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C o p yr i g h t . 1 9 16, B y L .

Ro g r
e s .

CD mA438886
I ntrod u c ti on
D re a m s an d premonition s are the most co mmo n of
all psychic p h e no me na ,
but they are nevertheless but
little understood Modern psychology has a c c u mu
.

lated a n imme ns e array of facts w hich very conclu


s iv e l ysho w th a t th e consciousness of th e hum a n being
is something vaster deepe r an d a ltog eth er more t e
,

markable than has generally b een suppos ed B u t j u st .

there th e psychologis ts stop on th e very threshold of


,

gre a t discoveri es They are puzzl ed by th e remark


.

a b le f a cts a nd a re b a ffl ed i n their attemp ts to co rel a te -

thema nd s a ti sfa ctorily explain them .

The facts that have b een collected a nd verifi ed


show th a t W hil e some dream s a re fantastic c ontra d ic

tory a nd i llo gic a l o th ers are not only coherent an d


,

logi c a l b ut present a m a rvelou s depth of wisdom


,

which when comp a red toordinary hum a n k nowl edge


,

,

seems a l most like omniscienc e T h ey some times solve


.

problem s tha t a r e impossible of solution by th e wak


ing consciou sness a nd frequently a ctual ly forecast th e
,

future by accurately descri b“ing an event which has


not y et occurred but which i s to b e Thus p eople .

h a ve dre a med of their appro a ching death or of th e ,

de a th of o th e rs s t a ting exactly the n a ture of th e a cci


,

den t th a t would c a u se it and describin g in detail the


,

scen e s of the coming tragedy Y et aga in th e imp end


.
4 DR E AM 8 A N D PRE M ON I TI ON 8

ing even t presented to th e c o nsciou sness i n th e dream


st a te may represent only th e most trivial of circum
tanc es Som eti mes dream s give warnin gs about dan
.
~

gers th at are threatenin g but of which the waking


consc iousn es s is W holly o b liviou s I n oth er cases a

dream has enabl ed on e to become a rescu er an d life


saver in some approachin g disaster Occasionally in a .

dream accu rate knowledge is obtain ed of some tragedy


that is occurrin g at a distanc e or of a crime that has ,

be en com mitted wh il e again mi ssing peopl e have been


,

located an d lost obj ects have b e en recovered throu gh


dreams .

Th e truth of these astounding facts i s b eyon d all


question T he prob lem I S to explain th e facts M od
. .

cm psycholo gy talks rather vaguely o f the sub c on

scious m ind and of the subliminal sel f b u t this rea lly ,

explain s not hing W e do not advance toward the


.

underst a n ding of a mystery simply by appl ying to it


a new n a me What is that thin g ca lled the sub con
.

scious o r the s ubliminal and wh a t are its powers and


, ,

its limi ta ti ons ? Unless science can satisfactorily a nswer


such questi ons it has d one little indeed towa rd solving
these psychological puzzles .

The most stri k ing characteri stic of th e recent work


of writers on dreams i s the stron g tendency toward a
purely materialistic interpretation of the ph en omena
~

ob served H amper ed by th e wholly inade quate hy


.

p o t h e s is that dream s are cause d either by impression s

made on th e physical sen ses o r by desires of th e wak


ing con sciousness th ey fill th eir page s with a discu s
,

sion of the class of dream s that may thus b e explain ed


IN TR OD U C TI ON 5

and careful ly av o id the dreams that are really worthy


o f investi gation j ust b ecause they present facts t hat

no such hypothesis can dispose of I t i s some cause


.

fo r con gratulation however that after devoting much


, ,

space to a descri ption of the dream s which illustr a te


the well known fact that slight external stimuli often
-

n —
c a use exa ggerated bra i impressions as for exam ,

ple a drop o f water on th e fac e causing a dream of a


,

vi o lent rainstorm— the se writers o ften devote a closing


e

paragraph to th e admis sion t h at neither physical nor


m ental causes are su fficient to account for th e dreams
that occasionally forecast th e future N o w it i s pre .
,

cis e l y those o c c a s ro na l dream s which th e materiali stic


hypothe si s can not expl ain that it 15 i mportant to
un derstand for they al o ne c a n give some clue to th e
,

real n ature of hu man c o nsciousness W e shall surely.

l earn but little by go ing many times over th e b eaten


,

path of admitted facts while n egl ecting to lo o k beyond


to th e un explored fi elds so full of fascinating po ssi
b il itie s
. The merest glance i s su fficient to show that
there are two distinct cl asses of dreams ' that one class
constitutes a memory on awakening of somethin g
, ,

that i s related to impressions mad e o n th e physic a l


senses ' that the other class clearly has no such or i g i n
an d that instead of b e ing distorte d and fantastic such
, ,

dreams sometimes embody profound wisdom or a ccu


rate knowledge o f future events Th ese two classes
.

of dreams no more arise from th e sam e causes th an


the noi se made by th e revolving record of a phon o
graph has the same origin as the song of intelligence
and e motion that flows from it T he on e is purely
.
6 DRE AMS AND PR E MON I TI ON S

mechanical while th e oth er is purely mental and spi f


,

itu a l tran smitted through a materi al m echani sm A n d


, .

that i s th e tru e d is tinc to n b etween th e dream arising


from a physical cau se and th e dream which o wes its
origin to th e h igher activiti es of unfettered consciou s
n es s Th e on e i s produc ed by th e mechanism of con
.

s c io u s ne ss— the physical brain and its etheri c count e r


part autom a tically responding to external stimuli an d
putting together fragmentary b rain pictures T he
.

other i s th e result o f th e activity of th e ego impre ssing


the physic a l b rain with tr a n scen dent a l truth .

Psychologists shou ld not b e slow er than the most

progressive of physical s cient ists in a ccepting th e fac t


of clairvoy a nce an d recognizing th e part it pl a ys i n
occu lt rese a rch T h ere i s so much of rel iab l e evi denc e
.

on record inv o l vmg th e u se of clairvoy a nce that it


woul d b e almost a s much a w a ste of tim e to a rgue its
.

exi stence a s to conten d that there i s a state of con


s c io u s ne s s known a s trance . T hose who are fami liar
with th e clairvoyant faculty a nd with the rema rk a b l e
powers of th e sci entifical ly tr a ined clairvoyant w ill ,

n ee d no argu ment to convin ce th em that h ere i s a



mean s of a scert a ining th e truth abou t th e v a riou s
states of con sciou snes s an d thei r relationsh ip to the
physical mech a ni sm through which th ey a re e x
pressed B ut i t i s of s econ dary imp or tance wh eth er
.

th e reality of clairvoyance b e admitted o r deni ed ' fo r


from th e ph enomen a cl a irvoya ntly ob served a nd c a ta
l o gu e d i t i s possibl e to construct th e hypoth esi s that
will explain th e facts an d all of th e known f a cts t e
, ,

lated to dreams A ny hypoth esi s that ca n do th a t


. ,
IN TR OD U C TI ON 7

legitimately holds its place and mu st b e regarded as


,

soun d unti l a fact i s pr o duced that it can not explain .

The method of acquiring the knowledge from whi ch a


hypothesi s i s C onstructed i s of little importan ce The .

only qu estion to be considered is wh ether th e hy po the


sis c a n explain the admitted facts On its ab ility to


.

do that it mu st stan d or fall .

There is a working hypothesis that logically and


satisfa ctorily explains all th e re ma rk a b l e facts tragic
,

or trivial presented by dream s an d premonition s that


,

will enab le us to classify an d c o mprehen d th em ' that


wi ll assign to each dream neith er less nor more im
portance th a n the facts warrant and that will give to
,

those interested in the su b j e ct a key t o th es e mysteries


of the m ind T he purpose of th e following chapters
.

i s to presen t this hypot he sis together with th e ne c e s


,

s ary facts to fully illustrate the psych ic princ iples ih - f

volved in the re m arkabl e dreams h erein recorded .


C H A PTE R I

The D re a mer
B efore we can hop e to comprehend drea ms we
mu st un derstand the n atur e and c o nstitution of the
dr eamer . We mu st free ourselves o f s o me of our
materialistic concepti o ns an d con sider th e qu estion of
what the hu man b eing rea lly i s I t i s th e popular
.

error of regarding man as b eing n o thing m o re than a


phys i cal body and brain that has so sadly retarded
progres s in thi s fi eld of research . The very ph e
h omena with w hi c h psych ology deals should long ago

have destr o yed such an untenable prem i s e fo r b y th at


,

materialisti c hy pothesi

s it is utterly impossibl e to ac

count for the facts in hand .

The work of such scientists as Crookes and Lo dge


and Rich et has fin al ly turned pub lic attentio n i n the
right direction Th ey have presented evidence in over
.

whelming abundance to sh o w that the con sciou s nes s


i s no t dependent on t h e physical body for its continu
ity ' that a ft er bodily death the con sciou sn ess survive s ,

and that during th e l ife of the phy s ma l b o dy the co n


s c io u s ne s s may also functi o n quite indepen dently of

it So conc l usive are the facts gathered by varied and


.

l o ng continued experim ents that Sir Oliver Lodg e w a s


-

l e d to decl a re in a lecture b ef o re the S o ciety Fo r Th e


'

A dvancement o f Sc i enc e th at the continent of a new


10 DR E AMS AND PREM ONI TI ON S

w orl d had b e en discovered and that a lready a b a nd


,

o f daring investigators had landed on its tre a cherou s

but promi sing shores .

Thi s n ew continent b elongs of course to the in


, ,

visibl e world and th es e pion eers o f th e s cientifi c


,

arm y are no t th e firs t to exp lore it Th ey a re only


th e vanguard o f the physical scien ti sts The occult .

scienti sts w ere lo ng ahead of them a nd had explored ,

an d studi ed th e invi sib l e realm s N a turally enough


.

they hail th e a dven t of th e phys ical scientists with th e


greatest sati sfacti on for they are rapi dly confirmin g
,

wh at th e occultists lon g have taught ab o ut the con


s titu tio n of man .

I t i s only wh en w e have fully b efo re u s these


facts ab out th e real n a ture o f man an d underst a n d ,

that he is essenti ally a spi ritual b ei ng a m i no r part ,

only o f w hose en ergies come i nto action in th e m a te


rial real ms that we shall b e abl e to comp rehen d th e
,

phenomena of dream s a nd premonition s L et u s turn .

our attention then to the occul t sid e of the prob l em


, ,

a nd examine th e working hypothesi s th a t s a tis fa c

to r il y explains th e f a cts .

Thi s hypoth esis i s that th e human b eing i s a n ih


d iv id u a l iz e d portion of the un i versa l min d wh ich i n ,

turn i s bu t on e expression of th e Supreme B eing '



,

th a t man i s an im a ge of God in th e very literal


s ens e of having potentially within hi m th e attribu tes ,

th e p ower an d th e wi sdom of the d eity to which he i s


thus so directly related ' that hi s evolution i s going
forward in a worl d that h as both its spiritual a nd
physi cal region s ' that h e i s essentially a soul o r cen ,
TH E D RE AMER 11

ter of consciou sness functioning through a physical


,

body which is but the temporary vehicle of the real


man in th e same s ens e that an automobile is one s ’

vehicle a nd that this material body which i s in real


,
-

ity but th e clothing of th e soul as the glove is th e ,

clothing of the hand i s disc a rded at death without


-

in a ny degree a ffecting th e life an d conscio u sness th at


ha s temp o rarily u sed it for ga i n i ng experi ence in th e

materi a l re a lms M an i s therefore a soul possessing


.
, ,

a m a teri a l body that enab les hi m to b e consciou s an d


active in the p hysical worl d This hypothesis revers es .

the old materialistic conception completely Thi s is


m an s te m
.


por a ry l ife H e existed a s an intelligenc e
.

b efore h e cam e down into th es e m a terial regions


through birth in a physical body and wh en that body ,

dies he resu mes hi s relationship to hi s home plane ,


\

the spiritual worl d B u t thi s s p 1ritu a l w o rl d is not


.

merely a realm of thought I t i s a worl d of form an d .

a life of a cti vity of deeper w ider knowledge than th e


, ,

physical an ethereal world b ut still a worl d of


, ,

thought of action an d of enterpris e I t is a worl d of


,
.

tenuou s matter a huge glob e not distant in sp a ce


, ,

but enclosi ng and interp enetrating our own as the


ether postulated b y science surrounds a nd interp ene
, ,

trates all physical obj ects I t i s someti me s called th e .

astral world T hi s etherea l world as a whole natu r


.

a lly has its sub — d iv is mns but fo r the purpos e of under


,

s tanding the phenomena of dream s it i s not necessary


to introd uce details I t is nece ssary however to com
.
, ,

preh end the relation ship b etween th e physical an d


astral region s and b etween the physical and astral
,
12 DRE A M S A N D PREM ON I TI ON S

p o rtions of the mechani s m of con sci o usness The rela .

tio ns hip o f th e former is that of a worl d within a


worl d —th e astral glob e b eing composed of matter s o
tenuou s that it enclos es the physical globe inte rpe ne ,

trates it thro ughout an d exten ds far b eyon d it i n


,

space A s a b a ll of fibrou s matter migh t b e immers ed


.

in liqui d matter s aturated with it an d completely


, ,

sur ro un ded by it so th e physical glob e i s inte rp e ne


,

tr a te d an d enveloped by the matter of th e astral

w o rl d The astral worl d then i s not remote but i s


.
, ,

here in the midst of u s abou t us through u s an d b e , ,

yon d u s .

The relation s hip of th e physical a nd astral b odi es


of a hu man b eing are of a like n ature The tenuou s .

matter of th e astral body i s withi n and wi thout th e


physi ca l b ody extending somewh at b ey o nd it and
, ,

con sti tutin g an exact dupl icate of it Of cou rs e ,


n either of thes e bodi es i s i n any sen s e th e man B oth .

are p a rts of th e complex m echan ism thr ou gh whi ch


h e manifests hi mself an d th e astral body i s a high er
,

and fuller exp r e s smn of th e man than the physic a l


body i s I ndeed the latter i s merely th e body of
.
,

action I t i s only th e ins tru me nt of the man which


'

. ,

enab les hi m to b e pres ent in th e physical world whi le ,

th e astral body is that with whi ch h e f e el s and through


which thought an d emotion are s ent downward or ,

outward into th e phys ical body Th e physical b ody


,
.

has no part in th e gen er a tion of th o ught I t is merely .

the m ean s by which thought an d emotion are e x


r e ss e d in th e materi a l world Theref o re thought and

p .
,
TH E D R E AME R

13

emotion do not co me to an end wh en th e physical


body i s in a ctive on account of either sleep or death .

Th e se tw o encasements of th e real man— th e phys



ical an d a stral bodie s separate from each oth er under .

certain con dition s the latter being used as a vehicle


,

of con sciousness while the former is quiescent A .


diver u ses a b o at and a diver s suit B oth are nec e s .

sary for the work he i s to do B ut h e may lea v e th e


.

boat and use only the diving suit fo r a time The .

b o at served the purpos e of enab ling him to go from


point to point on the surface The diving suit e n .

ables him to explore a region in wh ich the boat i s


not a vailabl e N ei ther i s the man Th ey are merely
. .

th e mechanism that h e u ses So it i s with his visib le


.

and invisible bodies The visibl e phy si cal body may


.

be discarded an d th e 1nv isib l e astral body may then


b e used as the veh icl e o f the con sciou sn ess o r so u l ,

th e man hi mself—A n the more eth ereal region s .

B ut what are the conditi o ns un der which th e con


s c io u s ne s s withdraws fr om t h e physical body an d
function s th rough th e astral b ody ?
One is sleep an d
the ot h er is deat h Sleep always indicates th e sepa
.

ra tion o f the V i s i b le fro m t h e invisibl e body Whether .

th e sleep i s natural or i s induced by hypnotism or


,

tra nce it indica tes the s eparation o f the bodies There


,
.

can b e no such separation without sleep and no sleep


withou t such separation S leep i s simply th e ab sence
.

of the ma n from his p hysical body That i s why it .

i s asleep . I t i s not b eing u sed by th e man H is .

intelligence i s not flowing through it He i s not .

ther e.
14 DR E AMS AND PRE M ON I TI ON S

But how then it may be a sked does the breathing


, , ,

conti nu e a nd the heart b eat if th e body i s wi thout


its tenant ? H o w does the worm entomb e d within
th e chrysali s beco me th e butterfly ? H ow do creatu re s
b elow th e line of intellect in th e evolution ary scal e
live without thinking ? Our physical bodi es a re not
dep en dent upon ou r intell ects . W e do no t con
s c io u s l y direct th e b eating of th e heart nor th e
p roces ses of diges t ion during th e waking hou rs T h e .

activiti es n ecessary to the life a nd w ell b eing of th e


- -

body go on until its death W h ether we think of th em


or do not an d wh ether the con sciousness i s func tioning
,

through the b ody o r i s W ith dra wn fro m i t .

D e a th i s th e oth er c a u se of th e s ep a ration of th e
astral b ody from th e physic a l body an d th e on ly ,

di ff er enc e between sleep an d de a th i s th a t in sl eep


th e man with draws hi s consciou sness tempor a rily
from the physical bo dy an d l a te r returns to it T he .

act of withdrawin g i s wh a t we c a ll f a llin g a sleep .

Returning i s what w e c all a w a kenin g T h e in s ta n t


.

th e con sciou sn ess i s with drawn th e phys ical body i s



asl eep That i s what sl eep i s the separ a tion of the
.

a stral body from the physical body The soul the .


,

re a l man has temporarily laid down hi s instru ment


,

o f activity i n th e visible world I t i s then like a


.

vacan t hou s e with drawn curtain s until its a b sent


ten a nt return s to it an d begin s to send h i s con sciou s
,
.

n es s through it . D u ring h is ab sence h e h a s b een


u sing his a st ral body a s hi s vehicl e of consciousn ess ,

j u st a s th e diver temporarily a b a n doned hi s boat for


h i s diving suit .
TH E DRE AMER 15

I n death the con sciousnes s has b een wit hdrawn


fr o m the physical body fo r th e last tim e The ab senc e.

i s permanent The b o dy has wo rn ou t or has b een


.

i n j ured b ey o n d the p o s sib il ity o f repair Th e soul


. .
,

th e real man can no t return to it b ecause it no longer


,

serves the purp o se fo r which it came into existence .

I t is a worth less machine worn out through long


'

us e b ro ken suddenly by vi o le nce or wasted sl o wly


,

by dis ease as th e case may b e D uring all th e tem


,
.

p o r a r
y ab s e nces call ed sleep there was a magn etic

co nnecti o n between the astral and physi ca l bodies o f
th e man B ut when death c o m es the ti e b etween th e
.

soul and th e material b o dy is b r o ken and there i s no


p o ssibility of returning to it A n d th at i s what death
.

i s— the s evering of the b o n d b etween the visib l e an d


invi sib l e bodies Th e physical b o dy i s th en dead an d
.

disin tegration b egin s B ut th e real man the indi


.
,

vidual consc iou sness has not ceased to live H e has


,
.

merely lost the in stru ment that conn ected him with
the material w o rld and which ena b led hi m to m o ve
,

about on it and b e kn o wn to o th ers there _


He is .

physically dead b ecaus e h e has l o st th e physical body .

H e i s not mentally and em o ti o nally dead b ecau s e he


has not lost that part o f his mechanism o f c o n sci o u s
n ess which i s th e seat o f th o ught an d emotion The .

physical body enab led him to express his life in th e


'

vi sibl e w o rld but it was no m o re th e man th an a


phonograph i s th e p erson who sings into it I f th e .

phon o graph is broken the o nly change to th e S i nger


i s that he has l o st th e in strument o f hi s expres sion ,

not hi s consciousness .
16 DRE AMS AND PREMONI TI ON S

I t may at first th o ught seem grotesqu e to speak


, ,

of a man as pos ses sing more th an one body B eing .

to many an unaccust o med thou ght it may soun d a s


b izarre as to say that a person may o ccupy two
h o u ses at on e an d th e same time B ut neverth eles s
.

the idea represents scientifi c accuracy A s a matter .

o f fact we do live i n two hOu se s wh en ever w e live in

any hou se S ci en c e asse rts that every physical atom


.

has its duplicate in etheric matter by which it is ,

su rrounded an d interp en etrated Every building


.
,

every b rick a nd board ha s its counterp art in un seen


,

m a tter T h e i mmob ile mountain s th e flowing streams


.
, ,

th e s w aying tree tops th e waving fi elds o f grain


-
, ,

the placi d lakes an d th e ocean te mpest tossed all ,

h ave th eir exact counterparts in the i nv i s i bl e matter


that reproduc es th e world in ph antom form .

So much science i s ab l e to d emonstrate and th e ,

very nature of thi s truth compels u s to postulate still


oth er an d rarer grades of matter th an th e ether I t i s .

the ne x t rarer grad e of invisib le matter tha t th e ‘

s cienti sts almo st b rough t within th e c atalog of a sc e r

ta ine d f a cts by disco veri ng th e electron an d proving

t hat th e atom i s a minute univers e in itself .

W h en we hold a p ebbl e in the hand we do not se e


all of th e pebbl e I t consists of its visib le an d inv is
.

ibl e p a rts and sigh t a nd touch can deal with but on e


,

of the m . The train ed clairvoyant woul d see what


oth ers see and al so the grade s of subtil e matter
surroundin g i t an d interpen etrating it N ow since .
,

thi s surrounding an d i nterpenetratin g relation ship of


seen and un seen matter i s as tru e of on e obj ect as
TH E DRE AME R 17

an o ther the physical b o dy is no excepti o n D upli


, .

cating it exactly in form an d feature i s th e tenuou s


matter o f a rarer grade surrounding and permeating ,

it The consciousn ess funct i on s thr o ugh these tw o


.

b o dies as one c o mplex instrum ent yet th ey are ,

separab le A n aer o plan e is equipped fo r movement


.

b o th on the gr o un d an d through th e air I t may .

l os e its wh eels w ithout l o sing its power to s o ar It .

has m erely l o st that part of its me ch anism that e n


abled it to op erate in conn ecti o n w ith the grosser
element S o with man N V he n h e los e s his physical
’ ‘

. .

b o dy it lim i ts his field o f activities but does no t


change the m an him self nor impair his ab il ity to
'

function el sewh e re .

Th e dreame r th en i s va stly m o re than a physical


m
, ,

b o dy with a ysteriou s brain W e are not deal ing



.

with a machine a p ortion o f which secretes th o ught


,


as th e liver s ecretes b ile as a scientist o f a past ,


gen eration v e ntured to gues s but with a spiri tual ,

b e i ng fu nct i o n i ng thr o ugh a materi al body c o ntaining


a brain that is at o nc e an i nstr u ment o f thou ght and
a limitation o f c o n sci o u sness ' for if thought and
em o ti o n have a superphysical o rigin a large percentage

material expression
m
of the i r o r i g i nal en ergy u st b e expended in attainin g
Th erefore the dreamer in his
.
,

waking h o urs is expressi n g but a faint refl ect i o n o f


,

his true c o ns ciousness which i s n ecessarily limited


,

by its material media A s a fragment o f th e universal


.

min d he pos sess es within hi s unfettered self a wi sdom


wholly fore i gn to his physical e xistence The home .

plane o f hi s b eing is above th e limit a tion s of those


18 DRE AMS AND PRE M ONI TI ON S

c o nditi o n s of c o n sci o u sn es s which w e kn o w a s tim e


an d spac e H e i s temporarily b l in ded by m atte r
.

'

whil e fun ctioning through the material b ody He .

i dentifies hims elf with it and loses consciou s con


ne c tio n with his higher estate B ut when h e escapes
.

the li mitation s of th e physical b ody either in sleep or ,

i n death an d b egins to functi o n through hi s ast ral


,

b ody h e i s a stage n earer to reality an d has in s om e ,

d egree a tran scend ental grasp of human aff airs I n


,
.

the case of sl eep h e returns at the m o ment of awaken


,

ing fro m th e higher state of con sciousn es s to th e


,

lower level of physical plane consciousnes s a nd is


again subj ecte d to th e limitations of th e physical
b rain B u t th e physical b rain has its counterpart i n
.

a stral matter an d it i s th e astral form i n wh ich th e


con sc i ousn ess the real man h as b een functioning
, ,

durin g th e hours of s leep H is experi ences durin g


.

th a t time have given ri s e to thoughts an d emotion s


which are not i mpress ed upo n th e physical b rain
b ecau se i t has had no part in them They h ave set

up vib ration s only in th e sub til er portion s of th e


mechanism of con sciou sn es s O rdinarily upon th e
.

r e un iting
-
of th e astral and phys ical b odies the
vib rations of the tenuou s astral matter a re not com
mu nic a t e d to th e matter of th e physical b rai n an d
there i s no m emory of what h as occurred during th e
p eriod of slumber O ccasion ally however there i s a
.
, ,

rare combination of physical a stral an d mental ,

con dition s that makes m emory possib le an d th e


recollection i s calle d a dream B ut all memories of
.

th e sl eeping hours are not recollection s of as tral


THE DRE AM ER 19

events an d it i s o nly after s o me e ffo rt and experi enc e


that it b ecomes p o ssible to disting uish be tween the
mem o ries which represent the adventures of th e soul
in th e astral region and th e b ra i n pictures caused by
the automatic activity o f th e physical b rain in which
,

ext ernal s timuli s o m etimes play a m o st dramatic


pa rt N evertheless th e two distant class es of dream s
.
,

th o se caused by aut o matic physi o logical activity ,

occasionally associated with excitation outside the


b o dy and those which represent the exp erien ces of
,

the man himself in the ethereal realms are as analysi s


, ,

will show as diff erent in their characteristics as are


,

the cau se s which produce th em .


C H A PTE R I I

Th e M at e rial i s ti c Hyp oth e s i s


Is Ina d e qu a te
Some modern writers h ave labored mightily to
sh o w that dreams may b e expl ained by a purely
materialistic hypothesi s . Coincidence has b een put
under such stress as to rais e th e accidental to th e
dignity o f the causal T el ep athy has b een relied u pon
.

to cover a mu l titude o f lame conclusion s To explain


.

s trange facts w e have b een given far fetched solution s


-

that require m o re credulity for thei r acc eptance than


'

an y fai ry tale of our childhood days .A writer will


c heerfully s et out to give a satisfactor y m a terial solu

ti o n for any an d all dreams a nd will e x pl a in that


the reason why a certain l a d y d re a me d of the correct
number o f an unknown addres s was possibly b ecau se
she had seen that particular nu mb er on the paging
of a book the day before ' A nother relates th e story
of a dinn er party b eing interrupted by on e of their
numb er being suddenly impre ss ed with th e feelin g
that he must go immedi ately to a barn not far away '
“ ”
that an u nd e fi na b l e som ething was wr o ng there .

H e had no id ea what it might b e but h e had an inn er


impul si o n with the b arn as a destination I t w a s an
.

unreasonabl e but irresistibl e impul se to go imme


d ia te l y to examine the barn and apparently for no
,
22 DRE AMS AND PREM ONI TI ON S

reason at all N one of th e oth ers shared the feeling


.

but upon reaching the barn th ey were astoni shed to


fin d that a s mall blaze had started in s o me unknown
way an d th ere wou l d h ave b een a c o nfl a gra tio n but
for th eir timely arrival .

H ere we h ave a phenomenon not easily explain ed .

B ut it does not tr o ub le th e writer who presents it in


o rder to show how s imple i t al l is .H e smell ed th e

s moke ' triumphantly exclaim s thi s Sherlock Holmes
o f p sychi c riddles . A n d when in such a case it i s
, ,

s ho wn that th e feeling of anxiety posi tively antedated


th e starting of th e blaz e by som e m inutes h e fal ls

back o n th e fin al resort of th e sub con sc iou s s elf ,

qu ite overlooking th e fact that that i s b egging th e


question and really explain s nothing .

I n on e of th e l eading monthly p eriodical s a w el l


knownpsychol o gi st for a tim e con ducted a department
on psychology an d th e announ ced purpose was to
explai n away pu zzling p sychic experien ces in d ai ly
a ffairs Th e thou ghtful reader will fin d it di fficult to
.

b elieve that th e p eople who propounded th e qu estion s


were sati sfi ed with the answers but th ey are appar
ently th e b e st that modern psychology i s prepared
“ ”
to give th em How ever if th e s o lutions s erve no
.
,

other purpose th ey are at l east u seful i n illustrating


the trivial argu ments pres ented an d th e astoun ding
con clu sion s reached .

I t was not so long ago that th e fact of telepathy


was struggling for slight recogn ition and was k nock
ing almost unh eard at the d o or of modern p sychology .

Slowly its statu s ch a nged from the condition of an


MA TE RIALI S TIC H YPO TH E S I S INA DE Q UA TE 23

o utcast to tardy recognition of its usefulness a nd th e ,

rapidly accumulating mass of psych ic fac ts i s likely


to raise it soon to the im po rtance of becomin g th e last
h o pe of the u ltra mat e rialist Ou r p sychologist of th e
-
.

periodical above menti o ned had not proceeded far


with hi s department until h e opened his monthly
digest with this declaration '

In the many letters received by me since I began
to discus s psychical prob lems in thes e colu mns on e ,


fact has been increasingly evident th e actuality of
telepathy or thought transference Even if I had
.

started with a disb elief in telepathy which I assur


e d l y di d not —I coul d no t have retained my skepticism


after study i ng the l e tte rs my readers have s ent me

.

From every State in the Union fro m Canada , ,

England France a nd other Europ ean countries has


, , ,

c Ome evidence ,
testifyin g with cumulative for ce t h a t
in some my sterious way one mi nd can in truth com
mu nic a te directly with anoth er mind though ha l f ,

the world apart .

Without the fact of telepathy th e attempt of th e


psychol o gist to expl ain som e of the dream s sub mi tted
w o uld indeed put h im in hard cas e ' for even with
, ,
-

telepathy an d tel epathy strained an d twisted out of


,

all s emblanc e to its l egitimate s elf hi s hy p othes i s i s


,

still hopelessly weak and utterly inadequate .

Telepathy —the communication b etween min d and


mind without material mean s has been demon str a ted
-

b y th e simpl e meth o d o f one p ers o n acting as the



sender and being hande d a written word o r a
simple drawing upon a piece of paper suppl ied by
24 DRE AMS AND PRE M ONI TI ON S

the exp eri mente r who has him self at that moment

,


conceived it The s ender fixes his attention upon it
.
.

A t that m oment anoth er person who is acting as th e


“ ”
receiver station ed at a distanc e of let u s say a
, , ,

hundred mile s waiting with pencil in han d repro


, ,

duces th e word or drawing with more or less accuracy


as the case may b e B y the hypoth es i s laid down in
.

Chapter I th e explanation i s a s simpl e as wireless


telegraphy Thought i s a force as certainly as elec
.

t r ic ity i s a force When a m ental picture i s f o rmed


.

i n th e mind grades of subtile m atter rarer than that


,

o f th e brai n are th rown into vibration an d reproduce


“ ”
th em selves i n the mind of th e rec eiver after th e
fashion of th e vibration s initiated by th e s en ding
in strument of W i reles s tel egraphy B ut tel epathy h as
.

i ts li mi tation s as c ertainly as tele graphy h a s


'
A .

thought a feeling a mood an emotion may b e tele


, , ,

p a th ic a l l y communicated from one person to anoth er


an d apparently regardl es s of any intervening spac e
which th e limits of th e earth can i mpose I n th e .

case of p eopl e with minds w ell develope d and capabl e


of forming stron g an d clear m ental images a more
extended commu ni cation would conceivably b e pos
sib le Th e scientifi c experim ents thu s far m ad e h ave
. ,

h o w ever resulted i n no su ch accomplishment Th e


,
.

most that can b e sai d to b e proved for tel epathy i s


that commun i cat i on i s a truth of n ature an d th at it
may occur in cases wh ere although th e parti es are
,

widely s e parated th ere i s eith er strong effort to com


,

mu nica te or wh er e th ere i s a b on d of sympath y ‘ .

b e tween th em W hen p eople are together a nd their


.
MA TER IA LI S TI C HYPO THE SI S INA DE Q UA TE 25

minds are running al o ng th e same lin es it may ) occur


under the most ordinary circumstances B ut we mu st .

not overlo o k the part played by facial ex pression in


reading the th o ughts o f oth ers no r of the physical,

conditions that shape thought in a c o mm o n mold as ,

fo r example when your frien d rises to open a window


,

before you can utter the req uest that i s in your mind .

H e ma y have thought of it bec a use he was moved by


'

y o ur thought or only because h e to o w a s u nc o m


'

, ,

fo rta b l e There are o th er cases not at all su sceptible


.

to such expl a nation On e often gets tel epathically th e


.

thought of anoth er who i s near hi m but it is partial


and fragmentary H e does not get a compl ete ih
.

v e nto ry of th e c o ntent of th e other s m i nd S o far



.

as casual e xp e rience an d sci entific experiment have


go ne it has b een made fair l y clear th at while telepathy
i s c o mmon it marks o u t an extremely n arro w fi eld in
ps ychological phenom e n a D eprived o f th e c o nnecting
.

link of p ersonal presenc e an d conversation or ti es o f ,

close sympathy it seems to b e e ff ective only when


,

the thought i s stimulated by some powerful emotion


like su dden and s eriou s illness accident or death ,
.

W h en w e go beyond that w e are in the realm of


assumption and sp eculat i on To assume that b ecaus e
.

one mind can catc h a thought or emotion from


another telepath ically on e person therefore gets from
,

another s m ind without e ffort or desire al l the details


relatin g to s o m e thing that in dividual has seen or


heard is as ab surd as to assume that b ecause wireless
,

telegraphy b rings a m es sage th at has p e ss e d thr ou gh


th e mind of the sendin g operator the message might
6 DRE AMS A N D PRE M ON I TI ON S

in some mysterious way give a knowledge of every


thing el se known to th at in dividual A n d yet j ust .

such fantastic and groundless assumption i s what ou r


p sychologist i s forced to i n th e e ffort to explain some
,

of the case s submitted H ere i s an exampl e '



.

A trifl e over a year ago contemplatin g a trip ,

East I decided to ren t my furni shed six—room ap a rt


,

m ent I t was taken by two youn g ladies one


.
,

employed th e other th e homekeeper


, Some three .

weeks later I had th e most di stres sing dream I .

thought I went over to my apartment only to fin d ,

everything i n most dre a dful confu sion The su n .

porch ha d b ee n converted into a temporary b edroom ,

an d in my own b edroom wh ere u sually stood th e ,

dressing t a b l e 'now on th e porch ) stood a small i ron


b ed white with everything up set a nd dirty I n my
, ,
.

dream I also saw that the youn g ladies had t a ken i n


as boarders a marri ed coupl e with two little on e s .

W ell I immediately for got th e dr eam but sever a l


, ,

n igh ts later had th e same dream a gain I magine my .

surpri se at l earnin g after my return home th a t j u st ,

what I ha d dream ed had actu ally occurred even to ,

th e l ittl e white b ed .


T hen follow s th e psychologi st s ex planation
-.
He .

says '
“ O n th e facts as st a ted thi s d ream mu st b e regarded
as telepath ic There i s of c ours e a pos sib ility th at
.
, ,

th e dreamer b efore l eavin g home had without b eing


, , ,

aware of it heard h er prospective tenants talking about


,

their plan s for taking in boarders changin g the fu rni ,


MA TE R I A LI S TI G H YPO THE SI S INADE Q U A TE 27

ture etc
,
The dream would then be merely the
.

emergence of a subc o n sciou s mem o ry .

The theory of telepathy in this case is so obviously


inadequate that our psychol o gi st hasten s to add th at
there i s another p o ssibl e explanati o n and then falls
back upon the safe vagu enes s of th e sub consci o u s
mem o ry .Bu t is his explanation even within the
realm o f probabi lity ? There may be the poss ibility ,

h e argues that she had heard tal k of t a king in board


,

ers and changing th e furniture ' B ut even if that had


happened and even i f we were to grant some conn e ction
b etween tha t fact a nd th e dream how coul d sh e h ave
,

o btain ed from th e knowledge that th ey w o uld take

boarders the fact that th e b o arders would b e a man


and hi s w ife and two littl e children ? an d if we grant
that she uncon sciou sly and in s om e myst e rious way
absorb ed th e info rmation that th ey woul d change th e
furniture how coul d that possib ly enabl e her to know
,

that h er d r e s s mg tab le woul d b e moved to th e po rch


and that a small white iron b ed would b e put in its
place ?

There i s no e vidence however th at she had heard


, ,

such conversation or had th e sl ightest hint that any


,

such th ing was contemplated I n deed there i s good


.
,

groun d for the b elief that it was all a most disagreeable


s urpri s e to h er She describ es the discovery as a

.

most distressing dream ”


Th e reasonable a ss u mp
tion from the language employed by her i s that she
was astonished a nd annoyed and was very much
disap pointed in her tenants Clearly n either of th e
.
28 DRE AMS AND PREM ONI TI ON S

explanation s of th e p sych o logi st real ly expla i n s this


dream .

O ur psychologist turn s hi s attention to premon i


t ions with no b etter results One of h is correspon dents .

submits to him the fo llowing exp erienc e '



On e Sunday evening durin g the M ain e ru m war ‘ ’

the pastor of my church announced that D r Wi lb ur .


F Krafts th en t o urin g the State in th e i nterests of


.
,

prohib ition would speak th e next day at n o on in th e


,

publi c square Though interested like many others in


.

keepin g th e proh ib itory law it was by that time I , ,

suppos e on my ri e r v e s an d I wanted to h ear no m o re


,

,

on th e subj ect and left th e church as so o n as possib le .

That night I dreamed of retu rning from my work at


noon h earing th e soun d o f mu sic M arching Thr o ugh
,

-

Georg ia an d going to th e pub li c s quare Th ere I



-
.


s a w a crowd surroun ding a group of thre e or four

men N ear the speaker sto o d my past o r who noticing


.
, ,

me mad e his w ay through th e cr o w d an d spoke to me


,
.

A t that p o int I aw o ke .

O n th e forenoon foll o w i ng I had no recoll ection o f


my dream an d at n o on h eard mu s i c evidentl y in th e ,

pub l ic square A s I started fo r th e sq uare I n o tic e d


.

that the ai r was Ma r c hii i g Throu gh Georg i a




B efo re .

I r eached th e s quare th e music changed to anoth er


air as in my dream which I th en rememb ere d I n the
,
.

s q u a r e I r e cognized i n D r Krafts th e speaker o f my.

d r eam M y past o r was near h im and noticing m e


. , ,

came to m e w it h a m e ssage from his wife Unti l then .

I had never seen D r Krafts nor heard anything in .


,
MA TE R IALIS TI C ‘
HYPO THE SI S INADE Q U A TE 29

par ti cular about him n ever had him in mind at all


,

and do not think I had ever seen hi s picture .

To thi s the p sychol o gi st replies '


“S ome psy c h o logists contrasting th e complete
,

forgetfulness until no o n wi th the vividn ess and full


n ess of the dream detail recalled by happenings in the
s quare woul d in si st that the whol e dream mem o r y
,

was an unconsc ious fab rication


B ut the likelihood
.

i s that sinc e as sh e says the prohibiti o n campaign


, ,

was o n h er nerves she did dream something ab o ut


,

the m eeting to take place the n ext day She may .

easily have dreamed of D r Krafts himself fo r i n sp i te


.
,

o f her discl a imer i t woul d b e strange i ndeed if s he


,

had never seen a n ewspaper or p o ster port rait of him


printed in c o nn ection with the campa i gn I f sh e did .

dream of D r Kr a fts sh e w o ul d b e all th e more likely


. _
,

b ec aus e o f her Surprise at recognizing him i n th e


square to fuse the tru e detai l s of her dream mem o ry
,


with detail s o f whi ch she had not real ly d reamed .

Perh a ps nothing could appear more ab surd to on e


w ho has had such an experi en ce than to call it unc o n
sciou s f abricati o n ”
I f that is what such evi denc e
.


would b e called by some psyc hol o gists they h ave
certainly not b een qualified for the i r w o rk by any
personal experienc e O ne of the o utstanding facts
.

ab o ut such drea ms i s the i r V i v i dn es s and lifelike


reality That she did not rememb er th e dream during
.

th e forenoon i s no e vidence whatever again st its


reality What followed was perfectly n atural Wh en
. .

she he a rd the same airs played by th e band in the


sam e sequen ce a nd saw th e same figures sh e had seen
30 DRE AMS A N D PR EMON I TI ON S

in th e dream i t i s impossib le th a t sh e coul d fail to


recall it To say th at sh e ma y have fus ed th e tr u e
.

details of her dream w ith th e de tail s of the events that


followed i s a far fetch ed pos sibi lity with no rel a tion
-

ship to probability an d a the o ry i s weak indeed t hat


,

must rely on such an assumption A kin to it i s the .

h azard that sh e mu st have seen D r Kraft s picture .


an d forgotten it Y e t if seeing his forgotten picture


.

had enabled h er to i dentify the man woul d not seeing ,

the man enabl e her to remember having previously


seen hi s picture ? B ut th e identity of th e speaker ,

which i s so un sati sfactorily explaine d i s of no more ,

importan ce than the movements of th e pastor In .

the dream h e notice s h er comes throu gh th e crowd


,

an d speaks to h er at which point she awaken s I n


,
.

th e eve nts of the n ext day h e doe s preci sely the sam e
thing There i s apparently no soun d reason what
.

ever for doubting any p a rt of th e evidenc e .

I n anoth er premonitory dream th e a ccount run s


as follow s
“ M y mo th er an Engli shwoman an d a dee p ly re
,

l igio u s woman dreamed sh e saw my sister lying


,

d ead with two doctors in white b eside h er


,
My .

mother was greatly di stress ed over thi s but a s the ,

w eeks passe d sh e gradually forgot it until on e day , ,

several month s after th e drea m my si ster had to go ,

to D ub lin for a slight operation Ju st b efore com .

menc ing th ey allowed mother to s ee her an d h er


dream was b efore h er She recognized i t in st a ntly
. .

My sister was unconsciou s and on th e operating tab le ,

whi l e a doctor stood on e a ch sid e .


MA TE RIA LI S TIC HYP O THE S I S INADE Q UA TE

31

Which the psychologist thus explain s '


“ A nd no d o ubt a t the time of the dream th e
, ,
'

si ster s health was such that her mother w o ul d con


s c io u s l y or subc o nsci o u sly b e aware that an operation

might some day b e n ecessary Out o f this con sciou s


.

or subcons ciou s knowledge the dream woul d logically


develop featu ring the attending physicians in the
,


regula r costume of the operating room .

Supp o se that fo r the sake of the ar gument w e



were to grant th e overworked th eory of subconsciou s

knowledge an d then for goo d m easure were to throw
,

in the a dmi ssi o n of the a ss su mp tio n— for which there



i s no fact in evidence that the daughter s h ealth was ’

bad at th e ti me o f the dream H ow even th en can


.
, ,

the dream b e thu s satisfactorily explained ? I f th e



mysteriou s subconsci o us kn ow l edge furni shed th e
info rm a tion that there would b e an operati o n th en ,

wh at put two doctors in the dream in stead of one o r ,

three ? When relative s are admi tted to see patie nts


be fore an operatio n they usually see th em j ust befor e

,

the ether i s administ ered I n this in st a n ce th ere must


.

have b een some unexpected delay in arriving or some


other mi scalculati o n which changed th e o rdinary
.

course . How did it happen that in th e dream the


mother saw her daugh ter apparently dead lying
'

b etween the two doctors with which details th e later


,

event exactly corresponded P


I f the dre am in this c a se was the waking mem ory

of the ego s d ramatization of approachin g events it
is easy to understan d why the mother thought h er
da ughter was dead . Having taken the anaesth etic
32 DREA MS AND PRE M ONI TI ON S

sh e appeared to lie dead B ut if th e dream came



.

b ecaus e th e mother was con sciou sly or s u b co n


s c io u s l y aware that an operati o n wou ld sometime

b e n ecessary why di d sh e not dream that her
daughter was not e d d b t had m erely taken ether

a u ?

N on e of th e explanation s of ou r psychologi st wil l


pass the test of analysi s N o thoughtful person can
.

fail to o b serve th at in almost every case h e is


, ,

ob liged to assum e facts that are not in evidence and ,

that h e proceeds to build up an imaginary structure


an d surr o un d the case with condition s whi ch th ere


i s no reason to b elieve really exist Wh en th e facts .

whi ch are in evidence are antagoni stic to hi s hyp o the


si s he calmly ign o res th e facts an d holds that th e
~

w itn ess es are mi staken ' H e is a poo r attorn ey who


coul d not win a case were h e p e rmitted to b e j u dge
an d j ury as well as advocate .

The ease w ith which our p sych ologis t can dispose


of a di fficulty i s well il lustrated by th e f ollowin g c a s e
an d explanation
My mother tell s th e followin g story Wh e n I .

was s everal month s old sh e on e n ight p u t me to sl eep


in my cradl e s o un d and well as u sual an d then went ,

to sl eep h ers el f I n th e n i ght sh e was awaken ed b y a


.

dreadful ni ghtmare Sh e dream ed sh e was standing


.

over my n ewly made grav e Getting out of b e d sh e


.
,

ru shed to my cradl e I was as pal e as a sh eet my


.
,

b reath cam e fast an d h eavy and she could not wak e,

m e fo r s o m e ti me. B y th e tim e th e doctor arrived


I had gon e in t o vi o lent c o nvul sion s My mother to .
MA TERIA LI S TI C ’
H YPO TH E SI S IN A D E Q U A TE 33

this d ay says her dr eam had saved my life Can you .


explain it ?
A nd here is his explanation '
“What und oubtedly had happened was that th e
noise however slight made by the stri cken child had
, , ,

disturbed the watch ful mother s s l eep giving rise to the ’


symbolical a nd most f o rtunate nightmare .

N ow ob serve that th e child had b een put to b ed


,

in h er usual health There was n o thing to cau se the


.

mother th e slightest uneasines s Had the p sy c ho l o .

g ist s aid that any slight n o is e made by th e child w o uld


a waken the m o ther the statem ent could eas ily b e a c
'

c ep t e d . B ut when he asserts th at wh a t mu st have


happ en ed was that s o me slight nois e fr o m the child
ca u s ed the mother to ha v e a mos t for tu na te nightma r e

th e statement would b e o f greater valu e in th e col


u mns of a humorous paper than in a serious st u dy of
psychology .

The l aughabl e extremity to which our p sychologist


i s pu she d in hi s determ ination to expl a i n everything
from the material vi ewp o int c o mes o u t well in another
cas e which is no t a dream at all but which furnishes a ,

fine exampl e of his method The experience is stated as


,
.

foll ows '


“One summer a par ty of u s were walking al o ng
a mountain trail I ndian fashion I was th e last in
,
.

line and kept my eyes on the group ahead We came


,
.

t o a clump of trees b eside the path The rest kept .

ri ght on but so mething prompted me to turn to the


,

l e f t an d l eave the path I did so an d going around


.
,

th e clump I h ear d s creams an d all ran back Coiled ,


.
,
34 DREA MS AND PRE M ON I TI ON ‘

r e ady to strike was a large rattler that di sappeared


.

i nto th e bu sh es I f I h ad gon e on in stead of aroun d


.
,

the trees I shou ld su rely h ave b een bitten by th e


,

s na k e f

Then comes hi s explanati o n


“A capital in stance thi s of th e pow er of the eye
, ,

o r in thi s cas e perhap s the ear— to perceive more than


, ,

o ne con scious ly comprehends and b y this perceiving


, , ,

to imp el to action which seem s to b e quite without



reason an d cons equ en tly mysteriou s .

We are h ere aske d to b elieve that a person s ees or


hears a rattl esnake n ear the path an d acts u pon th e ,

knowl edge to avoi d th e dan ger w ithout bein g con


s ciou s of the exi stenc e of th e reptil e ' Coul d the de
man d upon credulity go furth er than that ? One of
the m ost remarkabl e things about th e psychol o gist of
the m a terialistic type i s that wh ile he consta ntly wa rns
again st what h e regards as th e b lin d an d unreason ing
faith of those who see intelligenc e an d purpose in al l
fo rce s however apparen tly chaoti c in th eir e x pres
,

sion s h e n everthel es s off ers ex plan ation s of phenom


,

en a that set at naught all common sen s e experi en ce


an d plac e an impos s ib le tax up o n credulity A .

hypothesi s acc epted b y such sci enti sts as Crookes .

L o dge Wallace Flam mari o n Rich et an d o thers of


, ,

,

e qual standing in the s c ie ntifi c worl d i s dis regarded , .

while in order to account for all th a t oc cu rs by the


,

employment of purely physical factors sp ecial con ,

d itio ns are assum ed witn esse s are discredited facts


. ,

a re ignored an d in th e nam e of scienc e conclusion s


,
H A TE RI A LI S TI O HYPO THE SI S INADE Q UA TE 35

are drawn that repres ent nothing less than the most
a rrant non sen se .

W ith the vag ue e l u sive and undefined su b c o n


,


s c io u s ne s s to fall back upon in an emergency there ,

i s always a saf e retreat A n d that assurance may b e


.

doubly s ure our p sych o logist says


“ Le t me urge my readers never to forget that a ny
thing which has ever got int o the mind may under , ,

sp ecial condition s be externali zed a s an hallucinati o n


, ,

or may crop up i nto the recoll ection i n th e fo rm o f a


drea m ”
.

When we add to that declaration the privilege o f



assuming the special c on dition s th at may b e ne c e s

sary to make any particular case fit the materiali stic


interpretation it certainly ought to go a l o ng way
,

i n helping our p sychologist to harmon i ze hi s t heory

with th e facts '


There i s no danger of defe at in the a rena o f l o gic
.

if there i s some bywa y permitt i ng reti rement b ey o n d


the reach of logic at a ny cr i tical mome nt Forty .

years ago wh en th e i dea o f evolution was getting a


foothold i n the thought of western c 1v 11iz a to n I kn ew
an estimabl e and piou s old gentl eman whose mind
was so mewh a t scientific i n trend bu t ultra orthodox -

\
in faith H e would no t d eny a scientifi c fact or prin
.
-

c ip l e
,
as h e u nderstood it bu t h e clung tenaciou sly
,

to the old idea of th e literal interpretation of the B ible


which the evolutionary hyp othesis was invalidating ,

and when h e was asked to explain how a certain th ing


could b e so and so a s alleged when it was in viola

, ,

tion of th e scientifi c facts he would reply Well it i s , ,


36 DREA MS AND PRE M ONI TI ON S

N o matter what altogether imp o s



th e Lord s way .
~

sibl e or utterly contradict o ry matter had to b e e x


p lain ed it was m et with th e solemn declaration that
I t i s th e Lord s way
’ ”
A n d all th e time the ol d gen
.

tl ema n evidently b elieved that to b e con clusi ve an d ,

appeared to b e seren ely unc o n sci o u s of th e fact that


anything imaginable can b e ju stifi ed by the man who

merely has to declare it i s the Lord s way ’
.

O u r p syc ho l ogs t is equally safe H i s lin e of r e



.


treat to subconsciou sness i s always o pen If a .

dream a ccurately fore casts the future it i s b ecau se


the dreamer kne w o f s ome fact which by the won ,

d er fu l alch emy of th e sub con sciousnes s supp lied th e ,

future details I f o ne i s in a strange country which


.

h e ha s n ever b efore visited a nd suddenly becomes


,

aware that it is all as fami liar as hi s own garde n an d ,

th en proceeds to d escrib e to his fri ends What lies


'

ah ead a long th e road it i s b ec a us e h e h as somewhere


,

— —
had a gli mps e of a pi cture a nd forgot ten it an d that
wonderful sub c o nsciou sness accounts for the rest I f .

on e i s mo ving i n th e darkn ess t ow a rd a prec i p i c e a


yard away in p erfec t ignoran ce of its e xi stence and
, ,

feels him self su ddenly bodily pushed b a ckw ard when


there i s n o living b eing n ear h im why i ts a ha l l u c i
, ,

n a tion re pres entng i deas l a tent in h is con sci ou sn ess .

I f you are m eandering a lon g a forest path and are ,

suddenly s eized with a n i mpuls e to leave it for no


imaginab le reason an d co me back to it a few feet
,

further on an d th en discover that you thu s prob a b ly


,

escaped death it i s b ecaus e your sub c o n sciou sness


,

man a ged the matter Yo u saw or h eard the snake


. ,
MA TE RIA LI STI C HYPO THE SI S INADE Q UA TE 37

but didn t know it or you would h ave kn o wn why



,

you turn ed aside I f yo u have a dre a m of future


.

events as th ey afterward real ly transpire it is only ,

a coinc idence u nless the details are al l in agreement



with the dream an d if they are then you didn t
,

dream them ' not because you are consciously fabri


cating but becau se the mysteriou s subconsciousn es s
,

that previously saved yo u from snakes is now leading


“ ”
you to fu s e th e detail s and ap p ear in the rol e of an
unconsci o us liar ' and final l y if y o u have a dream that
, ,

presents facts which cannot possibly b e explain ed by


th e m aterial hyp o thesis y o u are simply mistaken ,

i —
about t you only th o ught yo u had a dream b ecaus e ,

if you really had had such a dream it woul d not b e


in agreement wi th the materialistic th eory '
It is ,
of
course tru e t hat s o me dreams an d appar
,

ent premonition s can b e explain ed by material f acts .

I t i s equally true that a great many dreams can no t


be thus exp lained A c lo se study of t hem wi ll at onc e
.

make thi s apparent an d show the utter inadequacy


the materialistic h ypoth e s i s A ny hyp o thesi s i s serv
.

ic e a b l e o nly so long as it can expla in the kn o w n fac ts .

T he moment it fails to explain an estab li she d fact it


fall s to t he groun d no matter how many oth er facts
,

it may have satisfact o r ily explained Th e b elief th at .

th e wo r ld was flat and station ary was at on e time gen


eral That theory satisfact ori ly explained th e kno w n
.

facts . B u t when o ther facts were di sc o vered th at


c o uld not b e thus explain ed the the o ry in stantly col
-

lapsed . Th e o nly qu esti o n involved was wh eth er


there were really new facts to b e dealt with The .
38 DREA MS AND PRE M ON I TI ON S '

worl d di scovered that it h ad been con sidering only


part o f the facts A dditional facts destroyed the old
.

hypoth esi s ' an d that i s preci sely the case in th e mat


ter here un der discu ssion Th e facts have not all b een
.

considered Th ey have either b een compl etely i gnored


.

or have be en waived asid e with the assu mption that


th e mos t trivial an d far fetched explanati o n s are su ffi
-

cient to di spo se of them .

T h e dream s that are utterly b eyon d explanation


by th e materialisti c hypothesis con stitute evi dence as
reliab le a s th e others an d are furnish ed by witn ess es
,

who di ff er in no way from those who have furnish ed


the detail s of the few dreams that in volve no sup er
physical factors A glance at som e of th ese dream s
.

will show how hop el essly the ol d theory b reaks down


i n th ei r pres ence M any of them are dream s of d is
.

c o v ery which b ring to light that which i s lost an d

under circu mstances th a t eliminate telepathy an d -

vagu e h ints at sub consciou s possib iliti es Others are


.

in the nature of w a rnings of impending danger whi ch


does not exis t at th e tim e th e warning i s given .

Sometim es they enab l e th e dreame r after awakening


to give life savin g assistance to other people
-
T he.

fact that some dream s can b e fully an d satisfactorily


explained on purely m aterial grounds does not th row
a single ray of light upon th e mystery of o ther dreams

i n whi ch th e dreamer obtains detailed knowledge of


what tr a nspired during th e night a t a di stanc e or ,

th e dream that foreshadows a n a pproaching tragedy .


C H A PTE R I I I

D re a ms of D is c ove ry
Most p e o pl e w ho are able to give testimony upon
such matters are unwilling to b e p ersonally menti o ned
fo r a doub l e reason ' they dread th e pos sib le r idicul e
of th e unthinking and they dislike th e task of reply
,

ing to letters of inquiry w hich th e pub licity of the


facts ma y call out Fortunately there are some who
.
,

in the interest of truth are willing to b e witnesses


'
,

for it regardles s of th e unpleasantness involved The .

extremely interesting an d remarkab l e dream selected


to open thi s chapter was related to me b y M rs R eeves .


Snyder a well known resident of Springfi eld Ohio
, , ,

with permission to use h er name H er moth er had .

died rather suddenly after a s hort illness W hen the .

time arrived for adj ust i ng the financial accounts it


was discovered th at certain bonds w ere missing They .

were not in th e stro ng box at th e bank where th ey


were supp osed to b e no r had any memb er of th e
,

family the slightest k nowl edge that could lead to


thei r recovery Th ey w ell kn ew that they woul d not
.

have be en d isposed o f without their con sent an d a d


vice. Every c o nceivab le n o ok and cranny of th e
hous e was searched and re searched but the mystery
-
,

o f th e missing bonds remain e d uns o lved Th e loss .

w a s a large o ne and a s time passed without develop


,
40 D R EA MS A N D PRE M ONI TI ON S

i ng th e slighte st clu e to th e mis sing property the



daughter s anxi ety grew .

On e night Mrs Re eves Snyd er dreamed Sh e . .

found h ers el f in the presenc e of her dead mothe r who ,

smilin gly said D o n t worry any more about thos e


,

bonds you ll fin d them in th e morning I had them


,

.

at th e hous e j u s t b efore I was taken ill an d had th em ,

in my han d when I went up to th e garret floor an d ,

l aid them asi de whil e busy there I forgot them when .


l eaving an d then c am e th e illnes s and c o nfusion that
fol lowe d B ut th ey are there an d you will fi n d them
.
,

i n an ol d tomato can covered with a board n ear th e


.
, ,


en d of the large b lack trunk .

A wakening th e dreamer related th e startlin g story


,

to her h usband who was wholly incredulous ,


B ut .

sh e herself had not th e slightest doub t that she had


seen an d conversed with her recently departed

mother We c a n e asily imagi n e th e i mpati ence with


.

whi ch sh e awaited th e coming of morning and with ,

which sh e hurried to h er moth er s late resi denc e at ’

the earliest p o s s ib le m o ment A s sh e approache d the .

h o use h er father an d si st er app eared o n th e verand a h .

N o w it s eems that Mrs R eeves Sn yder h ad th e repu .

ta tio n of b e ing a dr eamer of r e ma rk a b l e d r e a ms an d


'

,
/
h er fath er who w a s s tr o ngl y inc l ined to cons er vati sm

, ,

called out as she approach ed Have you had anoth er ,


dre a m ? To thi s she replied that sh e h a d dream ed of
h er moth er H e i nterrupted h er w ith th e remark
.

th at h er sister also had dreamed o f h er mot h er an d ,

added that b efore her si ster sp o ke of i t at all h e


wi shed to hear her full story I t was rel a ted to him .
D REA MS OF DIS C O VE RY

as above given and then the a mazed skeptic sai d that


,

h er sister had j u st told him of her own dream which ,

was identical in every detail She had al so dreamed


.

that h er dead mother came to her during the night ,

rec o unting the same story of th e lost bon ds with th e ,

same minute instructi o n s for recovering them To .

gether th e three made their way to th e place d e s ig


nated an d there in an empty tin can covered with a
,

b oa rd lay the m s s g bond s


,
i m '

I t req uires no argument to sh o w that th e expla na


tion o f these facts i s utterly b eyond th e possibilities
of th e materiali sti c hyp o t hesis B ut if it b e tru e as
.
,

s et forth in the hypoth esis stated in Chap ter I that ,

sl eep a n d death di ffer only in that one i s temporary


and the other permanent rel eas e from th e p hysical
body and that in ea c h cas e th e cons ciou sn ess is then
,

fu ncti o ning through a vehicle o f astral matter th en



,


c o mmuni ca tion b etw een th e dead an d the liv ing i s
a p erfectly natural thi n g dur i ng th e hours of sl eep .


N ith some people thi s memory o f th e m e eting may
b e vivi d and reali s ti c. With o thers it may b e vague ,

u n s ub stanti al an d fl eeting With stil l others there


.

may be no mem o ry at al l impressed upon the physical


brai n yet the ex p e r ie ncg ma y h a ve b een as impressiv e
,

to the person s c o n sciousness at the moment as in the


cas e o f the others w ho di d rememb er upon awakening .

I n what Othe r possible w a y can th e facts b e ex


plain ed ? Th e only p erson w ho kn ew where th e bonds
rested had b een d ead som e weeks N o oth er person .

e v e n knew that th e b o nds had b een removed fr o m

th eir accu stome d place o f security They were in a .


42 DREA MS AND PREMONI TI ON S

place where nobody would h ave thought for a moment


of s earching for them They woul d have b een safe
.

fr o m the most pain st a king burglar I t requi red d e fi .

nite in struction to fi n d them H ow did that d etailed .

information get into th e c o n s ci o u sness of th e two si s


ters sleeping in di ff erent hou ses at th e sam e time ?
, ,

A nother dream of discovery presents preci s ely the


same principles b ut di ffers mos t interestin gly in its
detail s T he facts were given to m e by D r L H
. . . .

H enley who was at th e time and still i s chief sur


, , ,

geon of th e Texas Pacifi c Railway hospital at


Marsh all Texas His f riends a M r and M rs Moore
,
.
, . .

lived on a farm fou r an d a half miles from A tlanta ,

Texas at th e tim e of th e financial p ani c of 190 7 M r


,
. .

Moore h a d deposited to hi s account at hi s b ank ab ou t


five thou san d dol lars I t will b e rem emb ered that
.

durin g that bri ef financial stringen cy th e b anks were


permitted to limit th e amount that could b e dr a wn
out by depositors an d th a t fo r som e time only a
small per c entage of any balance coul d b e ch ecked out
withi n a stated peri o d Thi s exp erience of b ein g
.

unab le to get hi s mon ey when he wanted it s eems to


h ave r a ised a qu e stion in th e min d of M r M oore .

about th e wi sdom of patronizin g b anks at all an d ,

h e evi dently resolved th at as soon as the restriction s


had b een removed h e would with draw hi s mon ey
and pu t i t in a safe place Ju st what h appened .

b etween the resump tion b y th e b anks of th e cu stom


'

ary rul es of proc edure an d the un exp ected death of


M r M oore s oon afterward nob ody knows B u t wh en
.
,
.

his wife w en t to the b ank in closing up th e estate


, ,
DREA MS OF DI S C O VERY 43

expecting to fin d about fi ve th o usan d dollars to the


credit of her late husb an d sh e w a s astoun d e d when
,

info rmed that he had withdrawn th e entire sum and


closed th e acc o unt N o w that five thousand dollars
.

was the t o tal of their little f o rtun e and she faced


grim poverty alon e She w a s o bliged to abandon th e
.

h o me an d go to liv e with a married daughte r at


T ex arkana More than two years pas sed She sup
. .

p o sed that her hu sb and had invested o r dep o sited


th e money s o mewhere an d neglected to me nti o n the
,

matte r to her an d she coul d o n ly vagu el y hope that


,

it would sometim e in som e way b e brought to h er


a tte nt io n a nd that sh e woul d at last l earn th e truth .

She finally did l earn th e truth the strange an d i m ,


-


pr o b abl e truth an d in a most ast o un ding mann er .

She dreamed one night that she was with her h usb and
an d that h e tol d h er th e secret of the mi s sing money .

He had sa id to h er in th e dream that h e drew the


m o ney fr o m the bank i n gol d an d silver coin and
that on a day when nobody b ut h imself was at hom e
he had buried the t reasure full three feet b elow th e
s urfac e of the groun d on a lin e running fro m a
'

certain cor ner of the house to a c ertain corn er of a


shed and exactly mi dway b etween th e two poin ts
,
.

So vivi d an d re a listic was th e dream that Mr s .

M o ore had ab solute confi denc e that it presented th e



facts ' but when she related it to h er daughter s hus
band and asked him fo r th e money necessary to make
the j o urn ey to the village of A tlanta h e ri dicul ed th e
wh o le thing so mercilessly that Mrs M oore b egan .

to lose her confi dence B ut again sh e dreamed o f it


.
44 DREA MS AND PRE M ONI TI ON S

and again h er hu sband sh o wed h er th e exact spot o f


th e bu ri ed coin u rging her to recover it The repeti

, .
a

ti o n of th e dream h o wever did not mov e the skeptic


, , .

He declin ed to furn is h mon ey for such an a p parently


ab surd investment B ut again an d again th e dre a m
.

recurred an d M rs M oore c o ul d no longer en d ure th e


.

susp ens e . Con cealing th e purpose of th e loan she


casually asked h er son in l a w to len d her five dollars
- s

which h e readily did Sh e hurri ed to th e station and


.

purchas ed a ticket for A tlanta A l igh ting at th e .

vi llage sh e wa s fortunate enough to find the old n egro


who had b een employed on th e farm H e obtained .

a s p a de an d th ey drove ou t to th e ol d h o me Care .

fully m easuring th e dist a nc e accordin g to th e dream


di rection s th e exac t spot wh er e th e mon ey was alleged
to b e secreted w a s ascertai ned an d th e n egro b egan
to dig I n du e ti me he u ne a r the d th e careful ly pro
.
~
~

te c te d coin th ree fee t b elow th e su rfac e


, Mrs Moore . .

return ed in triu mph with n early five thou san d dollars .

I n thi s intere sting c a se wit h its happy denou ement


th e qu estion naturally ari s es “ I f thi s dream re a l ly
,

repres ented a meeting of th e c onsciou sn ess of the


dead hu sb an d an d th at of th e livin g wif e why d id ,


h e d elay so l ong about giving th e information ? Th e
an sw er i s th at by th e h ypothesis th e delay was n ot
i n gi v mg th e i nform ation bu t was probably c au s ed
by th e inability of M rs M oore to impres s it upon h er
.

physical b rain an d th ereby b rin g it throu gh into h er


waking con sciou sn ess A pparent ly only after lon g
.

co ntinue d e ffort di d sh e fin a l ly tri u mph ' but onc e


sh e had su cc eeded in b ringing th e memory through
D REA MS OF D I SCO V E RY

into th e waking state she was a bl e to repeat it any


numb e r of times .

A n o th er case of treasure rec o vered presents quite


di ffe rent circumst a nces A t th e time of th e di scovery
.

o f the g o ld the o l d miser who had b uried it had b een

dead more than s e venty ye ar s and th ere was nothing


that we kn o w o f to caus e th e dreamer to b e thinking
o f h im ,
or of a hidden fortune The story w a s .

printed January 2 1 19 0 8 by the N ew Yor k W or l d


, , ,

whos e rep o r ter w e nt very fu lly into th e d e tails


“ Mi ss Lucy A lvo rd o f Taylo rt o wn N I t o ld h er -
.
,

broth er Clau de o n Sunday morn i ng t hat her gran d


father who died in 183 7 came to h er in a dr eam th e
, ,

night b efore , app earin g s o natural that a ltho u gh she ,

had n e ver s een a picture of hi m she r ec o gniz ed him


-

fr o m her m
.

other s descrip ti o n H e was middle aged



-

I n th e dream h e see m
.

a nd w o re a b e ar d e d to shake

M iss A lvord and ar o u se h er S he stared at him and .

was ab o ut to sp eak but he i ndicated silenc e and


,

mo tion ed her to f o ll o w him Sh e followed him into



.

the kitchen of the h o u se a wing that w a s b ui lt long


,

befo re the Revoluti o n The h o u se i tself has b een


.

O c cupied by the A lv o rd family fo r fi ve generations .

Stepping to th e no rth si de of the great room th e man


opened th e ir o n d o o r 0 ? th e brick o ven alongsi de th e
firepl a ce H e stepp ed i nside th e b ig oven and reap
.

p e a re d with a st o n e j ar W hich h e s et o n th e table


in the middle o f th e r o o m H e th en see med ob livious
.

to the pr e s ence of M is s A lvord and to he r in the , ,

dream hi s c o nduct se e med perfe ctly natural He du g


, .

hi s hands into th e cr o ck an d br o u ght them out filled


46 D REA MS AND PRE M ON I TI ON S

with gold pi eces H e em ptie d th e croc k on th e tab le


.

a nd b egan to stack an d coun t th e mon ey H e made .

separate stacks of Engli sh an d A meri can coin s an d of


the di ff eren t denominati o ns H e made fi gures on a . ,

sli p of paper which h e totalled an d put i n hi s pocket


, .

Th en the visitor put th e mon ey b ack into th e


crock and crawled into th e o ven M i ss A lvord peer e d .

in and saw him wal l up th e cr o ck with bricks an d -

mortar The oven is six feet deep an d th e wall was


.

s carc ely noticeab le in th e great depth When all had .

b een s ecure d the man clos ed an d lo cke d th e ir o n d o o r .

Then M i s s A lvord woke up Wh en she m et h er


'

b rother at b reakfast s he told hi m th e story-


The .

vivid ness o f her dream h ad frightened h er B ut sh e .

ins is te d f tha t h er brother attack th e wall of the oven .

S he was confi den t that he woul d fi nd th e ston e crock “

an d th e tre a su re H e lau gh ed at h er b ut to hu mo r
.
,

her wen t at th e w a l l with a cr o wbar Th e first light .

b low went through th e wall A few b lows d emo l .

is he d it an d th ere lay a crock such as th e woman had


seen in her dream Th e excitement of th e S i ster an d


.

brother knew no boun ds They dragged ou t the .

crock a nd opened it an d b efore th e i r eye s l a y gold


,
.


They emptied it on th e kit ch en tab l e a t a b le mad e
gen eration s ago out of a slab of pin e They counted .

the mon ey I n th e h eap of gold was fo u r th ou sa nd


.

an d some o dd dollars Th e hoard b elonge d to Silas


A lvord th e gra ndfather i n all probab ility H e was


, ,
.

th e last of the f a mily to work an i ron forge on th e


place .
He made an ch o rs anchor chains an d other ,

impl emen ts W hen h e died i n 183 7 it was though t


.
, ,
DREA MS OF DI S C OVERY

he had a fortune A pparently however he l eft noth


.
, ,

ing but the farm valuab le in itself Then hi s relatives


, .

thought he had lost hi s mo n ey in wildcat b anks Mi ss .

A lvord s story of the strange dream and of the fi nding


of the hoard of gold was told about the countryside ,

and all day yesterday n e i ghbors heard her repeat it


an d looked in the oven and saw where th e b ricks had
b een removed .

Still a nother dream of discovery resulting in t he ,

recovery of s everal thousan d dollars in gold coin i s ,

reported from Lancaster Penn sylvania which in di , ,

cates that while the physical bod y i s asleep th e


consciou sn es s escap es its material confinem e nt an d ,

may bring b ac k to the waking hours information


which it has acquired in th e eth ereal region s T he .

following story ap peare d in the A ssociated Pres s \

dispatche s sent out fr o m Lancast er June 19 19 16 and ,

was widely reprinte d throughout th e country '


“When John B ellman farmer n ear B rickervill e , , ,

died six month s ago very little mon ey was found , ,

though th e wid o w kn ew he had a sub stantial amount .

I n A pril William H eil took p o s ses sion of th e farm


, ,

and h e too mad e fruitl es s searches for B ellman s


, ,

mon ey . T u esday n ight h e dreamed th at B ell man


cam e to his bedside and told him that th e money was
buried in th e hay mow Y esterday mornin g h e an d
-
.

his wife search ed in that plac e and f o und a box deep ,

hidden in th e hay an d up o n opening it foun d thou


, ,

san ds o f dollars in five ten and tw enty d o llar go ld


,

pieces. The wid ow of B ellma n w as n o tifi ed an d ,

t o ok posses sion of the wealth Thos e interested will .


48 DREA MS AND PRE M ONI TI ON S

not tell th e amount but reports have it from


,

to

On Se ptember 2 5 19 09 the N ew Yor k Evening


, ,

fa ww a l published this
“M ore than five years a go Myra A uld the h a lf ,

grown daughter of S M A u ld living near N e w W il


. .
,

mingto n Penn sylvania dreamed that on th e f a rm


, ,

n ext to that on which h er fath er lived th ere had b een


buri ed a pot of gold She induc ed her father to b uy
.

thi s farm wh en opportunity o ff ered an d si nce that ,

tim e she has b een se a rchin g fo r th e gold wh ich sh e


saw i n h er dreams T o day h er perseve ran ce was
.
-

reward ed when sh e b rought up from th e b ottom of


an old , abando ne d well on the farm in gold ,

which ha d b een buried for evidently twenty years .

Th e farm had b een own ed by James B uch a nan a ,

rathe r eccentric farm er wh o died som e years since


,
.

H e h ad th e reputation of b eing a mi se r a nd wa s
always i n great fear of robb er s Som e year s b efore .
'

hi s de a th B uchanan told som e of his neighbors that


h e had buri ed som e gol d wh ere those w ho did not
deserve it woul d not fi nd it I t had evi dently b een .

th e intention of B uchanan to make some m ention o f


this in a w ill which he inten ded to h ave written b efore
his de ath but he died suddenly and the w ill which
, ,

h e had made som e years b efore stood The gol d .

mon ey was in an ol d pow der can an d it w a s filled


l evel full w ith th e gold an d th e l id had b een roughly
,

soldere d on an d th e whol e a ff air wrapped in an ol d


gunny sack M is s A ul d declare s that sh e had s earch ed
.

every s quare foo t of th e farm a t l e a s t twenty di ff erent


DREA MS OF D I S C O

VERY 9

times in the last five years and that this was h er ,

tenth trip i nto the old wel l Some animal had bur .

rowed i n th e earth by the can and had exp o sed part


of th e o l d sack which enwrapp ed the can o f gold .

W illiam Hays administrat o r of the B uch anan estate


, ,

admits th e finding of th e gold an d says h e will lay


clai m to it in th e name of th e estate ”
.

This case is not so strong as th e preceding on es ,

but it i s worthy a place i n the ever growing catalogu e -

of facts which reveal the real nature of human con


s c io u s nes s I n this ca se the mi ser had t o l d some of
.

hi s n eighbors that h e had buri ed the gol d p res u mab ly ,

on his farm and th e skeptical w ill argu e tha t the


,

girl had heard t he s e stori es and b elieving the m had , ,

i nduce d h er fathe r to purchase the farm This i s .

possibl e an d it reduces the valu e of the evid enc e to


th e testimony of Mis s A uld That should b e given .

the same weight th at it w o uld have in any other


matter She asserts that she saw the gold in her
.

dream s but eviden tly could not definitely locate it


, ,

and says that b ecau s e of her dreams she induced her


fath er to secure the farm The re seems to b e no
.

possible motive fo r telling the dream st o ry un le s s


it i s tru e There was nothing to b e gained by it I f
. .

th e tales tol d by n eighb o rs of the mi ser s hi dde n gol d


, ,

l ed to the purchase of the farm th ere appea rs to b e


no conc eivab le reas o n for fabric ating the dream st o ry .

B ut the case lacks the stren gt h o f th e preceding o nes ,

in which the sequ el furnish es overwh elming evidence


and leaves u s with no po ss ib l e a l te r na tiv e conclu si on

A case i n which a dream was th e mean s o f r e co v


50 DREA MS AND PRE M ON I TI ON S

ering the b ody o f a lost son is given in the N ew


Yor k A mer i ca n o f October 18 19 15 under the title
“ ,

M oth er s D rea m Saves Son From Potter s Field



,


,


.

The story follow s


“ A moth er s graphic dream in whi ch sh e saw th e

body of her long mi ssing son b eing lowere d into a ‘

paup er s grave has led to th e discovery of th e b od y



.

I t marks on e of the strangest inc idents i n local polic e


hi story H arry K a u fi ma n o f N o 2 64 C herry Street

.
, .
,

disapp eare d Jun e 3 0 H i s body was foun d Ju ly 4 an d


.

hu r ie d the same day amon g un identifi e d dead T h e .

only record as ide from m ere description was that


death had b een du e to drowning Last week M rs . .

Lib a Kau ff man dreamed all th e detail s of th e r ecovery


an d bur ial of he r son s b ody ’
Sh e informed he r
.

hu sban d H e went to the B ureau of U nidentifi ed


.

D ea d f T he detail s as made known to h is wife in


th e dream tallied i n ess ential s with th e a ctual inci
d ents conn ected w ith th e b urial of Kau ff man s b ody ’
.

I t was soon learn ed th at th e body bu ri ed on July 4


really wa s that of the missin g b oy O rders w ere th en .

given to have it exhu med Y esterd a y the fun eral was


.


held from the Kau ff man h om e .

I n thi s cas e abou t three month s p as s an d the


mother who no d o u bt h ad b een thinking daily of
,

h er son a nd mournin g for h im at last brin gs th e ,

knowl edge of th e facts into her waking consciou sn ess .

M any another moth er may hav e had a si milar exp e


r i e nc e
,
an d may h av e l o nge d a s earn estly for a clue
to th e mysteriou s di sappearance of h er boy an d yet ,

f a il ed to ge t it O n e of th e worl d s grea test p sychol o



.
DRE A MS OF DI S C OVERY 51

gists who enj oys the advantage of highly developed


,

clairvoyance to facilitate his studies remarks that ,

there i s nothing strange ab o ut the fact that a very


small percent age of astral experienc es are b r o ught
through into the waking state but that the greater,

w o nder is that anything at all i s brought through on


acc ount o f th e fact that in order to d o so there must
b e th e rare c o mb ination of astral mental and physical,

c o ndition s that make it p o s sibl e The factors in .

volved are naturally en o ugh many an d vari ed but


, ,

the degree of s ensitiven es s repres ented by the dream er


is certainly a most important one .

A mong dream s of disc o very on e of th e m o st


dramatic is that conn ected with the Wilkin s case at
San Francisc o in 19 0 8 . When the mystery of the
mi ssing woman could not b e explai n ed an d when \ ,

with Wilkins in thei r hands th e o fficers of th e law


,

cou ld get no tangib l e evi dence to supp o rt the w ell


groun ded suspici o n that h e had kill ed his wife a n eigh ,

b o r came forward with a dream clue M rs Wilkins . .

h ad lo ng b efore disappeared and h er husban d had


g iven contradictory an d improbabl e explanation s of

h er prolonged vi sit in the e a st ”
B ut absen ce and
.

s u s p i c w n are not eviden c e an d th ere was an emb ar


\
rassin g halt in th e p ro c e e d ings Wilkins would .

und o ub tedly have b een lib erated on account of th e


l ack of evi dence had no t M rs A nders o n urged the
.

authorities to b egin excavat i ons in th e b arn Sh .

dec l ared th at in repeated dreams sh e had s een th e


missing w o man w alk sl o wly to th e barn where an ,

o p en grave wa s pointed out .Th e suggestion of th e


82 D R EA MS AND PR E M ON I TI ON S

dreamer was finally relu ctantly acted upon an d the


dead body was di scovered an d exhumed .

A m o re recent c ase in wh ich a dream l ed to th e -

discovery o f a crime is rep orted by the S pokes ma n Re


vi ew Spok a ne Wa shington o f May 23 19 16
, , T he story , , .

foll ows '

“A fter a dream in which he s aw hi s son D allas ,

Green e who had b een mi s s mg for n early a month


, ,

k illed by a man J W G re ene of W 1002 S even th


,
. .
,
.

A venu e vi sited Tr o y M on t Saturd a y and after a


. , , ,

s e arch wi th o fii c e r s foun d hi s son s b ody b uri ed in a



den s e thicket o f brush on Callahan c r eek about a ,

mi le fr o m town Th e circu mstan ces in dicate d that


.

murder ha d b een c o mmitted an d J ack M il l er with , ,

w hom Gr een e is said to have b e en ca mpe d n ear th e


spot of th e supposed murder an d who i s allege d to ,

have s old horses whi ch f o r merly b elonged to Gre ene ,

was plac ed un der arrest and now i s in th e j ail a t



Libby .

On July 18 the M is s ou l a S e ntinel publ ished a dis


,

patch from Libby Montana giving the f ollowing addi


, ,

tiona l in formation '


“John C M i ll er arrested for th e mu rder of D allas
.
,

A Greene was br o ught b efore a j ury in th e di stric t


.
,

court ye sterd a y fo r tr ial Th e di scovery of th e mur .

d er came ab out wh en W J Gr een e fath er of th e de a d . .


,

man dreamed h e saw hisson b ein g kill ed Frighten ed


'

.
,

by th e dream th e fath er ca me to th is place from


,
'

Spokan e l eading th e S he riff to the spo t where th e


body was con ceal ed M il ler w a s arrested while tryin g


.

to sell th e deceased s li ve stock H e told fri en ds t ha t



.
DR E A MS OF DIS C O VERY 53

Gree ne had given him th e horse s to settle up an o l d



debt .

Whether it tran spires that D alla s Green e was


mu rdered by Mi ll e r or no t the valu e o f the dream
, ,

re m ains unchanged Someb o dy killed Greene and hi d


.

the body i n the thicket The y o ung man s f a th er


.

dreamed that his s o n had b een murd e red an d was


su fficiently i mpressed b y the dream to b egi n the
b

s e a rch immediate l y .

A cas e in which it required repe ated e ffo rts to


attain success is related by the D env er P os t o f Octo ,

b er Thi s i s the story '


“A Woma n s fai th in a dream an d h e r adh erenc e

to inj unction s given there by her father may be th e


mean s of w mnrng a law suit for that fath er s ’

former part ner an d o f s aving the partn er fr o m a j ai l


~

j udgment O n successive night s l ast week M rs Carl


. .

F V ote 2 53 1 Stou t S treet d reamed that her father


.
, , ,

Ch a rles F Leimer came to talk to h er M r Leimer


.
,
. .

died a ye a r ago Th e first two dreams were i dentical


. .

I n each she told h er fathe r exactly how sh e had


disposed of her property s ince h e had di ed an d asked
his advi ce Th e fath er attempted to tel l h er w h a t
'

to do— and sh e woke up Th e third night sh e .

dream ed th e sam e b ut di d not wake up H er father


,
.

a d v ise d he r a s to th e care o f th e property a nd further


told her to look in an o l d trunk in th e attic fo r s o me


papers . Thes e he t o ld her to take to his former
partn er Sylvester K nu tte l a r eal estate man The
, ,
.

next m o rning she had al most decided not to heed the


admonition for she had gon e through th e trunk many
,
54 D R EA MS AND PREM ON I TI ON S

times b efore and was su re that nothing worth while


had b een left th ere B ut sh e wa s convinced from th e
.

th ree d reams that the spirit of her father was trying


to com municate s o methin g of importanc e S he .

lo o ked foun d th e pap ers but did not realize th eir


, ,

sign ificanc e until sh e t o ok them to K nu tte l H e was .

overjoyed to receive them an d tol d h er th ey woul d


,

prove conclu sively h is titl e to eight lots in B erkel ey


a n d some lan d i n Je ff erson county wh ich are the ,

b asi s of a su it by M rs Ev a M ay Strong for


.

Leimer he said had b een taking care of the papers


, ,

for hi m an d at hi s death th ey were lost M rs Strong


, . .
,


who i s th e dau ghter in law of th e l ate m illion aire
-
,

Samu el Stron g i s su i ng for titl e to th e lots an d for


,

h eavy punitiv e damages from K nu tte l also demandin g,

that K nu tte l b e sen t to j ail until any j u dgm ent


return ed again st h i m I S sati sfied ”
.

This is a cas e in w hi ch th ere wa s c ertainly good


reason for making strenuou s an d su stained e ffort to
i mpress upon th e min d of th e dreamer the where
ab o uts of th e mis sing pap ers .

What can the materiali sti c hypoth esi s possibly do


with the facts presented in th es e dream s of s o d i c v e r y
P

B efore the testi mony of th es e w itn es ses th e adherents


of that outgrown hypothesi s stan d silent Th ey can .

n eith er deny the facts nor explain them .

A recent writer on the mystery of dream s remarks



th at dreams locating lost articles may b e but drafts
on th e marv elou s storeh o u se of subcon sciou s mem
ory . That woul d at least b e a pos sible explanation
wh ere on e loses a pocketkni fe or a key s earc hes in ,
DREA MS OF DI S C OVERY 55

vain fo r the lost article and then dreams of its exact


,

l o cation B ut how can it explain th e finding o f things


.

which the dreamer did not lose of which there can b e


, ,

n either c o nsciou sly no r subconsci o usly a memory


,

rec o rd and of which th e dreamer knows nothing


,

whatever b eyond what h e learn s from the dream


state ? I n at least two of thes e cas es 'Reeves Snyder
and Mo ore ) in formation unkn own to any living being
I S obtain ed during th e h o ur s of sleep is immediately
,

put to th e test and results in the recovery o f val na


,

b les I n thes e two cases alon e we have evidence of


.
-

the soun dness of the hyp o th esi s lai d down in Chapter


I which is not merely convincing in its character but is
,

also conclusive in its facts .


C H A PTE R IV

V ari e ti e s of D re a ms
Whil e many dreams may be traced to material
causes there are many others which undoubtedly owe
their origin to the activities o f th e ethereal world
where functi o ning in hi s astr a l body wh ile the phys
, _
~

ical body sl eeps th e dreamer is more o r l ess awak e


,

to an d conscious of what is going on a b out him


, , .

To peopl e who have thought but li ttle upon such


subj ects there will ,at first b e no app arent di ff erence
,

b etween a dream wh ich res ul ts from th e autom a tic


action of th e idl e physical brain and its etheric c ou n
te r p a r t a nd the dream w hich is the resul t of astral
,

activities recalled at th e moment of awakening


,
.

Each i s b u t a memory a mental picture associated


,

with variou s emotions B ut there is n everth el ess a


.

distinction and although it i s often slight and elusive


a t first it grows to d efi nite ne s s with experience Upon .

first e nterin g a garden fi lled with a profusion o f


blossoms i t is di fficult t o d istinguish b etween the
various delicate perfum es b ut after a little experi ence
on e is abl e to separate and recogn ize th e di fferent
odor s A n d somewhat thus it is in the subtl e region s
of the dream W hat is at first elu sive b ecomes definite
.

and unmis ta kab le with experienc e .

Every dreamer i s aware that there are broadly ,


58 DREA MS AND PREM ON I TI ON S

sp eaking two gen eral class es of m em o ri es which h e


,

call s dreams I n on e th e dream i s more o r les s


.

chaotic disj o inted illogical an d fantastic


, , Such .

dreams are usually the result of the automatic action


of the brain Th ey lack coh erence an d logic b ecau se
.

the thinker th e ego is not th ere H e has with drawn


, , .

hi s con sciousnes s with th e s eparation of th e astral


b ody fro m th e physical b ody a nd i s eith er dreamily
drifting about in hi s astral vehicl e or is alert to hi s
surroun dings accordin g to his stage of evolution
, .

T h e physical b ody has temporarily lost its tenant as


certainly a s a suit of cloth es ab andon ed b efore re
tiring has lost its occupant W hen th e ego return s .

to its tenement of clay an d th e center of con sciousn es s


i s tra nsferred on ce more to th e physical b rain the ,

fragmentary b ra i n pictures b ecome a part of th e


m emory .

Thes e more or l es s fantastic thought images some


times ow e their origin in part t o extern al stimu li an d ,

th e brain W i thout th e direct i ng i ntelligence of the


,

e go ,
m ay magn ify th e pres su re of a b utton i nto th e
stab of a dagger or th e soun d of a rolling marb le
m
,

into the roar of artil lery I n such drea s th e most.

lu dicrou s situation s cau s e no mirth an d the most


i mpos sib l e tran saction s call out no challenge from
th e reason b eca us e no intellec t i s presen t to protest
,

against th e riot of chao s Th ere i s a total ab sence .

of relation ship b etw een cau se an d e ff ect whi le all ,

laws o f spac e an d matter have disappeared The ,


.

d reamer is at one moment wa l king through th e qui et


country lan es n ear hi s hom e an d th e n ext in sta nt
VARIE TIE S OF DREA MS

may b e seated on th e throne of Si am H e changes .

p ersonality with equal facility an d may b ec o me in a ,

twinkling on e o f his n eighbors o r h is o w n gran d


,

father without th e slightest suspicion that it i s a


rather remarkable transformation H e may pass
.

swiftly from a pl easant chat with a friend to a furious


quarrel in which his frien d changes into a b andit and
slays him ' an d after calml y looking down on hi s
,

own corps e for a m o ment he rises fr o m th e dead ,

drags hi s murderer into court an d gives testimony


about hi s own as s assination without fo r a oment m
being aware that th ere is anything eith er illogical or
impossible in the whole a ff ai r
The other clas s of dreams di ffers from all this as
intelligenc e di ffers from s tu pidity or mental b alanc e
,

di ff ers from in sanity Thi s clas s of dream s consists


.

of either th e exp eriences of th e man in the astral


region whil e th e ab an don ed phy sical body is asleep ,

o r els e of som e truth of nature or s o me premon ition

which th e ego attempts with more or less succes s


, ,

to impress upon th e physical brain and which is in


some d egree rememb ered up o n awakening Su ch .

dream s are aki n to th e activiti es of th e waking c o n


s c io u s ne s s i n that th ey are o rderly coh erent a nd
,

l o gical D i ff erent p e o pl e will recall th e events with


.

varying d egrees o f su ccess s o me b eing ab le to re


,

memb er o nl y a very l ittl e while o th ers revi ew al l the


detail s with as vivi d recollection as th e occurrences


of yesterday s waking hours B ut wh ether th e me m

.
,

ory grasp s littl e or much all that i s rec a lled wil l be


,

re a son a bl e a nd n a tur a l . T h e dre a mer rememb ers


60 DREA MS AND PRE M ONI TI ON S

that h e has been to some place which may or may ,

not b e a place that h e know s i n hi s wakin g consciou s


n es s ' o r he may rememb er that h e has visited some
fri end wh ether dead or l iving matters not for wh en
, ,

hi s living frien d i s asl eep h e also i s fu nction ing in


, , ,

his astral bo dy The dreamer on awakenin g may


.

sometim es have a memory of a conversation with


s o mebody an d if so it will b e a s a n e an d logical con
, ,

versation qu ite as ab le or perhaps ab ler than any


, , ,

thing h e i s c a pab le o f in hi s waking state ' for in th e


astral realm the c e nter of h is consciou sness i s n earer
the ego an d th e thought is th erefore a fuller an d freer
expression of himself than it i s wh en expr es se d
through the physic a l b rain Thi s fact explain s why .

occasi onally som e great poem i s written or invention ,

is made or p rob lem is solved by thought b rou ght


, ,

thr o ugh into the wakin g con scious n es s f rom th e


sl eeping hour s .

I t no t infrequ ently happen s that o ne who has


recently lo st a very dear c o mpanion or frien d remem
b ers upon awakening to have b een w ith him I f th e .

m emory is vivi d and th e even t seem s reali stic there


i s very strong prob ab ility that t h e dream i s th e
mem o ry o f an astral exp erience Q uite often th e .

dreamer will brin g back a m emory of th e emotion s


aroused by renewed assoc i ation with th e departed ,

a lingering m em o ry of j oy an d exaltation Such .

memori es from th e eth ereal world are w ith som e ,

peopl e full an d compl ete while W i th oth ers th ey are


, ,

th e merest fragments A s a rul e they come at widely


.

separated peri o d s and month s may elapse b etween


,
VA RIE TIE S OF DREA MS 61

them Thi s is not in th e least b ecau se the association


.

is not renewed n ight after night for it invariably is


, ,

but wholly because th e dr eamer i s u nable to impres s


th e memory o f it upon the brain con sciousness I t i s .

possibl e to cultivate the ab ility to do so and slowly


but steadily to expan d th e consciou snes s until one i s
enabled to bring a ful l and vivi d memory of th e astral
activities into the daily l ife ' b ut a ful l discu ssion o f
the details essential to succ ess in the undertaking
can b est b e l eft for a foll o wing chapter .

Th e dreams that are the result o f th e au tomatic


activity of the physical b rain or of V agrant vibrations
drifting throu gh its ether ic counterpart may b e dis ,

missed as being o f no imp ortance whatever I t is.

necessary to classify them only to elimi nate them .

The dreams that are memories of th e hours spent in


th e eth ereal region s may b e extremely i mportant to
o ne who will take the troub l e to und er stan d them

b ecause they are th e activities of his consciou sness


working on high er levels Th at high er state of con
.

s c io u s ne s s is so radically diff erent from its expression

c o nditi o ned by physical matte r t ha t it is impossible


to comprehen d it fully but th e fragments of it that
,

c o m e through into the waking state at lea st prov e its


\
almost o mn i sc i ent chara cter .

Having eliminate d the dream s ari sing from phys


ic a l c a u s e s w e ma y no w classify th e remain der Th es e

ma y be divided int o tw o class es and b e d esign ated


as dreams that are th e m emories of astral experiences
and dream s that are the result of the atte mpt of the
ego to impress ideas o r facts upon the br a in c o nsciou s
62 DREA MS AND PREM ON I TI ON S

n ess D reams of th e latter variety are often symbolical


.

for as has b een w ell said symbology i s th e language


, ,

of the so ul .

Obviou sly facts or i deas impres sed on th e b rain


,

consciousn ess by the e go him self are lik ely to b e of


the greatest importan ce T he idea s may represent .

profoun d truth s of natu re an d th e facts may di sclos e


th e future or contain a warni ng that i t ma y b e ex
tre me l y desir a b l e to fully comprehen d Th e s ucces s .


of th e ego s attempt however n eces sarily dep en d s
, ,

upon a numb er of things an d a l ittle thou ght on the .

subj ect will su ffic e to show why failure i s co mmon


.

C W Leadb eater in his valuab l e littl e volume


. .
, ,

D r eams says '


“ ,

A result whi ch fol low s from th e ego s super ’

normal m etho d of time m easurem en t i s that in some


-

degree prevision i s possib l e to him T h e pres ent .


,

th e past an d to a c ertain extent th e future lie op en


, , ,

b efore him if h e knows how to r ead th em ' an d he u m


doubtedly thu s fores ees at times events that w ill b e of
interest e r importanc e to hi s lo wer person al ity an d ,

make s more or l es s su cce ssfu l e n deavors to imp ress


the m upon it

.

W he n w e take into account th e stup e ndou s


i

di fficulties i n h is way in th e cas e of an o rdinary '

person— the fact th at h e i s hims elf prob ably n ot yet


even h alf awake that h e has hardly a n , y control over
hi s var i ou s vehicl es and cannot theref o re prevent
, , ,

his m essage from b eing dist o rted o r altogether over


p owered by the surgings of desire by th e casu al ,

though t currents in th e eth eric part of hi s b rain or


-
,
VARIE TIE S OF DREA MS 63

by som e slight physical disturbance a ff ecting hi s



denser body w e shall not wonder that he so rarely
fully succeeds in his attempt Once now and again
.
, ,

a compl ete an d p erfect forecast of some event is


vividly brought b ack from the realm s of sleep ' far
m o re often the picture i s di storted or unrecogn izable ,

whil e someti mes all that comes through is a vague


sens e of some imp endin g mis fortune and still more ,

frequently n o thing at all penetrates th e dens er body



.

I t has someti mes been argu ed th a t wh en thi s


prevision occurs it mu st b e mere coincidence since ,

if events c o uld really be fore seen they must b e fore


o rdain ed ,
in which case there can b e no free will for -

man . Man , how ever undoubtedly d oes p ossess f ree


,

will ' and th erefore as rem arked ab ove prevision i s


, ,

poss ibl e only to a c ertain extent I n the a ff airs of


.

th e average man it is probab ly possibl e to a very


large extent since h e has developed no will of h is
,

own worth speaking of an d i s con sequently very


,

largely the c reature o f circumstanc es ' hi s karma


places him ami d c ertain surroun dings an d th eir action,

upon hi m i s so mu ch th e most import a nt factor i n hi s


history that hi s future course may b e foreseen with
a lmost mathematical cer tainty .

“When we con sider th e vast numb er of events


which can b e but lit tl e aff ected by hu man action ,

a nd a l s o th e c o mplex an d wide spreading relati o n of


cau s e s to the i r e ff ects it will scarc ely s eem won derfu l


,

to u s th a t on th e plan e where the result of all cau ses


,

at present in action i s vi sibl e a very large portion of


,

the future may be foret o ld with consi derable accuracy


4 DREA MS AND PR E MON I TI ON S

even as to detai l That thi s can b e don e has b een


.

proved again an d again not on ly by proph eti c dream s


, ,

bu t by the s econd si gh t of th e H ighlanders an d th e


-

prediction s of clairvoyants ' an d it is on this forec astin g


o f e ff ects from th e caus es alrea dy in e x i stence th a t

th e whol e sch em e of astrology i s b ased



.

B ut wh en w e come to deal with a develop ed


indivi dual a man with knowl ed ge an d will— th en

p roph ecy fai ls u s for h e i s no lon ger th e creature of


,

circumstanc es bu t to a gre a t extent their master


, .

Tru e th e main eve nts of hi s li fe are arranged b efore


,

han d by h i s past karma ' bu t th e w a y in which h e


will allo w th em to a ff ect him th e m ethod b y which
,

h e will deal with th em a nd p erhap s triumph over


,


th em th es e are his own a nd th ey c annot b e foreseen
,

exc ept as probab iliti e s Su ch action s of hi s in th eir


.

turn b eco me cau ses an d thu s chain s of eff ects are


,

pr o duced in hi s life wh ich w ere no t provide d for by


th e origi nal arrangement an d therefore could not
, , ,


hav e b een foretold with any ex a ctit u de .

I t is not easy to co mpreh en d in the physical b r a in


con sciousn ess how events can b e known b efore th ey
occur . May not the expl a n ati on be that they hat/e
occurred s o far as i nn er plan es are con cern ed but ,

that on ly as th ey work outward from th e real m of


causation an d b ecom e m aterialized i n what we call
an event can th e lim ite d physi cal con sciou sness b e
,

c om e aware of th em ? I f physical matter is a l imita ~

ti o n of con sciousnes s it must n ecessarily give ris e to


illu sory i deas of th e sup erphysic a l realms wh ere what ,

w e call past present an d future may represen t entirely


,
V A R IE TIE S OF DREA MS '
C

di ff eren t con dition s than we are now able to co nceive .

Sir Oliver Lo dge says '


“ A l u mino u s a nd helpfu l idea i s that time is but

a relative mode of regardin g things ' we pr o gres s


through phenomen a at a certain definite pace and this ,

subj ective advance we interpret in an obj ective man


n er as if events moved necessarily i n thi s order an d
,

at thi s rate . B ut that may be only on e mode of


regarding them The events may b e in som e s en se
.

i n existen ce always bot h past an d future an d it may


, ,

b e we who are a rriving at them not th ey which are


,


happ ening .

Whether or not we a r e able to harmon ize our


conception s of th e matter with th e evidence of our
sen ses th e evidence sti ll remain s
,
“ However strange
.

\

may b e th e ph enomenon o f precognition says Pro

,

fe s so r Charles Rich et we mu st not let ours elves b e


,

diverted from th e truth by the stran geness of ap pear


a nc e s
. A fact is a fact eve n though it may upset
,

our conception of the univers e ' for o u r con ception o f



the univers e i s terrib ly infantile .

I t i s scarc ely possibl e to overemphasize th e im


portance of th e fact th a t people who have premonitory
dreams represent a very wide r a nge of m ental and
physic a l condition s an d th a t in th e impressions made
upo n the wa k ing con sciou sness w e must naturally
expect c orresponding compl exity S o me peopl e are
.

pr o n e to assert th at since th ey h ave had dream s w hicih


have accurately forecast th e futu re all their succeed
ing dream s shoul d prove equally reliable and should
b e regarded as infallib le authority B ut thi s by no .
66 DR E AMS AN D PRE M ONI TI ONS

'

mean s follows Unti l on e has reache d th at advanced


.

point i n h is evolu tion where th e ego i s in control of


hi s vehicl es o f con sciousn ess and th e physical a nd ,

astral b odies have b ecom e fairly obedient to the will ,

it i s idle to talk of th e infallib ility of such p sychic im


pres sion s .I t shoul d b e rememb ered that with th e
average p erson th e memori es of both astr a l exp eriences
an d e go ic impression s are at b est fragmentary Th ey
, ,
.

are limited an d very parti a l expres sions of th e higher


consciou sne ss Such dreams th erefore are not some
.
, ,

th in g whi ch ev en with fu ll er underst a n ding an d fu r


,

ther developm ent can b e us ed for our gui danc e in


,

th e a ff ai rs of daily life T hey are fragm entary an d


.

- m

parti a f the ir expression i s not within the control of


the wi l l ,and th ey m ay at any ti me b e di storted by
th e physical brain con dition s of the moment a nd thu s
be ren dered fanta stic or ambiguou s Thi s b eing tru e .

we c annot po sitively kn o w the truth or falsity of such


premonition s unti l th e event t hey refer to has o c
cu rred I n one inst a nc e the event tran sp i res i n p erfect
.

conformity to th e dream whil e in anothe r w e fin d ,

p erhaps that wh at w e exp ected to happ en to ourself


,

really b efalls a frien d or doe s not happ e n to anyb ody


, ,

so far as o u r physical plan e kn o wl edge goes .

The reas o n for th e fai lure o f th e premonition ma y


b e foun d i n on e of the foregoing expl a nation s o r in ,

still oth er possib ilities as for example th e fact that


, ,

th e wakin g con sciou sn es s h as b rought through only


a part of th e entire drama droppin g out vital factors
,

th a t wo u ld have modifi e d o r s e t aside th at wh ich w e


VA RIE TIE S OF D R EA MS 67

rememb er and thu s we have mi staken a fragment fo r


,

th e whole .

B ut regardless of the fact th at we cannot always


use such flashe s from the ego to shape a course in
daily life th ey are none th e less u seful and v a luable
,

in revealing th e tru e n ature of our con scio u sness '


a nd although we cannot harnes s th em to rules an d

exceptions they occasionally play an importa nt an d


'

b ene fi c ent part in our lives Furthermore by care


.
,

fully studying th em we can arrive finall y at a point


wher e we can rely upon them be cause we sh a ll thus
h ave h astened the arrival of that period in our ev o l u
tion where the waking and sleeping hou rs are united
in unbroken co nscio u sn ess ' where th e distorting fac
tors in b rain transmis sion w ill have disappeared and

th e unshadow ed wisdom of th e ego will com e freel y


through into th e physical life .
C H A PTE R V

Premoni tory B re a ms
The e go is the source of m o st premonition s Th e
, .

dream may b e a warning to o n e s self or may b e ’

intended for another ' or it may convey some in forma


ti on about th e future I t may b e vivid in d etail or it
.

may merely leave a very vague impression of impen d


ing event s B ut whatever its character an d degree of
e fficiency it i s u sually the result of the e ffort of th e
m
ego to convey i portant information to the waking
consciousnes s .

Prem o nitor y dreams are comparatively r are Th ey


u sually relate to s o me very imp o rtant matter that is


not far ah ead in th e physical life of th e dreamer or ,

some o ne closely as sociated with him ' and as su ch


events are not numer o u s th e premonitions are corre
s p o nd ingl y few N at urally enough accidents an d
.
,

death are the subj ects with which premonitions fr e


qu entl y deal.

T here h ave b een ma ny n o tabl e exampl es and o ne


which will com e instantly to mind i s A b raham Lin
c o ln s premonition of approachin g death We h ave

.

very definite information on th e subj ect an d know


that he spoke to h is b o dyguard of th e matter th e
'

evening b efore the as sassination an d made som e,

philoso phic a l remarks about de a th I t is said that


.
70 DREA MS AND PRE M ONI TI ON S

h e interrupted th e last cabinet m e eting he ever h eld


to speak o f a drea m and Gideon Wel l es Lincoln s ,

secreta ry o f the navy wrote down the det a ils in his diary
, .

Lin coln was a great dreamer an d app ears to have


attached much i mportanc e to wh at he dream ed I n .

a series o f articles entitled Lincoln and B ooth by ,

W infi el d M T hompson which w ere w i dely pub lish ed


.
,

by a n ewspaper syn dica te m 19 15 M r Thompson ‘

, .

write s a s follow s of Li n coln s la st dreams ' ’

“ A few days b efore his d eath Lin coln related to


h i s w ife a nd a few fri en d s the story o f a stra nge
dream that had disturb ed hi m th e night b efore In .

hi s d ream he sa i d h e wen t from room to room i n th e


, ,

White House and everywhere heard sounds o f piti ful


,

sobb in g though no livin g b eing was in sight until I ,


arrived a t the e a st room B e fore m e wa s a cataf a lqu e


.
,

on w hich rested a corps e A roun d it w e re station ed .

soldiers Th ere wa s a throng of p eopl e s o me gazing


.
,

sorrowfully u pon th e corps e whose fac e was covered ,

others weeping pitifully W ho i s dead i n the W hite .

H ou s e I d em a n d ed of on e of the soldiers
? .

T h e President w a s hi s an swer
‘ ‘

,

H e was kille d .

by an assa ssin T h en came a lou d b urst of gri ef


.

from the crowd which w oke me from my dre am



.
,

On th e afternoon o f Fri day A pri l 14 a few hours , ,


b efore h e fel l un der th e a ssas sin s bu llet L in coln h eld ,

hi s last cabinet m eeting I t was remarkab le for tw o .

th ings— th e d epth of charity an d love di spl ayed by


Lincoln in a di scu ssion on th e return to th e Union of
th e s ec eded st a tes an d a curiou s vei n of mystici sm
the Pres iden t displayed in d es crib i ng a pr emonitory
PREM ON I TORY DREA MS 71

dre a m h e had had the night b efore Gen eral Grant .


,

w ho had j u s t arrived fr o m A ppomattox Wa s invited ,

to atten d the m eeting and did so Grant w a s a nxious .

ab o ut Sh erman who w a s c o nfronted by the army of


,

Gen eral j o seph E John ston in th e vicinity Of Gol ds


.

boro N C and exp ress ed a desire for n ews from him


,
. .
, .

Th e Presi dent re sponded by saying that h e thought


tha t all was well with Sh erman — a d r eam had cau sed
him to feel so H e th en describ ed th e dream H i s
. .

m a nn er w hile doing so made a deep impres si o n on



most of the m en about him .

Gideon W elles d iary gave in exten ded detail what


was said ab out t he dream wh ich had re feren ce to the


approach of important events a nd which Li ncoln de ,

c l a r ed ,
d id not h era l d success but merely indicated
that something very important was approachin g The .

record by Secretary W el les run s thu s


“ Th e presi dent remarked th at n ew s woul d come
soon an d com e favorably he had no doub t fo r h e had , ,

last night his usual dream which had preceded nearly ,

every great event of th e war W e in quired th e p a r '

H e said it w
.

tic u l a r s of this remarkab l e dream a s in .

my elem ent — it relate d to th e wat e r


' that h e s eemed
to b e in a singular a nd ind e s c r ib a b l e vessel b ut always
x ,

the same and that h e was moving with great rapidity


,

toward a dark and in definite shore ' that h e h ad h ad -

this sam e singular dr eam pre cedin g th e firing on


Sumter and b attl es of B ull Ru n A ntietam Gettys , ,

b urg St o n e River V icksbu rg Wilmington etc


, , , ,
.

Gen eral Grant remarked with som e emphasi s and


.


asp erity that St o n e River was no victory th at a few
2 DREA MS A N D PR E M ONI TI ON S

such vi ctori es wou ld have rui ned the country an d


that he kn ew o f no important resu lts fro m it T h e .

Pre s ident said that perhap s h e should not a ltogether


agree with hi m but whatever m i ght b e the facts hi s ,

singular dream prec eded that fi ght V ictory did no t .

always follow h is dream bu t th e event an d resu lts


were important H e h ad no doubt that a b a ttl e had
.

taken place or was ab o ut to b e fought a nd John sto n ‘

wi ll b e b eaten ' for I had thi s strange dre a m a gain


la st night I t mu st relate to S herman ' my thou ghts
.

are in that direction an d I know of no o th er very



important even t which i s likely j u st now to occu r .

On M arch 13 19 15 Col W H Crook di sbur sing


, ,
. . .
,

o fficer of the Wh ite H ou se die d at an adv a nced age


, ,

after fi fty y e a rs of continuou s govern ment service I t .

was e arly i n 186 5 that h e b ecam e Lin coln s bodygu a rd


.

.

H i s pas sing revived th e stories he u sed to tell of hi s


association with th e great statesman a nd a mon g th o se


that appeared w ith the announcement of hi s death
was thi s testimony ab out th e dream that foretol d th e
Presi dent s death

“Col Crook t o l d often of how on the afternoon


. .

b efore Lincoln s a ssassination the President had



,

c o me to hi m in confi den c e an d said that on succes sive


nights he ha d dream s which foretold h is murder .

Crook thereupon b egged th e Presiden t not to go to


th e theatre that evening as plann ed Lin coln in s i sted .
,

and furth ermore woul d not h ear of Crook accompany



i ng him H e ordered Crook to go h om e an d rest
.
.

A n intere stin g ca s e of prem o nition of approach ing


death i s th at o f D r J F B acon of San Franc isco
. . .
, ,
PREM ON I TOR Y DREA MS

who was kill ed i n th e earth quake of 19 06 H e was .

not ab le to bring into his waking con sciou sn ess any


of the d etails bu t he had b een su fficiently impress ed
with th e truth of the approaching calamity to have an
unchangeab le conviction that death was j ust ah e a d .

The following account a ppea red in the S an Fra ncisco

For two days b efore th e e a rthquake D r J F . . .

B acon was haunted by a premonition of su dden


death H e was killed by the colla pse of the hou se in
.

which he lived D r B acon was well known in S a n


. .

Franci sco H e was a promin ent practitioner and


.
,

also th e proprietor of a d rug store at 3 0 3 Fo l som St .

Sev eral times during th e day i mmediately preceding


th e disaster he mention ed h is fears to hi s friends .

I n stinctively h e felt that a terrib l e fate was i mpen ding


for him a nd whil e h e had no idea what was the nature
,

o f the threatened accident h e declared that it woul d


,

kill him T o A W V ance a real estate de a ler who


. . .
,

was gradu a ted from College in D r B acon s class he .



,

spoke of th e morb id idea which pos s essed him I .


can t tel l what it i s he sai d but I know that I will



,

,

m eet a sudden death within a day or two I t i s im .

possible to When th e tremb lor str uck San


Francisco the hous e in which D r B acon wa s sleeping .

at Sixth and Folsom fell to the ground burying him


, ,

in the d eb ri s D ec eased was a graduate of the c l ass


.

o f 18 76 of th e M edical College o f th e Pa cific .

Two years later another pr o m in ent citizen of San


Franci sco died suddenly after a premonition of th e
appr oa ching close o f physical li fe Fr om the B er kel ey
.
74 DREA MS AND PREMON I TI ON S

Ga z e tte o f A ugust 2 5, 19 0 8 , the follow i ng account is


taken '

W hen Eug e ne
Grace o nce a leader in th e South
,

ern colony an d promi nent in San Francisco bu s i ness


circl es dropp e d d ea d w hile runni ng to catch a trai n
,

in B erkeley M onday evening it w as bu t the workin g ,

out o f a premonition of death h e had received twenty


fo ur hou rs b efore So strongly was h e i nflu enced b y
.

thi s innate know l edge of hi s approaching en d that h e


ha d m ad e a final di sp o sition of hi s e ffects an d r e
qu ested th a t hi s b o dy b e sh i pp e d to hi s sister in
A tl a nta G e o r gi a
, . I t wa s in the Reg e nt Hot el 56 2
.
,

Sutter S tre e t San Francisc o where h e liv e d th at he , ,

rec eived th e inkling o f d eath i n th e n ear future . H


di spos ed of hi s property an d asked John F Sh ea te .

ship his b o d y south H e spoke o f hi s a ffa i rs sayin


.
,

t hat wh a t r emain ed o f a life in suran ce poli cy of

thou san d d o llars aft e r the fun eral exp en ses had b ee
,

dedu cted shoul d b e g i ven to his n eph ew an d n ame


,

sake in A tlanta Then havi ng don e al l that w a


.
,

necessary o n this earth h e b ravely thru st away t h ,

su bj ect of death A t on e tim e Grace wa s a l eadin


.

fi gure in San Fran cisco Courtly chivalrou s kin d


.
, ,

h earted a typical South ern gentlem a n he w a s


, ,

immensely popular everywh ere .

I n stu dying th e ph enomen a of pre mon ition s th



qu estion naturally ari ses Why does the ego impres s ,

or try to impress a warnin g upon the w akin g con


,

s c io u s ne s s Th e reason app ears to b e plain enough


'

When a physician knows th at d eath mu st soon com


to h i s pa tie nt h e disclo ses th e truth to him H e n eve .
PREM ONI TORY DREA MS 75

permits death to c ome suddenly and une xp e ctedly


upon him if h e can prevent it but gives hi m tim e to

,

arrange his affairs and put his house in order Fr o m


.

the purely physical vi ewp o int th ere i s excellent reason


for this c o urse .

I f death i s in evitable i t i s clearly much b etter to


kno w it a short time i n advance 'To b e advised of
.

the fact too far in advance of the event wou ld o b


v io u s l y not b e a n advantage ) .S o even if death i s
unavoidable the premonition i s of great valu e B ut .

death s or accidents which are th e subj ects of pre


monitions sometimes a r e avoidable and have been thus
escaped When w e rememb er the di fficulti es with
.

which the ego m ust deal i n impressing th e lower m i nd


with such warnings it i s easy to un derstand ho w very
partial an d in su ffici ent most o f th em mu st b e to the
brain c o nsciou sn es s A p remoniti o n that is inten ded
.

to b e full a nd vivid in detail may regi ster in th e b rain


merely as a vagu e impression o f impendin g danger ,

Or perhap s as an unshakabl e conviction of approaching


death as in th e cas e of D r B acon but b e utterly
,
.
,

lacking i n d etails that can lead to a cou rs e of action .

I n the case o f Euge ne B Grace ab o ve mention ed


.
, ,

who can say that deat h might no t h ave b een avoi ded
if he h ad known j u st where th e dan ger lay ? H ad D r .

B acon known that an earth quake woul d raz e the


buildin g in which h e was accustom ed to sleep would ,

h e have l eft th e city th e day b efore it occurred ? To


what extent accident and death might b e avoi ded if
the peopl e who have premonition s w ere more sen si
tive woul d be a diffi c ult guess
,
.
6 DREA MS A N D PREMON I TI ON S

Cas es are not wantin g in which th e ego a ppears ,

by repeated an d prolon ged e fforts to b e en deavori ng ,

to imp res s th e danger of a situation upon the brain


so fi rmly that it will be real ized in th e wakin g hours .

This s eem s to have b een th e cas e with Thomas W .

Ewing of Pueb lo Colorado a l o comotive engineer


, , ,

employe d on the D enve r an d Rio Gran de railway in ,

19 0 8 M r Ew ing s run w a s we s tward from Pu eb lo



. .
.

For several succ es s i ve nights h e dream ed of a terrib le


acci den t in which h e seemed to b e ki lled So vivi d .

an d re a list ic were th ese dream s th at h e coul d no t go


to sleep again after awakening on ac count of the
n ervou s c ondition th ey caused H e discus sed th e .

matter with his wife but not b el ieving in premon i ,

tion s th ey d ecided th a t overwork or some unknown


,

n erve di so rder mu st b e respon sibl e for the rem a rkabl e


dreams On the day fol l owing th e l a st of the dreams
.

while hi s locomotive w a s standing on a sidin g at


Florence Colorado th e boiler exploded i nstantly
, , ,

killing both Ewi ng a nd hi s fi reman H a d th e ego .

b een en deavoring to impres s upon th e low er min d i n


thi s ca s e the fact that th e locomotive w a s in dange r
ous con dition an d pi ctu rin g the consequence s th a t
must soon follow i f they were not avoided ? I t seem s
rather re m a r k a b l e that a dream repeate d so per
si s te ntl y an d imp r e ss ively should h ave b een i gnored

even i f details were not brou ght through into w a king


c o ns ci o u sness .

f A cas e in which th e premonition di d serve the


purpose is th a t o f M rs Hugh Larue o f Briceville
.
, ,

Tenn essee O n D ecemb er 9 19 1 1 o ccurred the dis


.
, ,
PREM ON I T ORY D REA MS

astrou s explosion in the Cross Mountain coal mine .

On the next day the N ew Yor k H era l d published the


fo llowin g acc o unt '
“A fter a terrific explosion that shook the earth ,

for a wi de area 20 7 men w ere entomb ed today in


,

the Cross M ountain coal mine of the Knoxville I ron


C ompan y Hu gh Larue a mi ner employed in the
.
,

shaft ow es hi s life to a dream his wife had last night


,
.

When h e arose this morning and prepared to go to


hi s daily t ask M rs Laru e refu sed to prep are hi s
.

lunch for him to carry to th e mines She did not '

want him to work today Sh e then recited a dream .

she had . I n her dream sh e saw s core s of miners


w ith th ei r h e ads blown o ff b e ing ca rrie d out of th e
'

min e entranc e as sh e a nd her little ch ildren stood


at the min e s mouth Laru e h a d not mi ss e d a day



.

from his work for many months but he was prevaile d ,

upon to remain out of th e min es I t was on l y a .


short tim e after Mr s Laru e told her story that th e


.

e x plosion occurr ed ”
.

A great disaster u sual ly furnishes several examples


of premonitions Where s everal hundred p eopl e are
.

con c erned it may reasonab ly b e expected that a few


among them are sen sitive enough t o b e i mpressed
with th e doom that awaits them The Titani c di saster .

furn ishe d several cas es each possessing more or les s ,

evi dential v a lue depen dent upon circumstanc es an d


,

upon wh ether or not th e principals involved men


tio ne d the facts to oth ers prior to th e sailing of the
ship A mong the stro ng cas e s is that of th e H o n J
. . .

Cannon M iddleton The Titanic was sch edu led to


.
78 D R EA MS A N D PRE M ON I TI ON S

sail A pril 10 I t app e a rs from the evi dence th at M r


. .

M iddleton purchas ed his ticket on M arch 2 3 A few .

days later he dreamed th at th e great steamer was


wrecked an d in th e dream h e saw her surround ed by
passen gers a nd crew sw i mm i ng ab out her W hen .

th e dream recurred th e followin g night h e b egan to


feel deci d edly u neasy about it but s ai d noth ing prob ,

a b ly for fear of us el essly alarming hi s family Fo r .

tu na te l y for hi m a cab legram arrived six days b efore


'

the ship sailed su ggesting a postponem ent o f th e


,

j ou rn ey on acc oun t of bu sin ess con dition s Suppli ed .

now w ith what s eemed to him a tangibl e re a son h e


had hi s ticket can cel le d an d th en to l d hi s wife an d
s everal frien ds of th e dream s The b ooks o f the
. .

White Star company an d th e cancell ed ticket which


'

M r M iddleton retain s furnish part of th e eviden ce


.
, .

N obody will deny that wh en th ere i s an elaboration


of detail s coinci denc e i s an i mpos sib l e explan ation
,
.

I f a dream i s vagu e in outlin e nd


l ackin g in detai l
a ,

an d later som ethin g o ccurs that correspon ds in a


ge neral way w ith th e dream w e ma y reasonab ly ,

e nough di smis s it as mere coinci den ce O n e dreams .


,

l et u s say that a fortun e i s in herited an d soon after


,

a relative die s b equ eathing prop erty to th e dreamer '

or on e dream s of b eing s eriously inj ure d an d later


ha s an arm b roken i n a railway wreck W hil e such .

dreams may or m ay not b e actually conn ected with


, ,

the su cc eeding even ts c o i nci den c e i s a pos sibl e ex


,

plan ation B ut w hen th e dream presents a wealth of


.

d etails an d th e foll o wing event corresponds e xactly


, ,

then coinciden ce is an ab surd an d i mpos sible expl an a


PRE M ON I TORY DREAM S 9

I t is coincidence that M r A in Chicago i s


tion . . .
, ,

telling an amusing story of a man whom h e once


saw under hypn o ti c influence at the same time that ,

Mr B in St L o u i s I S making himself ludicrous in


. .
,
.
,

a series of hypnotic antic s B ut it is impossible that .

every w o rd an d gestu re and facial expression of M r



.

B a nd the man of whom M r A speaks can b e


. . .

identical Coincidence can explain the concurr ence of


.

two general events but n ever an identity of details .

N ow it i s impossible to deny that dreams sometimes


,

fo recast the minu te s t details A n ac quaintance gives


. .

me the following p ersonal experience but without


permission to us e her n ame

.

I rarel y dream b ut several w eeks b efore my ,

hu sban d p a ssed on I dre ame d of h is death I s eemed .

to b e t a ken into our livin g roo m wh ere the c asket


was placed an d saw him surroun ded by floral pieces
b earing th e cu stomary cards A s my husb an d was .

a S pl e ndi d type of phys ical strength an d h ad never


been ill except for an occasional cold the dream
, ,

made littl e impression upon me I had no confi dence .

i n the real ity of any kin d of dreams and after casually ,

mentioning it to an intimate fri end I thought no ,

more ab out it Some we eks later my husban d con .

tracted pneumonia and die d s u ddenly My dream .

came vividly b efore m e then fo r every fl oral piece , ,

every card an d the arrangement o f th e room was


, ,


identical with th e dream .

Every student of psychology i s familiar with th e


fact that dreams a re very commonly expressed in
symbology I t i s the m ethod of th e ego apparently
.
, ,
80 DREA MS A N D PREM ONI TI ON S

and i t i s defin itely expressiv e of th e i deas to b e im


pressed upon th e lo w er min d A ttention has already.

been directed to th e fact that th e inn er p lan es are


n earer to reality than th e physical life Thi s symbol .

ical language o f th e soul illu strates th e point A s .

symbols are to words th e higher con sciou sn es s i s to


,

th e lower A story that woul d require a thou san d of


.

ou r clu msy word s for its pres entation may b e ex


pressed very b riefly by symbol s B ut it mu st not b e .

supp o s ed that b ecau s e a dream i s symbol ical it i s ,

th erefore an accurate description an d pres ents th e


,

facts with invariabl e certainty I ts reliab ility depe nds


.
,

as with any dream upon th e c l earn es s of the tr a ns l a


,

tion in th e l o wer min d an d th e freedom fro m confusion


wit h th e vib ration s of th e den s e brain and its eth eric
co unterpart .

Sometim es p eopl e who are in terested in th e study


of dream s ask if th ere i s s o m e code in symbology
whi ch wh en un derstood will enabl e one to compre
, ,

h end a dream expressed in symbol s Th e fact seems .

to b e th a t symbols convey di ff erent m eanings to ‘

di ff erent p eople an d that each p erson who dreams in


that fashion attach es to th e symbols a significance of
h i s own H e has however not th e l east doubt about
.
, ,

the me a ning of any particular symbol and prob ably ,

for th e rea son that th e ego impress e s its sp ecial


significanc e as everything els e i s impressed One

.

” ’
person a ssoci a tes su ccess or an all s well feelin g
, .

with the symbol of a fl ag ' anoth er with fl owers ' on e


know s that dark water signifies danger whil e another ,

s ees a n ani mal or a reptile a s the symb ol of impen ding


PREM ON I T ORY DREA MS 1

danger or misfortun e I s i t not pr o bable t ha t the e go


.

us es for expressin g facts to th e lower c onsci o usness


, ,

the symbol s which that particular person can b est


understan d ? I f one h as a fear of water that would
be the line o f least resistance in impressing the idea
o f coming calamity A noth er may feel perfectly at
.

eas e when about or in th e water but may b e fi lled



, ,

with appreh ension at sight o f a mous e or a spider .

I n that case the symbol of water would convey no


warning and serve no purpose in ar o using and
,

steadying th e p ers o nality against a coming sh o ck ,

while the symbol of the animal or th e inse ct would .

Therefo re th e meani ng of th e symbol varies with th e


temperament and exp erience of th e i ndividual .

A good illu strati o n of the symbolical dream in ,

which th e ego i s first en deavoring to warn an d fortify


the lower mind a ga ins t approach ing tr o uble an d l ater

to impress the encouraging fact that th e danger has


pass ed i s c o nta i ned i n three dreams r e l a te d to m e
,

by M rs Ro b ert K Walto n of N o rdh o ff California


. .
, ,
.

In th e early part of Janu ary 19 1 5 she dream ed , ,

that while W i th her hu sb an d a dangling b lack spider


appeared an d that both of th em b egan to figh t it .

Mrs Walton had no t b e en i n really good h ealth for


.

several years but at the time o f the dream Sh e was in


h er u sual health except fo r a s light fev e r which w a s
th o ught to b e the result o f a trifling indisp o siti o n .

N othing was farth er fr o m her min d than th e th o ught


that th e fever indicated anything seri o u s I n th e .

dream she felt that the spider must b e killed I nstead .


,

ho w e v e r it disappeared
,
. The scen e suddenly changed
.
82 DREA MS AND PRE M ONI TI ON S

and she foun d hersel f in a n ew cl ean room such a s


, ,

s piders are not likely to inhabit an d sh e experien ced


,

a feeling o f reli ef B ut su ddenly sh e b ecame aw a re


.

that instead of h a ving left h er wh en it disappeared ,

th e loath some insect was now b en eath her clo t hing '
T his dream M rs Walton related to h er h usb an d
.

i n the morning A few days passe d an d as th e slight


.

fever did not l eav e h er a physician was called in .

H e announ ced at once that h er con dition was such


th at she mu st go to a hospital the fol lowing day I t .

proved to b e th e b e ginning of an illn ess whic h con


tin ned s everal months Sh e had n ot b een long in th e
.

ho spital when a large ab sc es s formed and i n du e ,

course was lanced T his an d h er gen eral condition


, .
, ,

gave weeks of pa 1n an d m arked a distin ct st a ge i n


her lon g ill n es s Th e doct o r an d nurse cheered her
.

up with hopeful talk an d sh e was looking forward


to early recovery when th e s econ d dre a m occurred .

I t w as now the latter part of M ay M rs W alton


. .

dre a me d th at sh e was in a ga rret an d that in p a ssing



ou t of th e door sh e pu t h er h a n d in a spi der s web .

A n enormou s V i c i ou s lookin g spider r a n up h er wri st


, ,

fi lling her with a feeling of horror Sh e aw oke gasp .

ing with terror T h i s dre a m w as related to the nu r se


.
'

with th e prediction that i t portended great troubl e .

The nu rs e made light of th e matter as nurs es a lw a ys ,

do B ut a few days l ater th e doctor gently announced


.

to th e pati ent that a capital operation was n eces sary '

I t followed an d for some weeks sh e was a pawn in


,

the game played by life an d de a th Life fin a lly won.

and sh e arose an d wen t o u t into the worl d again .


PREM ON I TOR Y DREA MS 88

B ut meantime a third dream had cheered her with its


forecast of the truth an d no doubt h elped in h er
,

recovery as th e others had helped to fortify her


,

a ga in st approaching trouble .

I t was only two o r three days after the operation


that the third dream occurred M rs Walton dre a med . .

that She was sitting i n an arb o r talking with her sur


geon not h er phy 5 1c 1a n The surgeon looked about
, .

h im Overhead w a s an enormou s spider H e pulled it


. .

down an d fl ung i t into a fi re wh ere it was con sumed by


th e fla mes I t was th e operation notwithstanding its
.
,

great danger that finally clos ed the chapter of su ffer


,

ing and now for th e first time in fourteen years she


i s enj oying good h ealth Thi s series of d ream s is I
-

.
,

am inclin ed to think on e o f the most interesting on


,

record A littl e careful study of its details will f ev ea l


.

to th e student of dream lore a b etter understan ding of


th e watch fuln ess of the ego over the personality and ,

will indicate the extent to which h elpful impressi o ns


would be received by everybody if th ey w ere more
sensitive to th em .

W h il e th e more tragic things of life are usually


the subj ects o f premonition s there are of course ex , ,

c e p tio ns to the rule Sometimes wh en apparently the


m
.
,

astro —physical c o nditions are ost favorab le common ,

place things ma y b e impressed on the brai n an d b e


clearly retained in th e waking memory I t may occa .

s i o na l l y descend from th e commonplace even to the

trivial . B ut instances in which only th e o rdinary


drama of life and that at least dev o id o f tragedy for
,

the dreamer him self i s outlined in its immediate


,
84 DREA M S AND PRE M ONI TION S

future are fairly c o mmon A case o f th is kin d o c


,
.

curred recently in an eastern city I n June 19 16 a .


, ,

lady residing near me received a letter from Rob ert


D on o van o f B ro o klyn N Y describing a premoni
, . . .
,

tory dream M r D on o van has an intimate fri end


. .

whose profession i s teaching H i s family con si sted of .

his elderly parents an d a sister The sister di d th e .

hou sekeepin g an d looked after th e parents during the


absence of h er b rother who went d aily to h i s school
, .

H e was expecting to b e m a rried in th e n ear future


and thi s was Well known to hi s frien ds O ne ni ght in .

March 19 16 M r D onovan dreame d that h e was in


, , .

convers a tion with his frien d th e teach er who told , ,

him that h e would b e married on M ay 2 0 I n hi s .

drea m M r D onovan gl a n ced at th e cal endar and


.
,

observing that May 2 0th came on Sat u rday remarked


that i t was an unusual day for a wedding “ Why .

’ ”
don t you wait till th e scho o l term h as c losed ? he
aske d hi s friend Th e teacher replied that h e coul d
.

not do so but if h e gave any reason the dreamer


coul d not rememb er it I n th e mo rning he related.

'

his dream to his mother who laughed a t its improb a



b ility .Two w eeks later th e te ac her s sister fell dead ,

a nd a di fficult situation presented itself There was .

nobody to stay w ith th e parents while th e te a cher


w a s ab sent I n this emergen cy th e date of th e mar
.

r ia e
g w a s advanced and th e teach er wrote M r .

D onovan that as th e resu lt of the un expected develop


,

m ents and of h i s profes sional engagements th e


, ,

w edding would take place on Saturday M ay 2 0 ,


.
PREM ON I TOR Y DREA MS

While the e go i s undoubtedly respon sibl e for most


o f the premonitory dream s there are apparent l y cases

i n which th e forecast of the future may b e communi


c a te d by some entity of the ethereal regions . There
are als o on record s o me c ase s which appear to indicate
that when the ego is u nable to impress th e low er mind
the in fo rmation i s indirectly conveyed through a n
other person who erm be impressed ' and it would
app e ar that thi s sometimes occurs when th ere i s
'

nothing mor e i mportan t to b e revealed than an im ~

pending set of circumstances which may caus e di s


appointment and great annoyan ce th e dis tress o f
,

whi ch may b e somewhat softened by th e knowledge


that it is in evitabl e .

M uch has been written ab out dream s which have


enabled students to find th e soluti o n of p erplexing
math emati cal or oth er prob lem s M any stories are
t o ld of invention s poems and musical composition s
,

comi ng from t h e dream state an d b eing written out


immediately upon a w a k e nl ng B y ou r hyp o thesis th e
.

explanation may b e either that the dreamer gets th e


'

ideas from his own les s restrict ed c o n sciou snes s in


hi gher realm s or that h e gets them fr o m oth ers whom
,

h e meets in the astral reg i o n s and in eith er case is


, ,

f ortunate enough to retain th e memory when he


awakens .

Rob ert Lou 1 s Ste ven s o n who appears to have


,

known very much about the occult tells us in Travel s


,

a nd Ess ays that the most original o f his stories were



sketched or composed in dreams that he not o nly
thus got perfect plots but saw it all dramatized T he .
86 DREA MS AND PRE MONI TI ON S ’

dream state wa s apparently h is fi nal resort wh en the


wakin g consciou sn es s coul d not supply th e nece ss ary
material H e had lon g tried h e says to write some
.
, ,

thing o u dual p ersonality bu t in vain ,


T hen h e .

dre a med the essenti a ls o f The S tr a nge C as e of D r .

J e kyl l and Mr H yd e And this was only an inci dent



. .


in many years of similar work 0 10 1c was given

.


to him he as serts in bulk and detail
, ,
H e says that
.

h e merely added th e external scen ery and that the


moral its elf of th e story cam e i n th e dream
, ,
.

I n wh at degree th e ego with marvelou s grasp of


,

th e verities of n atu re might illuminate th e lower


,

mind and to what extent premonition s wou ld w arn u s


,

an d guide u s i f w e were all h ighly s en sitive an d re ,

s p o ns ive to th e delicate vib ration s sent down into


the physical brain it i s impos sible to gu es s
,
Th e .

e vi den ce furnish ed by th e many well auth enticated

cases o f premon itory dre a m s certainly indicates that


th e ego i s continually endeavoring to impress idea s
an d fa cts upon th e low er min d but u sually with no
,

very great succes s .


C H A PTE R V I

Memori e s of A s tra l
Exp eri e nc e s
Excluding the trivial a nd fantastic dreams— tho se w

which a r e aut o matic a lly produced by th e physical


mechani sm of con sciou sne ss b y far the larger part of
-
u -

th e remainder are th e memories of astral experienc es


m
.

Premonition s and also the dream “ if it a y properly


-

b e called a dream l n which th e lower min d i s im


pressed with some truth o f nature not previously


understoo d naturally con stitute a very small propor
,

tion of dream activiti es D reams which are the memo


.

ries of what on e has seen an d h eard an d said and


done i n the astral c o ns e rousn ess during th e tim e when
-

th e phy s i cal bod y sleeps are g reater in numb er b e .

cau se they represent the ordinary a ff airs o f l ife Such .

drea ms may come to any perso n who ha s at tain ed that


point in human ev o lution where th e mind and emo
tions are fairly well controlled Th e con dition s are
.

then present that ren der a rec o llection of th e astral


experi ences at l e a st pos sibl e but it must not b e for
,

go tt en that there must b e a necessary comb in ation of


physical astr a l and mental relation ship s that p er m1t
,

th e vibrations of the astral matter to regi ster th em


s elves in th e physical b rain I t therefore commonly
.

happens to the person who has reached th e stage


88 DREA MS AND PRE M ONI TI ON S

wh ere h e is consciou s and active in the astral re a l m


at n i ght that h e on ly occasi o nally rec alls the e xpe ri
e nc e s thr o ugh which h e has passed Wh en h e a tta in s
.

this stage of his evolution however h e will seldom if


, , ,

ever exp erienc e th e ol d order of con fused dream du e


,

to the senseles s automatic activity of the physical


b rain On the contrary h e will very probably have
.
,

no dream m emories at a l l upon a wakening in th e


morning except upon the infrequent occasions wh en
,

he b rings through a recoll ection of the astral ex p e ri


e me es T h e frequ en cy of th i s i n creas es as hi s e v o l u
.

tion proc eeds and h e u ltimately rememb ers all the


,

astral exp eriences — a gratifyin g result th a t can b e


greatly h a stene d by gi v mg studiou s attention to the
matter .

I f we pu t aside th e e ffort from th e material side to


bring back the m emory and consider th e matter i n its
rel ationship to th e avera ge person then w e may say
,

th at in premonit i on s w e have a class of dreams that


represents th e direct e fforts of the ego to i mpress the
lower min d while in dreams that are th e r esults of
,

astral exp eriences we hav e th e memories wh ic h flo a t


through simply b ecaus e so to speak all the inte r v e n
m
, ,

ing gat es happ en to b e open at th e sa e in stant .

A s more and more f a cts a b out dreams a re col


l e c te d th e hypothesi s h ere invoked to explain th em
will b ecome stronger O ccasional l y somebody has a
.

uni que dre a m that throw s n ew light on the tru e nature


o f the dre am state I n his lecture on S ha kespea r e 'p
.
.

4 5 ) Robert G I ngers oll rel ates the following dream '


.

I once h ad a dre a m an d in thi s dream I was dis


,
MEM ORIE S OF A S TR A L E' PE RIEN C E 89

cussing a subj ect with anoth er ma n I t occurred to .

me that I was dreaming an d I then said to myself '


,

I f thi s is a d ream I am doing the talking for both


sides con sequently I ought to know in advance what

the oth er man i s going to say I n my dream I tried


.

the experiment I then asked th e other man a ques


.

tion and before he answered made up my mind w hat


,

the answer was to b e To my surpris e the man did


.

not say wh a t I expected h e would an d so great was ,

my astonishment that I a woke ”


.

What Col I n g ersoll rememb ered as a dream wa s


.

probably an actual conversation H a d he b een famil


.
~

ia r w ith th e i dea that while th e phys ical body sleeps


th e con sciousn es s function s through a subtler b od y ,

h e coul d not have b een surprised at the actual conver


sation in which the oth er man furnished hi s own ideas
as he would do in the physic a l body H is memory of .

the incident on aw a kening w a s evide ntly a confused


blending of th e astral experience and hi s physical
ideas of wh a t dreams a re
I n Chapter I the di ff erence between sleep an d
death was di scussed an d th e fr eedom of the soul or
, ,

consciousness in eth erial re a lms while the physical


,

body sleep s was po int ed Ou t Since the relation ship


.

\
of p hysical an d astr al matter is that of interpenetr a
tion as in the case of a sponge surrounded by water
,

which both envelop s i t and permeates it pass i ng i nto ,

the astral region i s not necessarily a j ourney in space .

B ut it may mean that and may represent movement


,

of the astral b ody that i s extr aordinarily rapid as com


pared w ith anything of which we know in the physical
90 DREA MS A N D PRE M ONI TI ON S

worl d B ut however fa r afield on e m ay j ou rn ey in th e


.

astr a l body there remain s a magneti c conn ection w ith


th e physical body Clairvoyant investigation s reve a l
.

the fact that in th e case of p eople of low evolution a ry


d evelopment th e astral body remains during sleep in
th e i mmediate vicinity of th e physic al body while ,

with th e person of average mental an d moral develop


m en t it moves freely through th e astral regions a s
th e vehicle of his con sciou sn ess Th e experiences .

gain ed natural ly present great variety


M rs Ell a R T uttle of Rochester N Y furn i s he s
. .
, , . .
,

two dre a ms in which th e accur a cy of th e waking


m emory was promptly su stai ned b y physic a l f a cts .

I n 18 9 8 sh e dre a m ed th a t h er moth er who w a s dead


i
, ,

c a m e to her as a m essenger a sking as si st a nce for a


sick r elative who l ived about thirty m iles away Sh e



.

said A unt M ary i s very il l a nd n eed s you at onc e


,
.

Y ou r father will sen d you a tel egr a m tomorrow noon



and you must go to h er .

M rs T uttl e evidently accompanied h er moth er to


.

th e home of the sic k rel a tive She s a w h er aunt lying .

in b ed a nd ob served th a t it w a s c overed with a qui lt


having a cert a in peculiar pattern S he awo k e ' b ut .

ha d of course no me a n s of immediately verifying the


, ,

dre a m A bou t two o clock on the afternoon of the


.

followin g day sh e di d receive a tel egram from h er


father convey i ng the informat i on that her aunt was
ill an d re qu esting her im mediate presenc e Sh e w e nt
,
.
,

an d found h er aunt M rs Mary T inkl e p a u gh of Sodu s


,
.
, ,

N Y very much in n eed of her as si s ta nce as only a


. .
, ,

youn g a nd inexp erience d girl was in charge Upon .


ME M ORIE S OF A STRA L E' PE RIE NCE S 91

entering th e sickro o m the visitor observed up o n the


be d a quilt with the pattern she had seen i n her
dream .

A t a much late r date Mrs Tuttle was interested .

in the proj ect of b ea utifying the gr o unds o f an estate


b elon ging to a s o ciety of which she was a member '
Reading in a magazin e a n ann o uncement that con

tr ib u tio ns to a tree planting fund w o ul d b e received


-

she wr o te a l etter encl o sing a d o nat i on and address ed


,

it to M rs R , an o fficer o f the s o ciety but did not


. .
,

get th e letter in the mail that even i ng That night .

sh e dream ed that she V i sited th e estat e over two ,

thousan d miles di st a nt and saw and conversed with,

sev eral pe ople t here O ne o f them called her atten


.

ti o n to th e f act that sh e h ad addressed the letter to


the wrong perso n and that if it w ent to M rs R th e
,
. .

money woul d go into a fund to b e u sed for a totally


di ff erent purpose I t should her informant said b e

.
, ,

addressed to M r W B ut th e dream er was not con


'

. .

v inc e d an d argu ed th e p o mt The conversation cl o sed



.

with this advice ' Lo ok again in t he m a gazi ne an d


you wil l s ee you r mistake ”
I n th e morning M rs . .

Tuttl e related her dream to her daughters an d the ,

ma gazi ne w a s looked up Exam ination showed th at .

she had b een in erro r in ad dres sing th e donation to


M rs R a nd that th e dream information was correct
. . .

The lett e r was re wr i tten and properly addressed


— .

The dream terror of murderers i s w ell known I f .

our hypothesis is s o un d th e reason i s simpl e for sl eep ,

would again brin g th e murderer fac e to face with hi s


vi ctim fo r th e time being I f the murd erer b e o ne .
92 DREA MS AND PRE M ONI TI ON S

s en sitive en o ugh for th e impression to register in


the physical b r a i n the exp eri enc e wou ld b e remem
bered on a w aken i n g I f he b e les s s e ns itiv e he might
'

o nly have a vague sen sati o n of terror in stead of th e

vivid m emory of details a s Macb eth apparently di d



,

when h e referred to th es e t errib l e dreams that shake


us n ightly .

I f th e murderer b e of a very u nimp r e s
s io na b l e typ e h e wou ld probably b e uite u ndisturb ed
q
by anythin g exc ept physical plan e a ff airs an d th e fear
of l egal con se qu ences .

From Providenc e R I a cas e is reported i n whi ch


, . .
,

th e dream agony o f a murderer led to hi s arrest .

H en ry Kelly s eventy years old was foun d murdered


, ,
.

The poli ce searched systematically for th e p erp etrator


of th e cr i me b ut b ein g unab le to fin d a s ingle clue

to th e mystery th e case was fi nal ly ab an don ed M ean


,
.

ti me th e murderer s rememb ered astral experien ces


were so compl etely d estroying hi s peac e of mind that


-

confe ssion was inevitab l e On e day Frank I Lyons . .


,

tw enty two years ol d wa l ked into the pol i c e he ad



,

quarters an d surren dered to the authoriti es A Provi .

dence rep orter quotes the sel f a ccused murderer as fol -

lows
I w a s haunted by hi s ghost an d I had to con ,

f e ss I killed him th o ugh I di dn t mean to T hen I


.
,

.

w ent to my room but I could n t sl eep I had stran ge ’


.
, _

d rea ms an d in the m I s aw th e ol d man co min g


,

toward m e H e seem ed to be lame an d to b e coming


.
,

t o ward m e all the time as if h e wanted to say s o me ,

thing to me I coul dn t sta nd it any longer I fully


.

.

und erstand th e m ea nin g of thi s to m e I supp o se th at .


ME M OR IE S OF A S TRA L E ' PERIEN C E S 93

it means I wil l b e el ectrocuted or hanged but I can t ’

help i t I simply had to tell


,

. .

Ju st how great was the horror created by the


,


strange dream s only those w h o have b een abl e to
b ring into th e waking consci o usness astral impres
si o ns of the und e sirab le sort will b e ab le to compre
h e n d They must i ndeed have b een terrible to lead
.
, ,

to a con fession that might fo rfeit life and the sentenc e



,

I couldn t s tand it any longer in dicates that th e


’ ”

limit of human endurance had b een reach ed .

The v i vid reality o f an astral experience at the


moment it comes thr o ugh into th e waking consciou s

n ess i s such that th e j ust awakened dreamer some
times has di ffi culty for a moment in b elieving that
, ,

h e has no t seen the event with the physical eyes A n .

inter esting example of this is reported from Stock


holm . I t would b e well worth while to have the
sequel to the story but it was not possible to f o ll o w
,

it up for furth er d etail s A pres s despatch sent out.

from Stockholm under date of September 2 9 19 15 , ,

tells th e story '

“ The ide ntification of a mur d erer by a man who


never saw the prisoner but who claims to have s een,

the murder committed i n a ”dream wi ll b e attempted


by th e local p o l ice department j ust as soon as Gen eral
Bj orn who is now critically ill in the west of Sweden
, ,

i s strong enough to look at th e phot o graph s of the


'

anarchist who assassinated his fri end General B eck ~

man on the n i ght o f June 2 6 A t th e very h o ur that


,
.

the crime was committed but many m iles fr o m the ,

scene o f it General Bj orn raving in delirium saw


, , ,
94 DREA MS A N D PRE MONI TION S '

in a fever in spired vison his ol d frien d shot down in


-

a street in Stockhol m Suddenly h e shouted ' D rop .


’ ‘
that you scoundrel
, T hen ' Th e shots are exp l o d .


in g .
When th e n urs e sou ght to cal m him h e b ec a me
angry an d tried to sprin g ou t of b ed Can t you .
‘ ’


?
h ea r h e cri ed ‘
C an t you see th e smoke ? T h ey
.

have murdered Gen er a l B eckman D on t you see th e .



blood on th e street i H e raved all night but a t day ,

break grew cal mer an d sl ept an hou r W hen h e .

woke he said ' Yo u wi ll find that Gen eral B eckman


ha s b een murd ered I am sure of it He even de. .


scrib ed th e crime in detai l A t 9 o clock th e pap ers .


arrived telling of th e a ssas sination of Gen eral B eck


man .

A nother ca se in which the detail s of what i s occur


ing elsewhe re a re vividly remembe red i s re ported in
the D a ily Tel egram of Portl a nd Oregon o f J uly 2 , , , ,

19 16 '

A s h e lay dream i ng th at hi s brother was dying


and th at h e was vainly trying to re store him M E , . .

Lillis m emb er of th e Portlan d Police B ure a u was


, ,

awaken ed by th e p ersi sten t r inging o f th e telephon e


in hi s home 56 5 H oyt street thi s morning W hen h e
, , .

awoke a nd an sw ered th e word came over the w ire ,

that hi s broth er W i lliam P Lillis sp eci al a gent of


,
.
,

the Portl an d Railway Light an d Power Comp any , ,

h ad died un exp ectedly at Seasi de at an early h ou r .

When Lilli s l eft for hi s vacation at S easide a bout a


week ago h e wa s in e x cell ent h ealth although his
, ,

c onstitution had been somewhat weakened by a seve re


attack of l a gripp e I t i s b el ieved that h e a rt trouble
.
-
MEMORIE S OF A S TRA L
'

E' PERIEN C E S 95

due to the grippe was th e cau s e of death The body .

W 111 b e shipped to Portland today and funeral ar



rangements will be made this afternoon .

T hree dre a ms by three p eople on the same n ight ,


.

an d p resenting the same details in practically the same


language led to the f amous Sutt o n investigation cas e
,

at A nnapolis The first chapter of th e story i s told


.

in a press dispatch from Portland O regon th e home , ,


o f the ill fated lieutenant s parents u nder date o f
-
,

A ugu st 1 1 1909 I t reads



.
,

Two nights after the tragic death at A nnapoli s


of Li eutenant j ames M Sutton of t h e United States .
,

Marin e Corps each of three women had a dream in


,

which th e young man appeared b efore them and in



formed them that h e had b een murdered The son .

of a gun sneaked up b ehin d me a nd struck m e o n th e


back of the head Th e fi rst I kn ew that I had b een
.

shot w a s wh en I woke u p in eternity That i s the .


e x act language us ed by th e boy i n the dream as h e


sto o d b efore each woman The person s to whom th e .

youn g man appeared 1 n d ream form are M rs N . .

Su tton hi s moth er at th e family residence in Port


, ,

land ' Mrs M a rgaret S A in sworth his aunt on her


. .
, ,

farm i n W asco C o O regon and M iss Rose Sutt o n


.
, , ,

his si ster who was then on an Oregon Short Lin e


,

train sp eeding to A nnap olis E ach woman had th e .

dream Tues d ay night October 15 19 0 7 Y oung Sut , ,


.
~

ton died about one o clock Sunday morning Octob er



,

13 , 190 7
With thi s triple corr o b oration th e mother of th e

dead lieutenant d etermined to clear h er son s name
96 D R EA H S AND PR E MON I TION S

o f the suicide ch a rge N early two ye a rs p a s sed b efore


.

she fin ally had th e sati sfa ction of a pp earing b efore


t he court of inquiry a nd h ear i n g D r E dw a rd M . .

Sha ff er formerly coroner in th e city of W a sh ington


, ,

testi fy tha t in his opinion a s a n exp ert it wa s qui te


impossibl e that Li eutenant Sutton could have fi red
into hi s own h ead the bul let that killed him A fter .

the fi rst dream and b efore the o fficial i n quiry w a s


,

h el d th e mother had other dre a ms


, T o a reporter .

for the S a n Fr ancis é o Exa miner on the eve o f the ,

opening of th e in quiry A u gu st 9 1909 sh e sai d that , ,

her dead son had sai d to h er '


Moth er dear don t you b elieve it I n ever killed

, ,

.

myself They b eat m e to de a th a nd then shot me to


.

hide th e crim e H e told me how they l aid th e tr ap


.

for him how h e walke d into it how on e of them


, ,

grabb ed h im to pul l h im out of th e automobile how ,


'

th ey held hi m an d b eat h im ' a bou t hi s forehead b eing


broke n ' hi s teeth knocked out an d th e lump un der ,

hi s j aw an d how wh en h e w a s l ying on th e ground


, ‘

someone kicked him in the side an d smashe d hi s . .

watch H e begged m e to live to cle a r hi s n a m e


.
.

Well a fter three w eeks I proved some things h e tol d


,

m e w ere tru e an d after r epeatedly dem a n ding th e


,

evidence I got it an d w ithin th e l ast month I have


,

proved everyth in g h e told me .

A n in stanc e in whi ch m edical aid w a s given o n ~

account of a d ream was told m e by D r J S D evries . . .


,

now residing at Fremon t N eb rask a I n th e year ,


.

of 189 8 h e wa s pr a cticing hi s profession in Fonten e lle ,

N eb ra ska an d had among hi s pati ents the little d a u gh


,
MEMORIE S OF A STRA L E' PE RIEN C E S 97

ter o f Henry H ue a farmer residing several miles


,

from th e town The doctor hard dri ven by a large


.
,

practice c a me ho me one evening an d retired much


, ,

exhausted . H e had s een his little patien t at noon


the previou s day an d was intending to call again at
,

the sam e hour on the following day A fter sleeping .

a s hort time he awoke with an uncertain memory of


imminent danger to the little girl who was a fflicted ,

with scarl et fever While th e detail s were not clear


.
,

hi s appreh ension was great an d he felt an irresistible ,

impuls e to go to h er immediately N otwith standing .

hi s physical exhaustion and th e complete ab sence of ,

any tangibl e e vidence that he was needed h e n ever ,

the l e s s ordered his carriage out an d drove rapidly to

th e farmer s home H e arrived a t midnigh t and foun d



.

the hou sehol d in com motion th e child exhi b itin g ,

alarming symptom s and a messenger j ust ready to


,

leave to summon him .

A ttenti on has already b een call ed to the fact that


on e whose physic a l body i s asleep may in his astral ,

b od y visit pl a c es at a distance
,
I f his frie nd s are .

asl eep at the same time he may b e w i th them astrally


a lthough thei r sl eeping physical b o dies may be hun

dreds of mile s ap a rt \ I f h e i s a sleep and th ey are


.
,

a w a ke h e ma y v isit the m but could not communicat e

with them unle ss they we re c l a iraudi ent or unl e s s


th ere were som e other method for the interchange of
int e lligen ce such as the planchette a nd the waking
, ,

friend o r friends w ere su fficiently resp o n sive to opera t e


it A case th a t illu strates th e principles h ere involved
.

c ame to my attention soon after its occurrence A .


98 DREA MS AND PREM ONI TI ON S

party o f six p ers o n s five of w ho m were my personal


,

friends were chatting t ogether at the A nsonia Hotel


,
.

N ew Y ork one evenin g in Jun e 19 14 T h e conversa


, , .

ti o n turn ed to the subj ec t of gettin g co mmunication s


from th e living by automatic writing On e of th e .

party ha d had some su cces s in that lin e and penci l ,

and paper were procure d M r S thought of M rs T . . . . .


,

who had sailed for Englan d thre e days previously ,

an d would therefo re be somewhere in mid ocean I t -


.

was then about p m in N ew Y ork and would . .


,

b e w ell into th e ni ght in M rs T s longitu de and sh e . .



,

woul d presum ab ly b e asle ep T he group of exp e ri .

m enters got a mes sage about th e voyage an d then



,

VVil l you try



M rs B sai d to th e invi sib l e vi sitor '
.

to rememb er thi s experien ce an d pu t it in a l etter to



M r S in th e morning ? The respon se slowly sp elled

. .
,

out w a s I wi ll Sorry I h a ve to l e a ve you


, ,
. A bout ,
.

twelve days later M r S r eceived a l etter from Mrs . . .

T which had b een wri tten a t s ea an d wa s da ted on


.
,

th e morni ng following th e exp eriment M rs T wrote '



. . .

I had a qu eer experienc e last n i ght I suddenly .

a w oke ab out 2 a m T h e door of my cab in had


. .

blown open and was banging I r eme mbe red d is tinctly .


of b eing w ith you in a cir cl e o fp eo l
pe .

Evidently Mr s T could
recall the details o f no t
m
. .
,

her astral vi sit Sh e had n o emory of h er promise


.

to w rite a l etter about i t b ut she di d rememb e r b ei ng ,

with Mr S in a circl e of peopl e and this was so


. .
,

un expected an d pe r pl exin g that sh e called it a qu eer


experi en ce and felt i mp el led to write a bout it M r
,
. .

S ad ds that a car e ful calcul a tion of th e v a riation in


.
MEMORIE S OF A S TRA L E' P ER I E N C E S 99

time indic a t es that the hour menti o ned by M rs T . .

corresponded with th e m eeting in N ew Y ork .

A n interesting case of b ringing very clearly into


the waking consciousness wh a t i s transpiring at a dis
tance is a dream of D r L H H enley chi ef surgeon . . .
,

of the Texa s a nd Pacific Rail way hospi ta l at Marshall


'

Texas who sends me a n a ffi davit with the following


,

story
“ g

On the morning of J a nuary 8 19 10 I awoke , ,



about 3 o cl o ck from a dream a bout my sister M rs , .

He nry W Parker who w a s l iv ing in Ra ndolph C o


.
,
.
,

N C I had not he a rd from her for some time I said


. . .

to my wife Sister Lo u i s dying — literally choking


,

to d e ath M rs H enley s poke lightly a nd reas suringly




. .

of the matter I wrote at once to my si ster in quiring


.
,

about her he a lth T he following day I rece i ved a let .

ter fr o m her th a t had b een written J a nu ary 7 only ,

a da y b e fo r e my dream oc c urred saying that all were


'

well except for s evere colds I showed thi s l etter .

to my wife who warned m e a bout b eing too hasty


,

in telling my dream s ' A ga in at a b out 3 a m Janu . .


,

a r y 10 I aw a kene d an d told M rs H enley that my


, , .

sister was dying sitting in a willow rocking chai r , ,

and that her hu sb a nd H enry W Pa rker was near


,
.
,

d eath in the adj oining room This a nnouncement .

a fter the very re cen t l etter as serting t hat the family

w a s well wi th the e x c eption of b ad colds led m wife


,
y ,

to m a ke some facetiou s rem a rks about my sani ty



.

N 0 reply ever c a me to my letter of in quiry but at ,

10 a m January 16 I received th e fo ll o w mg tele


. .
, ,

g r a m' A s h eb o ro N C

Janu a ry 1 5 D r L H ,
. .
,
. . . .
0 D REA MS A N D PRE MON I TI ON S

Henley M arshall T exa s Your sister Lou died Friday


, ,
.

an d was buried H enry Parker her hu sb a nd died .


, ,

today . T hree ch ildren sick an d cannot recover . Pneu


monia Come -
Levi V Low e ’


. . .

Mr H . . E . Lewi s mon ey ord er clerk i n the post


,

o ffi ce M r ,
. H . E . B ehym er and M rs . H enley were
p resen t when th e tel e gram arrived . They had j u st
b een j oking m e a bou t my alarm found ed on a dre a m .

I silently handed th e tel egram a b out to my fri ends .

I felt quite a s certain that the children woul d not die


as I ha d felt th e sa d truth a bout th eir p a rents . La t e r

the dre a m detai l s a bout my si ster s d eath were v erifi ed .

T he chi ldren recovered , a nd a r e now livin g at Ed o r a ,

K a n s a s th e two eld er ones b ein g Mr Lind l ey


,
. Park e r
an d M iss M ar y Parker .

T hese dre ams have the element of pre w s ro n . On e


of th e dreams occurred five d a ys and th e oth er three
days b efore the de a th of M rs . Parker , an d e ach of

them ga v e some of the details of her d eath , as w el l as

the f a ct th at M r Parker w a s nea r dea th . .

Th e M essina earth quake like all gr e at di s a sters , ,

furn ish ed a nu mb er of interesting ca se s , a nd one of


th e b est attested w a s that of the youn g s a ilor who s e
dre a m revealed to h im th e spot where hi s fi a nc e w a s
i mpri soned in the ruin s a lthough th e most diligen t ,

s earch in hi s w a king consciou snes s ha d b e e n u nav a il


in g A pres s di sp atch tol d th e story thu s
.
MEMORIE S OF A S TRA L

E' PE RIE N C E S 10 1

A curi o us case of rescu e w a s that i n which a


sa ilor on bo ard the Itali a n battleship Regina El ana
found his sweetheart H e w a s granted leave to search
.

for the girl in M essina with whom h e was engaged ,

to b e m a rried A fter having sought for her in vain


.

fo r fou r days in the ruin s he returned to the ship ex


ha nsted an d fell asleep He dreamed tha t hi s fiance
.
-

s a id to him I am alive Come sa ve m e On aw a ken


,

.
, .

ing he obtained fresh leave from th e commander o f


th e ship gathered together several fri ends and wen
, ,

to the spot of which he had dreamed Th e party pried .

ap a r t the ruins of a hou s e and found the girl unin


j ured .

I f he searched four days in vain he coul d no t have


had any par ticular place in mind wh ere h e e xp ected
to find he r . Y e t wh e n he succeeded in bringing th e
me m ory of the sle eping hours thr o ugh into waking
consciousness he went immediately to the place wh ere
she was imprisoned by the ruin s . He not only remem
b ered conversing with the girl but h e evi dently had ,

a clear m emory of the locality wh ich enabled him


,

to go to it . The telepathic th eorists will hardly ven


ture to argue that h e got in telepathic touch with the
l a ndscape ' Only the hypothesis that the conscious
n ess is fu n ctioning in the as tral vehicle while t he
physical body i s aslee p seems to furnis h a s a tisfactory
e x plan a tio n .
1 02 DREA MS AND PR E M ON I TI ON S

A nother case whic h wa s widely pub li sh ed a lso tell s


the story of a l ife —savin g mi ssion but under very dif ,

circum stanc es I t occurred in A pril 19 12


fe r e nt .
, , a nd

i s given as follows in th e pres s di spatch es from A t


lanta Georgia

,

A w a kenedfrom a sleep in which he had dream ed


that a n ea rby railway trestl e on th e South ern Railroad
b een w a she d aw a y O T Kitchen s a sect ion fore
ha d , . .
,

man although su ff erin g from illness arose from hi s


, ,

b ed an d went to South River six miles from h ere , ,

b efore d a wn ye sterday an d foun d th at , his dre a m was


a re a lity . T h e stream ,
swollen by he a vy r a in s h ad ,

carried a w a y a trestl e sp a nnin g a si x ty fi v e foot -

ch a sm . He knew th at a p a ssenger tra in w a s s oon due to


arrive a t th e opposite side of the river but ha d no ,

me a n s of reachin g that point to warn th e engi ne


driver o f th e dan ger an d th e river i s three qu a rters
,
-

of a mile wide . Stan din g on t he b ank Kitchen s put


hi s h a nd s to hi s lip s i e p ea te dl y shou ted for h a lf
a nd

an hou r . Final ly h e h eard an a n sw eri n g shout a nd ,

h e c alle d out a warning to J E D ani el D anie l . . .


fl agged th e train as it neared th e brink of th e stre a m .

H ow can the advocates of the materiali stic hypoth


esi s possibly explain thi s ? I n th e M essin a case th e re
w as th e pos sib ility of e x plainin g a p a rt o f wh at oc

curred by tel epath ic com mu nication , but in the


Kitch en s dre a m th ere is no ch a nc e wh a tever of

lug
MEM ORIE S OF A S TR A L E' PE RIE N C E S

ging in tel epathy I n th e other case somebody knew


.

of at least a part of the facts n ecessary fo r the rescue .

But here we have a case of a bridge sudd enly giving


way and imperiling th e lives of a tr a inload of people
who knew n o thing of th e danger th at confronte d
.

them N o t a human b eing kne w of th e collapse of


.

the bridge not even D aniels who lived n earby I t


, , .

was late in the night towards dawn an d th e inhabit


, ,

ants of the countrysi de were sleeping Telepathy i s .

ab solutely out of the case There was nob ody whose


.


mind contained the information Kitchen s dream .

mu st have b een an 1mp e l l ing one H e was ill and .


,

th e night was stormy but in spite of the diffi culties


,

in the way hi s dream resul te d in stopping the train ,

and v ery prob a b ly in s a vin g m a ny li ves .


C H A PTE R V II

How to R ememb e r D re a ms
For th e same reason that it i s pos sible to evolve
into higher development any faculty or quality which
w e possess it i s also pos sibl e to cultiv a te the art of
br i ng i ng th e m e mory of our experience s during sleep
throu gh into the waking con sciou sness B ut it is of
.

little u se for one to a ttempt it un l es s on e i s willing


to devote con sider able time and thought to it . T here
i s n o mystic proc ess b y whi ch it can b e i nstantane
o u s l y accomplish ed VV e are a ll familiar with the fa c t
’ ‘

that muscular stren gth can b e dev elop ed by almo st


everybody B ut it requires tim e and attention A
. .

little e ffort will result in a little mu scular ga in B ut .

i f a man has the ambition to b ecom e an athlete he


shou ld b e wil ling to put forth patient and long con
tin ned exerti o n in developing physical stren gth A n d .

j ust so it is in th e matter of evolving the control of


.

th e mechanis m of c o n s ci ou sn es s A little attention


.

to it will b e of s o me valu e but one who woul d fully


,

succeed must resolve 111 advanc e to work faithfully at


the task .

I t s eems to b e the order of nature that at the ,

level of evolution represented by th e average human


b e ing the activit 1 e s of con sciou sness i n the waking
, ,

state and those o f the wider con sciousn ess of the


,
10 6 DRE A MS AND PR EM ONI TI ON S

astral realm shall b e separate existences B ut as evo


, .

l u tio n proceed s an d the les s o n s wh ich can b est b e


,

learned in the limited physical con s ci o usne ss are


largely acquired th e separating wall s slowly dis solve
, ,

an d u ltimately th e two states of consciousnes s are


merged i n one When a person has ev o lved far
.

enough for that happy con summation h e no longer


“ ”
sleep s i n the ordinary meaning of th e word H i s .

physical body sleep s but to hi s con sciou sne ss there


,

i s no period of a pparent ob livion H e i s con scious of


.

lying down to sleep con sciou s of h i s physical body


,

lying on th e b ed as h e move s aw a y from it in hi s


a stral body con sciou s of all that h e sees and hears
,

an d does in th e eth ereal reg i on s during th e mght and ,

con sciou s of hi s return to his physical b ody when in ,

th e mo rn ing h e takes it u p for th e activiti es of th e


,

ma teri a l w orl d onc e more Hi s a dv a n ce i n e volution


.

has united the separat ed fragments th a t h e ha s called


days i nto a continuou s whol e a nd night has ceased
,

to e x i st for him j u st as it woul d for on e if one cou ld


,

travel r a pidly enou gh to ke e p always 1n s1ght o f the


sun .

B u t th at m a rks a fairly high stage in human e v o l u


tion an d thos e who h ave reached it have evo lved very
,

de si rab le ment a l a nd moral qualities The rest of u s .

c a n a t least appro x im ate it w ith th e requi site e ffort


, ,

and c a n a cquire a su fficient degree o f control of th e


min d a nd the emotions to b ring much more of th e
astral experi ences into th e daily life Thos e who are.

willin g to take th e troubl e a nd who wil l b e p atient


,
H OW TO REM EMB ER DREA MS 107

an d pers evering can have personal proof of the tru th


,

o f thi s .

Th e first step i s to con trol th e process of thinking


dur 1u g the waking h o urs M o st pe o ple let the mind .

wan der idly from one th ing to another The current .

of their thought is directed almost wholly by external


things 'When th e mind i s not thu s stimulated to

action it i s likely to get its initiative quite nu ,

c o nsciously o f cours e from the mental activity of


,

o thers in th e l r v 1c 1n1ty— th e vagrant thoughts which

drift through the brain Su ch pas sive indi fference to


.

mental control is fatal to th e ext ension o f con sciou s


ness One mus t lea rn to think about w ha t one is think
.

ing and acqu ire the hab it of controlling on e s thoughts


,

.

When o ne b e gins thu s to turn the con sci o usness back


'

upon its elf there comes the opportunity for the e go .


'

to make its influen ce felt in the l o wer mind Gradu .

ally the mind c an thus be brought under control and


th e c o nnect ion b etween th e two state s of con scious
n ess b e strength ened Th e truth in that is ob V 1o u s
. .

Every thoug htful person knows that much thi nkin g


about any subj ect brings kno w l e d ge o f that subj ect .

I t i s u ndo ub tedly the natural order of thi ngs th at th e


ego which is the true se f i s con stantly en deavoring
,
l
to impres s the brain con sc i ou sn ess is exerting a steady
,

evolutionary pressure and the degree of success must


n ece ssarily b e d epe nd e nt upon the stab ility of th e

lower mind .

Th ere are two ways in which the min d receives


i mpression s during sleep— from within and from
without The former are from the ego an d the latter
.
,
08 DRE AMS A N D PRE M ON I TI ON S

are the vibration s set up by contact with others ’

va grant though ts or are the automatic action of the


,

brain reproduc ing its own thought i mag e s of the day .

I f th e mind i s thu s occupied th ere i s little probability


that it wi ll b e susceptib l e to th e un accu stome d gib ra
tions from the ego O nly wh en through thou ght
.
,

cont rol during the waking hours th e mi n d has b e ,

com e respon sive to th e high er influen ces will there


,
,

b e anything from the sl eepin g state worth rem emb er


ing I t then b ecom es pos sib le for it to regis ter th e
.

higher vib ra tions in stead of initiating th e low er ones .

B u t min d contro l a lone i s nOt enough T here .

mu s t also b e control of th e e mo tion s T h e waking .

thoughts a nd e motion s h a ve a powe rful and d eter


mining influen ce u p on the a ctivities of th e consciou s
n ess durin g th e hours wh en the physic a l body i s
asl eep T he trivial in though t a nd th e gro s s in e mo
.
u

tion a re foreign to th e ego a nd widen th e gulf that


s ep a r a tes th e lower m i n d from i t T he work in h a n d
.

i s to e stab l ish th e clos est possible conn ection b etween


the two an d su cc es s w ill d epen d largely u pon th e '

e xtent to which th e daily l ife can b e brough t int o

h a rmony w ith th e li fe of th e ego T herefore s e ren ity


.

of m in d an d purity of em otion s mu st b e cultiv a ted .

Whi l e it is important to h a v e th i s d esir abl e st a te of


mind m a in tain ed th roughout the waking hour s th e r e ,

is p e rh a p s n o oth e r mom en t of th e m a l l th a t is s o
e ss e ntial to su c c es s a s th e in s ta nt of fall ing a s l e e p a t '

nigh t I t seem s that th e l a st thou gh t as on e sinks


. ,

into s lumb er ha s an influ enc e out of all proportion


,

to the tim e it occupi e s th e mi nd B y i t th e tren d a p


.
'
H OW TO RE ME MB E R DRE AMS

p ears to b e g 1v e n to th e mental and emotional a c tiv i

ties o f the night I f the thought i s a sen suou s one


.

it seems to attract its g ros s a ffinities from its environ


ment and the mind b ecomes impervi o u s to high er
,

things B ut i f the mind i s d eliberately set upon a pure


.

and lofty theme as o ne falls asleep the channel i s


,
,

O p e n f0 r 1mp r e s s io ns from th e ego which may b e t e


~

c a ll ed upon awakening .

I f we reflect a moment upon the fact that there


can b e no memo ry of an astral experi enc e unless th e
delicate vibratio ns o f a stral matter have made thei r
i mpres s upon the physical brain w e shall see at once ,

the necessi ty for th e most tran qui l an d favorabl e con


d itio ns in the lower mind Worry an d all other
.
,

forms of mental and emotional distu rban ce shoul d b e ,

ab sent .

A s the ms ta nt of sinking i nto slumb er 1s 1mporta nt


so too that of awakening i s another golden moment
, ,

to be improved We are then nearest to the consciou s


.

activiti es of th e n ight and i t is th e most propitiou s


,

time for recalling th em T h e delicate tr a ces of th e


.

a stral vibra tions are then at t heir best but when th e ,

physical plane vib rati o ns b egi n to sweep through th e


brain th e astral i mpres sion s m ay soon b e ob literated .

One may write on the smo o th sand at th e seashore ,

and it is perfectly legibl e at the time ' but when th e


ti d e c o me s in th e boister o us waves eras e it and not

a trace remai ns A nd so it i s with th e astral record


.
-

on the physical b rain The vibration s of th e workaday


.

world ordinarily erase them unles s they are the record


of some th ing that has deeply moved u s H enc e the .
D R E A MS AND PR E M ON 1 TI ON S

n ecess ity of a littl e quiet retrosp ection at the moment


of awakening before the min d has b een turned to
,

th e busine ss of the waking hours .

B ut while what we can thu s recall will h el p to


hold the m emory of our a stral activities it i s not ,

u sually su fficient to a nchor it s ecurely in th e waking


con sci ou snes s and though w e may have a v i v i d r e c o l
,

lection when w e fi rst awaken it i s extremely l ikely


,

gr a dually to fad e ou t until in stead of b eing a bl e to


,

rememb er th e event we can only re memb er th at th ere


,

was something w e w i sh ed to rem emb er wh il e every ,

det a i l of it ha s vanish ed in ob livion ' Let th e reader


try th e exp eri ment an d h e w ill soon di scover that th e
in st a nces in which h e c a n rememb er t hroughou t th e
day the dream inci dents that were clear in th e morn
ing do not co nstitute th e rule b ut th e exception s ,

to it.

N o w it i s not only th e b ringin g through of th e mem


,

ory into the wakin g state but a lso th e retention of


,

th e m emory that a s si sts one in uniting th e two st a tes


o f con sciousness M ean s should ther e fore b e em
.
~

ployed of anchoring the astral experi en ces firmly in


the mind T his i s n ot so di fficult as woul d at fi rst
.

appear a s th e m ethod by which it i s accomplish ed


,

i s very s imple I t co n si sts merely of writin g down


.

th e memory upon awakening I f a pad of pap er an d


.

p en c il are l eft th e nigh t b efore On a stan d within


ea sy di stanc e one will soon form th e hab it of reachin g
for them with the first gl eam of physical con scious
n ess I ndeed th e writing i s so frequently b egun b e
.
,

fore the con sciou sn es s i s in ful l po sses sion of th e


H OW TO REME MB ER DREAMS

physical body that th e lines are often di fficult to read


afterward B ut the more immediately it is be gu n the
.

b etter I n advan ce of the experiment it wil l not s eem


.

prob a ble to the b eginner that merely having recorded


the memory will enabl e him to retain it if h e could
not rememb er it without th e memorandum H e wil l .

fin d by experience however that with the notes h e


, ,

can readily recall it a l l while without th em he i s quite


,

helpless .

Th e probability of success in recalling the ex p e r i


e me es of the night upon awakeni ng in th e m ornin g
can be greatly increased by resolving before falling
asleep the night b e fore that th e moment the waking
con s ciou sness returns the memorandum will b e made .

This pre resolution may also b e u sed to determin e


-

what one shall do during the night in th e astral


i

regions . I t would appear fr o m careful clairvoyant


in vestiga tion s of the matter that when a person ,

strongly resolves b efo re goin g to sl eep that h e wil l


enter u pon a certain course of action h e i s extremely
likely to do so I n this way o ne may b egin to make
.

his nights as well a s his days u sefu l to others an d to


, ,

himself H e may vi sit an d en courage the i l l and the


.

despon dent a mong h is li v i n g friends an d after su ffi ,

cient e x peri ence h e may have the sati sfaction of not


,

only b ringin g the memory o f it th rough into th e


-

wa king hours but also of b eing ab le to estab li sh the


.

truth of it by material evidence On e of the s i mple .

methods by which thi s i s sometimes done i s to write


down in the morning a detailed description of some
pl a ce one ha s visited often during th e sleeping state ,
112 DRE AMS AND PR E M ONI TI ON S

but has n ever seen or to note the changes t ha t h a ve


,

o ccurred in some plac e he has s een — a s new buil d

ings erected or tree s cu t down — an d then to verify it


al l by physically traveli n g to the p lace an d in sp ect
ing it.

I f the exp erim enter i s in earn est an d i s dilig ent i n


,

his e fforts to control his min d and emotion s he will ,

in goo d tim e achieve at l east som e degree of success ,


an d th at shoul d furni sh the m otive for farth er progress .

B u t he should never fal l into the error of b e l ie v mg


that b e cau se h e i s b eginning to un derstan d th e
ration ale of dream s an d i s ac quiring some a ccur a cy
in rem emb erin g astral e x p e r ie nc e s he may t herefore

safely us e hi s dream con sciou sness as a guid e in


phys ical p l a n e a ff a i rs .O f cours e if th ere shoul d


com e to hi m som e warning prem o nition he will u se
hi s common sen se in d etermin ing wh a t if anyth ing , ,

he will do B ut i t woul d b e f ol ly to subordin a te the


.

reason to astr a l impre ssion s an d thu s set asid e sob er


j u dgment i n deci din g upon a course of action Only .

wh en on e has succeeded in unifyin g the physical and


astral life to the point wh ere h e h as no break of ‘

cons ciousn es s a t al l wh en th e bod y s leep s can h e ,

b e certain that he may not b ring b ack to th e waking


st a te a confu sed m emory H e may or h e may not
.
, ,

correctly tran slat e th e a stral experi en ces in th e p hys


ical b rai n . H e may study the phenomena a nd h e
ma y steadily exten d th e h o riz o n of hi s con sciou sn e ss
but sinc e h e c annot positively know wh ether hi s
memory of a premonition i s accurate until the event
H O W TO REME MB E R DRE AMS 13

has ccurred i t is obvi o us that he can only u se it


o ,

fo r what it may b e worth as a suggesti o n .

A n extended d i sc u s s mn
the detail s of the dream of

s tate i s b eyond the limits of this little volu me but

there is o ne characteristic error of translati o n that


deserv es attention The drea me r by sympatheti c
.
,

ass ociation often merges hi s con sciousnes s with that


,

of another whom h e i s o b serving Let u s say that .

whil e in th e dream state he s ees an accident A .

switchman is run down by a locomotive and an arm


i s cut o ff Th e dream er upon awakening recalls th e
.

scen e with himself as chi ef actor in the accident an d ,

as he rememb ers it hi s o w n arm was severed Thi s


, .

symp a thetic sub stitution i s one of the well established


points in dre a m tran slation an d th e stu dent of th e sub
j c e t often fi nds c o rroboration o f the fact in t h e public

prints A case i n point i s the dream of M rs A n derson


. .

mentioned i n Chap ter I I I Only brief reference i s


.

th ere made to it but th e p re s s r e p o rts at th e time


quoted Mrs A nderson as saying
.
“On Thu rsday ,

mo rmng I had that awful dream I dr ea med we were . -

arguing over pap ers and I thought I was hi s w ife


and would not sign Then he grabb ed me raised
.
,


his hand and struck me w ith a knife S uch s u b s titu .
~

tion s eem s to b e comm o n with untrained ob s ervers .

On e may possibly dream o i seeing himself in his o w n


-

co ffin only because h e has in reality se en the funeral


,

of anoth er Only when h e becomes skillful in bring


.

ing th e m em o ry of h is astr a l experien ces through


into the waking state can h e b e certain that no errors
are involved .
4 DR E AMS AND PREMONI TIONS

The el ement of time i s al so a cau se of confu sion .

W hen on e has a premon ition there i s often not th e


sligh test clue to indicate ex a ctly wh en th e event
may b e expected to occur This may very pos sib ly
.

b e b ecau se only fragments of the visi on h ave been


brought through i nto th e brain memory B ut wh a t .

ever th e cau se th e fact remain s that th e event fore


seen may occur th e n ext day or may perhap s b e fa r
i n the future I t i s therefore often impo ssibl e to b as e
.

any action upon th e information Such fr a gm entary


.

an d indefi nite informat i on 18 in the s a me clas s with th e


forecast of th e future so commonly furnish ed by the
u ntrain ed clairvoyant or p sychic I t ma y cont a i n
.

some tr uth an d yet b e ab solutely ma d e qu a te as a


b a sis of action The point may b e illu str a ted by th e
.

exp erience of on e of my friends H e was tol d th at


.

there was a very de sir a b l e position for him a t th e


i

state cap itol which h e w a s to fi ll T hi s i nform a tion


.

came to h i m a t a ti me when his fortune s w ere a t


-

low tid e a nd h e w a s much i n need not so much of



,

a very desir a b l e position , as of any emp loyment at


al l that might b e s ecured Filled with new hope h e
.

borrowed a su ffi cien t sum of mon ey for th e long


ourney went to th e c a p itol b uilding a nd exhau sted
j ,

every possib ility th at would l ead to the fulfi llm ent of


th e prophecy Th e result was failure a nd bi tter di s
.

appointment Sev eral years l a ter h e was c a u ght u p


.

in a popular politi cal movement an d w a s el ected


li eutenant governor of the state
-
.H e then went to
th e capitol building fo r a term of o ffice a nd the vi sion
of th e clairvoyant was j u stifi ed by th e f a ct .
H OW TO R M MB E R E E DRE AMS 115

A mong th e milar cases that have come under


51

my obs erva tion i s that of a m ru 1ng p rospector and


his partner w ho were told that great w ealth was
ahead of them a nd th ey went rej oicing to th eir
work Y ears of th e most commonplace experienc e
.

followed in which like thousands of o ther gol d


,

se e kers they mana ged b arely to exist Finally one of


, .

them b ecam e disc o uraged an d disgu sted and aban


d one d th e ent erprise The other man leased an d
.

w o rked small claims for several m o re years wh en


“ ”
quite unexp ectedly a p o cket was unc o ver ed and he
,
,

retired with con si derable wealth Whether or not


.

the clairv o yant really f o resaw this denouement th e


information a s in the in stance above gi ve n was
,
-
,

misleading and w o rthl ess Thou sands o f pe o ple are


.

continually followin g th e advi se of pseudo p sychics -

to their sorrow quite overlooking th e fact that


, ,

al though the prediction s may often contain s o me


truth physical affairs cann o t u su ally b e directed by
,

the m A nd preci sely so l t I S with dreams


. Th eir
.

util ity lies chi efly in the fact that th ey disclose to


us the real nature of human c onsci ousn es s They.

so metimes gi ve a u seful warn i ng and often f u


,
rnish
muc h con s o lation b u t b ec a u se it i s u sual ly impos sibl e
,
i
for the average person to bring th em thr o ugh into
the waking consciou sness with accuracy th ey can b e ,

profitably ac ted u pon only when du e allowance has


b een made for their limitati o n s .
Q H A PTE R VIII

D re a ms of th e D e a d
Perh a ps there i s no direction in which the correct
understan ding of dreams can pr o ve so u seful as in
relation to our departed friends A nyth i ng that can .

in some degre e lessen th e sorrow caused by their


ab senc e i s certainly worthy o f carefu l study .

A s a m a tter of fact th e so c a l l e d d e a d are not -


'

de a d at all but they are none the less separ a ted from
,

th e livin g or to put it more accurately th e livin g


, ,

a re separated from their departed friends ' but only

b ecau se during th e waking hou rs the c o ns c fo u sne ss


,

is confined to the physical brain which is bot h its ,

instrument and its limitation D uring th e waking


.

hour s the human b eing is fu nc tio ning through his


astral body pl us his physic a l body the latter being ,

surroun ded and interpenetrated by th e matter o f th e


former When h e fall s asleep the dense body i s left
.

m
b ehind H e i s then fun ctioning through hi s astral
.

b o dy which is what th e iscalled dead are als o


doing
,

.
“ ”
The living and the dead are th erefore , ,

again t oge ther I f fortu nately the bereaved person


.
, ,

r emembers it in the morning he thinks he ha s had a ,

dream .

N ow since dreams are o f two kinds memories


,
-

o f astral exp eriences an d memories of i mpression s


1 18 D R E AMS AND PRE M ONI TI ON S

cau sed by the aut o matic activi t y of th e physical brain



an d its etheric counterpart thi s memory of th e de
parted may b e either the on e or th e other I f the .

cau se of the dream is th e b r a in pictures they a re ,

likely to b e rel ated to s cen es throu gh which th e


dream er has recently pas sed pos sib ly the events of ,

th e last days of the d eparted I f th e dre a m i s the .

m emory of an astral experi enc e a vi si t to the ,


departed it i s likely to b e more vivid a nd re a li s tic .

I n su ch a cas e th e experience i s l ife l ike the time -


,

passe s j oyou sly and th e dreamer often awaken s with


a feelin g of b li ssful exaltation for h e has really b een ,

with the loved on e an d th e j oy h e ha s felt i s refl ecte d


in the wakin g cons ciou sne ss Un fortun a tely w ith .
,

the p e r so n w ho does not un derstan d th e f a cts a s


.

they are thi s upliftin g emotion i s immedi a tely


,

quenc h ed by the gloomy b elief that it is al l a ph antasy


of th e b rain .

Thi s b eli ef i s unfortun a t e for more th a n on e


reason I t preven ts th e dreamer cultivatin g th e art
.

o f bringin g th e m emory of such as so ciation more


fully into th e wakin g state while the depres sion of
,

the b ereaved person acts di sastrou sly u pon the on e


who i s mourn ed as dead an d lost I t i s of course
-
.
, ,

natural th a t the b el ief th at on e i s separated from


thos e h e l o ves for th e remain der of thi s life shoul d
caus e great sorr o w I f th e fact w ere known th at th e
.

s eparation i s only on th e part of the on e who rema in s


b ehin d an d that that i s confined to th e hours of
,

waking con sci o usn ess th e gri ef woul d b e greatly


,

modifi ed To know th at whether we rememb er it or


.
DR E AMS OF THE DE A D 1 19

no t, whether w e dream o r d o no t dream we are ,

always with the depart ed during the h o urs o f sleep ,

if there is an attracting tie o f love b etw een u s would ,

soon bring perman ent serenity instead o f the h o pe


les s despai r that is so comm o n an d so unfortunate
fo r everybody conc erned . D epressing emotion s a re
bad enough fo r th e living but very much worse for

those for wh o m they m o urn A s the physical body


.

i s the instrument of action the astral body i s the


,

vehicl e of emotion I n the waking state an emotion


.

arises in th e astral body an d passes outward into the


physical mechanism a large percentage o f its energ y
,

b eing exhau sted in setting th e physical particl es in


motion .Con sequently emotion s are very much
keen er in th e astral life tha n in the physical I t is

no exaggeration to say that a given cause wi l l pro


duc e a very great deal more of either j oy or s o rrow
in the astral life than in th e physical Therefore
.

when bereaved pe o ple give way to unrestrained


sorrow an d despair they are doin g th e worst thing
possible for their departed fri ends .

W e have only to refl ect upon the fact that we are


all m o re or l es s a ffected by th e elation an d the de
pressio n of peopl e abo ut u s to understan d th at emo
tions are contagiou s Persons who hab itu ally indulge

.

that form of depression c o mmonly kn o wn a s th e


b lue s are i nj u r l o u s ly a ffecting all who c o me n ear
them in proporti o n to th e sensitiveness o f th eir
victi ms Life may thu s b e made quite miserab le for
.

those wh o are extremely sen siti v e Multiply that


.

e ffect m a ny times an d it will give some idea of th e


1 20 D RE A MS AND PRE MON I TI ON S

disastrou s results to their dead frien ds of th e grief


an d despair of which they are the helpl ess cause .

Such mou rning in the last analysi s i s not o n account


, ,

o f any fate that a wa its them but is caused by our sense


o f person a l los s ' and when we reflec t upon the f a ct that
such grie f on ou r part brings still grea ter s orrow to them
the value of a knowledge o f the facts bec omes a pparent .

T h erei s but o n e sen sible attitu de to assume


toward those who have pas s ed on We should think .

of them a s ch eerfu lly as po ssible and n ever w ith


longin g regret a nd th e d esire that th ey shoul d b e


wi th us aga in They a r e with us every night th at w e
.

sleep a nd a littl e pati ent consideration of th a t fact


wi ll b e lik e l y to bring to mos t peopl e an increasing
s erenity a nd j oy .

If p eople w ere better ab le to bring accur a te


memories of a s tra l e x perienc es into th e waking life
it would no doub t often b e of th e greatest sati sfaction
to thos e who have passed ove r to the oth e r life as
w ell as to th e dre a m er T here are a numb er of case s
.

on record in whi ch tho se who h ave p assed on su d


-

d e nl y w ithout l eavin g ful l in formation abo ut th eir


,

a ff ai rs b ehin d them h ave en d eavored for a long time


,

to pass such kno w l edge b ack b efo re th ey succeede d .

Who sh a ll say how ma ny never succeed at all ? Th e


Reeves Snyder cas e and the M oore c a se i n Chapter ,

I I I a re ex a mples of th e recover y of valuab les which


, ,

e sp ecially in th e M oore case would prob ably have


,

be en forever lost to th e survivi ng relatives b ut for


th e fortun a te dre a m I t was more than two years
'

.
DRE AMS OF TH E DEA D 1 21

after the death of M r Moore that th e bu ried coin


.

was rec o vered Who can guess how l o ng he had b een


.
'

endeavoring to rev eal the hiding place of the little


fortune to his wife a nd what h e su ff ered by th e long
delay and the fe a r that his failure to impart the
,

information at th e time th e money w a s secreted


might b e the cau se of co ntinued poverty ?

V ery much of th e hear ta ch e c a us ed by death



would disappear if the truth about th e dead w ere
.

known and the facts abou t sleep and dreams w ere


understood The least that we can do for our part
.

is to recognize th e relationship that e x ists in conscious


n ess b etw e en our dep arted friends an d ours elves an d,

by study of the facts a nd by s eriou s e ff orts a t th e


control o f th e mi n d and th e emotions bring about
,

th e condition s that will en a b le u s to get much


con solation from the truth in s tead of remai ning
i gnor a nt of it
.
THE OC C ULTISM IN THE
S HA KESPEA RE PLA YS

By L . W . R o ger s

Mo st r ea d er s p a ss o ve r e ve n th e o b vi o u s
'

o c c u l t i sm i n t h e S h a k e s p e a r e pl a y s w i t h

b u t l i tt l e t h o ugh t on th e su b j e ct a nd l i g h t l y
d i s mi ss th e ma tt e r wi t h th e b e l i e f t h a t th e
g r e a t d r a ma t i st w a s g i ve n r a t h e r fr e e r e i n
to h i s i ma g i na t i o n Th e f a ct i s t h a t i n
.

t h e se pl a y s w e a r e give n a t r u t h fu l a nd a c
c u r a t e p i ct u r e o f th e i nvi si bl e wo r l d a nd ,

a mo s t r e a l i sti c d e s cr i p t i on o f th e f a c t t ha t

h u man p a s si ons a nd e mo t i ons su rvive th e


d e a t h o f th e ph y si c a l b o d y a nd c o nt i nu e to
pl a y a p a r t i n th e vi si bl e wor l d .

Th e pl a y s d ea l t w i th a r e H a ml e t Ma c ,
-

b e th Ri ch a r d III J u l i u s C a e sa r A Mi d
a

, .
, ,

su mmer N i g h t s D r e a m a nd Th e Te mp e st '

a nd th e ph e no me na i n t h e m i ncl u d e s c l a i r

voy a nc e p r e moni t i ons fo r e k now l e d ge o f


, ,

c o mi ng d e a t h a c c ur a t e p r o ph e cy o f f u t u r e
,

ev e n s , t th e t
r e u rn o f th e d e a d , e tc . Th e
au t h or d e c l a r e s o f th e d r a ma t i s t s g r e a t ’

w o r k t h a t w h a t i s i ts s u p e r st i t i on to t h i s
g ene r a t i o n w i ll b e i ts s c i e nc e to th e next

.

Pa p er co ve r s on ly . Pr i c e 2 5 0 , p o sta ge
fr ee .

TH E TH E O S O PH I CA L B OO K C O NC E R N
Lo s A ng e l es , C a l iforni a
S ELF D EV ELOPMEN T A N D

THE WA Y TO POW ER

H ow ,
ca n W e d ev eBOp t he l a te n t

p ow er s w i thin us ? W ha t i s th e meth od
b y w hi ch sp i r i tu a l i ll u min a ti on ca n b e
r ea ch ed ? W h a t a r e the l aw s gover n
ing sou l gr ow t h ? Th ese are the l
oft

re p ea te d qu e s t o i n s th a t a re d ea l t wi th
b y the a u th or ,
w h o ta k es up in d eta il
th e qu ali f i c a ti on s qu ir e d f or oc cu l t
re

d ev el op men t a nd sp i r i tu a l pr o gr es s He .

s p ec i fic al ly p o in ts ou t the th r e e vi ta l
ne c essi ti es w hi ch l i e th e f ound a tion
’ '

at

of' a l l oc cu l t u n f ol dmen t a nd the mean s


by w hi ch, if one d oes not p ossess
th em, th ey ma y
v ol v e d
be e . N ot on ly
th e qu a l if ic a tionsne ed ed b ut meth th e
'

od s to b e f ol l ow e d a r e c onsi d er e d in
d eta il . Pap er cov er s onl y Pr i c e 25 c .
,

p osta ge fr ee .

TH E TH E O S O PH I C A L B OO K CO NC E R N
Lo s A ng e le s , C a l if or n a i
THEOSOPHIC A L LEC TURES
By L . W . R o ger s

S c i e nti fi c E vi d ence of F u tur e L i fe '

On so me of th e s ci e nt ifi c nd a h i s t o r i c fa c t s
i nd i c a t i ng th e i
e x s te n e c of a n u ns e e n w o r ld
fu t u r l ife

a

Th
nd
e
a

I nv i s i
e

bl e
W or l d A bo u t U s
.

O n t h e u ns ee n r e g i o ns o f t h e u ni v e r s e a nd
t h e c o nd i t i o ns o f l i f e a ft e r b o d i l y d e a t h

R e i nca r na t i o n Fr o m th e S ci entifi c V iew

p o int
On m e o f th e na t ur a l l a w s a nd t h e f a c t s
so
l i f e w h i c h s h o w t h a t r e i nc a r na t i o n i s a
,

of
ne c e s s a ry f a c t o r i n e v o lu t i o n
,


.


Th e Lo gi c o f Re i nca r na ti o n
O n t h e r e a s o na bl e ne s s o f t h i s h y p o t h e s i s
o f h u m a n e v o lu t i o n

B y e o nd
th e B o r d e r
.

On rv y c
lai c
o a n e, p e m o ni t i o ns r a nd ot her
u r y c
p e p h s i a l p h e no m e na

s .

K ar ma ' N t
a ur e 8

La w of J usti ce

0 1 1 th e l a w of c
u s e a nd e fi e c t a s o p e r a t i ng
a
i n th e a a i s offf r d a i l y l i fe

.

S o u l P o we r s a nd P os s i b i l i ti es ”

O n s o m e o f t h e m e t h o d s o f na t ur e i n e v o l v
,

i ng l a t e nt f a c ul t i e s

.

U ni ve r s a l B ro th e r h oo d
O n th e r e l a t i o ns h i p o f hum a n b e i ng s t o
ea ch o th e r a nd t o t h e a ni m a l k i ng d o m

.
,

O c cu l t is m a s a Fac to r i n C i vi li za ti o n ”

O n t h e q u e s t i o n W h y a r e c o u nt r i e s W h e r e
o ccu l t i s m i s g e ne r a ll y a cc e p t e d b e h i nd u s i n
c i v i l i z a t i o n? S h o w i ng w h y t h e y a r e no t


.


Th e H i d d e n S i d e o f E vo l u ti o n
O n t h e ne c e s s i t y f o r a gu i d i ng i nt e ll i g e nc e
in e v ol u ti o n b a ck of
“na t u r a l s e l e c t i o n a nd
r e a s o na bl e ne s s o f t h e e x i s t e nc e o f “a
,

th e
s p i r i t u a l h i e ra r ch y
“ Th e Li f e S u b li me ”
.

O n t h e p o s s i b i l i t y o f s h a p i ng t h e o rd i na ry
l i f e b y t h e p r i nc i pl e s t h a t h a v e gu i d e d t h e
l i v e s o f th e m o st ex a l te d s o u l s .

P RIC E 10 C EN TS EA C H ' A N Y THREE, 25 C EN TS .


POS TA G E FREE

Th e os op h i ca l Q u es ti o ns A ns w e r e d l 5o ”

O n t h e A s t r a l P l a ne R e i nc a r na t i o n K a rm a
a nd M i s c e ll a ne o u s O ccu l t E nq u i r i e s
, , ,

mp h l ets r
.

A ll of the a bove 12 Pa to one a d d es s f or S LOO

TH E TH E O S O PHI C A L B O O K C O N C E R N
Le s A nge le s , C a l i for nia

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