS vehicle

Table no: 4.2

Particulars No of respondents Percentage


Product 49 47%
Price 33 32%
Promotion schemes 13 12%
Dealers 9 9%
Total 104 100%

Graph no: 4.2

No. of Respondents
9% Product
12%
47% Price

Promotion
32% Schemes
Dealers

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 49% of
respondents are motivated by the product to purchase the TVS vehicle, 33% by price,
13%by promotion schemes and 10% of respondents by dealers. From the above
analysis it can be concluded that majority of the respondents are motivated by the
product and price to purchase the TVS vehicle.

43
Reason for Buying TVS vehicle from the Kusalava motors pvt ltd

Table no: 4.3

Particulars No of respondents Percentage


Service 38 37%
Wide range of choice 16 15%
Finance facility 20 19%
convenience 30 29%
Total 104 100%

Graph no: 4.3

No. of Respondents

29%
37%
Service
Wide range of choice
Finance Facility
Convenience
19%
15%

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 37% of
respondents buy TVS vehicle from Kusalava motors pvt ltd for service, 15% for wide
range of choice, 20% for finance facility and 10% of respondents for convenience.
From the above analysis it can be concluded that majority of the respondents buy the
TVS vehicle for service and convenience from the Kusalava motors pvt ltd.

44
Sufficient number of colors in TVS vehicles

Table no: 4.4

Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage

Yes 83 80%

No 21 20%

Total 104 100%

Graph no: 4.4

No. of Respondents
20%

Yes
No

80%

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 80% of the
respondents are satisfied with the number of colors available in TVS vehicle and 20%
of respondents are not satisfied with the number of colors available in TVS vehicle.
From the analysis it can concluded that majority of the respondents are satisfied with
the number of colors available in TVS vehicle.

45
Customer opinion regarding whether the company is providing any type of
warranty on vehicle

Table no: 4.5

Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage

Yes 92 88%

No 12 12%

Total 104 100

Graph no: 4.5

No. of Respondents
12%

Yes
No

88%

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 88% of the
respondents are satisfied with the warranty provided by company and 12% of the
respondents are not satisfied. From the analysis it can concluded that majority of the
respondents are satisfied with the warranty on the vehicle provided by the company

46
Customer’s opinion regarding the maintenance of vehicle

Table no: 4.6

Particulars No. of Respondents Percentage


low maintenance 14 15%
Average maintenance 52 55%
High maintenance 28 30%
Total 104 100%

Graph no: 4.6

No. of Respondents

15%
30% low maintenance

Average
maintenance
High maintenance
55%

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 14% of the
respondents felt that the maintenance of vehicle is low,55% of respondents felt that
the maintenance is average and 30% of the respondents felt that the maintenance is
high . From the analysis it can concluded that majority of the respondents felt that the
maintenance is average.

47
Opinion of customer that how long they have been using the vehicle

Table no: 4.7

Particulars No of respondents Percentage


Less than 3months 32 31%
Less than 6months 35 34%
6months to 1year 22 21%
Above 1year 15 14%
Total 104 100%

Graph no: 4.7

No.of Respondents
14%
31%
Less than 3months
less than 6 months
21%
6months to 1 year
above 1 year
34%

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 31% of the
respondents have been using the vehicle from last 3months, 34% have been using
from last 6months, 21% of respondents have been using less than 1year and 14% of
respondents from above 1year. From the analysis it can concluded that majority of the
respondents have been using the vehicle from the last six months.

48
Customer satisfaction regarding the mileage of the vehicle

Table no: 4.8

Particulars No. of Respondents Percentage


High satisfied 5 5%
Satisfied 52 50%
Average 15 14%
Dissatisfied 25 24%
Highly dissatisfied 7 7%
Total 104 100%
Graph no: 4.8

No. of Respondents
High satisfied
7% 5%
Satisfied
24%

Nether satisfied or
50% dissatisfied
dissatisfied
14%
highly dissatisfied

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 5% of the
respondents are highly satisfied,50% of respondents are satisfied,14% of the
respondents are average,24% of the respondents are dissatisfied and 7% of the
respondents are highly dissatisfied. From the analysis it can concluded that majority of
the respondents are satisfied with the mileage of the vehicle.

49
Customer’s opinion regarding the availability of spare parts

Table no: 4.9

opinions No of respondents Percentage


Always available 83 80%
Sometimes available 10 10%
Rarely available 11 10%
Total 104 100

Graph no: 4.9

No. of Respondents

10%
10% Always available

sometimes
available
Rarely available
80%

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 80% of the
respondents said that the spare parts are always available,10% of the respondents said
that the spare parts are sometimes available and 10% of the respondents said that spare
parts are rarely available. From the analysis it can concluded that majority of the
respondents are satisfied with the availability of the spare parts.

50
Customer opinion regarding the vehicle complaints handled by the
company

Table no: 4.10

opinions No of respondents Percentage


Excellent 58 56%
Good 22 21%
Average 11 13%
Poor 10 10%
Total 104 100%

Graph no: 4.10

No. of Respondents
10%
13%
Excellent
Good
56% Average
21% Poor

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 56% of the
respondents opined that company is handling the complaints excellently,21% of
respondents opined as good,13% of the respondents opined as average and 10% of the
respondents opined as poor. From the analysis it can concluded that majority of the
respondents are satisfied with the complaints handled by the company.

51
Customer opinion regarding the servicing charges on vehicle

Table no: 4.11

Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage

More than Estimated 0 0%


As per the Estimated 80 77%

Lower than Estimated 24 23%

Total 104 100

Graph no: 4.11

No. of Respondents
0%
23% More than
Estimated
As per the
Estimated
Low Estimated
77%

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 77% of the
respondents opined that servicing charges are as per the estimation and 23% of
respondents opined that servicing charges are lower than estimation. From the
analysis it can concluded that majority of the respondents are satisfied with the
servicing charged on vehicle.

52
Ratings on the explanation giving by the service adviser of work done on
your vehicle

Table no: 4.12

Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


Excellent 33 32%
Good 46 44%
Average 16 15%
Unacceptable 9 9%
Total 104 100

Graph no: 4.12

No. of Respondents
9%
15% 32%
Excellent
Good
Average
Un acceptable

44%

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 32% of the
respondents opined that the explanation given by service adviser of work done on
vehicle is excellent,44% of respondents opined as good,15% of the respondents
opined as average and 9% of the respondents opined as unacceptable. From the
analysis it can concluded that majority of the respondents are satisfied with the
explanation given by service adviser of work done on vehicle.

53
Rate the quality of service at Kusalava TVS

Table no: 4.13

Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


Excellent 21 20%
Good 59 57%
Fair 17 16%
Poor 7 7%
Total 104 100

Graph no: 4.13

No. of Respondents
7%
20%
16% Excellent
Good
Fair
Poor
57%

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 20%
of the respondents opined that the quality of the service is excellent,57% of
respondents opined as good,16% of the respondents opined as fair and 7% of
the respondents opined as poor. From the analysis it can concluded that majority
of the respondents are satisfied with the quality of the service at Kusalava TVS.

54
Customer opinion regarding the delivery service of Kusalava TVS

Table no: 4.14

Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage


Prompt 85 82%

Delay 19 18%
Total 104 100

Graph no: 4.14

No. of Respondents

18%

Promote
Delay

82%

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 82% of the
respondents opined that the delivery service of Kusalava TVS is prompt,18% of
respondents opined as delay in the delivery service. From the analysis it can
concluded that majority of the respondents are satisfied with the delivery service of
Kusalava TVS

55
Purpose of buying vehicle

Table no: 4.15

Purpose Response Percentage

Individual 40 38%

Business 32 31%

Family 32 31%

Total 104 100

Graph no:
4.15
31%
38%
Individual
Business
Family

31%

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 38 % of the
respondents are buying vehicle for their own purpose,31% of respondents for the
business purpose and 31% of the respondents for the family purpose. From the
analysis it can concluded that purpose for buying a vehicle is for personal, business
and family are equal.

56
Effective media which make you to buy TVS bike

Table no: 4.16

Type of media No. of Respondents Percentage


Television 40 38%
Magazines 13 13%
News Papers 20 19%
Hoardings 21 20%
Others 10 10%
Total 104 100%

Graph no: 4.16

10%

20% 38% Television


Magazines
News Papers
Hoardings
Others
19%
13%

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 38% of the
respondents are motivated by television media,13% of respondents by magazines,
19% of the respondents by news papers ,20% of the respondents by hoardings and
10% of the respondents by other media. From the analysis it can concluded that
majority of the respondents are motivated by television media to buy the TVS bike.

57
Customer satisfaction regarding the finance schemes

Table no: 4.17

Customer satisfaction response percentage

Yes 72 99%

No 32 1%

Graph no: 4.17

Yes
1%

response
percentage

99%

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 99% of the
respondents are satisfied with the finance schemes and only 1% of the respondents are
not satisfied with the finance schemes. From the analysis it can concluded that
majority of the respondents are satisfied with the finance schemes.

58
Reasons motivated customer s to buy two wheelers

Table no: 4.18

Reasons motivated No of respondents Percentage

Necessity 40 39%

Economy 25 24%

Finance 24 23%

Conveniences 15 14%

Total 104 100

Graph no: 4.18

14%

39% Necessity
Economy
23%
Finance
Conveniences

24%

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 39% of the
respondents are motivated by the necessity to buy the vehicle, 24% of the respondents
by economy, 23% by finance and 14% of respondents by the convenience.

59
Purchasing behaviour of the customer

Table no: 4.19

Purchase Behaviour Response Percentage

Cash 14 13%

Finance 65 63%

Exchange 25 24%

Total 104 100

Graph no: 4.19

Response
13%
24%
Cash
Finance
Exchange
Total

63%

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 14% of the
respondents are ready to buy the vehicle for cash, 63% of the respondents are willing
to buy on finance, 24% of the respondents are willing to buy on exchange. From the
analysis it can be concluded majority of the respondents are willing buy the vehicle on
finance.

60
Customer opinion regarding whether they suggest Kusalava TVS to their
friends

Table no: 4.20

Opinions No. of Respondents Percentage

Yes 92 88%

No 12 12%

Graph no: 4.20

No. of Respondents
12%

Yes
No

88%

Analysis and Interpretation

From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 88% of the
respondent are interested to suggest TVS Kusalava to their friends and 12% of the
respondents are not interested to suggest to their friends. From the analysis it can be
concluded majority of the respondents are willing to suggest TVS Kusalava to their
friends.

61
FINDINGS
1. From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 37% of
respondents buy TVS vehicle from Kusalava Motors pvt ltd for service, 15%
for wide range of choice, 20% for finance facility and 10% of respondents for
convenience. From the above analysis it can be concluded that majority of the
respondents buy the TVS vehicle for service and convenience from the
Kusalava motors pvt ltd.
2. From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 80% of the
respondents are satisfied with the number of colors available in TVS vehicle
and 20% of respondents are not satisfied with the number of colors available in
TVS vehicle. From the analysis it can concluded that majority of the
respondents are satisfied with the number of colors available in TVS vehicle.
3. From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 88% of the
respondents are satisfied with the warranty provided by company and 12% of
the respondents are not satisfied. From the analysis it can concluded that
majority of the respondents are satisfied with the warranty on the vehicle
provided by the company
4. From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 14% of the
respondents felt that the maintenance of vehicle is low,55% of respondents felt
that the maintenance is average and 30% of the respondents felt that the
maintenance is high . From the analysis it can concluded that majority of the
respondents felt that the maintenance is average.
5. From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 31% of the
respondents have been using the vehicle from last 3months, 34% have been
using from last 6months, 21% of respondents have been using less than 1year
and 14% of respondents from above 1year. From the analysis it can concluded
that majority of the respondents have been using the vehicle from the last six
months
6. From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 14% of the
respondents felt that the maintenance of vehicle is low,55% of respondents felt
that the maintenance is average and 30% of the respondents felt that the
62
maintenance is high . From the analysis it can concluded that majority of the
respondents felt that the maintenance is average.
7. From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 31% of the
respondents have been using the vehicle from last 3months, 34% have been
using from last 6months, 21% of respondents have been using less than 1year
and 14% of respondents from above 1year. From the analysis it can concluded
that majority of the respondents have been using the vehicle from the last six
months.
8. From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 5% of the
respondents are highly satisfied,50% of respondents are satisfied,14% of the
respondents are average,24% of the respondents are dissatisfied and 7% of the
respondents are highly dissatisfied. From the analysis it can concluded that
majority of the respondents are satisfied with the mileage of the vehicle
9. From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 80% of the
respondents said that the spare parts are always available,10% of the
respondents said that the spare parts are sometimes available and 10% of the
respondents said that spare parts are rarely available. From the analysis it can
concluded that majority of the respondents are satisfied with the availability of
the spare parts.
10. From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 56% of the
respondents opined that company is handling the complaints excellently,21%
of respondents opined as good,13% of the respondents opined as average and
10% of the respondents opined as poor. From the analysis it can concluded that
majority of the respondents are satisfied with the complaints handled by the
company.

63
11. . From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 32% of the
respondents opined that the explanation given by service adviser of work done
on vehicle is excellent,44% of respondents opined as good,15% of the
respondents opined as average and 9% of the respondents opined as
unacceptable. From the analysis it can concluded that majority of the
respondents are satisfied with the explanation given by service adviser of work
done on vehicle.
12. .From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 77% of the
respondents opined that servicing charges are as per the estimation and 23% of
respondents opined that servicing charges are lower than estimation. From the
analysis it can concluded that majority of the respondents are satisfied with the
servicing charged on vehicle.
13. From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 20%

of the respondents opined that the quality of the service is excellent,57%


of respondents opined as good,16% of the respondents opined as fair and
7% of the respondents opined as poor. From the analysis it can concluded
that majority of the respondents are satisfied with the quality of the
service at Kusalava TVS
14. From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 82% of the
respondents opined that the delivery service of Kusalava TVS is prompt,18%
of respondents opined as delay in the delivery service. From the analysis it can
concluded that majority of the respondents are satisfied with the delivery
service of Kusalava TVS
15. From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 38 % of the
respondents are buying vehicle for their own purpose,31% of respondents for
the business purpose and 31% of the respondents for the family purpose. From
the analysis it can concluded that purpose for buying a vehicle is for personal,
business and family are equal.

64
16. From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 38% of the
respondents are motivated by television media,13% of respondents by
magazines, 19% of the respondents by news papers ,20% of the respondents by
hoardings and 10% of the respondents by other media. From the analysis it can
concluded that majority of the respondents are motivated by television media to
buy the TVS bike.
17. From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 99% of the
respondents are satisfied with the finance schemes and only 1% of the
respondents are not satisfied with the finance schemes. From the analysis it can
concluded that majority of the respondents are satisfied with the finance
schemes.
18. From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 39% of the
respondents are motivated by the necessity to buy the vehicle, 24% of the
respondents by economy, 23% by finance and 14% of respondents by the
convenience.
19. From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 14% of the
respondents are ready to buy the vehicle for cash, 63% of the respondents are
willing to buy on finance, 24% of the respondents are willing to buy on
exchange. From the analysis it can be concluded majority of the respondents
are willing buy the vehicle on finance.
20. From the above survey it was found that amongst 104 respondents 88% of the
respondent are interested to suggest TVS Kusalava to their friends and 12% of
the respondents are not interested to suggest to their friends. From the analysis
it can be concluded majority of the respondents are willing to suggest TVS
Kusalava to their friends.

65
SUGGESTIONS

The following are the recommendations of the study;

1. The dealer has to provide services like mileage adjustments, A/c services, etc.
2. The dealer has to deliver the orders faster in order to the customers.

3. Some technical programs are to be conducted by the leader in order to upgrade

the skills of worker and employees.

4. There is a lot of competition in the market and some of the respondents are

getting attracted towards other brands. Therefore the dealer has to maintain a

better relationship with the customers.

5. The dealer has to introduce special sales promotional techniques retain

customers to counter competition attract.

6. The Company’s has to increase the awareness level in buyers through print

media.

7. The Company has also to provide special promotional festival or off-seasonal

offers to all customers.

8. The Company may also attract the customers by giving free gift hampers at the

time of purchase.

9. The Company has to provide the free demo show to the customers.

10. Company has to improve the quality of sales staff conduct communication

classes to the sales executives.

66
Bibelography

67
DAQUESTIONNAIRE ON CUSTOMER SATISFACTION

Name :

Age :

Gender : (Male/Female)

Address:

1) Why did you prefer TVS brand? Because of


a) Good mileage c) Economical
b) Durability d) Safety
2) Which attributes motivated you to purchase TVS vehicle?
a) Product c) Promotional d) Dealers
b) Price schemes

3) What are the reasons for you to buying TVS vehicle from kusalava motors
pvt.limited
a) Service c) Finance facility
b) Wide range of choice
4) Is there is sufficient number of colors available in TVS vehicle?
a) Yes c) Exchange
b) No
5) Does the company provide any type of warranty on vehicle?
a) Yes c) 10%
b) No d) 11%
6) What is the maintenance of your vehicle?
a) Low maintenance c) Average maintenance
b) High maintenance

68
7) How long you been using this vehicle?
a) Less than 3 months c) 6 months to one year
b) Less than 6 months
8) Are you satisfied with mileage of the vehicle?
a) Highly satisfied d) Dissatisfied
b) satisfied e) Highly dissatisfied
c) Neither satisfied or dissatisfied
9) How is the spare parts availability?
a) Always available
b) Sometimes available c) Rarely available
10) How do the company responding on customer complaints?
a) Excellent c) Average
b) Good d) Poor

11) How is the servicing cost charged on your vehicle?


a) More than estimated c) No
b) As per the estimated
12) Rate the explanation given by service adviser of work done on your vehicle?
a) Excellent c) Average
b) Good d) Unacceptable
13) Rate the quality of service at Kusalava TVS?
a) Excellent c) Fair
b) Good d) Poor
14) Please give the opinion on delivery service of Kusalava TVS (p)ltd?
a) Promote b) Delay

15) On what purpose do you want purchase two wheeler?


a) Individual b) Business c) Family

16) What is the most effective media which makes you to buy TVS BIKE?
a) Televisions b) News papers c) Magazines
d) Hoardings e) Others

69
17) Are you satisfied with finance schemes of kusalava TVS?
a) Yes b) No
18) What are the factors influence you to buy two wheeler?

a) Necessity b) Economy c) Finance d) Convenience

19) Which is most preferred payment system by the customer?


a) Cash b) Finance c) Exchange

20) Do you suggest a valued sales / service for your friends in Kusalava TVS?
a) Yes
b) No

Any suggestion you want to give

Thank you for sharing your opinion about Kusalava TVS your comments are much
appreciate

Date:

Place:

Signature

70
71
72