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Teacher's Handbook
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Student Book Scope and Sequence xtv

Unit 2 *: What's more important: taste or nutrition?


Teaching Notes 13
Unit Assignment Rubric 22
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Unit 4 ffix ls change good or bad?


Teaching Notes 34
Unit Assignment Rubric 43
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Unit 6 ffi; How can advertisers change our behavior?


Teaching Notes 55
Unit Assignment Rubric 65

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Unit 8 &:What do our cities say about us?


Tea(hing Notes 77
Unit Assignment Rubric 87

Unit I ffilCan money buy happiness?


Texhing l,lotes
Unii Assignment Buhric

Unit 10 &t Do we need technology to communicate long distance?


Teaching Notes 98
Unit Assignment Rubric 108
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Q: Skills for Success is a six-level series with two strands,


Reoding ond Writing and lrste ning ond Speoking.
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Q: Skills for Success is the result of an extensive development process involving thousands Firc-
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of teachers and hundreds of students around the world. Their views and opinions helped
shape the content of the series. Q is grounded in teaching theory as well as real-world
classroom practice, making it the most learner-centered series available.
To the Teacher
Highlights of the Q; Skills for Success Teacher's Handbook

As you probably know from your own teaching Each aspect of the learning process in the Q series
experience, students want to know the point of a builds toward completing the learning outcome. This
lesson. They want to know the "why" even when they interconnected process of considering new information
understand the "how." In the classroom, *re "why" is is at the heart of a crtttcal thinking approach and forms
the learning outcome, and to be successful, students the basis of the students'work in each unit of the
need to know it. The learning outcome provides a Q series. At the end of the unit, students complete a
clear reason for classroom work and helps students practical project built around the learning outcome.
meaningfully access new material. Learning outcomes create expectations in the classroom:
Each unit in Oxford's Q: Skills for Szccess series expectations of what students will 1earn, what teachers
builds around a thought-provoking question related will teach, and what lessons will focus on. Students
to that unit's unique learning outcome. Students learn benefit because they know they need to learn content
vocabulary to answer the unit question; consider new for a purpose; teachers benefit because they can plan
information related to the unit's theme that utilizes this activities that reinforce the knowledge and skills students
vocabulary; use this information to think critically about need to complete the learning outcome. In short,
new questions; and use those answers to practice the learning outcomes provide the focus that lessons need.
G new listening, vocabulary, gramrnaL pronunciation, and
a{
lE speaking skills they need to achieve the unit's learning
outcome.

The unit assignment ties


into that unit's unique
learning outcome.
LEARilINGOUTCOME

U5e appropriate eye contad,tone ofvoicq


GRAMMAR. simpl€ presentfor informal naftative5 and pauses totell a funny {ory or ajokeio
PROtrUNCIAT|ON . simple present thfd FEon -sl-es
SPEAK|NG.usrngeyeconhd,pduse.andtoneofvoice

qf Unit Assignment Tell a joke or a


funny story
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Unit Questioh (5 minutes)
Student told thejoke orfunny storyeasily
(without long pauss or reading) and was Refer students back to the ideas they discussed at the
easyto understand {spoke clearly and at a
qood speed).
beginning of the unit about who makes them laugh.
Cue students if necessary by asking specific questions
Student used the simple presenl
about the content of the unit: Why did people think
tense coiiectly.
Jackie Chan was funny? What advice did we hear about
Student used vocabulary from the unit. how to be funny? What skills can you use to mahe your
Student u5ed eye contaat pauses, and jokes and stories more entertaining?
tone ofvoice to effedively tell thejoke or
funny story.
Learning Outcome
Student correctly pronounced third
person -sl-e' 1. Tie the Unit Assignment to the unit learning
outcome. Say: The outcome for this unit is to use
appropriate eye contact, tone oJ voice, and. pauses to
tell a funny story or a joke to your classmates. This
Unit ,Assignrnent is going to let you show that you
can do that as well as correctly use and pronounce the
Clear assessments allow both simple present.

teachers and students to comment


on and measure learner outcomes.
I

A critical thinking approach


asks students to process new information and to
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learn how to apply that information to a new situation. Teachers might set learning tougheS
outcomes to give students targets to hit-for example: "After this lesson, give three @ rriti,*rliot ing 21$ cent
reasons why people immigrate"-and the materials and exercises in the lesson
ln Activity B, you successfr
have to restate,
provide students with the knowledge and skills to think critically and discover their be techl
or say again in
three reasons. perhaps a different Q app
Questions are important catalysts in the critical thinking process. Questions way, some of the students
encourage students to reflect on and apply their knowledge to new situations. information you whilettu
Students and teachers work together to understand, analyze, synthesizg and evaluate learned in the two increasin
the lesson's questions and content to reach the stated outcomes. As students become readings. Restating
QTeofit
is a good way to who wa
more familiar with these stages of the critical thinking process, they will be able
review information. classroo
to use new information to complete tasks more efficiently and in unique and
meaningful ways.

B (10 minutes)
Throughout the Student Book, CriticolThinking Tips
accompany certain activities, helping students to
!e
1. Introduce the Unit Question, Why da people
immigrate to other countries2 Ask related information
questions or questions about personal experience
to help students prepare for answering the more
abstract unit qvestiorl. Did you immigrate to this
practice and understand these critical thinking skills.

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counhy? What were your reasons for learing your Critical Thinking Tip (1 minute) I

home country? What were your rewons for clnosing


your new country? Wlnt did you bring with you?
1.
2.
Read the tip aloud.
Tell students that restating also helps to ensure
i'm
Tell students: Let\ starl off our discussion by listing that tley have understood something correctly.
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reasons why people might iwmigrate. For example, we
could start our list with finding workbecause many
people looh for jobs in new countries. But there are
After reading a new piece of information, they
should try to restate it to a classmate who has also
read the information, to ensure that they both
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many other reasons why people imwigrate. What else have the same understanding of information.
can we think of?

The Q Teach e r's H a n d book f eatu res notes offeri n g


questions for expanded thought and discussion.
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in a rag
students
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The Q Teacher's Handbook expands on the critical
,rccuriae
thinking approach with the Critical Q Expansion
reports c
Activities. These activities allow teachers to facilitate
more practice for their students. The Critical Q
onwta
Expansion Activities supplement the Q Student Bookby Tqdra
expanding on skills andlanguage students are practicing. orfupr
www.Or
In today's classrooms, it's necessary that students
have the ability to apply the skills they have learned
to new situations with materials they have never seen
before. Q's focus on critical thinking and the QTeacher's
Handbook's emphasis on practicing critical thinking skills
tfuough ttre Critical Q Expansion Activities prepares Th€sl
slrills rhel
students to excel in this important skill.
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Both the academic and professional worlds are becoming increasingly interdependent. The
toughest problems are solved only when looked at from multiple perspectves. Success in the
21't century requires more than just core academic knowledge-though that is still crucial. Now
successful students have to collaboratg innovate, adapt, be self-directed, be flexible, be creativq
be tech-literatg practice teamwork, and be accountable-both individually and in groups.
Q approaches language learning in light of these important 21't Century Skills. Each unit asks
students to practice many of these atffibutes, from collaboration to innovation to accountability,
while they are learning new language and content. The Q Student Books focus on ttrese
increasingly important skills with unique team, pair and individual activities. Additionally, the
QTeacher\ Handbooks provide support with easy-to-use 21't Century Skill sections for teachers
who want to incorporate ski1ls like "openness to other people's ideas and opinions" into their
classrooms but aren't sure where to start.

The QTeacher's Hondbook provides notes


for teachers to expand a unit's content into
a larger lesson about skills students need to
be successful in the 21't century.

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Q Online Practice is an online workbook that gives students quick access to all-new content
in a range of additional practice activities. The interface is intuitive and user-friendly, allowing
students to focus on enhancing thetu langtage skills.
For the teacher, Q Online Practice includes a digital grade book providing immediate and
accurate assessment of each student's progress. Straightforward individual student or class
reports can be viewed onscreen, printed, or exported, giving you comprehensive feedback
on what students have mastered or where they need more help.
Teacher's Access Code Cards for the digital grade book are available upon adoption
or for purchase. Use ttre access code to register for your QOnline Practice account at
www. Qonlinepractice. com.

These features of the Q: Skills for Success series enable you to help your students develop the
skills they need to succeed in their future academic and professional careers. By using learning
outcomes, critical thinking, and 27t century skills, you help students gain a deeper knowledge
of the material they are presented with, both in and out of the classroom.

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students on the goal of their instruction.

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Can money qF.-r

buy happiness? i
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How much money do )ou thinkpeople really need to
bc happyi Erplatu.

Do Iou thjnk nrore moneywould makc you happie.?


\\hr or wh,v ior?
Look at lhe phok). Do,you thnlk the pcofnc livhg nr rhi$
house arc happy? uihv or Nhv not?

!::li Discussthe UnitQuestion above with your classmates,

Itstentorr.oc/dsrroo,,i,:1:,11oni r,toh.arorheransweB

ffi-:-"-;--
j Thoughtprovoking unit questions engage I
I students with the topic and provide a critical ;

Having the learning outcome is important because it gives students and : I

teaehers a clear idea of what the point of each task/activity in the unit is. I

Lawrence Lctwson, Palomar College, California I


_*_"". " -- " """_.___.-l

Quick Guide
Fmrurrw lrsrrnrr*c I
, SuddenWealth
You are going to listen to a podcast that helps people learn to handle their
money wisely. The article discusses people who suddenly become rich and the
difflculties they face.
Which topics do you think the article will discuss? Check (/) your ideas.

E how sudden wealth makes people happy


. tr how sudden wealth causes problems
E the advantages and disadvantages of sudden wealth

Students discuss their opinions


of each listening text and analyze

# wxnr fis Yst


A.
Txtrqx?
Discuss the questions in a group.
how it changes their perspective
on the unit question.

1. Which do you think comes first, happiness or money? Explain.

2. What qualities of a happy person do you think lead to better employment


and financial outcomes?

B. Think about both Listening 1 and Listening 2 as you discuss the questions.
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Question 1 of
Activity B asks you 1. What is the difference between sudden wealth and earning more money
to choose between from a better job? Which would you prefer? Why?
two things. To make
the best choice, you 2. Do you pay much attention to financial matters? Do you enjoy thinking
evaluate a variety
of factors, including about money, or does it make you feel stressed? Explain.
your knowledge
and experience.

,*dJ ,*tF= One of the best features is your focus on developing


qilp f'f$ materials of ahigh "interest level."
Troy Hammond, Tokyo Gakugei University,
inter national S e c ondary S cho ol, J ap an

i Listening and,Speaking3 tx
Hx$licit skills ihstruction, :prepa,res students
for a*ademic success.

Explicit instruction and practice in listening,


speaking, grammar, pronunciation, and
vocabulary skills help students achieve
language proficiency.

Practice activities allow students


to master the skills before they are
evaluated at the end ofthe unit.
Slgrposs are wods ed ?hraee th4l es tell yo{
ahe otder in vhrch thisg}
happened. Lintetr fsr $igaposE to1€lp I@ followthe oidtr olevelb ed the logi.
in a 1dt,
Iisbn is rh€se qdples of signposta {rom li$si4g 1.

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Atthe siart lntheelddle Aatheerd There are .eidn ptrffer 6ed for agaetigrad dlsagieing. Itb ,mpofiant to
knou whi.h phsres 6nd €r?re.sioff ffi apP@pdaie for aomal and infothtl
AtfiEt Aher ltha$, Flnally
sltusions. An intomaL cot?ersatio! B vdry diferent frofr a aormal discussion
Firsl Sefore fthatl, ,! aooqlution,
a college or I rork.
ln th€ beqinninq Lalet h 5ummary,
Ne*, Here &e <one phrse! )ou en use wher you rtrt rc rgree o.dr\agree h
5e{iind, .iifferent sihalionr.
Th{n, A$*ing fi!agreeing
, agree {romplerely), ldisqree,
That! exady what I rhink. I don'r aqre 61 nllJ.
lr:.k:r A. Listen to a reporter interview a secretarywho suddenlyacquired a lot That3 a qo9d poht. Sdrry bltthal3 not my opinion.
ofmoney.Complete the interviewwith the signposts you hear Thnt! riqhr. I dodi f€el fi€ same way.

I thin& so too. ldontthlnkso.


Repofrer: You are one of many people in this iown who suddenly acquired
Absoiltelyl
a loi ofwealth when )our company was purchased by a large software

.ompanl How has that affected your life?

laura Green: lvell, it was pretty incrcdible. It took a :r,X:l:? A. Listen to the conversations. complete each conversation with the
phrases you hear
'1. Brr I. rerlt/, uha.
hhile ,o rne lu be'ie\, - I beqrn
Ellie What are you going to do with the money your grandfather gave you?
it could actuallydo lo mylife. Things have changed dramaticaily.
Sm: l'm not sure. I think I'm going to take an expensive vacation.
Reporter: Inwhatway?
Ellier Really? Don't you have a lot of school loans to pay?
Laura: I paid off all -of my credit card debt. And sent my son to college.
Smr Maybe the vacation's not such a good idea.
Receiving tlis money wasjtr$ fantasticl - , I was

worried all the time-


Ellie Vacatjons are tun, but it's much more imPortant
2

to pay off your debt.


Reporterr So your iirancial cjrcumstances have improved. What else

has chmged?

-. I think raising the averag€'income in coutrtries around the world k


Monica:

the best way to increase the level ofhappiness.


-.
UNIT9 : Canmoneybuyhappiness?
Patdciar l-. More moneymight make the very poor

happier bft not everyone.


Monica: i I think everyone except perhaps the very

hedlth) will herear irom a \rgher r.ome.


Patricia: Well, I can see wdll just have to agree to disagree.

UNIT9 Canmoneybuyhappiness?
-.
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The tasks are simple, accessible, user-friendly, and very useful.


Jesslco March, American University of Sharjah, U.A.E.

i QuickGuide
Q Online Practice provides all new
content for additional practice in
an easy-to-use online workbook.
Every student book includes a Q
Online Practice access code card.
Use the access code to register for
Defi nitiom of slmilar urords
your Q Online Proctice account at
Some words are $imrlar in meaning, for instance, creirtivity,ai,J.d,prodscttvitry.
wwwQonlinepractice.com.
People injobs where they.an show cr€ativity and productivity are,h*ppi€r
than those who arent,

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(*eotil)ity ard pradattlvity both have to do with making things, but they
a litde diferent. Look at tlleir di.tiorsr.i/ definitions.
are also i:
il
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rl' ere a trv j ty ESI! kripr'lvoli. nou, u ihe


abilitv to make or produce new things, especially
u\rng \kill or mdgindti on: 1?o(hng lhol eil ouruge5
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pro duc ti! i.ty ,.prod,\k rvdri:,pr oo- nounlLl


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producesgoods,andtheamountproduced:More l'i
iJlici"n *ill l"od to greater prod.uctivity.

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A research-based vocabulary
sol
Lsd fron dfotd Andi.an Di.tbnory program focuses students on
asoa I All d ci onary enties are taken rhe fot leohe4 of Enqlish

the words they need to know


i
academically and professionally,
using skill strategies based
All dictionary entries are taken from on the same research as the
F** I
the Oxford American Dictionary Oxford dictionaries.
for learners of English.
t

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with English learners in mind, and provides extra learning tools for
pronunciation, verb types, basic grammar structures, and more.

The Oxford 3OOO'"e


gd ii
The Oxford 3000 encompasses the 3000 most important words to
learn in English. lt is based on a comprehensive analysis of the Oxford
English Corpus, a two-billion word collection of English text, and on
extensive research with both language and pedagogical experts.

The Academic Word List EStr


The Academic Word List was created by Averil Coxhead and
contains 570 words that are commonly used in academic
English, such as in textbooks or articles across a wide range
of academic subject areas. These words are a great place to
start if you are studying English for academic purposes.

t Listening and Speaking 3 xl


Clear learning outcomes f*Cusrstudents on
the goals of instruction" E
For
A culminating unit .E
assignment evaluates the er
students' masterY of the
n€
learning outcome.
Take part in a grouP discussion
.Fl
-4.
ln this assignment, you are going to take part in a group discussion in
about money and happiness. As you prepare for the discussion' think
rel
about the Unit Question. "Can money buy happiness?" and refer to the
Self-Assessment checklist on page 184.
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Work with a partner. Discuss the questions about money and happiness'
questions'
.E
Be sure to use the correct intonation when you ask each other
-ft
What is money's influence on happiness?
What kind of person do you think would be happier with more money? Why?
Would your life be different if you had more or less money? How?
Is it more enjoyable to give or receive money? Why?

182 Untrg i Can moneybuYhappiness? 11

::

Track Your Success allows Check(/)theskillsyoulearned.lfyouneedmoreworkonaskill,referto


students to assess their the page(s) in parentheses.
own progress and
. . Lf$Efli+E$ffi lcail tisteq.for,signp.515. {p. 172} '
provides guidance on
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sentence types. (P. 181)
,t can use'phrasesfor,agreeing and disagreeing. (p' 1B1)

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xII t. QuickGuide
For the student
. Easy-to-use: a simple interface allows students to focus on
enhancing their speaking and listening skills, not learning a
new software program
. Flexible: for use anywhere there's an lnternet connection
. Access code card: a Q Online Practice access code is
included with the student book. Use the access code to
register for Q Online Practice at www.Qonlinepractice.com

For the teacher


. Simple yet powerful: automatically grades student exercises and tracks progress
. Straightforward: online management system to review, print, or export reports
. Flexible: for use in the classroom or easily assigned as homework
. Access code card: contact your sales rep for your Q Online Practice teacher's access code

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'. ' .i '. ::l'. ,iit,*#$'k$* . a Testing Program CD-ROMwith a customizable test for each unit.

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p
I

.: /f!,@W :
=. I. rbrI and exercises
For additional resources visit the ---' L::'v
@ : 'Aer
:- l I
e:skiilsforsuccesscompanionwebsiteat 'TheQClassroom t
www.oup.com/elt/teacher/Qskillsforsuccess :' ' i
if*f .Paxrr*fil.lfP**terlTrTriFftfrlrf aPaffiTryi. -".t'.-ra"aa-.f

It's an interesting, engaging series which provides plenty of materials


that are easy to use in class, as well as instructionally promising.
Donqld Weasenforth, Collin College, Texas

i Listening and Speaking 3 xilt


.Quandl
rxln-c(I

.Csud
astheo
. Auxiliary verbs do, be, have . Use contractions with . Assess your prior . Describe in detail
auxiliary verbs knowledge of content an inaccurate first
. Relate personal experiences impression.
to listening topics
. lntegrate information
from multiple sources
. Evaluate the truthfulness
of traditional wisdom
. ldentify your decision-
making processes
. Examine your reasons for
forming impressions of people

. Use linked sounds . Assess your prior . lnterview classmates


r Prior
with /j/ and /w/ knowledge of content to inform a group
:of
I . Relate personal experiences discussion on why
to listening topics people prefer
d and certain foods.
rtions of . lntegrate information
rithnouns from multiple sources
uocabulary . ldentify personal tastes in food
. Evaluate the healthfulness
ofyour habits
. Relate personal food preferences
to those of your classmates
. Evaluate classmates' reasons
forfood preferences

i
I

rpnor l I

. Gerunds and infinitives . Correctly place stress . Assess your prior . Discuss successful
eof
I

as the objects of verbs on important words knowledge of content and unsuccessful


ri
d and.use
I
in sentences. . Relate personal experiences
to listening topics
personal experiences
and explain what you
I
i lntegrate information learned from them.
r negatives I

nd rr-) and from multiple sources


nings (co-,
:
j . Understand, interpret, and
and anti-) evaluate others' attitudes
4l
I

toward succes and failure


rncrease
)
nsron i

esto !

rabulary
:

; Listening and Speaking 3


. Use prior knowledge and personal . Make notes to prepare . Assess your prior i .Simpk
experience to predict content for a presentation or knowledge of presel
. Listen for main ideas group discussion vocabulary :

. Listen for details . Describe a situation using . Understand dictionary :

. Listen to personal stories details so a listener can make entries to diagram


to understand other inferences about an event meanings in word webs
people's experiences . Ask for reasons to
U5TEil lil6' r: .(hhasifi
,Exiertations, r
+t, :.
''l . Use a T-chart to take effective notes understand why
:. . .:::,:: something happened
Atallt{Finarll*J : : . Listen for intonation to identify a
. Express reasons to explain
,HSTEI{IilG -ltiAfr 1 nterview w}th
speaker's level of interest in a topic
why something happened
Earhsrr Efttetrreiah,,', .,,, . Listen for exact words or phrases
. Use reasons to explain
An intervi*w.(JournalisE1, to improve your word recognition
personal beliefs
Sociq,lqgy). ,. ,',, ,

. Use prior knowledge and personal . Take notes to prepare . Assess your prior . Tag qr
experience to predict content for a presentation or knowledge of
. Listen for main ideas group discussion vocabulary
. Listen for details . Practice varying intonation . Find the most relevant
Ar* w,g+espgnsible{$r, and other features to
.the:w,6rld rye.Ii.lrs, in?., : . Listen for supporting statements to dictionary definition
apply a general concept to real life convey your attitudes for a word that has
. Add tag questions to many meanings
tl5?I!,tiHS.! :, ecru*rat* Soctil . Use intonation, volume,
Eespsnsibtliiy.,,,,.t,,,,t,... and other features to infer statements to find out
a speaker's attitudes what someone thinks
rA lect{}rs {B*siness;, E{*}wy} ::
. Answer tag questions
. Listen for exact words in a
f.tSTEBlf{G ?: Fersoml,' using proper grammar and
ReEpanribllit)r conversation to improve
yourword recognition intonation to accurately
An excerpt from a college express what you think
remina( {Busines:;: Soeio}qgy) . Lead a discussion so it
proceeds smoothly, fairly,
and stays on topic

.;-"--""*d;;;;l .',*"il**; - -l ;;-"r*;;;;;


it
.ti,lodd
content i
experience to predict or ! for a presentation knowledge of afiiUr
. Listen for main ideas group discussion : vocabulary
. Listen for details . Use modals to express . Use context to
l{ow.rafi .aduerll*ers,
. Listen for evidence to obligation, prohibition, understand the
'.has*dout:h[ha+ior] and recommendation meanings of unfamiliar
distinguish fact from opinion
. Ask questions and words or phrases
Ll$TEI{ll{G lr*dverti*ifiC . Listen for modal verbs to
Taahfiiqltqs.,:''. . -'' understand obligations, make statements with
A small:gbu,p:pr€senlatlon, , , prohibitions, and recommendations correct intonation to be
{Advertising},': :, ::', ::'::: . Listen for intonation to distinguish understood clearly
. Give reasons and
H$IEI{II{G ?. Adv**i}itg Ethic$ between statements and questions
examples to support '
ahd5tandarils':' :': :' . Listen for exact words or phrases
opinions you express
" to improve your word recognition
An interview (Blsiness, Ettiirs)

xvi ! Scope and Sequence


'pnor . Simple past and . Vary intonation to show . Assess your prior . Participate in a group
of present perfect interest in a topic knowledge of content discussion emphasizing
. Relate personal experiences the advantages
I dictionary to listening topics and disadvantages
iagram . lntegrate information of change.
n word webs from multiple sources
. Recall life experiences and
assess their signifl cance
. Considerthe methods used by
reporters to gather information

tl1
iii
pflor . Tag questions ; . Use rising and falling
_ ir-,_
|: . Assess your prior
__L
.**.-t-'-.--
| . State and explain your
of I intonation in tag questions knowledge of content opinions about our
to convey meaning i . nelate personal experiences I responsibility for i<sues
,st relevant to listening topics I impacting our world.
lefinition . lntegrate information
hat has from multiple sources
fngs . Consider social responsibility on
several levels, including individual,
; i family, and corporate responsibility
. Develop skills for leadership
in a small group

'prior . Correctly use intonation in . Assess your prior . State and support your
of yes/no and wh- questions knowledge of content opinions concerning
. Use intonation to make . Relate personal experiences the influence of
tto statements into questions to listening topics advertising on
I the to express surprise . lntegrate information our behavior.
f unfamiliar from multiple sources
rltlses . Assess your personal
experiences with advertising
and your responses to it
. Judge real-life situations according
to your ethical standards
. Summarize a discussion in a group
. Express and support a
personal opinion

Listening and Speaking 3 xvii


. Use prior knowledge and personal . Make notes to prepare . Assess your prior
experience to predict content for a presentation or knotvledgd
. Listen for main ideas group discussion vocabulary
. Clearly introduce the topic . Use a dictionary to learn
. Listen for details
of a presentation to focus about word families
. Listen for numbers to correctlY
an audience's attention . lncrease vocabulary
understand amounts
. Use sequence expressions by understanding
II$TEltlflG litFinrnthl{r,a, Fleam . Use the form of number
to clarify the order of word families
.A:talkffina6ce,.Filrn S!r.l$y):.,,.,,, expressions to distinguish between
events in a presentation
cardinal and ordinal numbers
E: .utTE*lr{6 2+The Tf,u*h A5our . Listen for exact words in a passage
. Use expressions of
the Loch Ness Monster purpose/reason to exPlain
to improve your word recognition
A,i'eBer lZoologyj .,: actions and attitudes

. Use prior knowledge and personal . Make notes to prepare . Assess your prior -Sepd
experience to predict content for a presentation or knowledge of pH
. Listen for main ideas group discussion vocabulary
. Use summary or recaP . Understand phrasal
. Listen for details
techniques to end verbs to accurately
. Understand figurative
a presentation interpret statements
expressions to interPret a
. Use a T-chart to take
speaker's true meaning
. Listen for comments that helP notes for a presentation
you match a city to a descriPtion

. Use prior knowledge and personal . Make notes to prepare . Assess your prior
experience to predict content for a presentation or knowledge of
. Listen for main ideas group discussion vocabulary
. Use expressions to introduce . Use a dictionary to
. Listen for details
statements of agreement distinguish among
- Listen for a sequence of factors to words that are
understand the stages in a Process somewhat similar
:,. . Understand examples to
H#I.EI{iI*61 t $udde.n*i&'lth :
in meaning
*,pqdeast t[ry.EhQ!,9$! ..,,, relate them to larger ideas
. Listen for signposts to understand
[I3Ttlaltl6ta tlappiness Breedr the structure of a passage
tuece*t,;,afid, 8[6n*id: : : ::
. Listen for exact words in a
{Pers+rlal*nance;
conversation to improve
yourword recognition

. Use prior knowledge and personal your prior


. Assess
experience to predict content knowledge of
. Listen for main ideas vocabulary
I So :wer fiaed,t*thnulogi . Ask questions to confirm . Understand idioms to
. Listen for details
to communicate long your understanding accurately interpret
. Listening for rhetorical
distanre of definitions statements
questions to understand
. Practice using idioms to . Correctly use idiomatic
tlSTE$tt{GII r ,: ,, . : the structure of a lecture
increase the naturalness expressions
in'u*u*gitLaq.grag*':' . Recognize definitions in
ofyour speech
A lecture (Communication) a passage to understand
. Use adjectives, fixed
unfamiliar vocabulary
LISTENING 2: Message in phrases, and idioms to
. Listen for exact words in sentences
aBsttle , ," to improve your word recognition
express emotions
A rcport,{Sociology) . ,' . Prepare a dialogue with
a partner to improve
your conversation skills

xviii I Scope and Sequence


rprior . Correctly use contracted . Assess your prior . Give a short
tof and uncontracted knowledge of content presentation on a
I forms of had . Relate personal experiences risk you have taken,
tnaryto learn to listening topics explaining your reasons
ilfamilies . lntegrate information for taking that risk.
rcabulary from multiple sources
anding . Evaluate risks to determine
hs which are justified
. Reflect on your own
willingness to take risks
. Explain and evaluate a
risk you have taken

rpnor . Separable and inseparable . Effectively link . Assess your prior . Give and recap
tof phrasal verbs consonants and vowels knowledge of content a presentation
. Relate personal experiences highlighting what you
to listening topics like and dislike about
I phrasal
a particular city.
curately . lntegrate information
atements from multiple sources
. Evaluate the strengths and
weaknesses of several entities
. Classify items according
to shared features
. Assess the significance of
an item's characteristics
. Analyze personal preferences

'prior . Assess your prior . Participate in a grouP


. Sentence types- . Effectively use intonation
of declarative, interrogatory, in different sentence types knowledge of content discussion evaluating
imperative, and exclamatorY . Relate personal experiences the influence money
to listening topics has on happiness.
nary to
among . lntegrate information
ire from multiple sources
imilar . Examine your attitudes toward
money and happiness
. Distinguish between causal
relationships and correlations
in research results
. Support opinions with
reasons an examples

your prior
. Assess . Role-play a phone
prior . Comparatives with . Correctly pronounce
of adjectives unstressed connecting knowledge of content call discussing an
words . Relate personal experiences emotional event you
to listening topics have experienced.
lidioms to
Dterpret . lntegrate information
from multiple sources
e idiomatic . Reflect on personal styles
of communication
. Speculate about the origins of
communication practices
. Evaluate the effect of technology
on language and communication
. Decide how to resolve
communication problems

i Listening and Speaking 3 xrx


' 7.4
a
IE
ET

Ar
Pr
LISTENING . making inferences i[
LEARNING OUTCOME
or
VOCABULARY. suffixes
Describe an inaccurate first a!
GRAMMAR . auxiliary verbs do, be, have lsl
impression in detail.
PRONUNCIAIION . contractions with auxiliary verbs lil
SPEAKING . taking coversational turns
TheQ
@e
) Listening and Speoking 3, pages 2-3 Activity A Answers, p. 3 1.H
Preview the Unit Possible answers: AU
1. Students may mention physical appearance, Ar
Learning Outcome
clothing, or voice as things they first notice. p
2. Students may think first impressions
are
1. Ask for a volunteer to read the unit skills and then important because they may not have the
2.4
opportunity to correct bc
the unit learning outcome. first impression.
a negative
Some students may think first impressions are not br
2. Explain: The learning outcome is what you are
important because a person's true character will iE
expected to be able to do by the unit\ end. you are id
be revealed eventually.
going to be eyaluated on how well you meet this so
3. They could be meeting a friend or relative for the
outcome. With this in mind, you should focus on (d
first time.
learning skills ( List ening, Voc abulary, Grammaq ft
Pronunciation, Speaking) that will support your goal
of describing an inaccurate first impression in detail. B (15 minutes)
This can also help you act as mentlrs in the classroom
)risi
to help the other stu(lents meet this outcome.
7. Explain that each unit in Q focuses on a Unit
Question that students will consider throughout
c (t(
the unit and will address in their Unit 1.D
A (15 minutes)
Assignment at the end of the unit. ft
1. Prepare students for thinking about the topic by 2. Inffoduce the Unit Question, "Are first
ft
eliciting the meaning of first imgtression. Then tell impressions accurate?" Ask related information 2-Pl
them about your first impression of someone you questions or questions about personal experience 3.E
recently met. Explain where you met the person to help students prcpare for answering the unit eI
and why you had this impression of them. question, which is more abstract. Have you ever b€
2. Pttt students in pairs or small groups to discuss had a negative first impression about somelne
lL
)-
the first two questions.
Ca1l on volunteers to share their ideas with the
that you found was inaccurate or accurate? What
happened to tupport or disprove your first impression? lr-
class. Ask questions to facilitate the discussion: Did ). Give students a minute to silently consider their
you notice physical characteristics more than other answers to the Unit Question. Then ask students
things? How much influence did the person\ clothing whose answer is yes to stand on one side of the
have on your opinion? Did the place in which you room and students whose answer is no to stand on
met the person influence yowr opinion? Why or why the other side of the room.
not? Did the person speak to you directly? Did this 4. Direct students to tell a partner next to them their
influence your opinion of the person? reasons for choosing that side of the issue.
4. Focus students' attention on the photo. Have a 5. CaIl on volunteers from each side to share their
volunteer describe the photo to the class. Read the
D(5
opinions with the class.
third question aloud. Ask additional questions: Do 1. rf
6. After students have shared their opinions, provide c1l
you think these people know each other? Why?
an opportunity for anyone who would like to iil
change sides to do so.

Unit 1
7. Ask students to sit down, copy the Unit Question 2. Ifyour students are from the same cultural
and make a note of their answer and their background, you can elicit answers from the class.
reasons. They will refer to these notes at ttre
end of the unit. E (10 minutes)

Activity Answers, p.3


B 7. Keep or put students in pairs to discuss their
Possible answers: First impressions may or may not be opinions about the proverbs in Activity C.
accurate. The accuracy of a first impression is revealed 2. Ask each student to report to the class which
over time; Sometimes first impressions are accurate proverb their partner thinks is truest and why.
and sometimes they are not. We don't know unless we
know the person for a long time; Maybe or maybe not.
We need time to see.

The Q Classroom
$ cot,rrackz I Listening ond Speoking 3, page 5
1. Play The QClassroom. Use the example from the LISTENING 1:
audio to help students continue the conversation.
Ask: How did the students answer the question? Do The Psychology of First lmpressions
ylu agree or disagree with their ideas? Why?
2. On the audio, the students give examples of VOCABULARY tts minutes)
behavior that gives a good impression (smiling, 1. Direct students to read the words and their
on.
being friendly) and those that give a bad first definitions. Elicit any difficulties or questions.
not
impression (being in a bad mood). Explore this
ill 2. Ask students to complete *re sentences.
idea further by eliciting other ways in which
someone can make a good or bad impression J. Put students in pairs to check their answers.
he
(they like / don't like the same things you 1ike, 4. Ask volunteers to read their answers. Elicit or
they are / aren't he1pful, etc.) provide corrections as necessary.

Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 4

C (10 minutes) . Groug tcjwer*level itudeats and.assiiittiem Wttn


)ut the,task;'Point oui'the cues in the sentences that will
1. Direct students to read the instructions. Explain
ttrat they should say whether each proverb means , After higher.level'students have checked ansvvers
that first impressions ate accurate or not accurate. in pairt{ellthe pairs trrivrite an additionat sentenes.,'.
n 2. Pul students in pairs to discuss *reir answers. using the new word, Have,volunteers write their
3. Elicit answers and ask students to support them, sentence ofl the board. Conect thE sentercai with
oce
e.9., Don't judge a horse by its saddle is accurate the wh61€ tlais,:foausing €n.the ure $f vacA'brilari.'
word ratherthan ather qramm-ati(aliisiles ,'-, ., :
dt
,r because a good horse can have a bad saddlq etc.

t
I Activity C Answers, p.4
I r.ru; 2.N; 3.A; 4.N; 5.N; 6.A; 7.A; s.N Vocabulary Answers, p. 5
sion? 1. sample; 2. errors; 3. assume; 4. briefly;
eir 5. behavior; 5. form an impression; 7. negative;
nts 8. trait; 9. positive; 10. encounter
le Allow lower-level studetti to malchth€:ptoveibs For additional practice with the vocabulary,
rd on and the pie*rlres' fnmurag* teigher-levef s&rdentsro have students visit Q Online Practice.
creale their.own;,pioverbs,using,thosein'the cxe,rrise
their asrnodels,e.g.1f.it.bark.{rkea.dog;it1s.adog.:.:
Listening ond Speoking j, poge 6

,tI D (5 minutes) PREVIEW LISTENING 1 (10 minutes)

1. If possible, place students in pairs from different 1. Direct students to look at the photo. Help students
vide cultures. Ask them to share proverbs about first to explore their own process for making first
impressions from their cultures. impressions. Ask'. Whqt is your first impression of

Unit 1
this woman? Help students to identify the factors 3. Have students compare answers with a partner. NU
that influenced their impression, for examplq 4. Replay the audio so that the partners can check frr'r
gender, dress, and facial expression.
their answers. nfu
2. Read the introductory paragtaph and the answer
5. Go over *re answers with the class.
choices aloud. Have students check their answers. )rir
I Listen for Details Answers, p.6
Tell students they should review ttreir answers
1.a; 2.c;3.a; 4.a;5.b tisr
after listening. | 00i
Preview Listening 1 Answers, p.6 #g for additional practice with listening !o
Students' answers will vary. W comprehension, have students visit
Q Online Proctice. L.q
L
Listening 1 Background Note o
Tip for Success (1 minute)
Remind students that it's important to make a 2-\
good first impression, especially in job interviews. 1. Read the tip aloud. q
Psychological research shows that when evaluating
people, we weigh initial information more heavily
2. Elicit the anecdote used in Listening 1 (the coffee {
than later information. The first information we
shop incident). {
get about a person influences the way we perceive
subsequent information. As a result, we are more
likely to believe that the first things we learn about
someone ate tfirc.
3. Ask students if they found this anecdote to be an
interesting way to introduce the topic. Ask them
to give reasons. 'I
Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 7
For example, if you show an interest in people during
a first meeting, they may form an impression of you WHAT DO YOU THINK? (10 minutes)

as an engaging and caring person. They might not 7. Ask students to read the questions and reflect on
notice or care if you arc distracted or selfish later. ttreir answers.
Conversely, a negative first impression makes an even 2. Seat students in small groups and assign roles: a
deeper impact. If you initially appeat distracted or group leader to make sure everyone contributes,
selfish, people may ignore your later caring behavior

$
a note-taker to record the group's ideas, a reporter
or interest toward them. It can take many additional to share ttre group's ideas with the class, and a
positive actions to overcome the impact of a negative timekeeper to watch the clock.
first impression.
3. Give students five minutes to discuss the

I
questions. Call time if conversations are
LISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (5 minutes)
winding down. Allow them an extra minute
$ cot,rrack: or two if necessary

1. Ask students to read the statements. Elicit any 4. Call on each group's reporter to share ideas wittr
quesflons about them. the class.
2. Play the audio and have students complete the What Do You Think? Answers, p. 7
activify individually. Answers will vary. Possible answers:
1. Yes, have met people who were very friendly when
3. Elicit the answers from the class.
I first met them, and they siill are.; No, sometimes
Main ldea Answers, p.6 people may be nervous when meeting someone
1. F; 2. f; 3. F; 4.7 for the first time and behave differently than they
usually do.
2. Yes, Iknow someone who was quiet and unfriendly
LISTEN FOR DETAILS tto minutes) when I first met her. After I got to know her, I
realized that she is just very shy.
$ cot,rrack+
1. Direct students to read the sentences before they
listen again. Elicit any questions about them. Learning Outcome od
2. As you play the audio, have students listen and Use the Learning Outcome to frame the purpose
LT
choose the correct answer. and relevance of Listening 1. Ask What did you
5
learn from Listening 7 that preprares ylu to describe
fr
ft
rri

Unit 1
EL an inaccurate first impression? What did you learn 2. Play the audio while students take notes.
* that will help you understand your own behavior 3. Tell students to compare ttrese notes with ttrose
when making first impressions? from Activity A.
4. Call on several pairs to share their answers.
I Listening ond Speoking 3, page 8
Listening Skill: Making inferences D (5 minutes)
(10 minutes) 1. Keep students in pairs. Read the directions aloud
to the class.
@ cot,rracts
2. Tell partners to describe meeting someone for the
1. Ask students to read the information about
making inferences. Elicit any difficulties first time. Students should make inferences about
or questions.
their partner's opinions.
2. Tell students they are going to listen to a student J. Call on several pairs to report their partner's
inferences to the class and say whether they were
talking about his first meeting with his professor.
Ask them to read 4long while they listen and correct or not and why.
ffiee
underline the positive or negative things the dP
'ts for additional practice with making inferences, have
student says about the meeting. students visilQOnlineProctice.
,an
em 3. Read the text below the description of the
meeting. Ask Did the student say anything negative j Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 9
about the meeting? What positive things did the
LISTENING 2: Book Review
stwdent say? Did your answers match those listed in
the book? of Blink by Malcolm Gladwell

on A (5 minutes) VOCABULARY tto minutes)


@ cot,rracro
Ask students to locate the bold words in each
:a 1. Ask students to read the questions before they sentence. Pronounce and have students repeat
ES, listen. Elicit any questions about what students are the words.
,rter instructed to do.
2. Have students read the sentences and circle the
I 2. Play the audio while students take notes in their correct answer for each. Call on volunteers to read
notebooks. the answers aloud.
3. Tell students to write ttreir answers to the
Vocabulary Answers, p. 9
questions. Do not elicit answers until students
have completed Activity B.
1. b; 2. a; 3. c; 4. a; 5. a;
6. a; 7. c; 8. c; 9. b; 10. a
(5 minutes)
rith B #O
'tii$,
for additional practice with the vocabulary, have
7. Put students in pairs to compare their answers. students visit Q Online Practice.
2. Elicit answers to the questions from Activity A.
Listening ond Speoking 3, page 1O
Listening Skill Answers, p.8
rhen
ES
1. lt was a positive first impression. Supporting PREVIEW LISTENING I (5 minutes)
information may include: Lee smiled; He had a firm
te 1. Direct students to read the information. Askl. Why
handshake; He was helpful.
ley do you think Malcolm Gladwell used the title Blir/r
2. Yes, the speaker likes Lee. Supporting information
may include: The speaker hoped to see him again; for a book about making decisions based on first
ndly impressions? Explain that the title comes from the
When she did, she invited Lee to join her lunch table.
expression "in the blink of an eye," which means
extremely quickly.
C (5 minutes)
2. Ask students to check the things they think they
S cot,rrack z could easily make a quick decision about. Point
1. Keep students in pairs. Tell them they are going out they can check more ttran one or none of the
to listen to the speaker's opinion about Lee. Tell things. Tell them to look back at their answers
them to take notes in their notebook and explain after *rey listen to see if they still agree with
that they will compare them to the notes that they their choices.
took in Activity A.
Listening 2 Background Note 2. Seat students in small groups and assign roles: a ft
Malcolm Gladwell is a writer for the magazine The grotp leader to make sure everyone contributes, a
a note-taker to record the group's ideas, a reporter
New Yorker He has also written several best-selling 2.C
non-fiction books, including The Tipping Point atd to share the group's ideas with the class, and a
im
Outliers. His books describe various phenomena timekeeper to watch the clock.
within the fields of psychology and social psychology 3. Give students five minutes to discuss the
A
questions. Call time if conversations are winding
A
including popularity trends and the factors that
down. Allow them an extra minute or tlvo
t.
contribute to success.
His book Blink was published in 2005 and examines if necessary.
the way in which people unconsciously process 4. Call on each group's reporter to share ideas with L
information to make at acaJrate first impression. the class.
Gladwell is of British andJamaican ancestry but was Activity A Answers, p. l1
raised in Canada. He now lives in New York. Answers will vary. Possible answers:
1. Yes, I think it's best to trust your instinct for difficult lsam
LISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (5 minutes) decisions; No, there are some difficult decisions that
require a lot of thought, such as taking a new job.
U*d
$ cot,rrack a
2. Yes, I think our first impression provide us relevr
1. Direct students to read the sentences and answer with accurate information; No, I think that first acdTn
choices. Tell them they will choose one answer for impressions can be misleading. you la
each sentence. yot fr
2. Play the audio and have students complete the
thst t
Tip for CriticalThinking (1 minute) firadc
activity individually.
1. Read the tip aloud.
J. Call on volunteers for the answers. )rmsr
2. Point out that comparing and contrasting is an
Listen for Main ldeas Answers, p. l0 essential skill for making decisions in academic Voa
t.b; 2.b; 3.b; 4.c and professional settings.
I
1_D
3. Explain that sometimes we may focus on
2.R
) Listening ond Speoking 3, page 1 t similarities more ttran differences, or vice-
tr
versa. Remind students that it is important to
LISTEN FOR DETAILS tto minutes) 3.C
consider both.
g
@ cot,rracko
on
1. Explain that students are going to match a
detail about the listening with the example
al
given in the review.
skill I
2. Direct students to read the details and examples.
f- As you play the audio, have students match the
hiff
woril
details and examples individually.
qpeed
4. Have students compare answers with a pafiner. o&er
5. Go over tlre answers with the class. exlltr
becru
Listen for Details Answers, p. 11
C'M
I
1.e; 2.d;3.b; 4.c;5.a ,-:,,!t.tit,,,!i!
Expla
lt.;:.,:'i,',j:::#
6p ror additional practice with listening than 1

t*i5; comprehension, have students visit suft


Q Online Practice. ,nofiq
can t
and fi
WHAT DO YOU THINK?

A (10 minutes)
A0
B (5 minutes) 1.D
1. Ask students to read the questions and reflect on fr
their answers. 1. Have students continue working in their small
groups to discuss the questions in Activity B. Te1l ft

Unit 1
5l them to choose a new leader, recorder, teporteL 2. Go over *re answers with the class.
EA and timekeeper. Activity A Answers, p. 12
IrfET 1
Call on the new rcporter to share the group's
a Part of
answers to the questions. New word Suffix Base word
speech
Activity B Answers, p. 11 2. assumption -(p)tion noun a55Ume
Answers will vary. Possible answers:
ding 3. consciously -ly adverb consctouS
1. Students may support their opinions based on the
general success or failure of their first impressions in 4. prediction -(t)ion noun predict
the past. 5. effectively -ly adverb effective
Fifr 2. Students may suggest that stressful situations often
6. instinctive -tve adjective instinct
lead to accurate first impressions because people
show their real character. 7. selection -(t)ion noun select

mcrrh Learning Outcome B (10 minutes)


rthat
Use the learning outcome to frame the purpose and 1. Put students in pairs to discuss the meanings of
,oh
relevance of Listenings 7 atd 2 and the Critical Q the new words.
activity of comparing and contrasting. Ask What did
2. Tell students to use their dictionaries to check any
you learn from comparing and contrasting that prepares
meanings they are unsure of. Go over the answers
you to describe a first impression? What did you learn
as a class.
that will help you to select or recall details abowt wlty you
made that .first impression? ActivityB Answers, p. 12
Read the dictionary definitions aloud and discuss any
Ustening ond Speaking j, poge 1 2 uncertainties or questions.
m
ric Vocabulary Skill: _$uffixes (10 minutes)

1. Direct students to read the information silently.


: 1',.'6roUBlowErlevel.students and assist them wlth .''
-:,
2. Read *re words aloud to model correct stress and
pronunciadon. Ask students to repeat them. thetaik. Flelitthem flndtherntords in the dictiunary' ' "
and check their meanings.
3. Check comprehension'.What do these words mean?
Aftqr higher-lwel studgnls have confirmed'
What base word is this noun, verb, adjective, or
meariingsin pairl lbll lhepajrSrtowrit€rientencs$,
adverb from? Does the noun refer to a person or an
u*ing the riew'word.t}*ave volufiteqrs wrlte their, . _ ,. ,

abstraction? sentence$ on{he .bsard;,(orreet thq sefltences with ' :


,',' the whole class, focusing. on the meanin$'of the'word
SkillNote . as-well iicoffect:Bart of speeeh. ,,.:'-.., .

P"i"t out;hrt *ffir* 6p."t rt th;;;d -r"y --


"f
words and that students can determine the part of
Listening ond Speoking 3, page 13
speech of a new or unknown word by thinking about
other words they know that have the same suffix. For C (10 minutes)
example, if students know that amusemerfi is a noun 1. Ask pairs to complete the sentences using words
because it ends in -ment, they can determine that from Activity A.
entertainment is also a noun.
Go over *re answers as a class.
Fxplain that the suffixes may give more information
fran the part of speech. For examplg the noun Activity C Answers, p. 12
suffixes -er and -or rcfer to people, e.9., writer, 1. selection;
2. accuracy;
,fiirlwger, director, actor, etc. Similarly, the suffix -zess
3. assumptions;
can turn an adjective into a noun, e.g. sad ) sadness
4. predictions;
ardhnppy ) happiness.
5. effectively;
6. instinctive;
A (15 minutes)
7. consciously
1. Direct students not to use their dictionaries for
[1
this exercise. Tell them to use the example words 6$
'W
for additional practice with suffixes,
from the skill box for help. have students visitQ Online Practice.
Te11

Unit 1
I Listening and Speaking 3, poge I 4 5. Jenny isnt working hard this week. 6-
6. I haven't formed a positive impression of that
company.

Grammar: Auxiliary verbs do, be, have Listening and Speoking 3, poge I 5
(10 minutes) B (15 minutes)
A
t. Read the information about auxiliary verbs. 1. Direct students to work individually to rewrite (
Provide and elicit additional example sentences the sentences as questions.
1.
for students to identify the auxiliary verbs: Do ) Have them read their questions to a partner. Ask
you often make a good first impression? Is he good at volunteers to write a sentence on the board.
making first impressions? They have not made a good Check the questions as a class.
first impression.
Activity B Answers, p. l5
Check comprehension by asking questions: Possible answers:
What auxiliary verb do we use in the simple past? 2. Do you like talking to new people on the phone?
(d1d) Which auxiliary yerbs do we use in the present 3. ls Darcy living with people she met last year?
perfect? (has, have) Which do we use in the simple 4. Did Marek make lots of friends at school?
present? (do, does) Which do we use in the present 5. Did the experts realize the statue was a fake?
continwous? (am, is, are) In the past continuous? 6. Has Patrick selected his library books already? / Has
(was, were) Patrick already selected his library books? B
1.
SkillNote 69 for additional practice with auxiliary verbs do, be,
\e have,havestudents visitQOnline Practice.
Students should be familiarwith the verb forms
shown in the book. Point out that it is important to 2.
use correct auxiliary forms so that students' English is C (10 minutes)
accurate. To remind them of which auxiliary verbs to 1. Direct students to work in pairs to ask and answer
usq you may wish to create, or ask students to create, the questions from ActiviQr B.
a chart showing the person and number of each
subject and the auxiliary verb used for each tense.
2. Point out that for questions students do not know {
a true answer for, they should use *reir own ideas.
For example:
j Listening ond Speaking 3, page 16
)u
Simple present
Pron unciation: Contractions !
I
You
do
do
We
You
do
do
with auxiliary verbs"" (ts minutes) I(
Hq she, it does They do @ cot,rrack ro
1.
1. Read the information about contractions with
A (10 minutes) auxiliary verbs. Write the example sentences used
in speech and writing on the board.
1. Direct students to rewrite the sentences as
negative statements.
2. Check comprehension by asking; Which words are
contracted in each sentence? (She is, They are, Lisa
2. Put students in pairs to discuss their answers. hag We have).
). Call on volunteers to share their answers with 3. Elicit the verb form in each sentence (present
*re class. 3-
continuous and present perfect).
Activity A Answers, p. 14 4. Repeat the process with the sentences for
Possible answers: contractions used only in speech.
2. Bill doesn't think first impressions about teachers
are usually accurate.
5. Play the audio as a model for the students. Stop 4-
3. Caterina didn't trust her instincts when meeting
for students to repeat *re contracted forms.
new people.
4. When Reza buys something, he usually doesn't
think/doesn't usually think about it for a long time.
6. Point out that in most situations, it is more
important for the students to be able to
understand contracted speech than to produce it.
However, their speech will sound more natural
and fluent if they are able to use contracted forms.

A (10 minutes)

@ cot,rrack tt

1. Have students listen to the sentences with


\sk contractions. Pause after each sentence to give
students time to write.
2. Elicit the answers from volunteers. If there
arc afly disagreements, play the audio again
to confirm.
Activity A Answers, p. 16
f . is; 2. did; 3. is; 4. has; 5. have;
6. did; 7. have

Has
B (5 minutes)

1. Put students in pairs. Ask them to say the


sentences from Activity A using the fuIl form
of the auxiliary verbs.
2.Have students practice saying the sentences with
conftactions. Monitor and provide feedback on
ffirer pronunciation.
gng for additional practice with contractions with A (10 minutes)
ow E# auxiliary verbs, have students visit Q Online Practice.
7. Direct students to look at the conversation.
bas. Point out that the conversation is between two
I Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 17 classmates, Tony and A1ex. Explain that even
friends will use polite turn-taking strategies.
Speaking Skill:
n!:ing*Sglu""tt"tiontltut 2. Pttt students in pairs to complete the conversation
utes)
_ Point out that more than one question may be
@ cot,rract tz possible.
1. Direct students to read the information about 3. Give the pairs time to practice their conversation.
taking turns in conversation. Point out that the 4. Call on volunteers to perform their conversation
;ed rules for turn taking in ottrer cultures may be for the class.
similar to those for American English, or they
may be different. Activity A Answers, p. 17
Students may choose a variety of the questions from
2. Play the audio. Encourage students to repeat
the speaking skills box.
the questions.
J. Check comprehension: What two things does turn
taking do? (It keeps the conversation going and B (10 minutes)

shows that you are interested) Can you think of 1. Read the questions aloudwith the students. Elicit
any other questions to use? any questions students may have.
4. Give students an opportunity to comment on 2. Give students a few minutes to write their
how turn taking may be similar or different in answers to the questions in their notebooks.
their cultures. 3. Put students in pairs to have a conversation about
each question.

Unit 1 9
l
4. Remind students to take turns and use *re impression you made wat inaccurate. Being able to
2.H
questions from the skills box to signal their analyze your opinions, especially when they qre not
1,I4

partner's turn. accurate, is a useful skill in the classroom and on


w
the job.
al
5. Monitor students' conversations. Be sure they are
taking three turns each. 2. Explain that you are going to use a rubric similar 3. Rr
p2
to their Self-Assessment checklist on page 20 of
Expansion Activity: the student book to grade their unit assignment. th
First lmpressions in Conversations (10 minutes) 4. ,\
Part of making a good first impression is I Listening ond Speaking 3, poge I 8 N
Consider the ldeas (10 minutes) u
being able to talk easily with people. Taking
tr
conversational turns will help you make a good
7. Direct students to look at the chart. Ask a

r
first impression when you are talking to someone volunteer to read the characteristics in the first Listen
for ttre first time.
column. Explain that students should write down
As a class, brainstorm additional follow-up two additional characteristics that people may
questions to keep a conversation going. Write
these questions on the board.
notice when forming a first impression. ctl
2. Direct students to rate each of the characteristics 1.R
). Conduct a mingling activity. Have the students by putting a check in the appropriate column. R
stand and find a partner. Tell them to pretend Remind them to rate the two characteristics they d
they are meeting this person for the first time and thought of.
want to make a good impression by showing that 2.P
J. Put sflrdents in pairs to compare and discuss 1I
they are interested in what their partner is saying.
their opinions. p
4. Call time after 30 seconds and tell students to find
a new partner and start another conversation.
Consider the ldeas Answers, p. 18 3.f
Answers will vary. Students should be able to give d
Repeat the activity until students have spoken to
four or five partners.
reasons for their answers. t
#18 for additional practice with taking turns, have 4.4
W students visitQOnline Practice. ) Listening ond Speoking 3, poge t9 a
Prepare and Speak I
I
Listening and Speoking 3, page l8
qf Unit Assignment: Give a short talk (10 minutes)
AIE
A
Assil
Unit Question (s minutes) 1. Direct students to read the prompt. Ask What assig
is brainstorming? Why (lo we brainstorm? (It is unit
Refer students to the ideas they discussed at the
generating ideas. We do it to generate as many
beginning of the unit about whether first impressions
ideas as possible.)
1. 1
are accwate. Cue students if necessary by asking I
specific questions about the content of the unit: 2. Point out that when we brainstorm, we write all t
What are some of the prwerbs we discussed about first of our ideas, including the ones that we are not
sure are very good. Have students wdte as much
2_1
impressions? What are some of the things that a gterson
does that help us to make our first imgtression of them? as they can about the situaticin and their thoughts I
What did you learn about first impressions? Are they in five minutes. Encourage them to write without I
stopping to correct any grammar errors or erase I
eyer accurate?
any content that they are unsure about. d
TE
Learning Outcome
1. Tie ttre unit assignment to the unit learning
outcome. Say: The outcome for this unit is to
describe an inaccurate
B (10 minutes)
first impression in detail.
This unit assignment is going to let you show your 1. Have students transfer the information from their
skill in giving a short talk about a time when a first brainstorming session into their books.
ato 2. Elicit the features of writing good notes. Ask Do Check and Reflect
we want to write complete sentences? Do we need to
fiot
I wrtte articles such as an or the in notes? Can we use
abbrertiations?
@
A (5 minutes)
ailar 3- Remind students that organization is an important
1. Direct students to read and complete the
of paft of preparing a ta1k. Give *rem time to review
Self-Assessment checklist.
nt their content in the organizational structure.
2. Ask for a show of hands for how many students
4. Ask students if they have used any words with
gave all or mostly yes answers.
any of the suffixes learned earlier in the unit.
Write these words on ttre board and underline -t- Congratulate them on their success. Discuss the
the suffixes. steps they can take if an item on the checklist
was difficult for them. For example, if they had
t Listening and Speaking 3, poge 2O trouble using contractions, they should practice
,w:n
E! this skill whenever they get a chance, recording
themselves and self-assessing or asking a friend to
listen for their pronunciation of contractions.
C (10-15 minutes)
Review the Self-Assessment checklist or:,page 20.

ey
1.
Remind students that they will be completing this
checklist after their talk.
@
B (5 minutes)
2. Put students in pairs to give their talks. If
Refer students to the learning outcome on page 3. Tell
time permits, call on volunteers to give their
them to talk with their partners about whether they
presentations to the class.
achieved the learning outcome. Elicit the €rnswers to
J. Use the Unit Assignment Rubdc onpage 72 of the unit question that students came up with at the
this Teqcher's Handbook to score each student's beginning of class. Encourage them to flip through
talk. the unit as *rey discuss the new things they learned
4. Alternatively, divide the class into large groups and new answers they may have to the unit question.
and have students tell their stories to their group.
Have listeners complete the Unit Assignment I Listening and Speoking 3, page 21
Rubric. (5 minutes)
TrackYour Success
Alternative Unit Assignments 1. Have students circle the words they have learned
in this unit. Suggest that students go back through
Assign or have students choose one of these
the unit to review any words they have forgotten'
assignments to do instead of, or in addition, to *re
unit assignment. 2. Have students check the skills they have mastered.

1. Tell a pafiileul, about a place you have visited. Was Ifstudents need more practice in order to feel
confident about their proficiency in a skill, point
your first impression accurate? Explain why or
out *te page numbers and encourage them to
why not.
review.
2. Tell a partfier, group, or the class about someone
). Read the learning outcome aloud. Ask students if
you admire. Describe your first impression of
they felt that they have met the outcome.
this person, and what you know about him or
her now.
I;|Q For an additional Unit Assignment,
W have students visil Q online Practice.

Unit 1 11
:::i-: | ::r!::ii:: i.:i i!i: :!:!::::r;ii

Unit Assignment Rubric


Student name:
LE
Date: vo
Unit Assignment: Give a short talk. GE
PRi
20 = Presentation element was completely successful (at least 900/0 of the time).
sPl
15 = Presentation element was mostly successful (at least 70%o of the time).
10 = Presentation element was partially successful (at least 50%o of the time).
0 = Presentation element was not successful. ) tistea

Pre
*ii]i:,r: iiiliiiiirri:' :#h-=:;SH.*:ffi-i1
ffi !%[=SN@r:
t=_ t:r - t -: Lean

Student spoke easily (without long 1.4


pauses or reading) and was easy to rl
understand (spoke clearly and at a good 2.8
speed) when describing an inaccurate a
first impression in detail.
g
It
h
Student used correct suffix endings D
where appropriate. I
it
Student used contracted forms with d
auxiliary verbs. t
Student used vocabulary from the unit.
A(
1. I
Student presented content in a coherent
t
s
and organized manner.
2-I
t
Total points: 3-(
a
Comments:
,
I
i
{
+1

I
I
I

12 Unit 1 o 201 1 Oxford University Press. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.
.1r,r,.::j5-'1
t::::::t.:::'
:::i' I
.:'.1 I
:::::. :.
: ]j:.:::.
::. I
i

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:-.:t._r: :i I

LISTENING . listening for causes and effects LEARNING OUTCOME


VOCABU LARY . adjective-noun collocations lnterview classmates to inform a
GRAMMAR. quantifiers with count/noncount nouns group discussion on why people prefer
PRONUNCIATION . links with /)l and lwl certain foods.

SPEAKING . giving advice

j Listening and Speaking 3, pages22-23 2. Students may think that food that tastes good is
high in fat or has a lot of sugar.
Preview the Unit 3. The men are tasting coffee. They might be labeling
coffee according to flavor and strength.
Learning Outcome
1. Ask for a volunteer to read the unit skills and then B (15 minutes)
tlre unit learning outcome. 1. Introduce the Unit Question, "What's more
Explain: The learning outcome is what you are important: taste or nutrition?" Ask related
expected to be able to do by the unit's end. You are information questions or questions about personal
going to be evaluated for how well you meet this experience to help students pteparc for answering
outcome. With this in mind, you should focus on the Unit Question, which is more absttact. How
learning skills ( Listening, Vocabulary, Grammar, implrtont it the taste of food to you? Would you eat
Pronunciation, Speaking) that will support your less of a favorite food if you knew it wasn't healthy?
goal of interviewing classmates to inform a grlup Do you view food as fuelfor your body or is it
discussion on why people prefer certain foods. This something that is meant to be enjoyed?
can you act as mentors in the classroom to
also help
2. Tell students, Let's start off our discussion by listing
help the other students meet this lutcoma
food we think tastes great, for example, ice cream-
Remind students to be specific. It is more helpful
A (10 minutes) to list specific foods than general categories, e.g.,
7. Prepare students for thinking about the topic by broccoli or carrots instead of vegetables.
telling them about the foods you prefer. Elicit J. Seat students in small groups and direct them to
students' food preferences. pass around a paper as quickly as they can' with
2. Put students in pairs or small groups to discuss each group member adding one item to the list.
the first three questions. Tell them they have tvvo minutes to make the list
J. Call on volunteers to share their ideas with the and they should write as many items as possible.
Ask questions to facilitate the discussion: Do
class. 4. Call time and ask a rcporter from each group to
you have any family traditions that include specific read the list aloud.
food? Are you aware of the health value of some
of
5. Use items from the list as a springboard for
your favonte food? Do you drink cffie? Do yow think
discussion. For examplel. Let's talk about ice
it is healtlty? Why or wlry not?
cream. ls it nutritious? Why or why not? Tell
4. Focus students' attention on the photo' Have a students to check the items that the class
volunteer describe the photo. Read the last question generally feels are healthy.
aloud. Ask What are the men doing? Why?
Activity A Answers, p. 23
Possible answers:
1. Students may mention that food is simply fuel for
the body, or they may say that it is a way to enjoy
life, comfort themselves, or spend time with friends.

Unit 2 13
Activity B Answers, p.23 2.
D (10 minutes)
Possible answers: The value of nutrition outweighs 3.
1. Put students in groups to discuss the chart on tlre
the value of good taste. lt's important that one's diet
board and their own individual charts. 4.
consist mainly of nutritious food with occasional tasty
treats; Nutrition is more important than taste. We need 2. Have students add one item to each category.
good nutrition in order to be healthy. Good taste does 3. Ask a reporter from each group to share the
not help our bodies stay fit and strong. group's chart with ttre class. Discuss foods that can
fall into several categories, for example, pickles
can be sour, sweet, or salty.
The Q Clossroom
Ask each group to contribute one food item to one
$ cot,rrack tr 4.
of the taste categodes. Accept other classifications
.=

1. Play The Q Classroom. Use the example from the


:::

of the food if they can be supported. =


audio to help students continue the conversation.
Ask: .FIow did the students answer the question? Do Activity D Answers, p.24
you agree or disagree with their ideas? Why? Student answers may vary. Some foods can fall =
2. On the audio, the students give different opinions into several categories like pickles, dark chocolate, .n

or yogurt. :,{
about the importance of nutrition versus taste. !
Elicit the range of student opinion. f;

3. Remind students of Felix's opinion. He believes E (10 minutes)


people value taste over nutrition, so it is important 1. Keep students in groups. Ask them to check their
that food tastes good. Brainstorm a list of favorite food in the chart.
nutritious food that tastes good. Tell students to check their favorite of the five
basic tastes.
Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 24
3. Ask students to compare their preferences with
C (15 minutes)
their group members.
1. Call on a volunteer to read the introductory 4. Ask students to raise their hand for their favorite
paragraph. If necessary provide the pronunciation taste. Say each taste aloud and tally the number of
of wmarui'. \ii-'mii-m6\. hands for each. Write the numbers on the board.

tA
2. Elicit the five tastes. Write them in a row on ttre
board (sweet, sour, salty, bitte1 umami). Expansion Activity:
3. Ask students to complete the chart individually Taste or Nutrition in Food Categories (10 minutes)
and check their favorite foods.
7. Keep students in their groups from Activity E. )ua
4. Put students in pairs to compare their answers.
2. TelT students to look at the foods listed under P]
5. Have volunteers write the foods in the columns each category. With their group, students should 1-
on the board. Discuss the answers as a class. Note decide ifthe food is known for being nutritious
that nuts are not naturally salty. (i.e., broccoli) or for tasting good (i.e., ice cream.)
Activity C Answers, p. 24 3. Ask: Do some categories have more nutritious foods
sweet: ice cream, bananas, pineapple; sour: grapefruit, than other categories? Are most of the foods in your 2.
lemon, pickle; salty: potato chips, nuts; bitter: coffee, fav orit e c at egory nutritiou s?

parsley, radish; umami: chicken 3_


4. Elicit answers from the groups.

croup lowel-tevel studentsiand a'ssistihein: r*iiti


the task" After higher-level itudents lidve'cheilied' ,

answers in pairs, tell the pairs to list as many foods for


Listening and Speoking j, poge 25
eaeh category as they ea&,Efrcotirage,thim,tolook
for patterns, e.9., what categories are fruits in?' IISTENING 1: You Are What You Eat
VOCABULARY tts minutes)

1. Direct students to read the words and their


definitions. Elicit any difficulties or questions.

14 Unit 2

t
2. Ask students to complete *re sentences. Listening 1 Background Note
fte ). Put students in pairs to check their answers. The listening stresses the importance of balance
4. Ask for volunteers to read the sentences aloud. in one's diet. There have been many efforts to
Provide corrections where necessary. advise people on how to achieve a balance that
is nutritionally sound as well as appealing. One
approach encourages people to choose a colorful
i can
diet. It is possible to balance one's diet by including
s
a variet5r of fruits and vegetables from the range of
: : :ihgl611r**1r. fidosd]hEtq$€ei iusrd!',Psr-e*arnb]*;.'., natural colors. For examplg yellow/green foods such
one as spinach and avocado help maintain good vision.
the blank,fq,l!61i$s:,?rtl4]ss the
,,. in:the.fi r.it sisntEn€E;
ons
: missin+wg!{ iseitheqqn.q$jectiyeor,snqg&,6iys,: :
Similarly red/purple foods, like berries and grapes,
,
:.,.tliem'additia*at senten(eiiq hslfli:th9l{.'F6i!!i th€,: help our heart function.
' dif'flc{rft to(Abu#ry. For exaff pler 14& dn-{lptpelmiffed
& rofi,|rE,*' foad *r drink in thetibr&ry, Don\'.tqlk ta me. LISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (5 minutes)
, . norar l s a. ylly:bid'mqa4.A'thtetes eat foad wfth a,'
lot of calories becouse they need a lot of energy. $ cot,track t+
':,, i::;:'lilaver:higti€l'-le$et ifrdents,eompfet*lheaqtiv.fty ..' 1. Ask students to look at the chart. Elicit any
. indivrdtall{.and -the.& cotlpag,?x$rqBf,a iq.p+trs lell,' :: : questions about it. Confirm that students
,the pairs towrite,aroth*r, *ampl*senteRee:fur each,,.., understand ttre task by asking a volunteer to
tr wprd" Have,yoluntee$ wftit.dae*f.+heiisen&ncds'on explain the procedure to you.
the board.{hackthese+iteai:e$:ar*ialit,f rrii,T$.on
2. Play the audio while students complete the
the use,af:v-q(abr{ltiy:l"theI.lh*n:gi?rfi i$a.relii5s+.res.
chart individually.
3. Elicit the answers. Correct as necessary.
Vocabulary Answers, p. 25
1. diet; 2. consume; 3. rely on; Main ldea Answers, p.26
4. calories; 5. mood; 5. spicy; 1. OK; 2. Better; 3. OK; 4. OK;
7. wise; 8. mix; 9. concentrate; 5. Better; 5. Bad; 7. Bad; 8. OK
of 10. balanced

4ryp for additional practice with the vocabulary, have tlSTEN FOR DETAILS tto minutes)
$ cot,rrack ts
1. Direct students to read the items before they listen
Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 26 again. Elicit any questions about them.
PREVIEW IISTENING 1 (5 minutes) 2. Play the audio while students listen and choose
the correct answer.
1. Elicit the meaning of "You Are What You Eat."
Explain that it means that our diets are a big paft J. Have students compare answers with a paftrrer
of who we are in that they affect our fitness, 4. Replay the audio so they can check the answers.
energy level, and overall health. 5. Go over the answers with the class.
Read the introductory p aragraph aloud.
Listen for Details Answers, p. 26
Have students list foods in their diet that have 1. c; 2. c; 3. a; 4. b; 5. a;
good effects and foods that have bad effects. 6.c;7,b;8.b; 9.a
Tell students they should review their lists after
the listening. d$ for additional practice with listening
Preview Listening 'l Answers, p.26
{# comprehension, have students visit
Q Online Practice.
Possible answers: Students may say that sweets and
high-calories foods have bad effects because they
make them gain weight; they may say that vegetables Listening and Speoking j, poge 27
and fruits have good effects because they give them
more energy.
WHAT DOYOU THINK? (10 minutes)

1. Ask students to rcad the questions and reflect on


their answers.

Unit 2 15
2. Seat students in small groups and assign roles: a 3. Call on a volunteer to give *re answers.
group leader to make sure everyone contributes, Activity A Answers, P.28
a note-taker to record the group's ideas, a reporter 1. Since; 2. becauseof; 3. Because; 4. so
to share the group's ideas with the class, and a
timekeeper to watch ttre clock.
Listening ond Speoking j, Poge 29
1-

questions. Call time if conversations are winding B (10 minutes)


down. Allow them an extra minute or Nvo if @ cot,rrack ta
necessary. 1. Tell students they are going to hear four cause
4. Call on each group's reporter to share ideas with and effect statements.
the class. 2. Point out that two causes and two effects are
What DoYou Think? Answers,P,27 printed in the book. Ask a volunteer to read
Students'answers may vary. Possible answers: them aloud.
1. Yes, I think it's important to eat a balanced diet; No, I ). Play the audio while students complete the
think her diet suggestions are too strict. senteoces and circle the linking words.
2. Yes, people should just eat what they like and 4. Put students in pairs to compare their answers.
worry less about"eating right"; No, nutrition is very
important to maintain good health. 5. Call on volunteers to read *reir answers.
3. Yes, what you eat affects how you will feel and Activity B Answers, p.29
behave. No, food does not have that much affect on 2. so it's good for your teeth;
your body. 3. due to the caffeine;
4. since they have no nutrition at all.
Learning Outcome
Use the learning outcome to frame the purpose and c (5 minutes)

relevance of Listening 1. Ask What did you learn from 1. Keep students in pairs. Tell them to read the
Listening 1 that prepares ylu to intentiew clqssmates directions. Elicit any difficulties with questions.
about why people prefer certain foods? What did yow 2. Call on a volunteer to read the examples in blue'
learn that will help you to inform a group discussion on Elicit the cause and effect of each statement, as
food preferences? well as the linking word.
j, J. Ask students to write their sentences individually
/ Listening ond Speoking Page 28
and then share them with their parher.
Listening Skill: Listening for causes 4. Call on several pairs to share their answers.
f4Sff_eSfJto *1,"'t for additional practice with listening for causes and
^Cg
{P effects, have students visilQonline Practice.
$ cot,rrack to
1. Ask students to read the information about causes
and effects. Elicit any difficulties or questions. I Listening and Speoking 3, poge 30
2. Tell students they are going to hear some LISTENING 2: Food Tasters
examples of cause and effect. Ask *lem to read
along while they listen. D
VOCABULARY tro minutes)
3. Check comprehension by asking qtesttons: What
words and phrases that signal cause and ffict? How 1. Ask students to locate the bold words in each
qre due to andbecatse of dffirent from since, as, sentence. Pronounce and have students repeat
because, and so? the words.
Have students read the sentences and choose the
A (5 minutes) correct answer for each. Call on volunteers to tead
@ cot,rrack tz the answers aloud.
1. Ask students to read the sentences. Vocabulary Answers, p. 30
2. Play the audio while students complete the 1. a; 2. c; 3. c; 4. c; 5. b;
sentences. 6. c; 7. c; 8. b; 9. a; 10. a

16 Unit 2
Listen for Details Answers, p. 32
Jobs: cheese buyer M; coffee taster E; chocolate taster 5
Type of business: important company E;
supermarket M; department store S
Locations: Los Angeles E; London 5; near Paris M

tP for additional practice with listening


ry comprehension, have students visit
Q Online Practice.

WHAT DO YOU THINK?


For additional practice with the vocabulary, have
students visit Q O nl i ne P racti ce. A (10 minutes)

1. Ask students to read the questions and reflect on


j Listening ond Speaking 3, page 31
their answers.
Seat students in small groups and assign roles: a
PREVIEW IISTENING 2 (5 minutes) grorp leader to make sure everyone contributes,
Direct students' attention to the photos ar;:d ask: Why a note-taker to record the group's ideas, a reporter
might afood taster taste cheese? What other foods do you to share tlte group's ideas with the class, and a
think a food taster might try? Why? timekeeper to watch the clock.
Give students five minutes to discuss the
Listening 2 Background Note questions. Call time if conversations are winding
Many food production companies employ food down. Allow them an e*tra minute or two if
tasters. These people typically have educational necessary.
backgrounds in food science or production
Call on each group's reporter to share ideas with
development and marketing. Food tasters can
the class.
specialize in one food, for example, chocolatg cheese,
beef, or coffee. Activity A Answers, p.32
Students'answers may vary. Possible answers:
1. Cheese, because I love salty flavors.
LISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (10 minutes)
2. Yes, I would love to eat all day; No, lwould gain too
S cot,rrack ts much weight.
Ask students to rcad *re statements about each
person. Elicit any difficulties with vocabulary or . B (5 minutes)
concepts. Play the audio and have students write
1. Have students continue working their small
T or F individually. groups to discuss the questions in Activity B. Tell
'them
Listen for Main ldea Answers, p.32 to choose a new leader, recorder, reporter,
1.T; 2.F;3.F; 4.F;5.1 and timekeeper.
6.T; 7.T;8.1 9.7 Encourage students to make a list of issues for
each food and food taster.
I Listening ond Speaking 3, page 32 Call on ftp new reporter to share the group's
LISTEN FOR DETAILS ts minutes) answers to the questions.
Activity B Answers, p.31
@ cot,rrackzo Students' answers will vary. Possible answers:
1. Ask students to look at the chart before they 1. Enrique, because ofthe caffeine.
listen again. 2. Marie, because cheese has a lot of salt.
2. As you play the audio, have students write the
letter of the name next to the correct information.
Tip for CriticalThinking (1 minute)
J. Have students compare answers with a partner.
Read the tip aloud. Point out that making predictions
4. Check answers with the class. is something we do every day, but we are not often

Unit 2
_a

aware of the thought process that goes into making a fast quick are synonyms, we doomsry
a;nd @Iwd'
prediction. By being aware of what clues and factors Encourage students to keep a list of adlnives or
influence our predictions, we can improve their nouns and their common collocations. '

acc14tacy.
A (5 minutes)

Put students in pairs or small groups to complete tre


collocations. Go over the answers with the class'
Activity A Answers, P. 33
1. a soft drink; .2. junkfood; 3. a juicy steak;
4. a balanced diet; 5. a quicksnack

B {10 minutes)
7. Have students complete the sentences individually'
2. Have students check their answers wi*r their
partners or group. Check answers as a class'
Activity Bfnswers, P. 34
1. juicy steak; 2. a balanced diet; 3. a soft drink;
4. junkfood; 5. a quick snack

> Listening ond SPeaking 3' Poge 34


C (5 minutes)

1. Have pairs or groups complete the sentences'


2. Go over the answers as a class. Point out that
although some of the answer choices have similar
Learning Outcome meanings, for example,flthy and dirty,the correct
allswers are the most common coll0cations.
Use the learning outcome to frame the purpose and
relevance of Listenings 7 and 2 and the Critical Q I Activity C Answers, P.34
activity of making predictions. Ask'. What did yow I r.a; 2.b;3.b; 4.b; s.a
learn from Listening 1 that prepares yow to interview
classrnates about why people prefer certain foods? What 4p for additional practice with adjective-nounPractice'
q# collocations, have students visil Q Online
did you learn that will help you to inform a grory
discussion on food Preferences?

j / Listening andSpeoking 3, Page 35


Listening and SPeoking 3, Poge 33
Vocabulary Skill: Adjective-noun
collocations (s minutes)
1. Direct students to rcad the information silently. Grammar: Quantifiers with
2. Read the sentences aloud to model correct sffess 99glt/nglsgg
and pronunciation. Have students repeat. 1. Read the information about count and noncount
3. Check comprehension'. What is a collocation? nouns. Write the wotds count and noncount on the
Which word comes first, the adjective or the noun? board. Elicit additional examples of each noun'
Why should students use collocqtions? For example, count: banana, chair, pen; nonclunt:
sugali moneY, Plastic.
SkillNote 2. Check comprehension by asking questions: Do we
Remind students that adjective-noun collocations use too mucln or too many with the noun money?
are very common in English. Point out that some Are too much and too many used when we have the
adjectives tend to collocate with some nouns and it is right amount of something?
important to remember them. For example, although

18 Unit 2
SkillNote ) Listening and Speaking 3, poge 37

Count and noncount nouns are frequently taught Pronunciation:


with food items because there is a range of both count links with /j/ and lwl (10 minutes)
and noncount nouns in this category. You may wish
to use items in the food category to present this point. @ cot,track zr
Give sentences for students to complete. For example: 1. Read the information about linking sounds. Write
I ruined the soup! I put too much salt in. the linking sounds /j/ and /w/ and the vowel
sounds they link on the board. Say the sounds and
My tea is perfect. There is enouglt sugar in it.
have students repeat after you.
How many bananas are in this recipe?
2. Check comprehension by asking: What sound
clnnects these words, Monday is? What sound
A (10 minutes)
connectt these words, go over?
1. Ask students to look at ttre photo. Ask'. What are
3. Have students read along while they listen to
those? Are they spicy or sweet?
the audio. Stop for students to repeat the linking
2. Direct students to complete the conversations with sounds.
the words and phrases from the box.
4. Point out that linking is a feature of fluent speech
3. Put students in pairs to check their answers. in formal and informal situations. Encourage
Check the answers as a class. students to think of the two words as one in order
4. Have students practice ttre conversations. to make the linking sounds.
A Answers, p.35
Activity
1. many; 2. enough; 3. too many;
A (10 minutes)

4. much; 5. not enough; 6. too much @ cot,tracrzz


1. Have students read rhe sentences. Point out
that there may be more *ran one linking sound
Listening and Speaking 3, poge 36
in each.
B (10 minutes)
2. Have students mark the linking sounds they
t. Read the directions aloud. Have students complete expect to hear in the sentences. Play the audio
the activity. while students check their predictions.
2. Ptrt students in pairs. Tell them to discuss their -). Elicit the answers from volunteers. Play the
parfiLer's food preferences. audio again.
3. Encourage students to ask follow-up questions, for Activity A Answers, p. 37
exampler How much sugar do you like in your cffie? 1. We /j/ all eat things we know we shouldn't.
How rnany times a week do you eat your favorite 2. "Empty" calories have no nutritional value /w/ at all.
food? 3. I can't drink coffee, but tea /j/ is fine.
4. Call on volunteers to report their partner's 4. Cheese has calcium, so /w/ it's good for your teeth.
information- 5. Sometimes in the /j/ evening l'm too /M tired
to cook.
Activity Answers, p.36
B 6. Marie makes sure the cheese is ready to go /w/ out
Answers will vary. Students should correctly list C or N on sale.
next to their food choices. 7. Stuart thinks the /j/ appearance of chocolate can be
/j/ as important as the taste.
for additional practice with count and noncount
-P
{H nouns, have students visilQOnlinePractice.
8. Enrique thinks people pay /j/ a lot for coffee, so they
want to /w/ eryoy /j/ ir.

Tip for Success (1 minute) B (10 minutes)


Read the tip aloud. Remind students that in addition @ cot,rrackzs
to maintaining eye contact, some people will nod 1. Put students in pairs to say the sentences from
their heads or smile to show that they are engaged in Activity A.
the conversation.
2. Have students practice saylng the sentences with
linking. Monitor and provide feedback.

Unit 2 19
3. Play the audio again, pausing for students to Remind students to maintain eye contact and use
repeat the linking sounds. the strategies for taking turns presented in Unit 1'
for additional practice with linking /i/ and lw/, ). Monitor students' conversations for their use of
flP
'tt, have students visit Q Online Practice. count/noncount nouns and ways of giving advice'
for additional practice with giving advice,
^1IO
W have students visit Q Online Practice.
I Listening ond SPeoking 3, Poge 38

S,p".Ling SIillt Cl (1o minutes)


) Listening ond Speoking 3, Page 39
@ cot,rrack z+
Un:t Assignment: Conduct a
1. Direct students to read the information about 6f
giving advice. class survey
2. Play the audio. Encourage students to repeat
(s minutes)
the sentences. Unit Question
3. Check comprehension: What words do we use to Refer students to the ideas they discussed at the
give adwce? Whqt word do we use to make advice beginning of the unit about why people prefer certain
stronger? How can we make advtce more polite?
foods. Cue students if necessary by asking specific
questions about the content of the unit Why do some
people prefer nutritious foods to delicious foods? What
kinds of foods should we eat? What is a balanced diet?
Can a balanced diet inclwde chocolqte?

Learning Outcome
1. Tie the unit assignment to the unit learning
outcome. Say: The outcome for this unit is to
interview classmates to inform a grlup discwssion on
why people prefer certain foods. This unit assignment
is going to let you show your sbill in conducting a
survey which will inform a grlup discussion on the
topic of food preferences. Conducting a survey is a
useful way to collect information or conduct research'
2. Explain that you are going to use a rubric similar
:-i:;;r1!:j-:i,Li' :!-ri.i+ltitr;+ to their Self-Assessment checklist on page 42 to
grade their unit assignment.
A (10 minutes)

1. Ask students to read the directions and sample Consider the ldeas (10 minutes)

conversation. Ask them to think about their 1. Put students in groups to match the food to the
diet and the things that they think are not good country it comes from. Explain that students
about it. If necessary ask students to look back should use their best guesses.
at page 36 to the lists of the foods they like and
don't like.
2. Review the answers with the class.
2. Put students in pairs to discuss their diets and give
3. Ask students to discuss which dishes they like and
which they don't like.
advice.
J. Call on volunteers to share some of their eating
4. Direct students to discuss other dishes from
around the world that they have tried. Tell them
habits and advice for each other.
to qriz each other on where different dishes
(10 minutes) come from.
B
1. Put students in groups to share the advice
5. Call on volunteers to share *reir information with
the whole class.
they received. Have a volunteer read the
examples aloud. i Consider the ldeas Answers, P. 39 6.e.
| ,.., 2.f; 3. b; 4.d; 5.a;

20
L
) Listening ond Speoking 3, page 40 1. In a small group, talk about the role of food in
popular holidays and festivals in your country.
Prepare and Speak
What food do people eat at celebrations? Is it
healthy or unhealthy?
2. Think about arecipe for a dish you know and
A (5 minutes)
love. Make notes of the ingredients, and how to
Direct students to read the prompt and list their cook it. Then tell each other your recipes.
favorite dishes. Encourage them to choose dishes that
they have had or prepared many times.
4|P for an additional unit assignment, have students
W, visit Q Online Practice.

) Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 42

B (10 minutes) Check and Reflect


1. Have students choose a dish from Activity A.
2. Remind students that organization is an important
(5 minutes)
part of preparing a talk. A
3. Encourage students to make their best guess 7. Direct students to read and complete the Self-
if they are unsure about the ingredients or the Assessment checklist.
healttrful benefits of the dish. 2. Ask for a show of hands for how many students
gave all or mostly yes answers.
Listening ond Speoking 3, page 41 3. Congratulate them on ttreir success. Discuss the
Tip for Success (1 minute) steps they can take if an item on the rubric was
difficult for them.
Read the tip aloud. Elicit the features of writing good
notes. Ask: Do we want to write complete sentences?
Do we need to write articles such as, an or the in notes?
Should we use abbrertiations?
B (5 minutes)

Refer students to the learning outcome onpage 23.


Tell them to talk with their partners about whether
C (10-15 minutes) they achieved the learning outcome. Elicit the
answers to the Unit Question that students came up
1. Put students in groups to interview each other.
with at the beginning of class. Encourage them to
2. Remind students not to read their information flip through the unit
as they discuss the new things
from Activity B. Encourage them to maintain eye they learned and new answers they may have to the
contact and only refer to their notes as necessary. Unit Question.
3. Monitor students' interviewing and answering
techniques. j Listening ond Speoking 3, page 43
4. Use the Unit Assignment Rubric onpage 22 of TrackYour Success
this Teacher's Handbook to score each student's
interview and answer. 1. Have students circle the words they have learned
in this unit.
5. Alternatively, have other group members listen
to each other's interviews and answers. IIave 2. Have students check the skills they have mastered.
listeners complete the Unit Assignment Rubric. If students need more practice in order to feel
confident about their proficiency in a skill, point
6. Have groups summarize the information from out the page numbers and encourage them to
their interviews. review.
7. Ask a reporter from each group to present the )- Read the learning outcome aloud. Ask students if
group's findings.
they feel that they have met ttre outcome.

Alternative Unit Assignments


Assign or have students choose one of these
assignments to do instead of or in addition to
ttre unit assignment.

Unit 2 21
ll nit Assi g n m ent Ru b ri c
Student name:
Date:

Unit Assignmentt Conduct a class survey.

20 = Presentation element was completely successful (at least 9070 of the time).
15 = Presentation element was mostly successful (at least 70olo of the time).
l0 = Presentation element was partially successful (at least 5070 of the time).
0 = Presentation element was not successful.

Student spoke easily (without long


pauses or reading) while discussing why
people prefer certain foods and was easy
to understand (spoke clearly and at a
good speed).

Student used /j/ and lwlfor linking'

Student used count and noncount nouns


correctly.

Student used vocabulary from the unit.

Student elicited relevant information from


other students during the interview phase'

Total pointsi
Comments:

22 Unit 2 O 2011 Oxford University Press. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.
r:j "ra:j : i* !:r:!:;; -:.ill:i:i

.i:i:=i+i:

LISTENING . listening for examples LEARNING OUTCOME


VOCABULARY. prefixes Discuss successful and unsuccessful
GRAMMAR. gerunds and infinitives as the objects of verbs personal experiences and explain what
PRONUNCIATION . stress on important words you learned from them.
SPEAKING . asking for and giving clarification

) Listening and Speoking3, poges 44-45 Activity A Answers, p.45


1. Students may say a person can be successful by
Preview the Unit earning a lot of money, by discovering or inventing
something, or by being happy and content with
Learning Outcome their lives.
Ask for a volunteer to read the unit skills and then 2. Students should support their answers with specific
examples from their lives.
the unit learning outcome.
3. The man is trying to fly or glide. He may be ,I
2. Explain: The learning outclme is what you are successful because the machine looks well-built,
expected to be able to do by the unit's end. You are :l
or he may not be successful because he lacks the
gling to be evaluated for how well you meet this speed to lift off.
outcome. With this in mind, you should focus on
.i
learning skills ( Listening, Vocabulary, Grammar,
B (20 minutes)
Pronunciation, Speaking) that will support yowr goal
of discussing successful and unsuccessful personal 7. Introduce the Unit Question, "What can we learn
expenences and explaining what you learned from from success and failure?" Ask related information
these expertences. This can also help you act as questions or questions about personal experience
mentors in the classroom to help the other students to help students prepare for answering the Unit
meet this outcome. Question, which is more abstract. How important
is it to be successful? Is it possible to be successful
A (10 minutes) even in failure? What is failure? How irnportafi is

7. Prepare students for thinking about ttre topic by it to fail once in a while? Do you think a person's
eliciting a class definition of success. Accept all definition of success can change over time? Do you
students' contributions and refine the definidon know anyone for whom this has happened?
accordingly. 2. Put students in small groups and give each group

2. Put students in pairs or small groups to discuss a piece of poster paper and a marker.
the first two questions. J. Give students a minute to silently consider their
3. Call on volunteers to share their ideas with the answers to the Unit Question. Tell students to
pass the paper and the marker arourd the group.
class.Ask questions: Did your discussion confirm
your definition of success or not? What are some of Direct each group member to write a different
the ways in which you are successful? How do you answer to the question. Encourage them to help
p er s onally define s uc c e s s? one another.

Focus students' attention on the photo. Have a 4. Ask each group to choose a reporter to read the
volunteer describe the photo to the class. Read the answers to the class. Point out similarities and
question aloud. Ask What is this man trying to do? differences among the answers. If answers from
Will he be successful? Why or why not? different groups are similar, make a group list that
incorporates all of the allswers. Post the list to
refer to later in the unit.

Unit 3
Activity B Answers, p.45 2. Conclude the activity by asking for a show of
Possible answers: Success and failure can inform us hands when students hear you read *te meaning
about what we have mastered and what we still need they ranked first. Read the list aloud. Tally the
to master; When we succeed, we have achieved a goal number for each meaning.
and when we fail, we discover the areas in which we
need to work harder; Success shows us what we can do Expansion Activity: How to achieve success
and failure shows us what we cannot do yet. (10 minutes)

1. Keep students in their groups from Activity D'


The QClassroom
2. Ask students to consider how they plan to
$ cot,rrackzs
be successful at the things they chose on the
1. Play The Q Cilassroom. lJse the example from the questionnaire.
audio to help students continue the conversation. )- Te1l them to brainstorm a few ideas for each
Ask How did the students answer the question? choice, and to make notes.
Do you agree or disagree with their ideas? Why?
4. Have the students discuss their plans to achieve
2. On the audio, Sophy gives three areas in which success with their group members. Group
people can be successful. Elicit them and whether
members should provide helpful suggestions for
all three of them were discussed in Activity A. their plan.
3. Also on the audio, the students give different 5. Elicit answers from the grouP.
opinions about the value of success and the value
of failure. Elicit these opinions and the range of
student opinions in the class.

I Listening ond Speaking 3, page 46

Listening ond Speoking 3, Page 47


Call on a volunteer to read the meanings of LISTENING 1: Chasing Your Dreams
success in the left column. Have students write
two additional ideas about what success may
mean to someone.
VOCABULARY tts minutes)
2. Tell students to check the top three items that are 1. Model the pronunciation of the words in bold.
most true for them. Have them write a reason for 2. Pttt students in pairs to circle the answers. Call
each choice in the space to ttre right of the list. on volunteers to read the answers aloud. Elicit or
Activity C Answers, p.46 provide corrections as necessary.
Students'answers will vary. Student should support
their choices with valid reasons.

thElg&'-Iell them tp. nrhstitute.trhechgiies.,.ttley.,, :.,


iren't s*re of in the :Cntenies::io see if,the !+4.!ng .
studeFtl and asiitt tlie*.*jllt ehangei.. Giw them additigr€l,ser*s-lces ie.hetp ..
"'. eroip. tcs,v.er.-tevst
task lf necessary,
the task,!! necexriry.altow chob$e qnly.gne
allow them to chobse onllron, thCm praeiie* the dif f iiult vo.at'*Ie5 tula:c.*nrt pt*j
or twooptions'fii}f{i.the liit; esk highei.lstel students 1. Thisrefrigeratorj5vefy,good;i*li€ side'is
to rari[ all theiitams fiom'1'thi7,ugfi:1 1'{*ith 1'belng
:', I :
,"'that ifetrnstimes:a lo+Ef:€le€=i<*5:.:,: ::': : :i

most true for them). Ask them to write a justification ?i ,Yru,willnot he abte,t+*G n=dr ir,sshootif
a5 to whyrths:iteiii is'rimportant, moderately
you do not study a lot.
impotiantor notimpoitirnt t6'them wherrrdefining 1. 1.findrlhii.p-f,qbte;n,Wfy E lcr{,t:,figUre
success. out the answer.
.il. I dddr krqw-wh14 you gal4p upso, e*!ify,,.lou ,, ;
almost had the ahslt/er,
D (10 minutes) Have higher-level students complete the activity

1. Put students in groups to discuss the items they individtially'and thcn compare aniwersin pairs, Telt
the pairs to write another sample sentence for each
checked in Activity C.
w*rd. Have volunteers wfite one of their se*ten(es on
the b*aid. check,thr sen,tences as a clais, focusing on
the use of vscabuiary rather than grernmatiea[issues.

24 Unit 3

L.
I
I
I
I
Vocabulary Answers, p. 47 ) Listening ond Speaking 3, page 49
E

I l. a; 2. b; 3. c; 4. c; 5. a; LISTEN FOR DETAILS tto minutes) E

6. b; 7. a; 8. b; 9. c; 10. a
$ cot,rrackzz
*9 for additional practice with the vocabulary, have
1. Direct students to read the statements before they
{8, students visitQ online Practice.
listen again. Elicit any questions about them.
2. As you play the audio, have students listen and
Listening ond Speaking 3, poge48
write T or -E
PREVIEW IISTENING 1 (s minutes)
3. Have students compare answers with a pafiier.
t. Elicit the meaning of the title "Chasing your 4. Replay the audio so that the parbrers can check
Dreams" (pursuing something you really want). their answers.
2. Direct students to look at the photo. Ask:. What 5. Go over the answers with the class.
definition of success doesthis car represent? Do you
Listen for Details Answers, p.49
think it\ a good symbol for success? Is having a car 1.F; 2.F;3.T; 4,T;5.T; 6,F;7.f
like this a realistic goal? Why or why not? I

3. Read the introductory paragraph aloud. Have For additional practice with listening
students check the things they think the comprehension, have students visit
professor will say are important for achieving Q Online Practice.

success. Students may check as many items as


they wish. Tell students to review their lists after
WHAT DO YOU THINK? (lo minutes)
the listening.
Ask students to look at the photo and read the
Preview the Listening Answers, p.48
caption. Elicit their opinions about the relationship
Students'answers will vary.The item mentioned in the
listening is having cleor gools. befiveen the photo and the caption. (Success is
notjust achieving first placg but a personal best,
whether that is second, third, or just competing.)
Listening 1 Background Note 2. Seat students in small groups and assign roles: a
This listening focuses on what it really means to be group leader to make sure everyone contributes,
successful. In order to achieve success on their own a note-taker to record the group's ideas, a reporter
terms, people around the world have changed careers, to share the group's ideas with the class, and a
set different priorities, or reassessed their values. timekeeper to watch the clock.
Ordinary people are doing this, as evidenced by the J. Give students five minutes to discuss the
increasing numbers of fathers who opt to spend time questions. Call time if conversations are
as primary caregivers for their children, as well as the winding down. Allow them an extra minute
number of people who dedicate themselves to greener or two if necessary.
living through recycling ar.d gardening.
4. Call on each group's reporter to share ideas with
the class. Remind them to report opinions about
LISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (10 minutes)
the things that are more important than success.
$ cot,rrackzo What Do You Think? Answers, p.49
1. Ask students to read the sentences and answer Students'answers may vary. Possible answers:
choices. Elicit any questions or difficulties 1. Yes, it makes sense to be realistic about what you
about them. can achieve; No, it's important to dream big.
2. Students may talk about a friend or family member
2. Play the audio and have students choose their
who has achieved something important in the life.
answers individually.
3. Good friends, a happy family, being healthy.
). Elicit the answers from the class

Main ldea Answers, p.48 Learning outcome


1.a; 2.b;3.b; 4.b
I
Use the learnlng outcome to frame the purpose and
relevance of Listening 1. Ask; What did you learn
from Listening 1 that prepares you to discuss successful

Unit 3
and unsuccessful personal experiences? What did you I Listening and Speoking 3, Poge 51
learn that will help you to explain what you learned C (10 minutes)
from these experiences?
1. Tell students to read the directions. Elicit any
difficulties or questions.
/ Listening and Speaking 3, poge 50
2. Model the activity by choosing a goal of your
Listening Skill: own, writing it on the board, and listing one
Listening for examples (10 minutes) benefit of achieving it.
1. Ask students to read the information about 3. Give students a.minute to think about their goal
listening for examples. Elicit any difficulties and its benefits. Students should write their
or questions. sentences individually.
2. Check comprehension by asking: Why do we need
to listen for examples?
D (15 minutes)

1. Remind students of the phrases from the listening


A (5 minutes) skills box by eliciting them from the class and
@ cot,tractza writing them on the board.
1. Tell students they are going to listen to the , 2. Put students in pairs to share their goals and
professor's lecture again. Explain that they are just the benefits they hope to gain. Tell them to take
going to focus on listening for the phrases that the notes while the listen. Review the features of
professor uses to inffoduce examples. good note-taking.
2. Play the audio while students write the phrases 3. Call on several students to share their partners'
used to inffoduce examples. If necessary pause goals and benefits. Ask their partnet to identify
or replay the audio to give students a chance the phrases used to give examPles.
to write. #P for additional practice with giving examples, have
3. Call on a volunteer to give the answers. W students visitQOnline Practice.

Activity A Answers, p. 5O
1. To give you an examPle; ) Listening ond Speoking 3, Poge 52
2. for instance;
3. Take for example;
IISTENING 2: The Benefits of Failure
4. for example
Tip for Success (1 minute)
1. Read the tip aloud.
B (10 minutes)
2. Point out that knowing a number of synonyms
$ cot,rrackzo
for common words can make students' speech
1. Tel1 students they are going to listen to Paul talk much more interesting, and it can make
about how his view of success has changed. understanding a variety of speakers in different
2. Explain that students should write the examples situations easier.
he gives in note form. Elicit that note form does
not require complete sentences or full words. VOCABULARY tto minutes)
J. Ask students to read the items. Elicit any questions
or difficulties.
1. Model the pronunciation of the words. Have
students repeat after you.
4. Play the audio while students write the examples.
5. Put students in pairs to compare their answers.
2. Review the meaning of the letters in parenttreses:
(n.) = noun, (phr' v.) = phrasal verb, etc.
6. Call on volunteers to read their answers.
3. Put students in pairs to circle ttre answers. Call on
Activity B Answers, p.5O volunteers to read the answers aloud.
1. only chose jobs that paid well;
2. left one company to work for another Vocabulary Answers, p. 52
I (for a better job title); 2. improve; 3. stress; 4. be afraid; 5. need;
3. loves jogging (in the park); 6. allow; 7. training; 8. leading;' 9. refuse;
4. sees reconnecting with his old college friends as 10. identify
a success.

26 Unit 3
,\
E

.ft
FJ

rt
::
Listen for Main ldea Answers, p.53
Students should check items 2,4, and 5. if
6rdup loter{evd itudehts assiit themwitti
and:
the task. Point out the cues in the words that will
hel p,ther.n.-to eh€{}teitha{orrec{. ans\tr6r; f,of:example, LISTEN FOR DETAILS tto minutes)
pIefixes]endsuffixes,et(ir: :':'::'': " r:.' :r:::!ii !: ' r:
,Have hiEherlsvsl 51u{enti coffiplete ttre,activtly @ cot,track:t
individually and. then cornparq,aqqwerlin.p*if i,..!el! 1. Explain that students are going to listen for
the paif$ towrite,alather'iqriFtbddtiteitce fgf q1 specific information about each successful
word. Ftave'*nluntcert write one' qf lheii'ientenc*i'on person or group.
the:board. Check the Serit-enees as a tfars;,focusin$'on 2. As you play the audio, have students write the
the,usn of rathel than srammaiicll letter of the quote next to the correct name. Tell
1gglufarl .itl-1..
students to work individually.
dS for additional practice with the vocabulary, have
students visit Q Online Practice. 3. Have students compare answers with a partter.
"iS
4. Go over the answers with the class. Elicit what
each person or group was known for.
PREVIEW IISTENING f (5 minutes)
Listen for Details Answers, p. 53
1. Direct students' attentiofl to the photo and ask: 1,f; 2. e; 3. a; 4. d; 5. c; 6. b
Do you recognize this basketball player? What do you
know about Michael Jordan? What else is he known IEO for additional practice with listening
for (Nike shoes and charity work)? W comprehension, have students visit
Q Online Practice.
2. Tell students they are going to listen to a speech
by a college student.
3. Give students a minute to write down their ideas WHAT DO YOU THINK?
about how failure can be a positive experience.
A (10 minutes)
Listening 2 Background Note 1. Ask students to read the questions and reflect on
When Michael Jordan was cut from his high their answers.
school basketball team, he improved his game and Seat students in sma1l groups and assign roles: a
went on to a successful college professional, and group leader to make sure everyone contributes,
Olympic careeL a note-taker to record the group's ideas, a reporter
John Grisham's first novel, A Time to Kill, took to share the group's ideas with the class, and a
three years to writg and was rejected numerous timekeeper to watch the clock.
times before being publishedby a small unknown )- Give students five minutes to discuss the
publishing house. Grisham has written more than five questions. Call time if conversations are
best-selling novels, several of which have been made winding down. A1low them an extra minute
into films. or tvvo if necessary.
Akio Morita was expected to take over the family 4. Call on each group's reporter to share ideas with
food business, but his talents were in science and the class.
technology. He and his friend Masaru Ibuka founded
Activity A Answers, p.53
Sony, which has become one of the world's most
Students' answers will vary. Possible Answers:
successful corporations.
1. Students should support their answers with reasons.
2. Student may talk about a class that they did poorly
I Listening ond Speaking 3, page 53
in but then took again and passed or a sports team
LISTEN FOR MAIN I-DEAS (s minutes) that they were cut from at first but then tried again
and succeeded.
@ cot,rractso
1. Ask students to read the statements. Elicit any
B (5 minutes)
difficulties with vocabulary or concepts.
2. Play the audio and have students complete the 1. Have students continue working their small
activity individually. Confirm answers. groups to discuss the questions in Activity B. Tell
them to choose a new leader, recordet, reporter,
and timekeeper.

Unit 3 27
For question 7, encourage students to make a list B (5 minutes)
of ttre examples in the speech and discuss each 1. Keep students in pairs or groups, but have
one. For question 2, suggest students record their
students write sentences individually.
answer for future reference.
2. Have students check their answers with the
Call on ttre new reporter to share the group's partners or group members. Go over tlre answers
answers to the questions. as a class.
Activity B Answers, p.53 Activity B Answers, p.54
Students' answers will vary. Possible answers:
Students' answers will vary. Students'sentences should
1. No, Carl Simmons thinks it's OK to pursue goals correctly use words from Activity A.
even when other people think they?e unrealistic.
2. Success now means more to me than just earning a
lot of money.

Learning Outcome
Use the learning outcome to frame the purpose and
relevance of Listenings I and 2. Askl. What d.id you
learn from the listenings that prepares you to discuss
successful personal experiences? What did you learn that
will help you to discuss unsuccessful experiences?

Listening ond Speoking j, page 54

Vocabulary Skill: Prefixes (5 minutes)

1. Direct students to read the information silently.


2. Check comprehension: What do the prefixes dis-,
ilm-, and ir- do? When do we use im- and when
do we use ir-? Which prefix means "many"? What
prefix means "against"? Can you think of a word that
uses this prefix?

Skill Note
Remind students that just as we have synonyms for c (5 minutes)
many words, there are prefixes with synonymous
1. Keep students in pairs or groups.
meanings. The examples in the book are the prefixes
dis-, im-, and ir-, which all give the opposite meaning 2. Ask students to read their sentences to each other
to a word. Point out that knowing the meaning of a again so that they can write the words with
prefix can help students figure out the meaning of a prefixes in their notebooks.
word that they are uncertain of. Remind them to use dP for additional practice with prefixes,
these skills when *rey are studying. ry have students visitQOnline Practice.

A (10-15 minutes)
I Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 55
1. Put students in pairs or small groups to complete
the activity. Encourage students to use a dictionary
if they are unsure.
2. Go over the answers with the class.
Grammar: Gerunds and infinitives
Activity A Answers, p.54
as the objects of verbs ('10 minutes)
1. review; 2. irresponsible; 3. dislike;
4. co-worker; 5. imperfect; 6. antisocial; 1. Read the information about gerunds and
7. multinational; 8. dishonesU f. impatient; infinitives.
10. irregular; 11. reapply; 12. multimedia

28 Unit 3
2. Check comprehension by asking questrons: What Pronunciation:
is the gerund for the verb run? What is the infinitive Stress on important words (10 minutes)
of the verb walP
3. Review spelling rules for forming gerunds: @ cot,rract sz

. Verbs ending in vowel +. consonant: double the 1. Read the information about stressing important
words.
consonant, e.g., running, swimming, planning, etc.
. Verbs ending in vowel + consonant + -e'. drop the 2. Check comprehension by asking: Why are some
words stressed? What can listening for stressed words
e and add -ing, e.g., hiking, becoming, having, etc.
help us to do?

SkillNote J. Play the audio as a model for the students. Stop


for students to repeat.
Some students may be familiar with a group of verbs
that change meaning depending on whether they are
followed by a gerund or an infinitive. There are only
A (10 minutes)

a few verbs that this applies to. They incfude stop, @ cot,rractsr
rememberi and forget. ' 1. Have students read the sentences. Point out that,
asin the sentences above, there may be more *ran
I forgot to write the nlte. (I didn't write the note.)
one word sffessed.
I forgot writing the note. (I wrote the note, but I don't
2. Ask students to underline the words they expect
remember doing it.)
to hear stressed in *re sentences.
A (10 minutes) ). Play the audio while students check their
predictions. Pause after each sentence to give
1. Tell students to circle the correct verb forms
students time to check.
individually. !
4. Elicit the answers from volunteers. If there :
2. Remind them to look at the grammar note
arc arry disagreements, play the audio again
for help.
to confirm.
J. Put students in pairs to check their answers.
Check the answers as a class. Activity A Answers, P. 56
1. Failure is an important staqe on the road to success.
4. Have students practice the conversation. 2. We shouldn't be afraid of failure, because we can
Activity A Answers, p.55 learn from it.
1. togive; 2. tobecome; 3. being; 4. working; 3. Failure is something to be encouraged by.
5. to quit; 6. to stay; 7. to spend; 8. to have 4. Don',t give gp too easilyl

Listening ond Speoking 3, Piqgs 56 / Listening ond Speoking 3, Page 57

B (15 minutes) B (5 minutes)

1. Direct students to work individually to answer S cot,rrack:+


the questions. 1. Put students in pairs to say the sentences from
Activity A.
2. Prtt students in pairs to discuss their answers.
Encourage them to ask follow-up questions, for Play the audio again, pausing for students to
example: WLty do you plan to do this soon? Why repeat the sentences with appropriate word stress.
didn't you finish? Why don't you have enough time J. Have students practice saying the sentences with
to do this activity now? their partners. Monitor and provide feedback on
3. Call on volunteers to report their partner's pronunciation.
information.
Activity Answers, p.56
B
C (10 minutes)

Answers will vary. Students should correctly use


@ cot,rrack:s
gerunds and infinitives. 1. Have students read the paragraph. Tell them
to think about the content and the important
for additional practice with gerunds and infinitives, information that is likely to be stressed.
-P
Wt have students visit Q Online Proctice.

Unit 3 29
2. Ask students to underline the words they expect )
to hear as stressed.
3. Put students in pairs to check their predictions. {
4. Play the audio while students check their
predictions. If necessary, pause to give students
time to check.
.n$tr'
5. Elicit the answers from volunteers. If there are
any disagreements, play the audio again
to confirm. i'ttie.tyrb,

Activity C Answers, p.57


You need to experience failure and learn from it, in j Listening ond Speaking 3, page 58
order to reaily succeed. Faiting is a good prepa(ation
for life. lt makes you stronger and more able to
A n0 minutes)
overcome life's oroblems. Don't be scared of failure! @ cot,rrack:z
1. Tell students they are going to listen to excerpts
from a discussion. Have students read the excerpts
D (5 minutes)
" from the conversation. Elicit any questions or
$ cot,rrackto difficulties.
1. Keep students in pairs. Play the audio again, 2. Play the audio while students complete the
pausing for students to repeat with appropriate conversations. Pause as necessary to give students
word stress. time to write.
2. Have students practice readingthe paragraph with 3. Put students in pairs to compare their answers.
their partners. Monitor and provide feedback on Call on volunteers to share their answers.
pronunciation.
4. Play the audio again to clarify any difficulties.
5ffiP for additional practice with stress on important
W words, have students visil Q Online Practice.
5. Give pairs time to practice the conversations.
6. Call on volunteers to perform for the class.
Activity A Answers, p.58
Speaking Skill: Asking for and 1. Sorry, I don't get what you mean;
clarification (5 minutes)
2. What l'm trying to say is;
Direct students to read the information about 3. What do you mean exactly?
4. to give you an example;
asking for and giving clarification. Point out that
it is always better to ask for clarification when 5. Do you think you could say a bit more about that?
6. Can you give an example, please?
one isn't sure.
2. Check comprehension: Which phrases can be used
to ask for clarification? Which phrases can be used B (10 minutes)
to give clarification? W\ry is it a good idea to ask an 1. Keep students in pairs. Explain that one student
audience for questions at the end of a presentation? should read the statement and the other should
3. Give students an opportunity to comment on ask for clarification. The student who read the
other ways they know of to ask for or give statement should give clarification.
clarification. 2. Point out that students should use what they
remember from the listenings to help them give
clarification.
)- Remind students to maintain eye contact and to
link words wirh /j/ and /w/ where appropriate.
4. Monitor students' conversations for their use of
phrases for asking for and giving clarification.
#9 for additional practice with asking for and giving
W clarification, have students visitQOnline Practice.

30 Unit 3

r.-
I Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 59 Nobel Peace Pize for his philosophical views that he
put into action by establishing a hospital which is in
qfl Unit Assignment: the present-day African nation of Gabon.
Take part in a pair discussion Winston Churchill was the British Prime Minister
during World War II. He was known for his gifted
Unit Question (s minutes) oratory skills and wartime leadership. He won the
Refer students to the ideas they discussed at the 1953 Nobel Prize for Literature for his writings on
beginning of the unit about the things we can learn World War II.
from success and failure. Cue students if necessary Thomas Edison was an American inventor known for
by asking specific questions about the content of the many inventions, including the phonograph, moving
unit: Why do some people belieye we can learn the same pictures (movies), and the light bulb.
things from success and failure? Why do some people
belieye we learn more from Jailure than front success? Tip for CriticalThinking (1 minute)
Who are some of the people famous people we tqlked
Read thetip aloud. Point out that by paraphrasing,
about who failed before successful?
.becoming we can better remember ar.d understand information,
which makes it easier for us to convey it to others.
Learning Outcome
1. Tie the unit assignment to the unit learning
outcome. Say The outcome for this unit is to discuss
successful and unsucces sful personal experiences
and explain what you learned from them. This
unit assignment is going to let you show your skill
in participating in a discussion. Participating in a
discussion is a useful skill because it allows people to
share their experiences, viewpoints, and opinions. In
doing so, we have the opportunity to educate andlearn
from other*
2. Explain that you are going to use a rubric similar
to their Self-Assessment checklist on page 62 to
grade rheir unit assignment.

Consider the ldeas (10 minutes)


Listening ond Speaking 3, page 60
1. Te1l students they are going to read some quotes Prepare and Speak
by Albert Schweizer, Winston Churchill, and
Thomas Edison. Flicit what students know about
these people.
A (10 minutes)
2. Put students in groups to read the quotes and
answer the questions.
1. Direct students to read the questions and make
their lists. Encourage them to list larger or
5- Remind students to use the sffategies for asking important things as well as smaller, seemingly
for and giving clarification if necessary. less important things. Remind them that they
4. Call on a rcportff to share their group's should list everything they can and not reject
information witlr the whole class. ideas at this stage.

Consider the ldeas Answers, p. 59


Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 61
Answers will vary.

Consider the ldeas Background Note B {10 minutes)


Albert Schweitzer was a German philosopher, 1. Remind students about the features of good notes.
physician, and music scholar. He received the 7952 Elicit that we do not use complete sentences.

Unit 3 31
2. Have students choose an item from question 1 of Check and Reflect
Activity A to develop in Activity B. They should
choose somettring for which they can answer all
questions. Remind students to use notes instead of
@
complete sentences.
A (5 minutes)

). Have students choose an item from question 2 1. Direct students to read and complete the Self-
Assessment checklist.
of Activity A to develop in the second part of
Activity B. Again, they should choose something Ask for a show of hands for how many students
for which they can answer all questions and they gave all or mgstly yes answers.
should use notes. J. Congratulate them on ttreir success. Discuss
the steps they can take if an item on the rubric
Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 62 was difficult for them. For example, if they had
trouble using gerunds and infinitives as objects,
EE! they should review the rules more carefully and
C (10-15 minutes) practice them on their own.

1. Review the checklist on page 62. Ask students to

2.
read the checklist. Elicit any questions.
Put students in pairs to talk about their
@
experiences. Remind them not to read directly
B (5 minutes)

from their outlines. Point out that the point of Refer students to the learning outcome onpage 45.
their discussion is to determine which experience Tell them to talk with their partners about whether
taught the student more, the successful one or they achieved the learning outcome. Elicit the
the failure. answers to the unit question that students came up
J. Monitor students' performance as they work. with at the beginning of class. Encourage them to
4. Use the unit assignment rubric on page 33 of
flip ttrrough the unit as they discuss the new things
they learned and new answers they may have to the
this Teacher's Handbook to score each student's
interview and answer. unit question.
5. Call on students you did not have a chance to
monitor to present a summary of their discussion.
I Listening and Speoking 3, page 63

TrackYour Success
Alternative Unit Assignments 1. Have students circle the words they have learned
Assign or have students choose one of these in this unit. Suggest that students go back through
assignments to do instead of, or in addition, to the the unit to review any words they have forgotten.
unit assignment. 2. Have students check the skills they have mastered.
1. Think about three goals you have not achieved If students need more practice to feel confident
yet, but would like to. Discuss your ideas with a about their proficiency in a skil.l, point out the
parher and explain what you will do to achieve page numbers and encourage them to review.
these goals. J. Read the learning outcome aloud. Ask students if
2. Some people like to "visualize" the goals *rey they feel *rat they have met the outcome.
want to achieve. One way of doing this is to put
up pictures of what they want, and focus on them
each day. Do you think this can help you achieve
your goals? Tell a partner why or why not.
1p for an additional unit assignment, have students
1l5, visitQOnlineProctice.

32 Unit 3
Unit Assignment Rubric
Student name:

Unit Assignment:Take part in a pair discussion.

20 = Presentation element was completely successful (at least 90%o of the time).
15 = Presentation element was mostly successful (at least 7070 of the time).
10 = Presentation element was partially successful (at least 5070 of the time).
0 = Presentation element was not successful.

Student spoke easily (without long pauses


or reading) and was easy to understand
(spoke clearly and at a good speed) while ,:]
irl
discussing successful and unsuccessful ;l
personal experiences. :l

Student used appropriate word stress.

Student correctly used gerunds and


infinitives as objects.

Student used vocabulary from the unit.

Student was able to ask for and give


clarification appropriately.

Total points:

Comments:

o 201 1 Oxford University Press. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use. Unit 3
LISTENING . taking notes using a T-chart LEARNING OUTCOME
VOCABULARY. using the dictionarY Participate in a grouP discussion
GRAMMAR. simple past and present perfect emphasizing the advantages and
PRONUNCIATION . variety of intonation to show interest disadvantage of change.

SPEAKING . asking for and giving reasons

Activity A Answers, p.65


I Listening ond Speaking 3, pages 64-65
1. Students may mention changes in their personal or
Preview the Unit professional lives, which may have affected them
positively or negativelY.
Learning Outcome 2. Students may wish to change nothing or a variety of
personal or professional things.
1. Ask for a volunteer to read the unit skills and then
3. The woman is moving her personal belongings.
the unit learning outcome.
She probably feels the change is good because
2. Explain: The learning outcome is what you are she's smiling.
expected to be able to do by the unit's end. You are
going to be e,'taluated on how well you meet this
B (15 minutes)
lutclme. With this in mind, you should focus on
learning skills ( Listening, Vocabulary, Grammar' 1. Introduce the Unit Question, "Is change good
Pronunciation, Speaking) that will support your goal or bad?" Ask related informadon questions or
of participating in a group discussion emphasizing the questions about personal experience to help
advantages and disadvantages of change. This can also students preparc for answering the unit question,
help you act as mentlrs in the classroom to help the which is more absffact.
other students meet this outcome. Read the Unit Question aloud. Give students a
minute to silently consider their answer to the
A (10 minutes) question. Say, Let\ consider the positive side of
1. Prepare students for thinking about the topic change in our individ.usl lives. What are the good
by asking what changes students made in their things about change? What are the disadvantages?
lives to enter this institution. Share your own 3. Write good and bad at the top of two sheets of
experiences about any changes you made in your poster paper.
life in order to teach this class.
4. Elicit student answers and write them in the
Put students in pairs or small groups to discuss appropriate poster. Accept.all contributions. Post
the first three questions. *re lists to refer to later in the unit.
J. Call on volunteers to share their ideas with the Answers, p.65
Activity B
class.Ask questions to facilitate the discussion: Possible answers: Change may be positive or negative,
What has been the biggest change in your life? depending on the reasons for it as well as the way in
Were you happy about the change? Why or why which one copes with it; Change may be good or bad.
not? Did you feel any other emotions, for example, It depends on why something changed and how we
fea6 anger, confusion? react to it;There are good changes in life and there are
4. Focus students' attention on the photo. Have a bad ones.
volunteer describe the photo to the class. Read the
question aloud.

34 Unit 4
The Q Clossroom
$ cot,tract la
1. Play The Q Classroom. lJse the example from the
> Listening and Speoking 3, poge 67
audio to help students continue ttre conversation.
Ask'. What tlpes of change did the class discuss? Felix IISTENING 1 : Changing Expectations
believes most changes have a good and a bad side. Do
ylu agree with this statement? Why or why not? VOCABUTARY tts minutes)
2. On the audio, Marcus and Yuna talk about 1. Direct students to read the words and their
starting their current course. Ask whether any of definitions. Elicit any difficulties or questions.
the students had similar experiences or feelings
when coming to the institution they are currently
2. Model correct pronunciation of the words. Say
each word and have students repeat.
studying at.
3. Ask students to complete the sentences.
/ Listening and Speoking j, page 66 4. Put students in pairs to check their answers. Ask
C (10 minutes) volunteers to read their answers.

1. Tell students they are going to answer a


questionnaire about their opinions on change.
Group lower:level students and assist them with
2. Have students complete their questionnaires the task. Point out the cues in the senteflces that
individually. Tell students not to read the answer will help them to choosethe(orlect word. Give ,

key yet. them additional sentences to help them practice the


Activity C Answers, p.66 difficult vocabulary For example: Ourteacher olways
Students' answers will vary. asks us ta iurtffry our opinionis with examples;After
callege, I plan ta look for on entry-level poriflon
in advertising,
Have higher-level students complete the
activity individually and then compare answers
GrouB lower-level students and assist them wilh
with a'partner.Tellthe pairs towrite an additional
the task Ask higherJevel students to predict what
sanrple sentence for each:word, Have volunteers
their answers say about their feelings toward change.
write one oftheir sentenc€son the board, Correct'
Tell them to write a few lines justifyiag their answer.
the sentences with the whole class. focusing on
the use of the vocabulary word rather than other
grammatical issues.
D (10 minutes)
7. Ask students to read the answer key to determine
what the questionnaire reveals about their attitude Vocabulary Answers, p. 67
toward change. 1. crisis; 2. handle; 3. adapt; 4. curious;
2. Put students in groups to discuss their answers
5. steady; 6. fulfilled; 7. Position;
8. considerably; 9. justify; 10. suffer
in Activity C and to answer the two questions in
Activity D. #B for additional practice with the vocabulary,
'EW have students visit Q Online Practice.
J. Choose a rcporter to say whether the group
members thought the questionnaire was
accutate, and give the main reasons for their
opinions.
> Listening and Speoking 3, poge 68
4. Elicit any similarities or differences amongst the
PREVIEW LISTENING | (5 minutes)

groups'answers. 1. Direct students to look at the photo. Ask: Do yow


p.66 think the man looks fulfilled? Why or why not? What
Activity D Answers,
do you think his job is? Why?
Students' answers may vary.

Unit 4 35
Read the introductory paragraph aloud. Have WHAT DOYOU THINK? (lominutes)
students check the reason they think Gary wanted
to do something different. Tell students they Ask students to read the questions and reflect on
should check their choice after the listening. their answers.
Seat students in small groups and assign
Preview the Listening Answers, p.68
roles: a group leader, a note-taker, a reporter,
Students'answers will vary. The item mentioned in the
and a timekeeper.
listening is "He was curious about the world;"
3. Give students five minutes to discuss the
questions. Call time if conversations are
Listening 1 Background Note winding down. Allow them an exffa minute
The speaker talks about his career on Wall Street. or tvvo if necessary.
Wall Street is a famous street in New York City. It is 4. Call on each group's reporter to share ideas with
the heart of the city's financial district. The New York the class.
Stock Exchange is located on Wall Street, and many
What DoYou Think? Answers, p.69
international banks have large offices there.
Students'answers may vary. Possible answers:
In contrast, Iowa is a state in the Midwest of the 1. He learned that there are more important things
country. It is primarily farmland. Iowa, like all of the in life than earning a lot of money. This will last
Midwest, is known for a more relaxed pace of life. because his family and friends are more important
to him; This will not last because Gary will
LISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (5 minutes) eventually want to have a lot of money again.
2. The sense of power and the ability to buy a lot
@ cot,rrack ts of things.
1. Ask students to read *re sentences. Elicit any 3. Yes, because I am very flexible; No, because I would
questions or difficulties abbut them. be used to having a lot of money and status.
2. Play the audio and have students choose their
answers individually. Elicit the answers. Learning Outcome
Main ldea Aniwers, p.68 Use the learning outcome to frame the purpose and
He changed his job; He moved home; He spent more relevance of Listening 1. Ask What did you learn from
time with his family; He found more friends. Listening 1 that prepares you to participate in a group
discussion about the advantages and disadvantages of
change? What did you learn that will help you to ertaluate
Listening ond Speoking 3, page 69
the fficts of these changes?
LISTEN FOR DETAILS tto minutes)

@ cot,rract+o
) Listening ond Speoking 3, page 70

1. Direct students to read tlre items before they listen Listening Skill:
again. Elicit any questions about them. Taking notes using a T-chart (to minutes)
2. As you play the audio, have students listen and
$ cot,rrack+t
choose their answers.
1. Ask students to read the information about
J. Have students compare answers with a partrleL taking notes using a T-chart. Elicit any
4. Replay the audio so that the partners can check difficulties or questions.
*reir answers. Go over *re answers with the class. 2. Check comprehension by asking questions: Why is

Listen for Details Answers, p.69 a T-chart a useful tool for taking notes? What types of

I
1.a; 2.b;3.a; 4.a;5.b information are suitable for a T-chart format? Should
you wT ite complete sentences in the T-chart?
aP for additional practice with listening Tell students they are going to listen to an excerpt
W comprehension, have'studentsvisit
about Gary's life as a city trader.
Q Online Practice.
Play the audio while students study the
advantages and disadvantages in the T-chart in
their books.

36
t-
I{

A (10 minutes)
{

il
@ cot,rrack+z
1. Tell students they are going to listen to a different
r

excerpt from Gary's talk.


2. Copy the T-chart on the board. Elicit what the
students remember about the advantages and
disadvantages of being a home-care assistant.
C ('10 minutes)
Write their answers in the appropriate place on 1. Read the directions aloud. Remind students not to
the chart in note form. tell their partner the name of the job.
Play the audio while students take notes in their 2. Put students in pairs to describe the jobs they
books. If necessary, pause or play the audio again. wrote about. Call on several students to share
their descriptions with the class.
4. Call on a volunteer to give the answers. Compare
the students' T-charts to that on the board. Suggest for additional practice with taking notes using a
-O
try T-chart, have students visitQonlinePractice.
ways to improve the notes for clarity and brevity.
Activity A Answers, p. 70
Advantages: very fulfilled, slower pace of life, more I Listening and Speoking 3, page 71
friends, better relationship with family, healthier. LISTENING 2:
Disadvantages: salary is lower, doesn't eat out often,
can't buy a new car, can't afford an overseas vacation An lnterview with Barbara Ehrenreich
VOCABULARY tto minutes)
Tip for CriticalThinking (1 minute)
Read the tip aloud. Point out that summarizing helps 1. Model the pronunciation of the words in bold.
us to focus on the main points of something, which 2. Put students in pairs to circle ttre answers. Call on
in turn helps us to retain information. Remind volunteers to read ttre answers aloud.
students that details are not included when we
Vocabulary Answers, P. 71
summarize because this makes it harder for us to 1. a; 2. c; 3. b; 4. ci 5. a;
remember the main points. 6. c; 7. b; 8. a; 9. a; 10. b
B (10 minutes) 4p for additional practice with the vocabulary, have
1. Tell students to read the directions. Elicit any
{s students visitQOnlinePractice.

difficulties or questions.
2. Elicit some jobs that students can write about. Listening ond Speoking 3, page 72
Write them on the board. PREVIEW IISTENING 2 (s minutes)
3. Students take notes in their T-charts individually. Read the background information to students. Elicit
ttre reasons why a journalist might "go undercover"
to do research. Write *re answers on the board in note
form. Tell students they will refer to *re list once they
have heard the interview.

ti
:!-"_1lg? F.kg tggl t'l gt""
Barbara Ehrenreich was born in the United States
in 7947. She has been interested in workers' rights
across all sectors of the workforce since the 1960s.
To date, she has written over 20 nonfiction books as
well as one work of fiction and dozens of magazine
articles and newspaper columns.

Unit 4 37
(10 minutes)
LISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (5 minutes) B
1. Ilave students continue working in their small
$ cot,rract+r
groups. Tell them to choose a new leader, tecordet,
1. Ask students to read the statements. Elicit any reporter, and timekeeper.
difficulties with vocabuTary or concepts.
2. For question 1, encourage students to refer to their
2. Play the audio and have students work T-charts from Listening 1.
individually and write T or F.
5. Call on the new rcporter to share the group's
Listen for Main ldea Answers, P.72 answers to the questions.
l.T; 2.Ft 3.T; 4.F;5.T; 6.F
Activity B Answers, P.74
Possible Answers:
Listening and Speoking 3, Poge 73 Similarities: Both Gary and Barbara experienced
(s minutes) dramatic changes in their lives.
LISTEN FOR DETAILS Differences: Gary learned a lot about himsell Barbara
learned a lot about other people' Gary's life improved,
$ cot,rrack+
Barbara's life became harder.
1. Tell students they are going to listen again' Play
the audio while students choose their answers
individually. Tip for Success (1 minute)
2. Have students compare answers with a pafifiet. Read the tip aloud. Point out that this tip is related
3. Go over the answers with the class. to another tip students learned-making eye contact. )
Both of ttrese behaviors show the speaker that we are
Listen for Details Answers, P. 73
paylng attention to them.
1.a; 2.c;3.c; 4.a;5.b; 6.ai 7.c;8.b
elp for additional practice with listening Learning Outcome
\ii6* comprehension, havestudents visitQonline Use the learning outcome to frame the purpose and
relevance of Listenings 7 and 2 and the Critical Q
activity of summarizing. Ask What did you learn from
the listenings and Cntical Q actiwty that prepares yow to
I Listening ond Speoking 3, Poge 74
discuss the advantages and disadvantages of change?
WHAT DO YOU THINK?

A (10 minutes)
Vocabulary Skill:
1. Ask students to read the questions and reflect on
Using the dictionary (s minutes)
their answers. 1. Direct students to read the information silently.
2. Seat students in small groups and assign 2. Check comprehension: Which word goes in the
roles: a group leader, a note-taker, arcpottet, middle circle of the word web? Why? What is the
and a timekeeper. purpose of the sh.ortcut words? Does the word web
J. Give students five minutes to discuss the contain only one Part of sPeech?
questions. Call time if conversations are
winding down. Al1ow *rem an extra minute SkillNote
or two if necessary. Remind students that the first definition of a word is
Call on each group's reporter to share ideas with the most common meaning and usage of that word.
the class. Remind students that a dictionary also provides other
Activity A Answers, P.74 useful information about a word, for example part of
Students' answers will varY. speech, irregular forms, and pronunciation.
1. lt exposed a lot of truths about low-paying jobs that
people did not know. ) Listening ond Speaking 3, page 75
2. A person needs to be able to completely change his A (5 minutes)
or her lifestyle. I would not like to do this because I
don't like change; I would like to do this because it
1. Put students in pairs or small groups to complete
would be very interesting. the activity.

38
2. Go over the answers wittr the class. Activity A Answers, p.77
1. Haveyouevertraveled; 2. I have;
Activity A Answers, p. 75 3. went; 4. Did you enjoy; 5. was;
1. become/makedifferent 2. replace; 6. haven't been; 7. traveled
3. bus/train/plane; 4. clothes; 5. money

B (5 minutes)
B (5 minutes)
Have students work individually to make their list.
Have students build a word web wittr their partners. Encourage students to choose events that arc cleat
Call a volunteer to the front to complete a word web to them.
on the board.
Activity B Answers, p.77
Students'answers will vary. Students should correctly
use the simple past.

C (5 minutes)

Have students work individually to make


dO for additional practice with using the dictionary, their list.
W have students visit Q Online Proctice.
Answers, p.77
Activity C
Students'answers will vary. Students should correctly
) Listening ond Speaking 3 poge 76 use the present perfect.

D (10 minutes)
1. Put students in groups to discuss their lists.
Grammar: Simple past and present 2. Encourage them to use ttre simple past for events
perfect (10 minutes) that happened during their childhood. Encourage
them to use present perfect for events that have
l. Read the idormation about the simple past and
happened since their childhood.
present perfect.
2. Check comprehension by asking questions: Which 3. Have a reportet share some of the group's events'
verb form do we use for events that are no longer CS for additional practice with the simple
happening? Which verb form do we use since and {f,i past and present perfect, have students visit
for with? Q Online Practice.

)- Review the past parliciple forms needed for the


past perfect. Elicit some of the irregular past I Listening and Speoking 3, page 78
participle forms, e.g., written, seen, ridden, taken. Pron unciation: VarietYof
Remind students that time expressions are intonation to show interest (15 minutes)
frequently used with these verb forms. Elicit some
common phrases tsing last, ago, in, and on- Repeat @ cot,rrack+s
with since arrd for. 1. Read the information about varying intonation.
2. Check comprehension by asking: What does
* Listening ond Speoking 3, Page 77 rtsing intonation mean? What does falling
A (15 minutes) intonation mean? Why is intonation important?
1. Tell students to circle the correct verb forms 3. Tell students to listen to the audio. Elicit what
individually. Remind them to look at the grammar they notice about the second time the speaker says
note for help. the sentence. Write the sentence on the board.
2. Put students in pairs to check their answers. Draw an arrow over the words to show the rising
Check the answers as a class. and falling intonation.

3. Have students practice the conversation. 4. Tell students they are going to listen to some more
examples. Have them draw the intonation changes
over the sentences as they rcad along.

Unit 4 39
5. Play the audio as students write the intonation I Listening and Speaking 3, page 79
changes. Copy the sentences on the board and Speaking Skill: Asking for
3Ig ggtng re$qlf 6 minutes)
elicit the intonation changes.

A (10 minutes)
$ cot,rrack+e
@ cot,rrack+o 1. Direct students to read the information about
1. Play the audio. Tell students to check which asking for and giving reasons. Point out
speaker sounds more interested. that others expect us to give reasons for our
2. Elicit the answers from volunteers. If there opinions.
ate arLy disagreements, play the audio again 2. Check comprehension: Which phrases can be used

to confirm. to askfor reasons? Which phrases can be used to give


reasons? Why do we ask for reasons?
Activity A Answers, p.78
1. Speaker 2; 2. SPeaker 1; 3. Tell student they are going to listen to the way in
3. Speaker 2; 4. Speaker 2; which these phrases are used in conversation.
5. Speaker 1; 6. SPeaker 1; 4. Play the audio while students read the
7. Speaker 2; 8. Speaker 1 conversation.

B (5 minutes)

S cot,rrack+z
Play the audio again, pausing for students to repeat
the sentences with appropriate intonation'
#D
q3,
for additional practice with intonation to show
interest, have students visit Q Online Proctice.

Expansion Activity: lntonation in job interviews


(15 minutes)

t. Pair students. Remind them that proper intonation


is very usefu1 in job interviews and other
situations when they want to make a good first
impression.
2. Tell students that they are going to practice
varying their intonation to show interest while
role-playing a job interview. A (10 minutes)

3. Assign roles. One student should be the $ cot,rrack+o

interviewer, the other the potential employee. 1. Tell students they are going to listen to a
conversation between friends. Have them read the
4. Throughout *re conversation, the interviewer
excerpts. Elicit any questions or difficulties.
should state facts about his or her "company."
The potential employee should respond with 2. Play the audio while students complete the
appropriate intonation. conversations. Pause as necessary.

Ask volunteers to repeat their conversation for 3. Put students in pairs to compare their answers.
the class. Call on volunteers to share their answers.
4. Give pairs time to practice *re conversations. Call
on volunteers to perform for the class.
Activity A Answers, p.79
1. Why do you say that? 2. Because,
3. first of all, 4. Another reason is, 5. also

40 Unit 4
rl
{
I

I
Tip for Success (1 minute) 2. Explain that you are going to use a rubric similar il
to ttreir Self-Assessment checklist on page 82 to
Read the tip aloud. Point out that asking questions is a I

grade their unit assignment. I

useful way to keep a conversation going. Ask students i

to look at the conversation in Activity A and find the I


!

expressions and questions that keep the conversation Consider the ldeas (10 minutes)
i
going. 7. Tell students they are going to discuss the
advantages and disadvantages of several important
/ Listening and Speoking 3, poge 80
events that can occur in one's life.
B ('10 minutes) 2. Put students in groups to discuss the events. Tell
1. Ask students to read the activities in the box. Elicit them to choose a gro17p reporter.
the meaning of each activity. Tell students to wdte J. Remind students to use the sffategies for asking
an item of their own in the space provided. for and giving reasons.
2. Put students in groups to discuss the activities 4. Call on reporters to share their group's
they'd like to try. Remind them of turn-taking information on one of the events with the
strategies. Elicit some phrases to use when whole class.
signaling ano*rer's turn, e.g., How about you?
Consider the ldeas Answers, p.8O
3. Remind students to maintain eye contact, to Answers will vary. Students should be able to discuss
link words, and to use questions to keep the advantages and disadvantages for each event while
conversation going. using phrases from the speaking skill.
4. Monitor students' convetsations for their use of
phrases for asking for and giving reasons. j,
Listening and Speoking poge 81
dO for additional practice with asking for and giving
ts reasons, havestudents visitQOnlineProctice. Prepare and Speak

qf unit Assignment:
@
- A (5 minutes)
Take part in a group discussion Direct students to read the questions and choose
an event that they have experienced. If they have
Unit Question (s minutes) experienced more ttran one event, tell them to choose
Refer students to the ideas *rey discussed at the the event that has changed their life the most or that
beginning of the unit about the good and bad aspects they remember most clearly.
of change. Cue students if necessary by asking
specific questions about the content of the unit:
What are some of the feelings that people we'tte talked
about have had about change in their lirtes? Can you give B (10 minutes)
examples? What are some of the types of change we've
1. Remind students that they do not have to use
talked about?
complete sentences or words when they write
something in notes.
Learning Outcome
2. Have students make a T-chart to list the
1. Tie the unit assignment to the unit learning advantages and disadvantages that resulted from
outcome. Say: The outcome for this unit is to discuss the change from Activity A.
the advantages and disadvantages of change. This
3. Tell students to summarize their findings in
unit assignment is going to let you show your skill one or two main points that they have learrred
in participating in a discussion. Participating in a
as a result.
discussion is a useful skill because it allows people to
share their experiences, viewpoints, and opinions. In
doing so, we have the opportunity to educate and learn
from others.

Unit 4 41
j Listening ond Speaking 3, page 82 Check and Reflect
G! @
C (10-15 minutes) A (5 minutes)
1. Ask students to review the Self-Assessment 1. Direct students to read and complete the Self-
checklist on page 82. Elicit any questions. Assessment checklist.
Put students in groups to talk about their 2. Ask for a show of hands for how many students
experiences. Remind them not to read directly gave all or mostly yes answers.
from their outlines or T-charts.
). Congratulate them on their success. Discuss
J. Tell students to make a T-chart to take notes the steps they can take if an item on the rubric
during each group member's part of the was difficult for them. For exampls if they had
discussion. trouble using the simple past and present perfect,
4. Monitor students' performance as they work. they should review the rules more carefully.
5. Call on sfirdents you did not have a chance to
monitor to present a summary of their discussion.
6. Use the Unit Assignment Rubric on page 43 of
this Teacher's Handbook to score each student's B (5 minutes)
interview and answer. Refer students to the learning outcome on page 65.
Tell them to talk with their partners about whether
Tip for Success (1 minute) they achieved the learning outcome. Elicit the
Read the tip aloud. Point out that taking notes answers to the unit question that students came up
is useful to help you remember the main with at the beginning of class. Encourage them to
points when many people are participating in flip through the unit as they discuss the new things
a discussion. they learned and new answers they may have to the
unit question.
Alternative Unit Assignments
Assign or have students choose one of these
) Listening and Speaking 3, page 83

assignments to do instead of, or in addition, to the TrackYour Success


unit assignment. 7. Have students circle the words they have learned
1. Do you agree that travel changes your ideas, and in this unit. Suggest that students go back through
gives you abelter understanding of people and the unit to review any words they have forgotten.
places? Give reasons for your ideas and ask your 2. Have students check the skills they have mastered.
paftrril for his or her reasons. If students need more practice to feel confident
2. Losingyourjob can cause big changes. Read the about their proficiency in a skill, point out the
roles and then role-play the conversation in pairs: page numbers and encourage them to review
Student A: You have lost your job. You really liked it, ). Read the learning outcome aloud. Ask students if
and now you feel depressed. Tell your partner what they feel that they have met the outcome.
job you had, and why you liked it. Explain how
losing yourjob has changed your life.
Student B: Listen to your partneL Show sympathy, and
encourage your partner to be positive. Think of ways
in which ttris change might be a good thing. Can you
persuade your partner to see things differently?
tD
q#
for an additional Unit Assignment, have students
visitQOnline Proctice.

!
{
t 42 Unit 4
*
t
{
Unit Assignment Rubric
Student name:

Unit Assignment:Take port in a group discussion.

20 = Presentation element was completely successful (at least 90%o of the time).
15 = Presentation element was mostly successful (at least 700lo of the time)'
10 = Presentation element was partially successful (at least 500/o of the time).
0 = Presentation element was not successful.

I ii;!:rj.::H:
Lffi$i:.

Student spoke easily about the


advantages and disadvantages of change
(without long pauses or reading)and was ll
easy to understand (spoke clearly and at a
I
good speed). r!
t
t
Student used a variety of intonation.

Student correctly used the simple past and


present perfect.

Student used vocabulary from the unit.

Student was able to ask for and give


reasons appropriately.

Totalpoints:
Comments:

O 201 1 Oxford University Press. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use. Unit 4
Activity B Answers, p.85 2_ Ask a reporter from each group to state which
Possible answers: Yes, we are responsible because we people should be responsible for each activity
pollute the environment, and we have a responsibility and why.
to take care of iU Yes, we are responsible because we J. Ask groups to discuss how individual members
are the only ones who can do anything. Yes, we are
feel or do not feel responsible for each activity.
responsible because the world needs help.
Remind groups to discuss examples of ways that
the members take responsibility.
The Q Classroom 4. Choose a different student to report how the
$ coz,rrackoz group members felt about being responsible for
1. Play The Q Aassroom. TJse the example from the one of the activities, for example picking up litter.
audio to help students continue the conversation. Encourage the reporter to give the best example
Ask: What three ways are mentioned as ways in of the way in which one of the group members
which people can be responsible in their communities? takes responsibility for the activity.
Which of these three things do you do? Which don't Activity D Answers, p.86
you do? Why not? Students'answers will vary. Students should be able to
2. On the audio, the teacher asks if people should be give reasons and examples for their answers.
responsible as individuals or if the government
should take some responsibility for taking care of
Expansion Activity: Other ways to take
*re communlty and environment. Elicit students'
responsibility (10 minutes)
opinion on this issue. Ask them to support their
opinions with examples. 1. Seat students in groups or have them stay in their
groups from Activity D.
> Listening and Speaking 3, page 86 2. Ask students to think of the things on the
C (10 minutes) web survey that they currently do not take
1. Tell students they are going to iulswer a survey on responsibility for, and write them down.
roles and responsibilities. Ask students to read the 3. Students should then brainstorm ways they can
survey. Elicit any questions about vocabulary. take responsibility for these things and discuss
2. Put students in pairs to discuss who should be these with their group.
responsible for each activity. Explain that they 4. Elicit ideas from the group.
should choose from the list of people on the right
and that they can use a group more than once.

I Activity C Answers, p.86


I Students'answers will vary.

I Listening and Speoking 3, poge 87

LISTENING 1:
Corporate Social Responsibility

VOCABULARY tts minutes)


7. Direct students to read the words and their
definitions. Elicit any difficulties or questions.
2. Model correct pronunciation of the words. Say
D (10 minutes) each word and have students repeat.
1. Put the pairs in groups to discuss their ideas and J. Ask students to complete the sentences.
ttreir reasons for assigning responsibilities as they 4. Put students in pairs to check answers. Elicit
did. Remind them to use their notes as a basis for answers. Correct as necessary.
their discussion, not as a list to simply read aloud.

Unit 5 45
The professor also mentions the corporate movement
that dates back to the 19th century in Britain. At that
time, working conditions were not good and workers
had few rights. As a result, there was a movement to
orgarrize workers into unions so that they could find
protection or solidarity as a group.

' rsh'fpoli*rtb deluoud.saenrion' fronryatrr' te*cher #hen LISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (5 minutes)

:'' rothE-f ttlJdel+ts dre e.hgdd,ofJ4u,1


:,-1, li; I :., :. ; :..
.
:
;.
@ coz, rrack os
','.:,,,1:. H4v$d1!€h€r-levej,Si.udelts cotr,rplete tlje a,ctisity
qo-{tpnre an$wer$ irt.paiF...Te!
Ask students to read the sentences. Elicit any
.,, :ildiyidual,k4ndtlren
questions or difficulties. Play the audio and have
.t$BCi{'$ rw,ritea!:1.qthgr sample.1gn1en,ce for each :

,.waid. hlare,volu nteersrlv.rit*$naof thq! $ente!q+$. on students choose their answers individually. Elicit
the'board,,Check the sentences as a class, fa-cuslngon the answers.
:th: use,sf vo{abulary rath*i thanErtrnihbtitai'isiues.
I Main ldea Answers, p.88
I r.x 2. F; 3. F; 4.T; s. I 6. F

Vocabulary Answers, p. 87
1. consumer; 2. fair; 3. ignore;
) Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 89
4. fine; 5. profit; 6. benefiu
7. demand; 8. pollute; f. impact; LISTEN FOR DETAILS tto minutes)
10. Developed coz,rracko+
@
d0 for additional practice with the vocabulary, 1. Direct students to read the items before they listen
again. Elicit any questions about them.
2. As you play the audio, have students listen and
choose their answers.
Listening ond Speoking 3, page 88
J. Have students compare answers with a partneL
)
PREVIEW LISTENING 1 (5 minutes)
4. Replay the audio so that the partners can check
l. Direct students to look at the photo. Ask: In which tlreir answers.
ways are clothing companies responsible for people or
5. Go over the answers with *re class.
the environment? How might a clothing company take
advantage of its workers? I Listen for Details Answers, p.89
2. Read the inffoductory paragraph aloud. I
1.a; 2.a;3.b; 4.a;5.b
Brainstorm the meaning of "corporate social
responsibility" as a class. Write the class definition
dO for additional practice with listening
{# comprehension, have students visit
of it on the board. Q Online Practice.
Preview Listening 1 Answers, p.88
Students'answers will vary. ln the listening, the term is
Tip for Success (1 minute)
defined as the need for companies to be responsible
for the economic, social, and environmental impact of Read the tip aloud. Point out that students may want
their actions. to review the vocabulary words before they begin
their discussions.

Listening 1 Background Note


WHAT DO YOU THINK? (10 minutes)
The professor mentions the use of children in the
production of clothing. These children work in what 1. Ask students to read the questions and reflect on
is typically called a sweatshop. A sweatshop is a ttreir answers.
manufacturing operation that underpays employees- 2. Seat students in small groups and assign
often women ar,dwderuge workers-and asks roles: a group leader, a note-taker, a reporter,
them to work long hours. The working conditions and a timekeeper.
may be particularly difficult or unsafe. The workers
are not protected and are often taken advantage of.
Sweatshops exist throughout the world, but they are
illegal in most countries.

46
fl;
:t
'il,l
::
'::ri
J. Give students five minutes to discuss the A (5 minutes) I
questions. Call time if conversations are $ coz,track oo :::
:
winding down. Allow them an exffa minute or 1. Tell students they are going to listen to three :l
two if necessary.
sentences and match them with the speaker's
I

4. Call on each group's reporter to share ideas with attitude.


the class. 2. Play the audio while students match. If necessary,
What Do You Think? Answers, P. 89 pause or play the atdio again.
Answers will vary. Possible answers: 3. Check the answers as a class.
1 . lt is very important. The benefits are the people

respect the companies more and might buy more Activity A Answers, p.90
things from them because of it. 1. nervoirs; 2. angry; 3. uninterested
2. The company is because it is more powerful;
lndividuals are because change has to start with B (10 minutes)
an individual person's decisions.
@ coz, rrack oz
3. Student may talk about companies in their
own country. 1. Tell students they are going to listen to three
conversations. Tell them to check the word
that describes the way the woman in the
Learning Outcome conversation feels.
Use the learning outcome to frame the purpose and 2. Review quickly the features of each attitude
relevance ef li5fsning 1. Ask What did you learn from by eliciting the characteristics of speech for
Listening 1 that prepares you to stete and explain your that attitude.
opinions ablut our responsibility for issues irnpacting our ll
3. Play ttre audio while students check the words.
world? What did you learn that wll help you to identify i.i

4. Call on volunteers to rcad their answers. .l


these issues?
\
Activity B Answers, p.9O
iI
j Listening and Speoking 3, poge 9o 1. angry; 2. uninterested; 3. nervous
Listening Skill: lnferring
a speaker's attitude (1s minutes) _
C (5 minutes)

1. Read the directions to the students. Ask students


@ coz,trackos
to read the sentences quickly Elicit any difficulties
1. Ask students to rcad the information about
or questions about vocabulary.
inferring a speaker's attitude. Elicit any difficulties
or questions. 2. Pttt students in pairs. Tell them to think of a
situation for each sentence in which it would
2. Check comprehension by asking questions:
be said nervously, angrily, or with no interest.
Why might sovneone speak slowly or hesitate before
Explain *rat this will help them to do the activity.
speaking? Why might someone raise his or her voice
when speaking? What are the speaking charactenstics 3. Have students practice the sentences with their
of someone who is bored or uninterested?
partners. Call on a volunteer to read *re sentence
angrily. Cal1 on different volunteers to read the
J. are the
Elicit how these speech characteristics other two sentences in the different ways.
same or different from their own languages.
Tell students they are going to listen to an excerpt
tO for additional practice with inferring a speaker's
4. tff attitude, have students visit Q Online Practice.
from the lecture in which the professor feels a
little angry. Ask them to read along and mark
where the professor raises his voice or sounds ) Listening ond Speoking 3, page 91
angry. Elicit from students the words for which LISTENING 2: Personal Responsibility
the professor raises his voice.
5. Tell students they are going to listen to a
VOCABUTARY tro minutes)
conversation in which Speaker A is bored and
Speaker B is nervous. Ask them to read along and 1. Model the pronunciation of the words in bold.
mark the point of hesitation in Speaker B's speech. 2. Put students in pairs to write the words or phrases
6. Play the audio while students read along. Elicit next to the correct definitions. Cal1 on volunteers
the place where Speaker B hesitates. to read the answers aloud.

Unit 5 47
Vocabulary Answers, p. 91 3. Go over the answers with the class. Elicit what
a. check up on; b. trus! c. guilty; each person from the listening does.
d. sensible; e. influence; f. obligation;
Listen for Details Answers, p.92
g. lie; h. in chargeof; i. help ouU l.c; 2.a;3.c; 4.b; 5.b; 6.d
j. appropriate

tP for additional practice with the vocabulary, have dO for additional practice with listening
tEl students visitQOnline Practice.
t5ii comprehension, have students visit
Q Online Proctice.

Listening ond Speoking 3, page 92


Listening and Speoking 3, page 93
PREVIEW LISTENING
1. Direct students'
2 (s minutes;
attention to the photo and ask: Do
d WHAT DO YOU THINK?

you drink bottled water? If yes, what do you do with A (10 minutes)
the bottles? If no, what do you think people who do 1. Ask students to read the questions and reflect on
drink bottled water should do with the boxles? Why? their answers.
2. Read the paragraph aloud. Ask students to 2. Seat students in small groups and assign
brainstorm a list of things they are personally roles: a group leader, a note-taker, ateporteL
responsible for during the day. Tell them to and a timekeeper.
include things as small as recycling water bottles.
)- Give students five minutes to discuss the
questions. Call time if conversations are
H't"l':gIgSIgpggNot" " _
Many young people live at home while they are going
winding down. Allow them an extra minute or
two if necessary.
to college or a universit5r. They do this to save money.
Call on each group's leportel. to share ideas with
Most young people are expected to contribute to the
the class.
household chores, for examplq doing dishes, keeping
the house clean, or helping with meals. Similarly, Activity A Answers, p.93
teenagers who are still in high school usually live Students'answers will vary. Possible answers:
at home. They may be responsible for taking care 1. My family gives me a lot of responsibility because
of younger children in the household in addition to l'm the oldest. Sometimes I wish I had less
helping with chores. responsibility!
2. I think it depends on the person. Some people
mature more quickly than others.
LISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (5 minutes)

@ coz,rracka B (10 minutes)


1. Ask students to read the statements. Elicii any 7. Have students continue working their small
difficulties with vocabulary or concepts. groups to discuss *re questions in Activity B. Tell
2. Play the audio and have students work them to choose a new leader, recordeLreporter,
individually to choose the correct answer. and timekeeper.
Check as a class. For question 1, encourage students to refer to the
tisten for Main ldea Answers, p.92 pages in their book for Listening 1.
I
| 1.a; 2.b;3.a; 4.c;5.b )- Call on the new reporter to share the group's
answers to the questions.

LISTEN FOR DETAILS tto minutes) Activity B Answers, p.93


Students'answers will vary. Possible answers:
@ coz,rracks 1. Companies should be careful not to pollute and
1. Tell students they are going to listen again. Play to follow environmental laws. lndividuals should
the audio while students match the responsibilities recycle and reduce waste.
and the students. 2. By recycling, by walking instead of driving, by
reducing waste.
2. Have students compare answers with a partner.

48 Unit 5
Learning Outcome Activity A Answers, p.94
2. (noun) the highest lgj/el
Use the learning outcome to frame the purpose and
3. (verb) to stop doing something without achieving
relevance of Listenings 7 and 2 Ask: What did you
what you wanted to do
learn frorn Listening 1 and 2 that prepares you to form 4. (adj) not yet paid or done
an opinion about our responsibility for issues impacting 5. (verb) to use something in a bad or dishonest way
our world? What did you learn that will help you 6. (adj) having high standards of behavior
express them? 7. (verb) take the chance that something bad will
happen
Vocabulary Skill: 8. (adj) honest and willing to talk

Vt,"g I!" qi.ti""


(10
minutes)

1. Direct students to read ttre information silently. B (10 minutes)

2. Check comprehension: What is the first thing you 1. Keep students in pairs, but have students write
should identifu to help you find the conect meaning of their sentences individually.
a word? What should you do after this? What is the 2. Have students compare their sentences with the
context of a word?' partner. Call on volunteers to share one sentence.
3. Ask students to read the conversation to determine Activity B Answers, p.94
the part of speech for the word wrong. Then ask Students'answers will vary. Sample sentences include:
them to read the paragraph after the conversation t. lt is important not to risk the environment
to check their answer. for profit.
4. Tell students to read the definitions to find out 2. It is not just to pay workers less than a fair wage.
3. People won't like a politician if he or she
why definition number 4 is correct. Elicit any
abuses power.
questions or difficulties about the entry.
People and companies should be moral in
their actions.
SkillNote You must pay your outstanding library fines or you
Point out that the dictionary often lists words or won't be allowed to register for next term.
phrases that are common with a particular word.
Explain that these are commonly called collocations' For additional practice with using the dictionary,
These are words and phrases that typically go have students visit Q Online Practice.
together in a particular context or situation. Point
out that when the words are in parentheses it means j Listening ond Speaking j, page 95
that they are not reqttued but they may frequently
be used with the word to express that meaning.
Elicit the collocation for definition number 4 of the
word vu,r'ong.
c,
1. Read aloud the information about tag questions.
2. Check comprehension by asking questions:
If the statemrnt is positive, should the tag questiln
be positive or negative? If the statement is negative,
should the tag question be positive or negative? What
is the subject of a tag question? What should we do
if the statement clntains an auxiliary verb or modal?
) Listening ond Speaking 3, page 94 When should we use do in the tag question?
A (15 minutes)
SkillNote
1. Put students in pairs or small groups to complete
the activity. Review the question tag forms of the simple present,
simple past, present continuous, past continuous, and
Go over the answers with the class.
present perfect. For example:

Unit 5 49
Shc was herq wasn't she? We weren't therq were we? 2. Check comprehensionby asking: Wheru do we use
He was living here, wasn't he? They weren't living there, rising intonation in the tag question? When do we use
were they? falling intonation in the tag question?
Elicit the main verb and attxjliary verbs for each 3. Tell students to read the sentence while they listen
statement and question tag. to the audio. Have them run their fingers along
ttre arrows as they listen.
A (10 minutes) 4. Play the audio again as a model for the students.
1. Tell students to complete the tag questions Stop for students to repeat the sentences with
individually. correct intonation.
2. Remind them to look at the grammar note
for help.
A (10 minutes)

J. Put students in pairs to check their answers.


S coz,rract t t

Check the answers as a class.


1. Have students read the sentences.
4. Have students practice the conversation.
2. Tell students they will check whether the sentence
has rising or falling intonation. Encourage them
Activity A Answers, p.95 to write intonation arrows above the sentences as
l. aren'tyou? 2. does he? 3. did they? they listen.
4. isn't it? 5. shouldn't she? 6. have they?
3. Play the audio while students write their arrows
7. didn't she? 8. can we?
and check their answers.
4. Elicit the answers from volunteers. If there
Listening and Speaking 3, page 96 are any disagreements, play the audio again
B (5 minutes) to confirm.
1. Keep students in pairs, but have them work I Activity A Answers, p.97
individually to complete the activity. I t. nise; 2. Rise; 3. Fall; 4. Fall
2. Encorrage students to use vocabulary or ttremes
from the unit. B (5 minutes)
Activity B Answers, p.96 $ coz,rrack tz
1. have you? 1. Tell students that they are going to use what they
2. shouldn't they? know about question intonation to determine
Answers will vary. Possible answers: whether or not the speaker knows the answer to
3. We need to recycle, don't we? the question.
4. He was taking care of his sister, wasn't he?
5. The company hasn't polluted the river, has it?
2. Elicit the meaning of rising and falling
intonation from the class.
3. Play the audio while students check *reir answers.
C (5 minutes)
Encourage them to draw arrows above the
Have students take turns asking and answering the sentences to show the intonation pattern.
questions from Activity B. Call on several volunteers
Activity Answers, p.97
B
to share their original sentences and answers with
1. the answer; .2. Fall, doesn't know;
Rise, knows
the class.
3. Rise, knows; 4. Fall, doesn't know
# for additional practice with tag questions, have
W students visitQ Online Proctice.
Listening and Speaking 3, poge 98

I Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 97 C (5 minutes)

Pronunciation: S COz, tracks 1 1 and 1 2

Play the audio, pausing for students to repeat the


lntonation in tag questions (10 minutes)
sentences with appropriate intonation. Have students
$ coz,rrack to repeat the sentences chorally and individually.
1. Read the information about intonation in tag
questions.

50
T
iE

ii
r!

D (5 minutes) 2. Play the audio while students complete the ]E

conversation. Pause as necessary.


7. Put students in pairs. Tell them to take turns
reading the sentences from Activities A and B. J. Put students in groups to compare their answers.
Call on volunteers to share ttreir answers.
Have their partners draw another arrow above
each sentence to show whether the intonation 4. Play the audio again to clarify any difficulties.
they hear is rising or fa1ling. 5. Give groups time to ptactice *re conversations.
41p for additional practice with intonation in tag Call on volunteers to perform for the class.
tff questions, have students visit Q Online Proctice.
Activity A Answers, p.99
1. we're going to look at; 2. what's your opinion;
3. What do you think; 4. can we keep to the topic;
Speaking Skill:
5. Do you have anything to add; 6. to sum up, then
Leading lgroup discussion _
(5 minutes)

1. Direct students to rcad the information about B (10 minutes)


leading a group di$cussion. Point out that an
effective discussion typically needs a leader to
1. Split the groups into pairs. Tell the pairs to
continue the discussion using their own ideas.
guide the flow.
2. Check comprehension: What are some of the things
2. Remind them that they are no longer leading a
discussion since they are in a pair. Elicit some of
the discussion leader is responsible for? Whqt are the
the things they should do when discussing with
phrases he or she can use to $art the discussion? What
a partneL for example, maintain eye contact, give
about to end it?
reasons, take turns, etc.
3. Monitor students' conversations for their use of
phrases for asking for and giving reasons and
taking turns.
dlp for additional practice with leading a group
W discussion, have students visit Q Online Practice.

I Listening and Speaking 3, poge 100

qf Unit Assignment:
Take part in a group discussion

Unit Question (s minutes)


Refer students to the ideas they discussed at the
beginning of the unit about whether we are
responsible for the world we live in. Cue students
if necessary by asking specific questions about the
content of the unit: What are the types of responsibility
we talked about? What is corporate social responsibilrty?
What are some the things we are responsible for as
individuals?

Learning Outcome
1. Tie the unit assignment to the unit learring r'
Listening and Speoking 3, page 99 outcome. Sayl' The outcome for this unit is to discuss
whether we are responsible for the woild we live in.
A (10 minutes)
This unit assignment is going to let you show your
$ coz, rrack t r
skill in participating in a discussion. Participating in
1. Tell students they are going to listen to an excerpt a discussion is a useful skill because it allows people
from a discussion on recycling. Have students read to share their experiences, \)iewplints, and opinion. In
*re excerpt. Elicit any questions or difficulties. doing so, we han')e the opportunity to educate and learn
from others.

Unit 5 51
2. Explain that you are going to use a rubric similar since this will make the activity more interesting.
to their Self-Assessment checklist on page 7O2 to 2. Tell students to copy *re statements in the correct
grade their unit assignment. places in *te outline and write their reasons for
their opinions in the space provided. Encourage
Consider the ldeas (s minutes) them to use notes for their reasons since they
should not read directly from their books.
1. Tell students they are going to brainstorm a list of
issues that affect their world. Elicit the examples
Tip for Success (1 minute)
given in book.
2. Put students in groups to brainstorm a list. 1. Read the tip aloud.
Depending on the size of your class, you may 2. Point out that taking notes is useful to help you
want to assign a catego{y to each group. remember the main points when many people are
1. Remind students that when we brainstorm' we
participating in a discussion.
accept all ideas. Tell students to write their lists in
their books.
4. Call on a rcport..r, to share their group's list of
issues with the whole class. Call on reporters from
other groups to add information not mentioned.
Consider the ldeas Answers, P. 1OO
Students' answers wi vary. Possi ble answers:
I I
Pollution-resonsible for recycling; Health-responsible
for eating well and exercising.

Prepare and Speak

A (5 minutes)

Direct students to read the statements. Tell students


to check the statements they agree with. Have them
work individually.

) Listening ond Speoking 3, Poge 101

Tip for CriticalThinking (1 minute) c (10-15 minutes)

1. Read the tip aloud. 7.Review the checklist on page 102. Ask students to
read the checklist. Elicit any questions.
2. Point out that it is important to be able to support
one's ideas and opinions. Explain that giving 2. Put students il groups to talk about their opinions
reasons helps people to better understand your about whether or not we are responsible for
position, and that it is easier to convince or the world we live in. Remind ttrem not to read
persuade people to adopt a viewpoint if they can directly from their outlines.
understand why they should do so. J. Ask students to choose a gtoup leader. If students
are reluctant to choose aleader, choose a student
who is outgoing and capable of leading.
4. Have the leader open the discussion by asking
B (10 minutes) the group members about one of the statements
1. Tell students they are going to choose two in Activity A. Remind students to limit their
statements from Activity A *rat they agreed with discussion to the issues in Activity A so that the
discussion stays on track.
I and one statement they disagreed with. Encourage
I them to choose the statements they felt most 5. Use *re unit assignment rubric on page 54 of
) strongly about, either positively or negatively, this Teacher's Handbook to score each student's
I
participation in the discussion.

Unit 5
t52
ii
6. Monitor students' performance as they work ) Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 103
in pairs. Call on students you did not have a Track Your Success
chance to monitor to present a summary of
their discussion. 1_ Have students circle *re words and phrases they
have learned in this unit. Suggest that students go
Alternative Unit Assignments back through the unit to review any words they
have forgotten.
Assign or have students choose one of these
assignments to do instead of, or in addition, to the Have students check the skills they have mastered
unit assignment. If students need more practice to feel confident
about their proficiency in a skill, point out the
1. In some countries, companies employ children
page numbers and encourage them to review.
in poor conditions, working long hours for
little money. What can be done to prevent this, 3. Read the learning outcome aloud. Ask students if
and what action should be taken against such they feel that they have met the outcome.
companies?
2. Imagine a teacher keeps a whole class after
school because of the bad behavior of one or
two students. What do you think of this idea
of "collective responsibility," which punishes
everyone for ttre mistakes of a few people?
Form a group and discuss your ideas.
#-Q For.n additional unit assignment, have students
\5, visitQOnline Proctice.

Check and Reflect

A (5 minutes)

1. Direct students to read and complete the


Self-Assessment checklist.
2. Ask for a show of hands for how many students
gave all or mostly yes answers. Congratulate them
on their success. Discuss the steps they can take if
an item on the checklist was difficult for them.

dm
B (5 minutes)

Refer students to the learning outcome on page 85.


Tell them to talk with their parlners about whe*ter
they achieved the learning outcome. Elicit the
answers to the Unit Question that students came up
with at the beginning of c1ass.

Unit 5 53
i*ii't:+i;:.:::-g:.f i.iii

Unit Assignment Rubric


Student name:
Date:

Unit Assignment:Take part in a group discussion.

20 = Presentation element was completely successful (at least 907o of the time).
15 = Presentation element was mostly successful (at least 700lo of the time).
10 = Presentation element was partially successful (at least 500/o of the time).
0 = Presentation element was not successful.

i-+:'.ffi,,ffi
Student easily explained opinions about
whether we are responsible for the world
we live in (without long pauses or reading)
and was easy to understand (spoke clearly
and at a good speed).

Student used correct question tag forms.

Student used appropriate question


tag intonation.

Student used vocabulary from the unit.

Student was able to give reasons for his or


her opinions.

Total points:

Comments:

54 Unit 5 @ 2011 Oxford University Press. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.
;

LISTENING. identifying fact and opinion LEARNING OUTCOME


VOCABULARY. context clues to identify meaning State and support your opinions
GRAMMAR. modals expressing attitude concerning the infl uence of advertising
PRONUNCIATION . intonation in questions on our behavior.

SPEAKING . giving and supporting your opinions

) Listening ond Speaking 3, poges 104-105 4. Focus students' attention on the photo. Have a
volunteer describe the photo to the class. Read the
Preview the Unit questions aloud.

Learning Outcome Activity A Answers, p. 105


1. Students may get something to eat, channel surl
7. Ask for a volunteer to read the unit skills and then text or phone friends during the commercial breaks'
the unit learning outcome. 2. Students may or may not click on lnternet ads,
2. Explain: The learning outcome is what you are and they may or may not buy things. Students
expected to be able to do by the unit's end. You are may purchase clothing, music, or electronics on
going to be evaluated on how well you meet this the lnternet.
3. The man is looking at the TV or the convertible
outcorne. With this in mind, you should. focus on
sports car. Students may say he feels tired of
leaming skills ( Listening, Vocabulary, Grammqr,
walking and carrying packages and is interested in
Pronunciation, Speaking) that will support your goal
buying the car, or that he may wish that he could
of stating and supporting your opinions concerning
afford to buy the TV or the car.
the influence of advertising 0n lur behavior. This can
also help you oct as ruentors in the classroom to help
the other students meet this lutcoma B (15 minutes)
t. Inffoduce the Unit Question, "How can
A (10 minutes) advertisers change our behavior?" Ask related
1. Prepare students for thinking about the topic by information questions or questions about personal
asking them where they see ads or commercials, experience to help students prepare for answering
for example, on TV on the Internet, at movie the unit question, which is more abstract. What
theaters, on billboards, etc. Ask which ads or is the goal of advertisers (to make us buy)? How
commercials they remember. Elicit why they can they mske us do this? WLry do they have famous
remember these. Share your own recollections athletes and actors endorsing products? Why do they
of memorable ads and commercials to spark have attractirte people in ad.vertisements? What other
discussion if necessary. techniques do they use?
2. Put students in pairs or small groups to discuss 2. Label four pieces of poster paper: Trust and
the first four questions. Familiarity, New and Different, Rich and Famous,
3. Call on volunteers to share their ideas with and Identify with a Group. Place them in the
the class. Ask questions: Why do you watch corners of the room.
the commercials? Do you like any particular 3. Explain that each poster represents a feeling
comrnercial? Why? If yow don't wqtch them, what that advertising appeals to in order to influence
do you do during the commercial breaks? Why consumers' behavior. Ask students to read and
don't you watch the commercials? Do you recall any consider the unit question and then to stand in
Internet ads that attracted your attention? Why did the corner next to the poster that best represents
the\/ attract your attention? the feeling that they believe influences most
consumers.

Unit 6 55
4. Direct the groups in each corfler to talk amongst D (15 minutes)
themselves about the reasons for their answers.
7. Put students in pairs to compare ttreir answers.
Tell them to choose a recorder to write the
answers on the poster paper. 2. Draw a T-chart on *re board. Write the
headings'Advantages" and "Disadvantages"
5. Call on volunteers from each corner to share their
in the top of the T-chart. Make a separate row
opinions wi*r the class.
for each type of advertising. Tell the pairs to
6. Leave the posters up for students to refer to at the make their own T-chart and use it to take notes
end of the unit. during ttreir discussion.
Activity B Answers, p. 105 3. Remind students'to talk about which type
Possible answers: Advertisers can change our behavior of advertising they pay most attention to in
by manipulating our emotions through the use of their discussions.
beautiful, successful people, or by appealing to a desire
Assign one qlpe of advertising to each pair. Call a
for prestige, to make us want to buy things; Advertisers
student to the board to wyite the advantages and
can change our behavior by making their products
disadvantages of that type of advertising.
look very attractive to us and showing us how they
can make our lives better and easier; Advertisers can Review the information as a class. Elicit
change our behavior by using actors and athletes to which types of advertising students pay most
make their products look good. attention to.
Activity D Answers, p. 106
The Q Classroom Students' answers will vary. Possible answers:
TV-advantages: you can reach a lot of people at once;
$ coz,rract< t+
disadvantages: it's easy for people to change the
1. Play The QClassroom. Use the example from the channel. I pay most attention to magazine ads.
audio to help students continue the conversation.
Ask: According to the students, why does advertising
work? Why is it important that you hear the name
of a company over and over? According to Felix, why : SliirrFil$.iaf;levet:5tHdEntg.:ahdl asSj:at:th€Ic t|iliift
,

might someone buy something new, even if they don't :,rthe:€ai-k BkhJgh*ijer€{'$!udenE:&*f5i851 +r,
:,:::

need it? ': :gt lia*&!e+.whererrh+y.nar:{Grt$ia#$*,,.Ee..:r.:


2. On the audio, students mention that advertising : 1:]::exarjiple. gfl ,:,brtse*;in lB:subxa$at:aB:F€-GFfd$

, :.:.€lctliinslSb}lthent te :eoneider
makes companies seem familiar and then e,&&,erttag**.'and-
consumers trust them, which results in consumers ,' digidyailtagee ofthelq:ryFesof: d_rt8xli5irrcE:.:::,:,:::,
buying their goods and services. Elicit students'
opinion on this issue. Ask students to support tleir
opinions with examples.

Listening and Speaking 3, poge 106

C (10 minutes) Listening and Speoking 3, poge 107


1. Tell students they are going to answer a IISTENING 1 : Advertising Techniques
questionnaire on types of advertising. Ask
students to read ttre questionnaire. Elicit any
questions about vocabulary. VOCABULARY (rs minutes)
2. Explain that students should check how often they 1. Direct students to read ttre words in bold.
notice these ads in their daily 1ife. Tell students 2. Model coffect pronunciation of the words. Say
to think about the things they do and places they each word and have students rcpeat.
go on a typical day. Point out that they need not
). Ask students to read ttre sentences and choose the
remember the company or product ttrat is being
correct answer.
advertised, just that they are aware of the presence
of advertising. 4. Put students in pairs to check their answers.
5. Ask volunteers to read their answers. Elicit or
Activity Answers, p. 106
C
provide corrections as necessary.
Students' answers will vary.

56
E
::
ll
t:

Listening 1 Background Note


Advertising is a field that draws a lot of creative
talent. People who are skilled at writing, music, fine
arts, and visual arts are often drawn to careers in
advertising. It is also known for innovation in film
and video. Advertising is one of the few fields in
which creative people can make a good living.

) Listening and Speaking 3, page 109


LISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (5 minutes)

O cD2,Track ts
1. Ask students to read the ads and techniques. Elicit
any questions or difficulties about *rem.
2. Play the audio and have students match the ads
and techniques individually.
). Elicit the answers from the class.

Vocabulary Answers, p. 107 Main ldea Answers, p. 109


l. a; 2. c; 3. a; 4. b; 5. c; 1.c; 2.d;3.a; 4.e; 5.b
6. b; 7. b; 8. c; 9. b; 10. a

gp for additional practice with the vocabulary, have LISTEN FOR DETAILS tto minutes)
qP students visitQ Online Practice.
@ coz,rrack to
T. Direct students to read ttre sentences before they
Listening and Speaking 3, Poge 108 listen again. Elicit any questions about them.
Tip for Success (1 minute) 2. As you play the audio, have students listen and
Read the tip aloud. Point, out that students may want write 7 or -E

to orgafiize their notebooks according to unit or class, J. Have students compare their answers with
depending on how they remember information best. a partrLer.
4. Replay the audio so that the parffrers can check
PREVIEW LISTENING 1 (5 minutes) their answers.
1. Direct students to look at the photo. l,:sk:. What 5. Go over the answers with the class.
does the cowboy make you think of? Why? Have you Listen for Details Answers, P. 109
ever seen cowboys used in advertising? What were the l. T; 2. F; 3. T; 4. F; 5. F; 6. F; 7.7
products? How did the image of the cowboy help sell
the prod.uct? f,O for. additional practice with listening

Read the introductory paragraph aloud. ti, comprehension, have students visit
QOnline Practice.
Brainstorm the possible products *Iat might be
mentioned on the radio. Encourage students to
narrow their responses by asking them to think WHAT DOYOU THINK? (10 minutes)
about the vocabulary. Lsk: Can you recall any of
the techniques from the vocabulary being used on the 1. Ask students to read the questions and reflect on
radio? What gooils or seruices did they promote? ttreir answers.
Preview Listening 1 Answers, P. 108 2. Seat students in small groups and assign roles: a
Answers will vary. ln the listening, the goods and group leader to make sure everyone contributes,
services mentioned are: home security, chocolate, a a note-taker to record the group's ideas, a rcporter
rodeo event, a restaurant, and deodorant. to share the group's ideas with the class, and a
timekeeper to watch the clock.

Unit 6 57
). Give students five minutes to discuss the Activity A Answers, p. 110
questions. Call time if conversations are 1. fact; 2. opinion; 3. opinion
winding down. Allow them an extra
minute or tvvo if necessary.
B (10 minutes)
4. Call on each group's reporter to share ideas with coz,rrack ta
@
ttre class.
1. Tell students they are going to listen to statements
What Do You Think? Answers, p. 109 from another ad describing a personal computer.
Students' answers will vary. Possible answers: 2. Play the audio while students circle ttreir answers.
1. Ben's diner because it is catchy. Pause or play the ardio agarn if necessary.
2. Emotional appeal since it causes the strongest
reaction. 3. Call on volunteers to read ttreir answers. Elicit
3. Student can talk about radio ads they have heard in the words or information that led sflidents to
English or their own language. their answers.
Activity B Answers, p. 110
1. opinion; 2. fact; 3. facU
Learning Outcome
4. opinion; 5. opinion; 6. fact
Use the learning outcome to frame the purpose
and relevance of Listening 1. Ask: What did yow
learn from Listening 1 that prepares you to state ylur Tip for Success (1 minute)
opinion about advertisers and their techniques? What Read the tip aloud. Point out that students may
did you learn that will help you explain how advertising want to apply these techniques when listening to
influences y our b ehavior? advertisements on the radio or television. Doing so
will make them smarter consumers.
Listening and Speoking 3, poge 1 10
*0 for additional practice with identifuing fact and
Listening Skill: ry opinion, have students visit Q Online Practice.
ldentifying fact and opinion (5 minutes)
1. Ask students to read the information about the Listening ond Speoking 3, page 1 I I
difference between a fact and an opinion. Elicit LISTENIilG 2:
any difficulties or questions.
Advertising Ethics and Standards
2. Check comprehension by drawing a T-chart on
the board. Label the headings Fact and Opinion.
VOCABULARY tro minutes)
3. Elicit other facts and opinions. For example:
This language institute is located in (name of your 1. Direct students to read the words and their
location). This language institute is the best one in definitions. Elicit any difficulties or questions.
the area. ) Model correct pronunciation of the words. Say
4. As a class, brainstormTanguage that indicates a each word and have students repeat.
fact (dates, measurements, locations, prices, etc.). J. Ask students to complete the sentences.
Repeat with language that indicates an opinion
4. Put students in pairs to check their answers.
(adjectives such as good, bad, bettef worse, best,
worst, etc.)
5. Ask volunteers to read *reir answers.
Vocabulary Answers, p. I l1
A (5 minutes) 1. refund; 2. mislead; 3. aimed aU
S coz,rrack tz 4. injury; 5. withdraw; 6. monitor;
1. Tell students they are going to listen to three 7. competitor; 8. evidence; 9. deliberately;
sentences and they need to determine whether 10. regulations
each is a fact or an opinion.
2. Play the audio while students circle fact or opinion.
If necessary pause or play the audio again. , Giouplawet tevel st$dentl,and:qsiislthern.uvith
3. Check the answers as a class. Elicit the words or thetask Point'out:the'etrei ih thE words that will'
information that led students to their answers. thelp1hem fo choose theconect answeq, for example
the prefix,re- in refrnd inditates again,sothe ward
indieatesle fundogoin

58
2. Play the audio while students choose the best
answer to complete each sentence.
J. Have students compare answers with a partner.
4. Go over the answers with the class.
Listen for Details Answers, p. 1 12
I
1. b; 2. a; 3. b; 4. c; 5. a; 6. a; 7.a; 8. a
tP
qi*
for additional practice with listening
comprehension, have students visit
Q Online Proctice.

flp
W
for additional practice with the vocabulary, have
students visit Q Online Practice.
ffru
I Listening and Speoking 3, page 1 14

A (10 minutes)
I Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 1 1 2
Ask students to read the questions and reflect on
PREVIEW LISTENING 2 (5 minutes) 1.
*reir answers.
Read the paragraph aloud. Explain that the FTC is
2. Seat students in small groups and assign roles: a
responsible for regulatingtade, or buying and selling,
group leader to make sure everyone contributes,
in the United States.
a note-taker to record the group's ideas, a reporter
to share the group's ideas with the class, and a
Listening 2 Background Note *_ timekeeper to watch the clock.
The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is an independent )- Give students five minutes to discuss the
agency of the US government. It was established by
questions. Call time if conversations are
President Woodrow Wilson in 1915. It is responsible
winding down. Allow them an exffa minute
for keeping American business competition free and or tvvo if necessary.
fat andwas established as part of a program to check
4. Ca1l on each group's reporter to share ideas wittr
the growth of monopoly. and preserve competition as
an effective regulator of business. The FTC has five
the class.
members, and no more ttran three of them may be Activity A Answers, p. 1 14
members of the same political parry Students' answers will vary. Possible answers:
1. Yes, because you see the product but are not
LISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (5 minutes) bothered by an annoying ad; No, because it's too
subtle. Many movies and TV shows use product
@ coz,rrack ts placement ads.
1. Ask students to read the statements. Elicit any 2. Student may say children or teenagers because they
difficulties with vocabulary or concepts. are younger and more easily influenced.

2. Play the audio atd have students complete the


activity individually. B (10 minutesl

J. Call on volunteers to share *reir answers. 7. Have students continue working their small
groups to discuss the questions in Activity B. Tell
Listen for Main ldea Answers, P. 112
4.f; 5.F; 6.1; 7.r; 8. them to choose a new leader, recorder, reporter,
I
1.1 2.F; 3. F; F
and timekeeper.
2. For question 7, etcourage students to reflect on
LISTEN FOR DETAILS ts minutes) the discussion from the Q classroorru, as well as
Listenings 7 arrd 2.
$ coz,rractzo
)- Call on the new reporter to share the group's
1. Tell students they are going to listen again. Ask
answers to the questions.
them to read the sentences and answer choices.
Elicit any questions or difficulties.
Activity B Answers, p. 1 14 SkillNote
Answers will vary. Possible answers: Point out *rat being able to determine a word's
1. lt's cheap, healthy, beautiful, modern, prestigious. meaning from context is an important skill because
2. cheap-appliances, books, household items; there may be times when a dictionary is unavailable.
healthy-food, vitamins, skin care;
Similarly, in testing situations, dictionaries may not
beautiful-makeup, hair products, clothing;
be permitted.
modern-electronics, cars;
prestigious-electronics, cars, clothing.
I Listening ond Speoking j, page 1 1 5
A (10 minutes)
Tip for CriticalThinking (1 minute)
1. Review ttre first sentence with the class. Ask
Read the tip aloud. Point out that we need to evaluate students to work individually to underline the
in our academic as well as our everyday lives. context clues in each sentence. Point out that there
Practicing this skill is important to academic success may be one or tvvo context clues for each.
as well as to success as a consumer in the marketplace.
2. Put students in pairs to review their answers. Go
over the arswers with the class.
Activity A Answers, p. 115
2. same ads all day/ over and over;
3. the most expensive;
4. sell more;
5. ads / everywhere;
6. couldn't stop humming for days.

Learning Outcome
Use the learning outcome to frame the purpose and
relevance of Listenings 7 and 2 and the Critical Q
activity of evaluating an advertising slogan. Ask:
What did you learn from the listenings and evaluating
advertising slogans that prepares you to state and
support your opinions about advertising's influence on
our behq\)ior?
B (5 minutes)

Vocabulary Skill: Context clues 1. Keep students in pairs, but have students do the
to identify meaning (10 minutes) activity individually.

1. Direct students to read the information in the first 2. Have students compare their answers with their
partner. Call on volunteers to read their answers.
paragraph silently.
2. Check comprehension: What does corfiert mean? Activity B Answers, p. 115
How can it help us to understand a word's meaning? I. push; 2. eye-catching; 3. primetime;
4. hype; 5. catchy; 6. tedious
3. Ask students to read the remaining information.
Elicit a way based on part of speech that students for additional practice with using context
can determine fhat circulation is a rrolon (It is
^ID
{|l, cluesto identify meaning, have students visit
preceded by a which is used before nouns). Q Online Proctice.

4. Elicit any questions or difficulties about the


information.

Unit 6
t'

b Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 1 1 6 Pronuncialion Part 1z


lntonation in questions (10 minutes)

@ coz,trackzz
1. Read the information about intonation in
Grammar: questions.
Modals expressing attitude (to minute,
2. Check comprehension by asking'. Is intonation the
1. Read the information about modal verbs aloud. same for all questions? What is the intonation at the
end of yes/no questions? What is the intonation at the
2. Check comprehension by asking qtesttons: What
end of wh- questions?
kind of verbs are modal verbs? What four kinds of
attitude can they express? What is an example of a J. Tell students to read the questions from the
modal verb that expresses prohibition? Is must / must interview while they listen to the audio. Have
not more comrnon in conversatiln than in writing? them run their fingers along the arrows as they
listen to the audio.
SkillNote 4. Play the audio again as a model for the students.
Write the subject pronouns, I, you, he, she, it, we, ar;:d Stop for students to repeat the sentences with
they on the board. Point out that with modal verbs, corect intonation.
the form is the same for each of these subjects.
A (10 minutes)
A (10 minutes) @ coz, rrack zr

@ coz,rrackzt 1. Have students read ttre sentences.


1. Tell students they are going to circle the 2. Tell students to circle whether the sentence has
modal verbs they hear. Ask them to read the rising or falling intonation. Encourage them
conversation. Elicit any questions or difficulties. to write an arrow above ttre sentencq as in the
2. Play the audio while students circle their answers. examples in the preceding section, to show the
intonation as they listen.
3. Put students in pairs to check their answers.
Check ttre answers as a class. 3. Play the audio while students write their arrows
and circle their answers.
4. Have students practice the conversation.
4. Elicit the answers from volunteers. If there
Activity A Answers, p. 116
arc any disagreements, play the audio again
1. don't have to; 2. don't have to; 3. can't;
to confirm.
4. should; 5. shouldn't
I Activity A Answers, P. 117
Listening and Speaking i, Page 1 17
I t. rise; 2. fall; 3. rise; 4. rise; 5. fall
B (10 minutes)
B (5 minutes)
1. Put the pairs into groups to discuss the questions. $ coz,trackz+
2. Assign a note-taker and a rcpofier for each group. 1. Tell students to repeat the questions, using the
3. Call on the reporter for each group to present the same intonation that they hear.
group's opinions for each question. 2. Play the audio, pausing as necessary for students
Activity B Answers, p. 117 to repeat.
Student's answers will vary. Possible answers:
1. Ads that make people angry should still be allowed; j Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 1 18
advertisers don't have to make people happy. Pronunciation Part 2
2. Ads that mislead people must not be allowed. They
have to tell the truth.
lntonation in questions (10 minutes)

For additional practice wilh modals, have students


$ coz,trackzs

visil Q Online Practice. 1. Read the information about intonation in


statements as questions.

Unit 6 61
2. Check comprehension by asking: Is intonation 2. Point out that an opinion that is presented clearly
the same for statements used as a question as it is and is supported is usually more persuasive than
for traditional questions? What is the intonation for one that is not.
a statement? What is the intonation for a statement Check comprehensiouWhat are some of the
used as a question? phrases used for giving opinions? What are some
3_ Tell students to read the sentences while they phrases used for supporting an opinion?
listen to the audio. Have them run their fingers
along the arrows as they listen to the audio.
4. Play the audio again as a model for the students.
Stop for students to repeat the sentences wittr
correct intonation.

C (5 minutes)

$ coz, rract zo
1. Tell students they are going to listen to some
sentences that are spoken as either statements
or questions.
2. Do the example with the students. Remind them
to put the punctuation at the end of the sentence.
3. Have students complete the activity. Check
as a class. Replay the audio as necessary to
clarify answers.
Activity C Answers, p. 118
1. question; 2. statement; 3. question;
4. statement; 5. question; 6. question;
7. statement {
A (10 minutes)

D (5 minutes) @ coz,rrack zs

$ coz,rrack zz 1. Tell students they are going to listen to a

1. Put students in pairs. conversaflon about an ad. Have students read the
conversation. Elicit any questions or difficulties.
2. Play the audio again for students, pausing after
each sentence for students to repeat. 2. Play the audio while students complete the
conversation. Pause as necessary to give students
3. Tell students to take turns saying the sentences
time to write.
from Activity C in a random order and using the
intonation (question or statement) of their choice. 3. Put students in pairs to compare their answers.
Call on volunteers to share their answers.
4. Call on several students to say a sentence for the
class. Ask the class to determine if the intonation
4. Play the audio again to clarify any difficulties.
was for a question or statement. 5. Give pairs time to practice the conversations.
for additional practice with question and statement 6. Cal1 on volunteers to perform for the class.
^6|P
W intonation, have students visit Q Online Practice.
Activity A Answers, p. 119
l. lfyou askme; 2. because;
> Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 1 l9 3. As far as l'm concerned; 4. For instance;
5. ln my opinion
Speaking Skill: Giving and
supporting your opinions (5 minutes)

1. Direct students to read the information about


> Listening ond Speoking 3, page 120

giving and supporting opinions. B (10 minutes)

1. Keep students in pairs. Tell them to discuss the


effectiveness of ads that feature famous people.

62 Unit 6
2. Remind them to use the phrases for giving and Consider the ldeas (10 minutes)
supporting opinions. Elicit some of the *rings they
should do when discussing with a partner, for 7. Tell students they are going to choose one of the
example, maintain eye contact, give reasons, take topics and discuss their ideas with a partner. Ask
turns, etc. students to quickly read the three topics and their
questions. Elicit any difficulties or questions.
J. Monitor students' conversations for their use of
phrases as well as their intonation. Remind students to keep the Unit Question in
mind as they discuss. Also remind them to focus
For additional practice with giving and supporting
on their intonation in questions and statements.
opinions, have students visit Q Online Practice.
3. Put students in pairs to choose their topics and
discuss them. Tell them to take notes during
Expansion Activity: Opinions about advertisements their discussion.
minutes)
('10
E
t; 4. Call on volunteers to share their opinions and give
l. Put students into pairs. their reasons.
a
2. Ask them to think about three different kinds of
I Listening and Speoking j, page 121
advertisements they have seen recently.
J. Have them tell their partners about the three Prepare and Speak
different advertisements they saw and the
advantages and disadvantages of each type.
f
i
Remind them to support their opinions with
reasons and examples, and to use the phrases
A (5 minutes)

ii 1. Direct students to write notes on what they can


l
from the Speaking Skill box on page 119 of the recall from their discussion of the Consider the
studeut book. Ideas activity. Encourage them to add any new
a
f Elicit answers from volunteers. ideas they have thought of.
Point out that students should write as much

ffi unit Assignment: as they can remember since they will have
the opportunity to select the most important
Take part in a group discussion
information in the next activity.
Unit Question (s minutes) Remind students not to write complete sentences.
Refer students to the ideas they discussed at the
If necessary elicit the main points of writing
notes (main ideas, no complete sentences, etc.).
beginning of the unit about how advertisers try to
change our behavior. Cue students if necessary by 4. Tell students to compare their notes with
asking specific questions about the content of the their partner's.
writ'. What are sotne of the techniques that adttertisers
use to influence conswmers? What are the different
types of products that rnay be marketed with these
various techniques? B (10 minutes)

1. Tell students to choose the most important


Learning outcome ideas from their notes in Activity A and
7. Tie the unit assignment to the unit learning complete the outline.
outcome. Say: The outcome for this unit is to discuss 2. Remind students not to write complete
how advertisers can influence our behavior. This sentences, just the most important points
unit assignrnent is going to let yow show your skill in they need to mention.
participating in a discussion. Participating in a group
discussion is a useful skill because it allows people to Listening and Speaking 3, page 1 22
share their experiences, viewpoints, and opinion. In
doing so, we have the opportunity to educate qnd learn E@
from others. C (10-15 minutes)
2. Explain that you are going to use a rubric similar
to their Self-Assessment checklist ot page 722 to
1. Review the checklist on page 722. Ask students to
read it. Elicit any questions.
grade their unit assignment.

Unit 6 63
,=
.=
:=
:=
2. Put students in groups according to which topic Check and Reflect :=
they chose. Remind them not to read directly from
their outlines.
Ask students to choose a group leader. If students
@ =
J.
are reluctant to choose aleader, choose a student
A (5 minutes)

who is outgoing and capable of leading. Remind 1. Direct students to read and complete the Self-
Assessment checklist.
students of the role of the group leader (to ensure
everyone speaks, to keep the discussion going, etc). 2. Ask for a show of hands for how many students
gave all or mostly yes answers.
4. Have the leader open the discussion by asking the
group members about their opinions on the topic. 3. Congratulate them on tlreir success. Discuss the
Remind students to limit their discussion to the steps they can take if an item on the checklist
issues outlined in Activity B so that the discussion was difficult for them. For examplg if they
stays on ffack. had trouble with intonation, they can record
themselves speaking and ask another student to
5. Use the Unit Assignment Rubric on page 65 of
rhis Teacher\ Handbook to score each student's listen to them.
participation in the discussion.
Monitor students' performance as they work
in groups. Call on students you did not have
@
a chance to monitor to present a summary of B (5 minutes)
their discussion. Refer students to the learning outcome on page 105.
Tell them to talk with their partners about whether
Alternative Unit Assignments they achieved the learning outcome. Elicit the
Assign or have students choose one of these answers to the Unit Question that students came up
assignments to do instead of, or in addition, to the with at *re beginning of class. Encourage them to
unit assignment. flip through the unit as they discuss the new things
1. Think of an ad you know, or find one onlinq on they learned and new answers they may have to the
TV or ita magazine or newspaper. Using the Unit Question.
chart below as a guidq make notes and prepare to
talk about the ad. ) Listening and Speaking 3, page t 23

TrackYour Success
Type of ad (radio, TV etc.):
1. Have students circle the words they have learned
Name of product it is advertising:
in this unit. Suggest that students go back through
Target audience: the unit to review any words they have forgotten.
What you like about the ad: 2. Have students check the skills they have mastered.
What you don't like about the ad: If students need more practice to feel confident
about their proficiency in a skill, point out the
Techniques it uses: page numbers and encourage them to review.
How it could be improved: ). Read the learning outcome aloud. Ask students if
they feel that *rey have met the outcome.
Form a group and present your analysis of the
ad you chose. Remember to explain your reasons
clearly and give examples wherever possible. After
you finish, be prepared to answer any questions
your classmates may have.
Make your own radio ad. ln a group, discuss your
ideas and then plan your ad. Use the worksheet
from question 1 to help you.

64 Unit 6
Unit Assignment Rubric
Student name:

Unit Assignment:Take part in a group discussion.

20 = Presentation element was completely successful (at least 9070 of the time).
15 = Presentation element was mostly successful (at least 70%o of the time).
10 = Presentation element was partially successful (at least 5070 of the time).
0 = Presentation element was not successful.

Student spoke easily (without long


pauses or reading) about the influence
of advertising on our behavior and was
easy to understand (spoke clearly and at a
good speed).

Student expressed attitude using correct


modal verb forms.

Student used appropriate statement and


question intonation.

Student used vocabulary from the unit.

Student was able to give and support


their opinion.

Total points:
Comments:

O 201 1 Oxford University Press. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use. Unit 6
umbers LEARNING OUTCOME
VOCABULARY . word families Give a short presentation on a risk you
GRAMMAR. past perfect have taken, explaining your reasons for
PRONUNCIATION . contraclion of had taking that risk.
SPEAKING . giving a short presentation

j Listening and Speaking 3, poges 124-125 Activity A Answers, p. 125


Possible answers:
Preview the Unit 1. Risks people take can include physical, financial, or
emotional risks. Examples of physical risk include
Learning Outcome sports and expeditions. Examples of financial risk
include some investments and perhaps education.
1. Ask for a volunteer to read the unit skills and then
Examples of emotional risks include confrontlng
the unit learning outcome.
50meone.
2. Explain: The learning outcome is what you are 2. Students will have different opinions about where
expectedto be able to do by the unit's end. You are to draw the line on taking risks.
going to be evaluated on how well you meet this 3. The photo is a rocket launch. Student may say that
lutcome. With this in mind, you should focus on this is a risk because it is very dangerous.
learning skills ( Listening, Vocabulary, Grammar,
Pronunciation, Speaking) that will support your
B (15 minutes)
goal of giving a short presentation on a risk you have
taken, explaining your reasons for taking that risk. 1. Introduce the Unit Question, 'What risks are
This can also help you act as mentors in the classroom good to take?" Ask related information questions
to help the other students meet this outcome. or questions about personal experience to help
students preparc for answering the Unit Question,
A (10 minutes) which is more abstract. What is the reward of
1. Prepare students for thinking about the topic by taking a risk? Hw,t do people evaluate the risk of an
asking students what they ttrink constitutes a risk. activity in relation to its reward? Are some rewards
Elicit the characteristics of an activity that make worth more than others?
it a risk. Start the discussion by asking questions 2. Read the unit question aloud. Point out that
such as: Does a riskhave to involve physical danger? answers to the question can fall into the following
Must it inyolve the possibility of losing something, for categories: 1. Risks that offer personal financial
example tnoney? Generate a class definition of risk benefits; 2. Risks *rat offer financial benefits to
and write it on *re board. society or humanity; 3. Risks that offer personal
2. Pttt students in pairs or small groups to discuss benefits not related to finances; and 4. Risks that
the first five questions. offer societal benefits not related to finances.
3. Call on volunteers to share their ideas with the )- Give students a minute to silently consider their
class. Ask questions to facilitate the discussion:,4re answers to the unit question.
some actittities more risky than others? Why? What 4. Write each category at the top of four sheets of
makes a risk worth taking? How do people decide that poster paper. Elicit answers for the question and
a risk is worth tuking? make notes of the answers under *re correct
4. Focus students' attention on the photo. Have a heading. Post the lists to refer to later in the unit.
volunteer describe tkre photo to the class. Read the
questions aloud.

66 Unit 7
=l

Activity B Answers, p. 125


Possible answers: Risks that are worth taking are
those for which the potential benefits of success ,,, ,,,,, Gf,o-irpiAwer-latel,studentrandas-iist thern,with
outweigh the potential losses if the risk fails; The . the sl*dak,lii$hetilevelrstudents to categorize,rhei
risks that are good to take have a greater benefit if '',i aathritietiiilthe qruastionnaire into thefollowing:. :',,
successful than loss if unsuccessful; Good risks will give :, gfoxr.ili;:ph}t9iaii:risk tsking, {iniaeial'rtsttakiE$.
:

a very good reward if they are successful. They will not and social risk taking. Tell them to categorize their
be very harmful if they fail. .. , aniu/eB:trtdetdrming exactly what kind of risk tal*t
thcy,are,:i.e Bhltsica[ social. or financi8l riJl(,takef;

The Q Classroom
$ coz, rrack zo Expansion Activity: Risks in reallife (10 minutes)

1. Play The QClassroom.Use the example from the 1. Keep students in their groups from Activify D.
audio to help students continue the conversation.
2. Ask students to think of risks they have taken in
Ask: What Wes of risks do the students mention
their lives. They should think about why it was
(social and professional) ? Why is it good to take
a risk, why they took it, and if it was a good risk
social risks? What are the risks of changing jobs?
to take.
2. On the audio, students mention that it is
3. Have students share their risks with their groups.
important to be careful about taking risks.
Elicit students' opinions to how one can be
as 4. Elicit answers from the groups.
careful about taking risks. If necessary, begin the
discussion by offering suggestions, for example,
thinking about the effects on their family, their
financial situation, etc.

Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 126 Listening ond Speoking 3, poge I 27

C (10 minutes) LISTENING 1: Financing a Dream


1. Tell students they are going to answer a
questionnaire to find out whether they are risk VOCABULARY tts minutes)
takers. Ask students to read the questionnaire.
1. Direct students to read the words and their
Elicit any questions about vocabulary. definitions. Elicit any difficulties or questions.
Explain that students should check whether they 2. Model correct pronunciation of the words. Say
have done the action, have never done the action
each word and have students repeat.
but might do it, or have never done the action and
they won't do it.
3. Ask students to complete the parugraph.

Have students complete the questionnaire and 4. Put students in pairs to check their answers.
rate their answers according to the key at the 5. Ask volunteers to read their answers. Elicit or
bottom of the page. provide corrections as necessary.

Activity C Answers, p 1 26
Students' answers wil I vary.
I

D (10 minutes) willhElp.th3:l tp chqo1e tle,cq1f!t $&td. Qive . ,,


t. Put students in groups to compare their answers. them:additioiat sanleruqi !o hglp thert,nrteticqilhe
diffiqnf!.locfFulgry, For,exarnple: I ofw4ys pqefer,lo pcy
2. Tell students to review their answers and their
cash ihsttsd. of baying rhings with nrad{. A' Jaaf ndlist'*,
results. Students should discuss whether they j6& ii to erpos€,rh* rruthi ererr:rTtfur fs da,ngercusor:
agree with the descriptions and give reasons and
unpopul*r,
examples for their opinions.
J. Ask students to rank the members of their group
from most willing to take risks to least willing to
take risks.
4. Call on volunteers to report their group's findings.

Unit 7 67
Main ldea Answers, p. 128
I Check items 1, 3, and 6.
I
) Listening and Speoking 3, poge 1 29

IISTEN FOR DETAILS tto minutes)


$ coz,rrackrt
1. Direct students to read ttre names and types
of financing before they listen again. Elicit
Vocabulary Answers, p. 127 any questions.
1. financial; 2. income; 3. crediu
4. debt; 2. As you play the audio, have students listen and
5. funds; 6. embarrass; 7. expose; 8. model; match the names with the types of financing.
9. audience; 10. threaten
3. Have students compare *reir answers with
a0 for additional practice with the vocabulary, have a partneL
5i students visit Q online Practice. 4. Replay the audio so that the partners can check
their answers. Go over the answers with the class.

I Listening ond Speoking 3, page 128 Listen for Details Answers, p. 129
PREVIEW LISTENING 1 (5 minutes) 1.d; 2.c;3.b; 4.a;5.e
Read the introductory paragraph aloud. Ask students
to think of two financial risks a filmmaker might take
4O for additional practice with listening
S comprehension, have students visit
in order to make a movie. Tell students they should Q Online Practice.
review their answers after the listening.
Preview Listening 1 Answers, p. 128
Possible answers: Filmmakers might lose all their ffwHAT Do You rHtNK? r,o r,nur"o
savings or their homes. L. Ask studenB to rcad the questions and reflect on
their answers.
Listening 1 Background Note Seat students in small groups and assign roles: a
group leader to make sure everyone contributes,
A1l the filmmakers mentioned in the listenilg arc
a note-taker to record the group's ideas, a reporter
noted independent filmmakers. Independent films
to share the group's ideas with the class, and a
differ from mainstream, commercial movies in that
dmekeeper to watch the clock.
they are created without the financial backing of a
Hollywood studio. As a result, independent films Give students five minutes to discuss the
t1pically have lower budgets and frequently, they questions. Call time if conversations are
are not marketed widely. They often rely on critical winding down. Allow them an extra minute
acclaim or word-of-mouth recommendations to attract or tvvo if necessary
their audiences. 4. Call on each group's reporter to share ideas with
tlre class.
IISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (5 minutes)
What Do You Think? Answers, p. 129
Answers will vary. Possible answers:
$ coz,rrack:o
l. They wanted to make these films but did not have
1. Explain that students are going to listen to the the money to do it.
film critic's talk and check the risks that *re 2. My dream of getting a degree and a good job
filmmakers took when making their movies. requires a financial risk since l'm spending a lot of
2. Ask students to read the information. Elicit any money to make it happen.
questions or difficulties. 3. Policemen or firefighters have jobs that have a
lot of physical risk because they are often in life-
3. Play the audio and have students check the risks
threatening situations.
individually.
4. Elicit *re answers from the class.

68 Unit 7
Learning Outcome Activity A Answers, p. 130
1. one hundred and eightythousand dollars;
Use the learning outcome to frame the purpose and
2. ten dollars;
relevance of Listening 1. Ask What did you learn from 3. five-pound, three dollars;
Listming 1 that prepares you to give a short presentation 4. four-hundred-seat;
0n a risk you have taken? What did you learn that will 5. five-hundred-dollar;
help you explain your reasons for taking that risk? 6. ten-question;
7. sixty pounds;
) Listening and Speoking 3, page 1 i0 8. fifty-dollar
Listening Skill Part I:
ldentifying amounts (ts minutes) Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 131

O cD2,Track 32-34 B (10 minutes)

1. Ask students to read the information about 1. Put students in pairs to ask and answer questions
identifying amounts. Elicit any difficulties about the sentences in Activity A.
or questions. 2. Call on volunteers to ask their questions. Elicit the
2. Check comprehension by asking questions: Do answers from the class.
you write currenq omounts in the same way that you
ActivityB Answers, p. 131
hear them? Answers will vary. Possible answers:
3. Tell studens to follow along in their books while 2. How much are the cheapest tickets?
they listen to the examples of currency amounts. 3. How much is the five-pound bag of sugar?
Play track32. 4. How many seats were in the theater?
5. What does that store sell?
4. Review the currency symbols for dollars ($),
6. What kind of survey did you take online?
pounds (9), and euros (€). Ask students to pay
7. How much does your suitcase weight?
attention to the amount theY hear.
8. What did Maria find on the sidewalk?
5. Play track 33 and elicit how the amounts in the
excerpt were spoken. aD for additional practice with amounts,
6. Tell students they are going to listen to anottrer ry have students visit Q Online Proctice.

example of amounts, but this time they will hear


the amounts as adjectives.
Listening Skill Part 2 Cardinal
7. Play frack34 while students follow in their and ordinal numbers (5 minutes)
books. Pause for students to repeat the amounts
in bold. @ coz,track:o
8. Tell students to read the information on amounts 1. Ask students to rcad the information about
as adjectives. Ask Do we use a plural form in the identifying cardinal and ordinal numbers. Elicit
adjective? (No) any difficulties or questions.
2. Check comprehension by asking qtestiots: What
A (5 minutes) do most ordinal numbers end in? What kind of
@ coz,rrackss number is one? (cardinal) What kind. of number is
1. Read the directions aloud. Tell students to write third? (ordinal).
the amounts as words, including hyphens if 3. Tell students they are going to listen to some
necessary. Point out that they don't need to write cardinal and ordinal numbers. Have them follow
the dollar sign if the amount refers to money, along in their books while they listen.
because they will have written the wotd dollar.
Play the audio, pausing for students to say the
2. Play the audio while students complete the pairs of numbers.
sentences. If necessary pause or replay the audio.
3. Check the answers as a class. C (10 minutes)
@ coz, rrack sz
1. Tell students to look at the first pait of
sentences. Elicit the difference between them
(The first has a cardinal number and the second
has an ordinal number).

Unit 7 69
2. Tell students they are going to hear only one of I Listening and Speaking 3, Poge 1 33 I
tlre sentences from the pair. Have them check the PREVIEW IISTENING f (5 minutes)
{
sentence they hear.
1. Read the paragraph aloud. Ask students to look at
). Play the audio while students check the correct
the photo of the Loch Ness Monster. Ask'. Do you
sentences.
beliente it is real? Why or why not?
4. Check as a class. Play the audio again to confirm.
2. Tell students to check the risks they think
Activity Answers, p. 131
C scientists might take. Tell them to review their
1. The seventh test can be taken this week. answers after the listening.
2. The nine students left an hour ago'
3. I ate fifteen cookies. Listening 2 Background Note
4. Did you receive the sixth email I sent you?
The Loch Ness Monster is believed by some to be
5. Push the fourth button.
a dinosaur-like creature that lives in Loch Ness, a
lake in the Scottish highlands. The first reported
Listening and Speoking 3, Poge 132 sighting was in 7933, although evidence for its
existence is based on conffoversial photographs and
D (10 minutes)
much-disputed sonar readings, and has never been
$ coz.rrackse
scientifically proven.
1. Play the audio again, pausing for students to
repeat the sentences.
LISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (5 minutes)
2. Put students in pairs. Tell them to choose a
sentence from each pair to say to their partnet. $ coz,rrack ro

J. Explain that their partner should hold up one 1. Ask students to read the statements. Elicit any
finger if they hear the first sentence, or two if difficulties wi*t vocabulary or concepts.
they hear the second. Tell them to change roles 2. Play the audio and have students work
after one sentence from each pair has been read' individually to write T or F.
4. Monitor students' activity. Pay attention to the 3. Call on volunteers to share ttreir answers.
ending sound on the ordinal numbers.
p. 133
For additional practice with cardinal and ordinal I Listen for Main ldea Answers, F;
I t.r 2. F; 3. 1 4. F; 5. 6.7
numbers, have students visit Q Online Practice.

LISTENING 2: The Truth I Listening and Speaking 3, Poge 1 i4


about the Loch Ness Monster LISTEN FOR DETAILS ts minutes)

@ coz,rrack+o
VOCABULARY tto minutes)
1. Tell students they are going to listen again. Ask
1. Ask students to locate the bold words in each them to read the questions and answer choices.
sentence. Model correct pronunciation and have Elicit any questions or difficulties.
students repeat the words. 2. Play the audio while students choose ttre correct
2. Tell students to rcad the sentences and then write answer.
the word next to its definition below. 3. Have students compare answers with a pattner.
). Put students in pairs to check their answers. 4. Go over ttre answers with the class.
4. Ask volunteers to read their answers. Elicit or
provide corrections as necessary. I Listen for Details Answers, P. 134
I t.u, 2. a, 3. c, 4. b, 5. a, 6. b, 7.b
Vocabulary Answers, P. 132
a. locate; b. solve; c. previous; d. investigate; 4Q for additional practice with listening
qE
e. invent; f. retire; 9. reputation; h. prove; comprehension, have students visit
i. mystery; j. discover Q Online Practice.

For additional practice with the vocabulary, have


students visil Q Online Practice.

70 Unit 7
I
I

Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 135 2. Check comprehension: What is a word family? I

What is the root word for invention and inventle? I

WHAT DO YOU THINK? !

What do these words mean? i

A (10 minutes) -)- Ask students to read the remaining information. ,i l

Elicit how understanding word families can


Ask students to read the questions and reflect on
increase vocabulary (t is possible to add new words ,l
1.
their answers.
to it based on understqnding a root word).
2. Seat students in small groups and assign roles: a 4. Elicit any questions or difficulties about the
group leader to make sure everyone contributes, information.
a note-taker to record the group's ideas, a reporter
to share *te group's ideas with the class, and a I Listening ond Speaking j, poge 1 36
timekeeper to watch the clock. (1 minute)
Tip for CriticalThinking
3. Give students five minutes to discuss the
Read the tip aloud. Point out that categonzing is an
questions. Call time if conversations are
extremely useful skill and that groups can be based on
winding down. Allow them an extra minute or
a various things, for example, meaning or ttreme, or
two if necessary.
even parts of speech.
4. Call on each group's reporter to share ideas with
the class.
Activity A Answers, p. 135
Students' answers will vary. Possible answers:
1. He is willing to risk so much because he really
believes in Nessie. He is different from most people
in that he will risk his career and reputation for
something that may not be true.
2. People find mysteries interesting because they are
unusual and cannot always be explained.

B (10 minutes)

1. Have students continue working in their sma1l


groups to discuss the questions in activity B. Tell
them to choose a new leader, recotdet, reporter,
and timekeeper.
2. Recap the people talked about in the listening as Learning outcome
well as the risks they took. Use the learning outcome to frame the purpose and
Call on the new reporter to share the group's relevance of Ustenings 7 and 2 and the Critical Q
answers to the questions. activity of categorizing. Ask: What did you learn from
the listenings that prepares you to identifu a risk you have
Activity B Answers, P. 135
taken? What d.id you learn that will help you give q short
Answers will vary. Possible answers:
presentation explaining your reasons for taking it?
1. Reputation: People, especially those with a lot of
money, may not care what people think. Money:
Some people value their reputation more than
A (10 minutes)

money because once lost, it may not be regained,


1. Copy *re first row of the chart on the board.
but money, once lost, can be earned again. Review the meaning andpart of speech of each
2. Student answers will vary depending on their word in the first row.
willingness to take risks or their interests in 2. Point out the suffixes that are attached to each
those fields. word to create the different parts of speech (-or
for noun, -ive for adjective, -ly ort an adjective to
cteate al adverb).
Vocabulary Skill: Word families
Put students in pairs to complete the chart. Point
(10 minutes)
out that ttre shaded areas indicate no word is
1. Direct students to read the information in the first possible. Encourage them to use their dictionaries.
paragraph and the definitions silently. 4. Go over the answers with the class.

Unit 7 71
Activity A Answers, P. 136 SkillNote
2. create, creator/creativity/creation, creative, creatively; Point out that many native speakers do not use the
3. discover, discovery/discoverer; past perfect if the meaning of the sentence is clear
4. embarrass, embarrassment, embarrassing, with two simple past verbs, for example, My parents
embarrassingly; went t0 bed before I got home. Remind students that
5. finance, finance(s), financial, financially; time clauses wtth when often require use of the past
6. locate, location; perfect to make the meaning clear' e.9., My parents
7. prove, proof, proven;
went to bed when I got home. (I got home and they
8. solve, solution
went to bed.) My parents had gone to bed when I got
home. Shey went to bed and then I got home.)

A (5 minutes)

1. Tell students they are going to write sentences


with the past perfect. Review the first one with
the class as an examPle.
Tell students to mark the sentences 1' and 2 and
then write *reir sentences.
Call on volunteers to read ttreir sentences.
Activity A Answers, P. 137
Possible answers:
B (5 minutes) 2. (1 ,2) I hadn't heard about the Loch Ness monster
1. Keep students in pairs, but have students do the until I read the article.
3. (2, 1) We had finished hiking before it started to rain'
activity individually. Remind them they may have
+. (2, 1) By the time Mari picked the phone up, lt had
to change the form.
stopped ringing.
2. Have students compare their answers with their 5. (2, 1) I hadn't realized my sweater was on backwards
partner. Call on volunteers to read their answers' until my sister told me.
Activity B Answers, P. 136 6. ('1, 2) Hilario had left his house when his mother
1. creative/inventive; 2. solve; 3. create; called.
4. finance; 5. solution; 6. financial; 7. proof; Z. ,2\ I had drunk the cup of coffee before I realized
(1

8. location; 9. prove; 10. embarrassing it was not mine.


8. (2, 1) Our plane had departed by the time we
for additional practice with word families, have arrived at the airport.
^5p
'{# students visit Q Online Practice.

) Listening and Speaking 3, Poge 1 i8


) Listening ond Speoking 3 Poge 1 j7
B (10 minutes)

1. Tell students to complete the sentences with


information that is true for them. Remind them
to use the Past Perfect.
9" I?I!ng: t"ftp" tr"gl t1
9 "Ti,:,"'l__* ) Put students in pairs to read *reir sentences.
1. Read the information about the past perfect aloud. 3. Call on volunteers to read *reir sentences.
2. Check comprehension by asking questions: Activity B Answers, P. 138
When do we use the past perfect in relation to the Answers will vary. Possible answers:
simple past? What is the form of the past perfect? 1. I had lost my keys when I got home yesterday.
(had + past participle) Which adverbs is the past 2. I hadn't understood lectures until I started taking
perfect ofien used with? What kind of clquses do we this class.
)
use the past pedect in? What are some words these 3. I had turned 18 by the time I graduated from
clauses often begin with? high school.
4. I had moved to the United States by the year 2000.
5. I had learned to drive before I was 21.

72
L-
:=

:
dlo for additional practice with the past perfect, have 2. Play the audio, pausing for students to repeat
ry students visil Q Online Practice- the sentences.
3. Put students in pairs. Tell them to choose either
sentence from each pair to say to their partner.
) Listening ond Speoking 3, Poge 1 39
4. Explain that their partner should hold up one
Pronunciation: finger if they hear the first sentence in the pair,
Contractions of had $o minutes) or two if they hear the second. Tell them to
change roles after one sentence from each pair
$ coz,rrack+t
has been read.
1. Tell students to read the information about
contracted forms of had. 5. Monitor students' activity. Pay attention to the
contracted forms of had.
2. Check comprehension by asking'. When does the
for additional practice of contractions with hod,
speaker join'd to words that follow? (When those l:Q
qtr have students visit Q Online Practice.
words begin with vowels sound5 | or t.) Do we use a
contracted form of had with questions? What is the
ne gativ e c ontract e d form? Speaking Skill:
3. Tell students to read the examples while they
listen to the audio
gyLl*$gtt Prglg$3lrgn l1'' l*"ll
4. Play the audio again, pausing for students
to repeat.
1. Direct students to read the information
giving a short presentation. Point out that
about
-
it is important to introduce arrd organize all
presentations, even short ones.
A (10 minutes)

$ coz,rrack+z 2. Check comprehensiot: What phrases can you use


to introduce your topic? Wlry should you use words
1. Tell students to look at the first pair of sentences'
and phrases to make the order of events clear? What
Elicit the difference. (The verb in the first is the
phrases can you use to do this?
simple present; in the second it is the past perfect.)
2. TelTstudents they are going to hear only one of
the sentences from each pair. Te1l them to check
the sentence theY hear.
3. Ask students to quickly read the sentences. Elicit
any questions or difficulties.
4. Play the audio while students check the correct
sentences.
5. Check as a class. Play the audio again to confirm'
Activity A Answers, P. 139
1. He'd worked at a bookstore.
2. We left when it started raining.
3. They answered the questions'
4. l'd eaten my lunch.
5. You'd alreadY taken the test.
6. She hadn't worked there.
7. lt hasn't started to rain. =.
t-tiri$
8. Had he found it?
.i
9. Have you called Alex?

Listening and Speoking 3, Poge 141


Listening ond SPeaking 3, Poge 140

B (5 minutes) A (10 minutes)

S coz,rrack+: $ coz,rract++
1. Tell students they are going to listen to a
1. Tell students they are going to listen to the
presentation on learning Japanese. Have
sentences again and rePeat them.
students read the paragtaph. Elicit any
questions or difficulties.

Unit 7 73
) Play the audio while students complete the Learning Outcome
paragraph. Pause as necessary to give students
1. Tie the unit assignment to the unit learning
time to write.
outcome. Sayl. The outcome for this unit is to
J. Put students in pairs to compare their answers. give a short presentation on a risk you have taken.
Call on volunteers to share their answers. This unit assignment is going to let you show your
4. Play the audio again to clarify any difficulties. skill in givtng a short presentation. Gitting a short
presentatiln is a useful skill because it allows you to
Activity A Answers, p. 14I
share your knowledge and opinion with others. In
1. l'm going to talk; 2. By the time; 3. so; 4. so;
doing so, we have the opportunity to educate others.
5. Before; 6. Bythetime
2. Explain that you are going to use a rubric similar
to ttreir Self-Assessment checklist on page 144 to
B (10 minutes)
grade their unit assignment.
7. Keep students in pairs. Tell students to work
individually to check the risks *rey have taken Consider the ldeas (5 minutes)
to learn English. Remind them to add ideas of
their own. @ coz,rrack+s
2. Call on volunteers to share their own ideas. 1. Tell students they are going to listen to a woman
talking about a risk she took and her reasons for
Tip for Success taking it.
Point out it is typical to end a presentation with 2. Tell students to look at the photos and the
falling intonation to signal that the presentation questions. Elicit what they think the risk is.
has ended. Tell students that this is important so 3. Tell students to take notesas they listen. Remind
that the audience knows they may ask questions them of the features of good notes (no complete
or make comments. sentences, only main points, etc.).
dI9 for additional practice with giving a short 4. Play the audio while students take notes.
tffi presentation, have students visit Q Online Practice.
5. Put students in pairs to compare their notes.
6. Check *re answers to the questions as a class.
c (10 minutes)
Consider the ldeas Answers, P. 1 42
: 1. Keep students in pairs. Tell them to take turns Answers will vary. Possible answers:
:
talking about the risks they checked in Activity B. 1 . She had had a good job, a nice house, a good social

2. Remind them to use the words and phrases from life, and lots of friends.
ttre speaking skill box on page 140. 2. She risked her job and her normal life.
3. Yes, she was much happier with her life after taking
Encourage students to ask their partners questions
the risk
to make the order of events or the reason for
4. She had to start over.
taking risks clear.
4. Call on volunteers to share the most interesting
thing they've learned about their pattner. Prepare and Speak

I Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 1 42 @


qf unit Assignment: A (5 minutes)

Give a short presentation 1. Direct students to write notes on similar risks in


their own life. Encourage them to add any new
ideas *rey have.
Unit Question (s minutes)
Refer students to the ideas they discussed at the 2. Point out that students should write as much
beginning of the unit about what risks are good to information as possible since they will have
take. Cue students if necessary by asking specific the opportunity to select the most important
questions about the content of the unit What are some information in the next activity.
of the dffirent types of risks that people take? Why do 3. Remind students not to write complete sentences.
people take these risks?

74 Unit 7
rl
:4.
,iil,i
) Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 1 43 Check and Reflect .i I

rl
EE!
B (10 minutes) A (5 minutes)
1. Tell students to choose one of their risks from 1. Direct students to read and complete the Self-
their notes in Activity A and complete the outline. Assessment checklist.
2. Remind students not to write complete sentences, 2. Ask for a show of hands for how many students
just the most important points they need to gave all or mostly yes answers.
mention. Point out that they only have one
3. Congratulate them on *reir success. Discuss the
minute to give their presentation so they need to
steps they can take if an item on the checklist
be selective.
was difficult for them. For example, if they had
ffouble with contracted forms of had, they can
Listening and Speoking 3, poge 144
record themselves speaking and ask another

@! student to listen to them.

C (10-15 minutes)
1. Review the checklist on page 144. Ask students to
read it. Elicit any questions. B (5 minutes)
& Refer
2. Depending on the size of your class, you may students to the learning outcome on page 725.
wish to put studerts in groups to give their
{f-
Tett them to talk with their partners about whether
presentation or have students present to the they achieved tlre learning outcome. Elicit the
entire class. answers to the unit question that students came up
). Remind students not to read directly from their with at the beginning of class. Encourage them to
outlines. Remind them to use appropriate phrases as they discuss the new things
flip through the unit
to introduce their topic as well as show the order they learned and new answers they may have to the
of events and their reasons for taking the risk, unit question.
4. Use the unit assignment rubric ot
page 76 of
this Teacher's Handbook to score each student's I Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 145
presentation. TrackYour Success
5. Monitor students' performance as they present. 7. Have students circle the words they have learned
in this unit. Suggest that students go back through
Alternative Unit Assignments the unit to review any words they have forgotten.
Assign or have students choose one of these 2. Have students check the skills *ley have mastered.
assignments to do instead of, or in addition to, the If students need more practice to feel confident
unit assignment. about *reir proficiency in a skill, point out the
1. Do you agree with the idea that successful page numbers and encourage them to review.
language learners have to be risk takers? Why or )_ Read the learning outcome aloud. Ask students if
why not? Discuss your ideas with a paftfler or in a they feel that they have met the outcome.
small group.
2. If some risks are worth taking, and others not,
how can you tell the difference? Go online and
research terms such as "healthy risk taking,"
"positive risk taking," and "benefits of risk taking"
to find out about good ways to take risks. Tell a
partner about your research.
*P for an additional unit assignment,
ry have students visit Q online Practice.

Unit 7 75
Unit Assignment Rubric
Student name:

Unit Assignment Give o short presentation.

20 = Presentation element was completely successful (at least 90olo of the time).
15 = Presentation element was mostly successful (at least 70%o of the time).
10 = Presentation element was partially successful (at least 50olo of the time).
0 = Presentation element was not successful.

ffiffiffi

Student spoke easily (without long pauses


or reading) about a risk he or she had taken
and was easy to understand (spoke clearly
and at a good speed).

Student used correct Past Perfect


verb forms.

Student used appropriate contracted


forms of had.

Student used vocabulary from the unit.

Student organized the presentation by


using appropriate phrases to introduce
the topic, show order ofevents, and reasons
for behavior.

Total points:
Comments:

Unit 7 O 2011 Oxford University Press. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.
LISTENING . understanding figurative meaning LEARNING OUTCOME
VOCABULARY . phrasal verbs Give and recap a presentation
GRAMMAR. separable and inseparable phrasal verbs highlighting what you like and
PRONUNCIATION . links between consonants and vowels dislike about a particular city.
SPEAKING . recapping a presentation

) Listening and Speaking 3, poges 146-147 4. Focus students' attention on the photo. Have a
volunteer describe the photo to the class. Read the
Preview the Unit question aloud.

Learning Outcome Activity A Answers, p. 147


Possible answers:
1. Ask for a volunteer to read the unit skills and then 1. The city may suit one's personality because of its
the unit learning outcome. size, things to do, location, character. lt may not suit
2. Explain: The learning outcome is what you are one's personality for the same reasons.
expecte(lto be able to do by the unit's end. You are 2. Students will have different opinions about this
going to be waluated on how well you meet this based on personality and previous experience.
3. The city is Paris, France's capital and largest city.
lutcorue. With this in mind, you should focus on
It is known for museums and monuments, like
learning skills ( Listening, Voc abulary, Grammar,
the EiffelTower.
Pronunciation, Speaking) that will support your goal
of giving and recapping a presentation that highlights
what you like and d.islike about a particular city. This B (15 minutes)
can also help you act as mentors in the classroom to
1. Introduce the Unit Question, "What do our cities
help the other students meet this outcome.
say about us?" Ask related information questions
or questions about personal experience to help
A (10 minutes) students preparc for answering *re unit question,
1. Prepare students for thinking about the topic by which is more abstract. Where are wany of the
eliciting students' opinions about the city they are most famous cities located? What features do most
in or the city that is closest to their institution of well-known cities hatte in common? Do most cities
learning. Start the discussion by asking questions look the same? How are they dffirent?
such as: What do you think about the size of this
2. Put students in small groups and give each group
city? Are there enough interesting things to do in the
a piece of poster paper and a marker.
city? Is it an affordable city or is it very expensive?
3. Read the unit question aloud. Give students
Write students' opinions about these and other
a minute to silently consider their answers to
characteristics of the city on the board.
the question. Tell students to pass the paper
Put students in pairs or small groups to discuss and the marker around the group. Direct each
the first four questions. group member to write a different answer to ttre
Call on volunteers to share their ideas with the question. Encourage them to help one another.
class. Ask questions to facilitate the discussion:
Ask each group to choose areporteir to read the
What are the things obout our city, 0r the closest city
answers to the class. Point out similarities, and
that most fit your personality? Which things do not
differences among ttre answers. If answers from
fit your personality? What would you like to change different groups are similar, make a group list that
about this city? Which city would you most like to
incorporates the answers that are similar. Post the
live in?
list to refer to later in the unit.

Unit 8 77
Activity D Answers, P 148
ActivitY
-p"itiorl Answers, P' 147
B
Students'answers may vary' Possible
answers:
answers:The things that are
popular show there are' I
people are 1. I like how many different restaurants
ii" p""pf"t interests' For example' ofif the
museums; How dislike how crowded it is'
inteiested in art, there will be a lot made the biggest impression on
popular or important it is' -- iong Kong has
z.
crowded a city is shows how
,". i, *.ti positive impression' because the city is
so vibrant and full of life'

TheQClassroom
$ coa,tract<o
example from the
1. Play The QClassroom'Use the
,"it" a hJlp students continue the conversation'
-Xi-Wnrt Do
kind of city do the stwdents live in?
149
theY like it? WhY? ) Listening and SPeoking 3, Poge
people who
2. In the audio, students mention that
more quiet life' Elicit LISTENING 1: Do Cities Have
live in a sma1l town like a
to whether this is true' If Personalities?
students' opinions as
,ru..rrury begin the discussion by mentioning
for example'
' (15 minutes)
reasons why people live in aplace' VOCABULARY
is there' job opportunities' etc' their
their family 1. Direct students lo tead the words and
or questions'
definitions. Elicit any difficulties
1 48
I Listening and SPeoking 3, Page words' Say
2. Model correct pronunciation of the
c (10 minutes) each word and have students repeat'
complete-a quiz
I
1 Tel1 students they are going to 3. Ask students to complete the sentences'
.iti"t' Ask students to read the qttu'
uio"iiu*o", 4. in pairs to check their answers' Ask
Elicit any questions about vocabulary' -' Put students Elicit or provide
I volunteers to re;d their answers'
match each city
i 2. Explain that students should corrections as necessary'
*iin ,ft" coffectdescription' Point out that they
to herp
should look for clues in the descriptions
ir.*, r"t example, place names or geographical
information.
and then score
3.
"' Have students complete the quiz
Tell them to
tto"*r"t res using check your answers'
to the key at the afulary,.Farei*mpl* lf is importunljg
rate their performance aicording i#ctr*'"i ,

bottom of the quiz' be owme of your surroundingswhenyw orewalking


.JIeaA oi nrgl&rrfre.kprop computel was an
inhovirt'oll
Elicit the clues that helped students if
they
4. Jiiirr**1f*mucheosierfur: b-fl5irlri5p,eopf€i' :'''
weren't sure. :
csrflplq.te'th$i ir i';irr
.. lHiy,e.tligher.l€Vet'studel1tl,
trr'-:,,
try;nitivrdually,and' then'colnpare:{t!5w

in-gtoup'ti9 ao,q.!-le!!
,Ji*ii#"et:' the'pqin:to'write'a1r+ddltionat;
natlowdr.leretftud .iii.gt ;;*qa;s1 e&;li'word' IJave'v.[rnteers i :
tti'ghlr-tevel*udlnts .ttrr*ir: sentenci* onrthe bqard' coirett-'
:":
thetask ar afrlst'them''- k
based on theff 'deseriptians. frorn "1
;i*il*
'
io iaat<rtiadti*s
ther'n tcgive ril;i**.&i with ttre o'"!lqle' 41-qgs''focuslng otl' .,:
,. s}651.,pppealing to leastappealinglleu
their'fa$kings" 'l' : 'I '"' '' '
ffi -i;;;;f iliu[ut** *"rd rathEr {q1 9t!ei
spieific reassns:fut ' qiammatiial'issubr'

D (10 minutes) VocabularY Answers, P' 149


Put students in groups to discuss the questions' 1. region; 2. surroundings; 3' innovation;
1.
+. mlOite; 5. agreeable; 6' satisfy;
7' attract;
things
2. Point out that they should discuss specific e. lo;scientiout, g. hand in hand; 10' tend to
like and dislike, as well as give reasons
that they
ior,ft"ii opinions. Remind them to use examples .gg For additional practice with the
vocabulary' have
to support their oPinions' W students visitQOnlinePractice'
findings'
J. Call on volunteers to report their group's

78 Unit 8
) Listening and Speoking 3, poge 1 5o I Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 151

PREVIEW LISTENING 1 (s minutes) LISTEN FOR DETAILS tto minutes)


1. Direct students to read the information. Ask: Do $ cos.rrack+
you think cities have personalities? Why or wlty not? 1. Direct students to read the names of the cities and
2. Ask students whether they think people with the kinds of work before they listen again. Elicit
similar personalities choose to live in the same any questions about them.
place. Tell them to check their answer after 2. As you play the audio, have students listen and
they listen. match the cities with the kinds of work.
Preview Listening 1 Answer, p. 150 ). Have students compare their answers with
Students'answers will vary. ln the listening, a partneL
the argument is made that people with similar 4. Replay the audio so that the partners can check
personalities do choose to live in the same place.
their answers.
5. Go over the answers with the class.
Listening 1 Background Note
I Listen for Details Answers, p. 151
Professor Richard Florida was born in the United I t.O; 2.e; 3.b; 4.f; 5. a; 6.c
States in 7957 . He earned a PhD from Columbia
University in 1986. His research is on urban flP for additional practice with listening
regeneration, specifically the rise of a creative E; comprehension, have students visit
class. The creative class refers to individuals who Q Online Practice.
are innovativg creative, and highly sought after
by businesses. Expansion Activity: Personality Factors (10 minutes)

IISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (5 minutes) 1. Put students into pairs or groups.
2. Remind them that in Listening 1, they heard
$ co:,rrack r about how a city's personaliqr can be related to the
1. Explain that students are going to listen to the people that live there.
report and write T or F next to the statements. 3. Ask students to think about other thing that may
2. Ask students to read the information. Elicit any affect a city's personality, for instancq the weathe(
questions or difficulties. or an importailt part of its history.
3. Play the audio and have students complete the 4. Have students discuss their ideas in their groups.
activity individually. 5. Elicit answers from volunteers.
4. Elicit the answers from the class.

WHAT DO YOU THINK? (10 minutes)


I Main ldea Answers, p. 150
I r.F; 2.r;3.T; 4.F;5.T; 6.F
1. Ask students to read the questions and reflect on
ttreir answers.
Tip for Success 2. Seat students in small groups and assign roles: a
Point out that it is important to listen for opinions. group leader to make sure everyone contributes,
Simply hearing the word think or belierte does rrot a note-taker to record the group's ideas, a reporter
indicate that the speaker holds that opinion since to share the group's ideas with the class, and a
the speaker may be introducing someone else's timekeeper to watch the clock.
ideas. As a result, it is important to pay attention Give students five minutes to discuss the
for such inffoductions. questions. Call time if conversations are
winding down. Allow them an extra minute
or tvuo if necessary.
4. Call on each group's reporter to share ideas with
the class.

Unit 8
What Do You Think? Answers, P. 151 4. Students complete the sentences individually.
Answers will vary. Possible answers: 5. Put students in pairs to check their answers.
1. Yes, because people want to be around like-minded Check the answers as a class.
thinkers; No, because many cities are full of a variety
of personalities. I Activity A Answers, P. 152
2. Student may talk about a city in their native country I z. ooay; 3. rockeu 4. plant
that is well-known for a particular industry.
I Listening ond Speaking 3, Poge 1 5j
Learning Outcome B (10 minutes)
Use the learning outcome to frame *re purpose $ col,rracko
and relevance of Listening 1. Ask What did you 1. Tell students they are going to listen and complete
learn from Listening 1 that prepares you to give a short the sentences with the word ttrey hear. Point
presentation highlighting what you like and dislike about out that after *rey listen, they are ttren going to
a particular city? What did you learn thqt will help you complete tlre comParisons.
recap that presentation? 2. Ask students to read the sentences. Elicit any
questions or difficulties.
Listening ond SPeoking j, Page 1 52
). Play the audio while students complete the
Listening Skill: Understanding sentences individually.
figurative meaning (to minutg:l 4. Tell students to complete the comparisons
individually.
$ co:,rracts
1. Ask students to read the information about 5. Put students in pairs to share their answers. Elicit
understanding figurative meaning and the first the answers from the class.
two examples. Elicit any difficulties or questions. Activity B Answers, P. 153
2. Check comprehension by asking questions: 1. heart, body; 2. seed, Plant;
What is the dffirence between literal and figurati\)e 3. ate, person or animal; 4. flew, a bird or a plane
language?
4p for additional practice with figurative language,
Tell students to follow along in their books while s have students visit Q Online Proctice.
they listen to the excerpt of figurativelangluage
from Listening 1.
4. Ask students to read the explanation after
the excerpt.
LISTENING 2:
Check comprehension by asking questions: Why is Buenos Aires, Beijing, and Dubai
the use of the words magnets and spatk figurative?
WLty is it implrtafi tu be able to understand VOCABULARY tto minutes)
figurative language?
Pronounce the words in bold and have students
repeat them.
A (10 minutes)
Put students in pairs to circle the answer that best
7. Ask students to read the sentences in the box.
matches the meaning of thd word in bold.
Point out that the words in bold are used with
their literal meanings. Encourage students to use their knowledge of
prefixes, suffixes, and roots. Also encourage them
2. Tell students they are going to read the sentences
to use a dictionary.
in which the words in bold are used figuratively
and then complete the sentence that follows. Point 4. Ask volunteers to share their answers.
out that the sentence asks them to identify the Vocabulary Answers, P. 153
things that are compared between the literal and 1. man-made; 2. honor; 3. personality;
figurative meanings. 4. honest; 5. exciting; 6. exacU
Do the first one as an examPle. 7. give; 8. uncover; 9. modernize;
10. belief
-t]

:l
,

LISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (15 minutes) ll

$ coe,tract z
1. Explain that students will listen and write
the letters for two of the descriptions next to
each cit5r
Ask students to read the descriptions. Elicit any
difficulties with vocabulary or concepts.
3. Play the audio while students work individually.
4. Call on volunteers to share their answers.
Listen for Main ldea Answers, P. 154
1. c, e; 2, d,f; 3. a, b

Listening and Speoking 3, poge I 55


LISTEN FOR DETAILS tto minutes)

@ co:,rracks
€Eg for additional practice with the vocabulary, have
ry students visil Q Online Practice.
1. Tell students they are going to listen again and
write the abbreviation for one of the three cities
next to the each detail. Ask them to read the
/ Listening and Speaking 3, page I 54 details. Elicit any questions or difficulties.
PREVIEW LISTENING 2 (5 minutes) 2. Play the audio while students write the
abbreviations.
1. Tell students they are going to listen to
descriptions of Buenos Aires, Beijing, and Dubai' 3. Have students compare answers with a partner.
Elicit what students know about these cities, 4. Go over the answers with the class.
including where they are located and what they Listen for Details Answers, P. 155
are famous for. 1. BA; 2.D; 3. B; 4. BA;
Ask students to look at the photos of the cities and 5. B; 6. D; 7.BA; 8. D
give their opinions about them.
6fiP ror additional practice with listening
Listening 2 Background Note W comprehension, have students visit
QOnline Proctice.
Buenos Aires is the largest city and capital of
Argentina. It is also the second largest city in South
America, after Sao Palolo,Btazil Buenos Aires is WHAT DO YOU THINK?
known for the European flavor in its architecture
and culture. It is sometimes referred to as the Paris of A (10 minutes)
South America. 1. Ask students to read the questions and reflect on
Beijing, located in the northeast of China, is the their answers.
capital of that country. Once known as Peking, 2. Seat students in small groups and assign roles: a
Beijing is one of the largest cities in the wodd. It group leader to make sure everyone contributes,
is a modern, 2l'Lcentury city with skyscrapers and a note-taker to record the group's ideas, a reporter
modern conveniences, but there is evidence of its to share the group's ideas with the class, and a
traditional past in its imperial Chinese architecture, timekeeper to watch the clock.
such as the Forbidden C1ry comPlex.
). Give students five minutes to discuss the
Dubai is one of the seven Emirates, or kingdoms, that questions. Call time if
conversations are
form the United Arab Emirates. Dubai has the largest winding down. Allow them an extra minute
population and the second largest area' after Abu or tvvo if necessary.
Dhabi, in the United Arab Emirates. Dubai is known
4. Ca1l on each group's rcporte.ir to share ideas with
for its wealth, stemming from banking and business
ttre class.
related to the oil industry.

Unit 8 81
Activity A Answers, p. 155
Students' a nswers wil I vary. Possible a nswers:
1. Beijing. because it is always changing. I would never
get bored.
2. Students should be able to give reasons for their
answers.

B (10 minutes)

1. Have students continue working their small Learning Outcome


groups to discuss the questions in Activity B. Tell Use the learning outcome to frame the purpose and
them to choose a new leader, recorder, reporter, relevance of Listenings 7 and 2 and the Critical e
and timekeeper. activity of relating information. Ask: What did you
For question 7, recap Professor Florida's points learn from the listenings that prepares you to give a
about the personality of individuals and the cities presentation about what you like about a city? What did
they live in from Listening 1. you learn that will help you given a presentation about
3. Call on the new rcporte.ll, to share the group's what you dislike about a city?
answers to the questions.
Activity
) Listening ond Speoking 3, poge I 56
B Answers, p. 155
Answers will vary. Possible answers: Vocabulary Skill: Phrasal verbs (5 minutes)
1. Yes, cities do have personalities and the people 1. Direct students to read the information in the first
there often have the same personality as the city; paragraph silently.
No, there are too many different people living in a
city for it to just have one personality. Check comprehension: What is a phrasal verb?
2. Students should be able to give reasons and What is a particle? Do phrasal yerbs haye the
examples for their answers. same meaning that the verb and the particle do
individually?
J. Ask students to read the example and the
Tip for CriticalThinking (1 minute)
remaining information. Elicit how the verb look
Read the tip aloud. Point out that relating information into in the first example sentence dlffers from look
to one's own experience is also a good way to analyze into in the second example sentence. (In the first
information. By relating information to your own sentence, both are used literally, i.e., gazing into
experience, you are better able to see the differences the room. In the second they are used together
and similarities between your experience and the new and create a figurative meaning for investigate.).
information.
4. Elicit any questions or difficulties about the
information.

A (10 minutes)
1. Tell students to rcad the sentences and circle the
answer that best matches the meaning of the bold
phrase. Remind students that.they should think
about the context, not the meaning of the words
by themselves.
2. Have students work individually to choose their
answers. Then tell students to check sentences
which have phrasal verbs.
3. Put students in pairs to compare their answers.
4. Go over the answers with the class.
Activity A Answers, p. 156
1. a; 2, b; 3. b; 4. a; 5. a;
5. b; 7. b; 8. a; 9. b; I0. a
Sentences with phrasal verbs: 2, 4, 6,7 ,9

82 Unit 8
-I
i

8. Ask students to read the list of inseparable phrasal


verbs silently. Elicit any questions about meaning.

SkillNote
if'k ih8nges the qeaning cf the Yerb. . .

llave higher-level students work in, qqall groups Point out that phrasal verbs are extremely common
. to writ€ra Rew sentencerfor each phrasal verh; Review in spoken English. Explain that students need to pay
." : them ars .a class, fucusing.on whether
:tho phras*f ,verh' : special attention to separable phrasal verbs when they
is uied correctly. are used with object pronouns because they may not
be listening for a phrasal verb. As a result, they may
miss the particle of the phrasal verb and consequently,
Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 1 57 they may fail to notice the speaker's figurative use of
B (5 minutes) language. This can lead to miscommunication.

1. Keep students in pairs, but have students do the


activity individually. Point out that they may have I Listening ond Speaking 3, page 1 59

to change the tense of some of the phrasal verbs. A (5 minutes)

2. Have students compare their answers with their 1. Te1l students they are going to rewrite the
parrner. Call on volunteers to read their answers. sentences with object pronouns. Review the first
one with ttre class as an example.
Activity B Answers, p. 157
1. came to; 2. go out; 3. bring up; 2. Review the object pronouns if necessary.
4. deal with; 5. turn into 3. Ask students to write their sentences individually
For additional practice with phrasal verbs have
4. Put students in pairs to check their sentences.
students visil Q Online Proctice. 5. Call on volunteers to read *reir sentences aloud.
Activity A Answers, p. 159
2. We usually run into her at the gym.
) Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 1 58
3. Linda and Victor talked it over before class.
4. Hong hasn't gotten over it yet.
5. Will you look after it while l'm in S5o Paulo?
6. I didn't put them away after dinner.
Grammar: Separable and
inseparable phrasal velbs (10 minutes) B (10 minutes)

1. Read the first two paragraphs about phrasal verbs 1. Tell students to write answers to the questions,
and the examples aloud. using the object pronouns when possible. Remind
students to review the rules for object pronouns
2. Check comprehension by asking questtons: What
and separable phrasal verbs on page 158.
is a separable phrasql verb? What separates the parts
of the phrasal verb? 2. Tell students to write their answers individually
)_ Read aloud the remaining information on ). Put students in pairs to take turns asking and
separable phrasal verbs and object pronouns as answering the questions. Tell students to correct
well as the examples. any mistakes their partner may have made.
4. Ask students to read the list of separable phrasal 4. Call on volunteers to read their answers aloud.
verbs silently. Elicit any questions about meaning. Activity B Answers, p. 159
5. Check comprehension by asking qtoestior$'. Why Answers may vary. Possible answers:
are the sentences with the red X incorrect? How can 1. I looked them up in my dictionary.
we make these two sentences conect? (By using the 2. I handed it in to the teacher.
noun instead of the pronoun.) 3. My teacher pointed it out to us.
of inseparable 4. No, we didn't go over it.
6. Read the information and examples
5. Yes, I talked it over with my partner.
phrasal verbs aloud.
Check comprehension by asking quesltorrs. Why 6gQ for additional practice with separable and
are the sentences with the red X incorrect? W inseparable phrasal verbs, have students visit
Q Online Practice.

Unit 8 83
I Listening and Speoking 3, poge 1 6o j Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 1 61

Pronunciation: Links between Speaking Skill:


cgnsgnants and vowels (10 minutes) Recapping a presentation (s minutes)

@ co:,rrack o Direct students to read the information about


recappirg a presentation.
1. Ask students to read the information on linking
between consonants and vowels. 2. Check comprehension'. Why is it important to recap
or summarize? How long should the recap be? What
Elicit the vowels and their sounds.
are some phrases you can useto recap a presentation?
Check comprehension by asking: Why is
linking common in phrasal rterbs? What does it
mean when words are linked? (There is no pause
beNveen them.)
4. Tell students to read the examples while they
listen to the audio. Elicit why come over is
linked despite the word come ending in a vowel
(Because the final sound is a consonant, not
a vowel.)
5. Play the audio again, pausing for students
to repeat.

A (5 minutes)

@ co:,rrack to
1. Teil students to read ttre sentences and connect the
words they think will be linked.
Play the audio while students check their links.
Elicit any difficulties or questions students had
about identifying the linked words.
4. Play the audio again, pausing for students
to repeat.

(10 minutes)
B A (10 minutes)
7. Tell students they are going to practice linking by $ coa,rract t t
asking and answering questions. 1. Tell students they are going to listen to a
2. Ask students to rcad the questions. Elicit any presentation about the American city of
questions or difficulties in meaning. Charlotte. Explain that they should take
J. Tell students to connect the words that should be notes in the T-chart about the advantages and
linked. Check the words for linking as a class. disadvantages of ttre city.
4. Put students in pairs. Tell them to take turns 2. Elicit the features of good notes (do not use
asking and answering the questions. Remind them complete sentences, use abbreviations, etc.).
to listen for the linking in their parlner's speech. 3. Play the audio while students take notes. Pause as

5. Monitor students' activity. Pay attention to the necessary to give students time to write.
linking between consonants and vowels, especially 4. Do not check answers until students have done
on the phrasal verbs. Activities B and C.
dO for additional practice with linking between
q# consonants and vowels, have students visit B (10 minutes)
Q Online Proctice. 1. Put students in pairs. Tell them to take turns
summarizing the advantages and disadvantages
according to their T-charts.
2. Remind them not to simply read their notes. important points of yowr presentation. In doing
Ask them to present the advantages and so, we hate the opportunity to persuade others and
disadvantages using ttre notes only as a guide. communicate information ffi ctiv ely.
3. Do not elicit:my answers until students have had 2. Explain that you are goirg to use a rubric similar
a chance to complete Activity C. to their Self-Assessment checklist on'page 164 to
grade their unit assignment.
C {10 minutes}
@ cor,rra.r tz Consider the ldeas (5 minutes)
1. Keep students in pairs. Tell them they will check
1. Tell students to read the list of things they
the information in their charts while they listen to
might consider when choosing where to live.
a summary of the presentation.
Have them circle the three things that are most
2. Play the audio while students check their notes. important to them.
3. Write a T-chart on the board. Call on volunteers 2. Pttt students in pairs to discuss their answers
to share their information from ttreir T-charts. and reasons.
Write it on the board, Check the information as
a class.
3. Conduct a quick class survey by asking for a show
of hands foreach of the things in the chart.
Activity A, B, C Answers, p. 161
Advantages Disadvantages Prepare and Speak
Pretty A little quiet
Clean Not as much to do as in
Friendly people Boston A (5 minutes)
Becoming more diverse Fewer cultural activities
1. Direct students to brainstorm a list of things they
Fewer places to eat
like and don't like about a city they know well.
Fewer creative people
2. Point out that students should try to list as many
things as they can.
For additional practice on recapping a presentation,
have students visit Q Online Proctice. ). Remind students to wdte the name of the city.

) Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 1 6j


I Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 1 62

qfl unit Assignment:


Give and recap a presentation B (10 minutes)
1. Tell students to choose the three likes and dislikes
Unit Question (s minutes) that they feel most strongly about to complete the
sentences in the outline.
Refer students to the ideas they discussed at the
beginning of the unit about what our cities say 2. Remind students to write ttre name of the city.
about us. Cue students if necessary by asking specific 3. Ask students to create a statement that recaps their
questions about the content of the unit Why do some likes and dislikes.
people believe that cities have personalities? What makes a
city interesting? Tip for Success (1 minute)
Read the tip aloud. Point out that the rccap rl;:ay
Learning Outcome
not make an impact on the audience if the audience
1. Tie the unit assignment to the unit learning isn't ready for it. Explain that this is why the pause
outcome. Say: The outcome for this unit is to give is necessary.
a short presentation highlighting what you like
and dislike about a particular city and then recap.
This unit assignment is going to let you show your
skill in giving and recapping a short presentation. C (10-15 minutes)
Recapping a short presentation is a useful skill
because it allows you to emphasize the most
7. Review the checklist on page 164. Ask students to
read it. Elicit any questions.

Unit 8 85
2. Depending on the size of your class, you may
wish to put students in groups to give their
@
presentation or have students present to the
aro
B (5 minutes)
entire class. ({ nefe. students to the learning outcome on page 747.
). Remind students not to read directly from their Tell them to talk with their parmers about whether
outlines. Remind them to link words' ending they achieved the learning outcome. Elicit the
consonants to those beginning with vowels. answers to the unit question that students came up
Also remind them to pause before their recap with at the beginning of class. Encourage them to
statement. flip through the unit as they discuss the new things
4. Use the unit assignment rubric on page 87 of they learned and new answers they may have to the
rJ;lis Teacher's Handbook to score each student's
unit question.
presentation.
j Listening ond Speaking 3, page 165
5. Monitor students' performance as they present.
TrackYour Success
Alternative Unit Assignments 1. Have students circle the words ttrey have learned
Assign or have students choose one of these in this unit. Suggest that students go back through
assignments to do instead of, or in addition, to the the unit to review any words *rey have forgotten.
unit assignment. 2. Have students check *re skills they have mastered.
1. Compare the "personalities" of two cities. Tell a If students need more practice to feel confident
partner or group the advantages and disadvantages about their proficiency in a skill, point out the
of each. page numbers and encourage them to review.
2. Choose one of the cities mentioned in the unit, )- Read the learning outcome aloud. Ask students if
or another city that interests you. Research two they feel that they have met the outcome.
opposing opinions about the city and present them
to your classmates.
5frP for an additional unit assignment, have students

I Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 1 64

Check and Reflect

@
A (5 minutes)

1. Direct students to read and complete the Self-


Assessment checklist.
2. Ask for a show of hands for how many students
gave all or mostly yes answers.
). Congratulate them on their success. Discuss the
steps they can take if an item on the checklist
was difficult for them. For example, if they had
trouble with linking, they can record *remselves
speaking and ask another student to listen to them

86 Unit 8
Unit Assignment Rubric
Student name:

Unit Assignment Give and recap a presentotion.

20 = Presentation element was completely successful (at least 900/o of the time).
15 = Presentation element was mostly successful (at least 700lo of the time).
10 = Presentation element was partially successful (at least 500/o of the time).
0 = Presentation element was not successful.

Student spoke easily (without long


pauses or reading) about what he/she
liked and disliked about a city and was
easyto understand (spoke clearly and at a
gmd speed).

Student used correct figurative language or


phnsalverbs.

Student linked words ending in consonants


to those beginning with vowels.

student used vocabulary from the unit.

Student had an appropriate recap


statement and paused before delivery of it.

Tota! points:

Comments:

O 201'l Oxford University Press. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use. Unit 8
LISTENING . listening for signposts LEARN!NG OUTCOME
VOCABULARY. using the dictionary Participate in a group discussion
GRAMMAR . types of sentences evaluating the influence money has
PRONUNCIATION . intonation in different types of sentences on happiness.
SPEAKING . agreeing and disagreeing

I Listening ond Speaking 3, poges 166-167 Activity A Answers, p. 167


1 . Students may say that people only need enough
Preview the Unit money to cover their basic needs, e.9., food,
clothing, shelter, medical care, education costs, or
Learning outcome they may say people need substantially more than
this to be happy.
1. Ask for a volunteer to read the unit skills and then
2. Students may have different opinions about
the unit learning outcome.
whether more money would make them happier
2. Explain: The learning lutcome is what you are based on how much money they currently have and
expected to be able to do by the unit's end. You are / or what their lives are like now.
going to be evaluated on how well you meet this 3. Students may think the people are happy because
outcome. With this in mind, you should focus on they are obviously wealthy, or they may wonder
learning skills ( Listening, Vocabulary, Grammar; about other factors in the people's lives, e.9., quality
Pronunciation, Speaking) that will support your goal of personal relationships, amount of time available
of participating in a growp discussion evaluating the to enjoy the nice house, etc.
influence money has on happiness. This can also help
you act as mentors in the classroom to help the other (15 minutes)
B
students meet this outcome.
7. Introduce the Unit Question, "Can money buy
A (10 minutes) happiness?" Ask related information questions
about personal experience to help students prepare
7. Prepare students for thinking about the topic by
for answering the Unit Question, which is more
eliciting a class definition of happiness. Start the
abstract. Whqt are some things money can't buy?
discussion by asking questions such as: What does
What are some things that money can help a person
happiness meon to you? Is a happy person happy all
do? Does having money make people kinder or
the time? Write students' opinions on the board.
Accept a1l answers. friendlier, or does it make them impatient or rude?
Why do you think so?
2. Put students in pairs or small groups to discuss
2. Read the Unit Question aloud. Give students a
the first four questions.
minute to silently consider their answer to the
). Call on volunteers to share their ideas with the question and supporting details.
class.Ask questions to facilitate the discussion:
J. Write Advantages of having money and
Are people with more money happier in general? Is it
Disadvantages of having mlney at the top of two
harder to make friends if you have a lot of money?
sheets of poster paper. Say, What are the advantages
Why or why not? What things can money buy that
of having a lot of ,money? What are the disadvantages
you absolutely need? (housing, food, health care,
of having a lot of money?
transportation, education, etc.) Are you happy when
you have enough money to buy these things? 4. Elicit student answers. Write *tem under the
correct heading. Post the lists to refer to later in
4. Focus students' attention on the photo. Have a
the unit.
volunteer describe the photo to the class. Read the
questions aloud.

88 Unit 9
lffirlE1p.167 3. Call on volunteers to share which list makes them
Fosft rekney cannot buy happiness happier and why.
be1715EfmFE b generated internally, from
Activity E Answers, p. 168
treiqg.rry:frr one3 life, surroundin gs, and
Students'answers will vary. Students should support
ftir5lryamot buy happiness because
their answers with reasons.
hqlrcIsborne from inside. People can have
ruqdfl be miserable; Money cant make
eeaEhlryanthe inside.

IheQ(hm
$e,uu Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 169
1- Phf Ib QClassroom. Use the example from the
nfubhdr students continue ttre conversation. LISTENING 1: Sudden Wealth
t* f,f'b lhings did the students mention they
ffi bil thq, hgd more money? According to Felix, VOCABULARY trs minutes)
*tf; fi ssffting money can't buy?
1. Direct students to read the words and *reir
definitions. Elicit any difficulties or questions.
ticiQdSpking3,poge16S
2. Model correct pronunciation of the words. Say
C (r0nirres) each word and have students tepeat.
1- fUIl cndFnb they are going to complete a )- Ask students to complete the paragraph.
qpeuinnaire about their priorities. Ask students
b rcad fte questionnaire. Elicit any questions 4. Put students in pairs to check *reir answers.
abmvocabulary. 5. Ask volunteers to read their answers.
/- FrJrlein that students should rank the expenses
in Gder of importance with 1 being trre most
iryortant and 10 being the least. .- Gr,oup lcwqr:level.studenls,a$d :astist thern with,
' ttyi,ast( P,sint aut *eitq|1a:the se.nte1rccs,thqt :

wlll he{p.them to choole the conect word, Give

-'
mt .s*aeffisih:i+€uerja+esin:ptete*i thenr additlonal,senierrces,ts hefp.thempractic+.,
th*dlfficiiti,vocafulary,r[r dxarn$lerl iant g*i "
:or-,9-, them,.ArkhfurheLtevel-$fijd€fit5,ts-tafik,
:ussd *, firvrhg
elasses rn:ftq.r"fl gf,eirlg,+ecqu,sq{ fial{e
GEes aad.thet d ivide rhe :ene,r.rlijliqrt, doEars
tft e
always hadthem in thqaftgrnaan;The{rnlFgtry sqw a
h - E€ ereJ+"TElt them to be. Fr:esargd rhm,julJlfy ,.d@i ,in:sol,qs,,5o.leEw€tle€f their-rofi,.erf ,,'
tref s&aions.
level ever.
. ., I{ave,.f,rlglier-Levet slqi*ent5or6ptete thB 11, ;
:.'
D (10 minutes) ', *tiylt:r'inidivid*alF+** then:{G,I,npqlq a't$wsfi',-
,,.utiih:n,Bi.trry-{Fli:the.p.+lts,to,wlite.q-rt.additiolFl.
1. Put students in pairs to discuss their choices. .sr*pt+sen!*a*.i4fie+ word, Have yqtynteers,:
2. Foint out that *rey should discuss the reasons for ,, wtie orte *$i:li"rnn!eiiee{-n!t lhir 5obrd,,Col1€.{t
6eir opinions. Remind them to use examples to the sentences with the wfrote ctiss, focusing on
$pport their opinions. the use ofthe vocabulary word rather than other
grammatical issues.
3. Call on volunteers to report their partner's top
choice and reasons for it.
Vocabulary Answers, p. 169
E {10 minutes) 1. acquire; 2. inheri! 3. pleasure;
7. Keep students in pairs. Tell them to write the 4. immediate; 5. dramatic; 6. circumstances;
three things in life that make them the happiest. 7. complicated; 8. destructive; 9. get/had used to;
10. wearoff
2. Ask students to compare their list to the top three
things they listed in Activity C. Tell them to gp for additional practice with the vocabulary, have
discuss with their partners how their list relates to t# students visitQOnlinePractice.
the list in Activity C.
) Listening and Speaking 3, poge 1 70 2. Play the audio while students list the
examples. Pause as necessary to give students a
PREVIEW LISTENING 1 (5 minutes)
chance to write.
1. Direct students to read the information. Ask: 3. Have students compare their answers with
What are some ways that someone might become a partrber.
wealthy suddenly?
4. Replay the audio so that the partners can check
Ask students to check the topics they think the their answers. Go over the answers with the class.
article will discuss. Point out they can check more
Listen for Details Answers, P. 171
than one. Tell them to check their answers after
Answers may vary. Possible answers:
they listen.
Effect on our lmmediate effect is pleasure
Preview Listening 1 Answer, P. 17O brain Effect wears off
Students'answers will vary. ln the listening, all three of (list any two) Have to buy more to get same
the topics are touched on. pleasure
Effect on Too many people want something
Listening 1 Background Note relationships from you
it is possible to become (list any two) People dont understand your stress
In the United States,
May be alone, lose support
wealthy suddenly through a variety of
circumstances, including inheritance, or a risky Effect on Negative emotions: fear, shame,
investment. emotions guilt, anxiety
(list any two) Can lead to bad decisions
lf inherited, can complicate
LISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (5 minutes)
emotions
$ co:.track t+
1. Explain that students are goitg to listen to the dO for additional practice with listening
article and write 7 or F next to the statements. t# comprehension, have students visit
Q Online Practice.
2. Ask students to read the information. Elicit any
questions or difficulties about them.
3. Play the audio and have students write 7 or F WHAT DO YOU THINK? (10 minutes)
individually. Elicit the answers from the class.
Ask students to read the questions and reflect on
I Main ldeas Answers, p. 170 their answers.
I r.r; 2.F;3.T; 4.r;5.F; G.F
2. Seat students in small groups and assign roles: a
group leader to make sure everyone contributes'
Tip for Success (1 minute) a note-taker to record the group's ideas, a reporter
to share the group's ideas with the class, and a
Point out that talks sometimes begin with a question.
timekeeper to watch the clock.
This often indicates the speaker's main topic. These
questions also serve as a hook to interest listeners 3. Give students five minutes to discuss the
in th.e topic. If listeners feel that their answer is in questions. Call time if conversations are
agreement with the speaker's answer they are likely to winding down. Allow theman exffa minute
listen. Conversely, if the listeners' answer differs from or tvvo if necessary.
what they hear, they may be curious to find out why. 4. Call on each group's reporter to share ideas with
the class.
I Listening and Speoking 3, poge 171

LlsJM ro! PEIIILI (ts minyg)_ What Do You Think? Answers, P.171
Students' answers will vary. Possible Answers:
1. Effects on our relationships because my friendships
$ co:,rrack t s are very important to me.
1. Ask students to read the three main points 2. A friend inherited money and was able to pay off
listed in the oufline. Te11 them they are going her loans. That made her happier.
to listen agait and write tvvo examples for each 3. lf someone is struggling to afford necessities, like
main point. food and shelter, sudden wealth would make them
happier.

90 Unit 9
Learning Outcome 4. Call on volunteers to share their answers with
Use the learning outcome to frame the purpose and
the class.
relevance of Listening 1. Ask What did you learn from Activity B Answers, p. 173
Listening 1 that prepares you participate in a discussion Possible answers:
about the impact of money on happiness? What did you 2. ln the beginning, she didnt believe it.
learn that will help you evaluate the influence of money 3. First, she paid off her credit card debt.
on happiness? 4. After that, she sent her son to college.
5. ln the immediate future, she's going to go to Paris.

I Listening ond Speaking 3, page 172 6. She's thinking of going back to school next.
Listening Skill: #O for additional practice with signposting, have
Lis!*ening for" signposts (s minutes) W students visitQOnlinePractice.

@ co:,rrack to
Listening ond Speoking j, poge 174
1. Ask students to read the information about
listening for signposts. Elicit any difficulties LISTENING 2: Happiness Breeds
or questions.
Success... and Money!
Check comprehension by asking questions: What
are signposts? What da thry help us dn?
VOCABUTARY tto minutes)
J. Tell students to follow along in their books while
they listel to the examples of signposts from 1. Pronounce the words in bold and have students
Listening 1. repeat them.

4. Check comprehension by asking questions: Which 2. Ask students to read the sentences. Elicit any
phrases can you use at the start? Where do you use questions or difficulties.
phrases such as in conclusion and in summary? J. Tell students to write the words in bold next to
the correct definition.
A (10 minutes)
Vocabulary Answers, p. 174
@ cor,rrack tz
a. independence; b. wholly; c. demonstrate;
1. Ask students to read the interview and predict d. analysis; e. burn out; f. conduct;
what kind of signposts they will hear for each g. associated with; h. outcome; i. persuasive;
item. Elicit *reir answers and reasons. j. somewhat
2. Play the audio while students write the
signposting phrases individually.
3. Put students in pairs to check their answers.
Check the answers as a class, confirming whether
students' predictions were correct.
h'elp theni 1oundentahd,the:wordt tnaaning;fdr
Activity A Answers, p. 172 .xample the word urhollyris'related, tothe word,,'
f. in the beginning; 2. then; 3. Before that; whele, whirh,mearr, +.orngfelg.,The:eading,:If:gfua:i$:
4. Finally; 5. First; 6. Next; 7. Afterthat i ndicates an adverb,Ther,if&e. rrrbtlry' ti. a,{r.edve{b

rreani ng, eom'pletely; Give thei* ad$ticlial,sentenees

Listening and Speoking 3, page 173


to help theni pia(tice thr diffiqult vocabuf ary. .
' , . ..,
Have tiigher-l€tel studrnts'completethe activitll
B (10 minutes) individria$,r:iirid thEn.eiihpaie answers with a
partner.Tell the pairs to write a sentence for each
1. Tell students that they are going to answer the
word. Hqvervalu nta€fs w rite :ofl $i ttl thslt qentenres
questions using signposts. Point out that they
on the,hoard, Corr€ct the'sentehc{r, w-ith the, w,hole
should write complete sentences.
<1as.s;,fqgusing.on,!he,.qle qJ the-vocqbqlary w.ord,.,,
2. Have students write their responses individually.
fi.(hetthnhother gramrnatical lspu-esr
'' '

3. Put students in pairs to take turns asking and


answering the questions. Ask students to identify For additional practice with the vocabulary, have
their partner's signposts. students visit Q Online Practice.

Unit 9 91
I Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 175 Listen for Details Answers, p. 176
PREVIEW LISTENING 2 (5 minutes) 1. F; 2.1; 3. T; 4. F; 5. F; 6. T

1. Direct students to read the information. Ask: For additional practice with listening
What ha,'te lur inyestigatilns into the relationship comprehension, have students visit
between money and happiness revealed so far? Q Online Proctice.

2. Ask students to check the things they think the


researcher will Point out that they can check
say. WHAT DO YOU THINK?
more *ran one. Tell them to check their answers
after they listen. A (10 minutes)

Preview Listening 2 Answer, p. 175 1. Ask students to read the questions and reflect on
Students'answers will vary. ln the listening, the their answers.
researcher says that happiness can lead to money. 2. Seat students in small groups and assign roles: a
group leader to make sure everyone conffibutes,
Listening 2 Background Note a note-taker to record the group's ideas, a reporter
to share the group's ideas with the class, and a
Dr. Sonja Lyubomirsky is a professor in the
timekeeper to watch the clock.
Department of Psychology at the University of
California Riverside. She is also the author of a )- Give students five minutes to discuss the
book entitled The How of Happiness, which presents questions. Call time if conversations are
research-based strategies to increase one's happiness. winding down. Allow them an exffa minute
She is also an associate editor of theJournal of or two if necessary.
Positirte Psychology. 4. Call on each group's reporter to share ideas with
the class.
IISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (5 minutes) Activity A Answers, p. 176
Students' answers will vary. Possible answers:
@ co:,rracr te 1. Students should support their opinions with
1. Tell students they will listen to the interview with rea50ns.
Dr. Lyubomirsky. Explain that they should circle 2. Happy people are often more positive and friendlier,
the correct answer for each item. which makes people want to work with them.
2. Ask students to read *re sentences. Elicit any
difficulties with vocabulary or concepts. (10 minutes)
B
3. Play the audio while students work individually.
7. Have students continue working their small
4. Call on volunteers to share their answers. groups to discuss the questions in activity B. Tell
for Main ldea Answers , p.175 them to choose a new leader, recorder, reporter,
I Listen
1.b; 2.c;3.b; 4.a;5.c and timekeeper.
|
2. For question 7, recap the main points from the
listening. Ask: What did we learn about people who
Listening ond Speaking 3, page 176
acquire sudden wealth? How is acquiring sudden
LISTEN FOR DETAILS (s minutes) wealth dffirent from what Professor Lyubomirsky
talked about?
@ co:,rrack ts
1. Tell students they are going to listen again and
t- Call on the new rcporter to share the group's
answers to the questions.
write T or F for each sentence.
2. Ask students to read the sentences. Elicit any Activity B Answers, p. 176
questions or difficulties. Possible answers: l.
People who acquire sudden
wealth are unprepared for it and it majorly changes
3. Play the audio while students do the activity
their lives. On the other hand, people who are happy
individually. Go over the answers with the class. in their work tend to earn more money and are not
adversely affected by this.
2. Students should support their answers with reasons.

92 Unit 9
Tip for CriticalThinking (1 minute) Activity A Answers, p. 177
1. b, financial; a, economical;
Read the tip aloud. Point out that choosing between
2. a,fun: c, amusemenq
two things requires us to evaluate the benefits and 3. c, sudden; b, immediate
drawbacks. One way that we do this is by relating
those benefits and drawbacks to our knowledge and
personal experience. Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 178

B (5 minutes)

Keep students in pairs, but have students complete


the sentences individually.
) Have students compare their answers with their
partfler. Call on volunteers to read their answers.
Elicit or provide corrections as necessary.
Activity B Answers, p. 178
1. economical; 2. financial; 3. immediate;
4. happiness; 5. sudden; 6. fun

c (10 minutes)

1. Keep students in pairs, but have students write


their sentences individually.
2. Have students read their sentences aloud to their
partner. Call on volunteers to read their sentences.
Activity C Answers, p. 178
Students' answers will vary.
Learning Outcome I

Use the learning outcome to frame the purpose and For additional practice with dictionary definitions,
relevance of Listenings 7 and 2 and the Critical Q have students visit Q Online Practice.
activity of weighing benefits and drawbacks. Ask:
What dil you learn from the listenings that prepares you
participate in a group (liscussion evaluatingthe influence
/ Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 179

monqt has on happiness?

Listening and Speaking 3, poge 177


Vocabulary Skill: Using the dictionary Grammar: Types of sentences (10 minutes)

(5 minutes) 1. Ask students to silently read the information on


types of sentences and the examples.
1. Direct students to read the information and
examples silently. 2. Check comprehension by asking questions: What
are the four types of sentences? Can yow give an
2. Check comprehension: What is similar about the
original example of each tlpe of sentence?
wor(ls creatrity and productivity? What is d.ffirent
about them? Why is it a good idea to use a dictionary 3. Ask students to silently read the information on
to choose a word? punctuation at the end of sentences.

)- Elicit the parts of *re dictionary definitions 4. Check comprehension by asking questtons: What
tryes of sentences end with a period? What type
A (15 minutes) ends with a question mark? What type ends with an
exclamation mark?
1. Tell students to first compare the dictionary
definitions of the pairs of words.
SkillNote
2. Have students match the words with their
Point out that it is important to know the different
definitions.
types of sentences because, as students will see in the
). Put students in pairs to compare their answers. next section, each type has its own intonation.
4. Go over the answers with the class.

Unit 9 93
A (10 minutes) 2. Play the audio while students check their answers.

1. Tel1 students to read ttre conversation' Elicit any 3. Call on volunteers to share ttreir answers.
questions or difficulties. Activity A Answers, p. 181
2. Ask students to identiff the sentences individually 1. a. yes/no question, b. statement;
2. a. command,b.wh- question;
3. Put students in pairs to check their sentences and
3. a. statement, b. exclamation
practice the conversation.

Activity A Answers, p. 179


1. exclamatory; 2. declarative; 3. declarative;
B (5 minutes)

4. declarative; 5. interrogative; 6. declarative; S co:,trackzt


7. declarative; 8. exclamatory or imperative 1. Tell students they are going to listen again and
repeat the sentences using the same intonation
they hear.
Listening ond Speoking 3, Page 1 80
2. Play the audio, pausing for students to repeat.
B (10 minutes)
#P for additional practice of intonation, have students
1. Keep students in pairs. Ask students to quickly s visitQOnlinePractice.
read the situations. Elicit any questions or
difficulties in vocabulary
2. Tell students to choose one situation and write Speaking Skill: Agreeing and
a short conversation. Remind them to include a
variety of sentence tYPes.
disagreeing (5 minutes) " --
l. Direct students to read the information and
3. Have pairs practice their conversations. Call on phrases about agreeing and disagreeing.
volunteers to perform for the class.
2. Check comprehension'. What are examples of
Activity Answers, P. 180
B formal ways to agree and disagree? Informal ways?
Answers will vary.

For additional practice with sentence types, have


students visil Q Online Proctice.

Pronunciation: Intonation in
different types of sentences (10 minutes)
1. Tell students to read the information
and examples on intonation in different {
sentence types.
2. Check comprehension. Ask: How many sentence
tryes are there? (4) How many intonation tryes are
there? (3) Which two sentence types have the same
intonation? (declarative and imperative)

I
3. Ensure that students understand the falling
and rising intonation by using your finger
to demonstrate.
I
4. Ask for volunteers to read the sentences. Ask the
rest of the class to run their fingers along the
arrows as theY follow along.

i
I Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 1 81

x
A (5 minutes)

I
S coa,track zo
1. Tell students they are going to hear a pair of
sentences. Tell them to check *re type of sentence

il
they hear based on the intonation.

ti

94 Unit 9
:

I Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 182 discussion. Participating in a group discussion is a


A (10 minutes) useful skill because it allows yow to exchange ideas. In :,

doing so, we ha\)e the opportunity to learn from and


$ cor,rrackzz
education others.
1. Tell students to quickly read the conversation.
Elicit any questions or difficulties. 2. Explain that you are going to use a rubric similar
to their Self-Assessment checklist on page 184 to
2. Play the audio while students complete the
grade their unit assignment.
conversation.
3. Check the answers as a class. Consider the ldeas (5 minutes)
4. Put students in pairs to practice the conversation.
1. Ask students to read the questions. Elicit any
Activity A Answers, p. 182 questions or difficulties.
1. That's a good point. 2. You can say that again!
Put students in pairs to discuss the questions.
3. I don't feel the same way. 4. I disagree.
Remind them to focus on correct intonation as
For additional practice on agreeing and disagreeing, much as they can without sacrificing *re content
have students visit Q Online Practice. of their discussion.
3. Monitor the discussions, paying attention to
students' intonation.
Expansion Activity: Agreeing and disagreeing in
different situations (10 minutes) j Listening and Speaking 3, poge 1 83
1. Put students in pairs. Prepare and Speak
2. Have the pairs think about two different scenarios
in which they might agtee or disagree with
someone. One situation should be a formal
situation, such as a conversation in the workplace.
A (10 minutes)

The other situation should be an informal situation, 1. Tell students to reflect on their discussions wi*r
such as a conversation between family members. their partners. Tell them to write notes about
what they can remember.
). Have the pairs role-play each situation using *re
appropiate phrases from the Speaking Skill box 2. Point out that students should use ttre questions in
on page 181. the book to guide them. Tell them to write their
notes in the book.
4. Ask volunteers to perform their conversations for
the class.
Tip for Success (1 minute)

qfl Unit Assignment: Read the tip a1oud.

Take part in a group discussion Point out that disagreeing is naturally difficult for
nearly everyone and typically requires sensitivity.
This is one reason why there are formal phrases
Unit Question (s minutes)
for disagreeing.
Refer students to the ideas they discussed at the
). Point out that the polite phrases I know what you
beginning of the unit about whether money can
mean but... and I
your point, but... can be used
see
buy happiness. Cue students if necessary by asking
in formal and informal situations.
specific questions about the content of the wit: Can
sudden wealth make people unhappy? Can happiness lead
to more wealth? Why or wlry not?

Learning Outcome B (10 minutes)

1. Tie the unit assignment to the unit learning


1. Tell students to choose one of the questions from
the Consider the Ideas activity to discuss.
outcome. Say'. The outcome for this unit is to
participate in a group discussion about whether money 2. Ask students to use the outline in their books to
can buy happiness. This unit assignment is going to help them prepare for a group discussion. Remind
let you show your skill in porticipating in a group them not to write exactly what they are going to
say and to just write notes to help them organize
their ideas.

Unit 9 95
3. Put students in groups according to the question Ask for a show of hands for how many students
they would like to discuss. If many students have gave all or mostly yes answers.
chosen the same question, form more than one ). Congratulate them on their success. Discuss the
group for that question. steps they can take if an item on the checklist
was difficult for them. For example, if they
> Listening ond Speaking 3, poge 184 had trouble with intonation, they can record

@ themselves speaking and ask another student to


listen to them.
C (10-15 minutes)
1. Review the checklist on page 184. Ask sflidents to
read it. Elicit any questions.
Depending on the size of your class, you may B (5 minutes)
wish to put students in groups to give their Refer students to the learning outcome on page
presentation or have students present to the 165. Tell them to talk with their parffrers about
entire class. whether they achieved the learning outcome. Elicit
). Remind students not to read directly from the answers to the unit question that students came
their outlines. Remind ttrem to use appropriate up with at the beginning of class. Encourage them to
intonation according to sentence types, as well as flip through the unit as they discuss the new things
appropriate phrases for agreeing and disagreeing. they learned and new answers they may have to the
4. Use the unit assignment rubric on page 97 of
unit question.
this Teacher\ Handbook to score each student's
presentation. ) Listening and Speoking 3, page 185

5. Monitor students' performance as they present. TrackYour Success


t. Have students circle the words they have learned
Alternative Unit Assignments in this unit. Suggest that students go back through
Assign or have students choose one of these the unit to review any words they have forgotten.
assignments to do instead of, or in addition, to the 2. Have students check the skills they have mastered.
unit assignment. Ifstudents need more practice to feel confident
1. In this unit, you have heard about factors that about their proficiency in a skill, point out the
influence the effects money can have on our page numbers and encourage them to review.
happiness. Brainstorm ways money or wealth can 3. Read the learning outcome aloud. Ask students if
be used so that it will contribute to happiness, they feel that they have met the outcome.
rather than create problems. If necessary, do
research online to get more ideas. Then form a
grorp, and tell your classmates about your ideas.
2. Think of someone who had to make a choice
befiveen having money and being happy What
did they do? How did their choice affect their life?
Tell a partner or a group.
# for an additional unit assignment, have students

Check and Reflect

@
A (5 minutes)

1. Direct students to read and complete the Self-


Assessment checklist.

96 Unit 9 t

I
Unit Assignment Rubric
Student name:

Unit Assignmenl:Take part in o group discussion.

20 = Presentation element was completely successful (at least 9070 of the time).
15 = Presentation element was mostly successful (at least 7070 of the time).
10 = Presentation element was partially successful (at least 50%o of the time).
0 = Presentation element was not successful.

ln the group discussion, student spoke


easily (without long pauses or reading)
when evaluating the influence money has
on happiness and was easy to understand
(spoke clearly and at a good speed).

Student used correct signposting.

Student used intonation correctly according


to sentence type.

Student used vocabulary from the unit.

Student used appropriate expressions


for agreeing and disagreeing, including
polite phrases.

Totalpoints:
Comments:

@ 201 1 Oxford University Press. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use. Unit 9
LISTENING . recognizing and understanding definitions LEARNING OUTCOME
VOCABULARY. idioms Role-play a phone call discussing an
GRAMMAR. comparatives emotional event you have experienced.
PRONUNCIATION . unstressed connecting words
SPEAKING . expressing emotions

Activity A Answers, p. 187


) Listening ond Speoking 3, poges 186-187
1. Possible answers: email, cell phone, letters, texting.
Preview the Unit Reasons may include cost, ease of use, and
convenience.
Learning Outcome 2. The method of communication may depend
on how comfortable the other person is with
1. Ask for a volunteer to read the unit ski11s and then
a particular technology, the availability of
the unit learning outcome.
technology, etc.
2. Explain: The learning lutclme is what you are 3. Students will probably not think this is an effective
expected to be able t0 do by the unit's end. You are way to communicate since it reaches people in the
going to be evaluated on how well you meet this local area only.
lutcome. With this in mind, you should focus on
learning skills ( Listening, Vocabulary, Grammar, (15 minutes)
B
Pronunciation, Speaking) that will support your goal
of role-playing call to discuss an emotional
a phone 1. Inffoduce the Unit Question, "Do we need
event you have experienced. This can also help you act technology to communicate long distance?"
as mentlrs in the classroom to help the other students Ask related information questions about
meet this owtcome. personal experience to help students prepare for
answering the Unit Question, which is more
A (10 minutes) absffact. How far away are the people that you
communicate with on a regular basis? What would
1. Prepare students for thinking about the topic by
you do if you couldn't use your current method of
having a class discussion about all the reasons why
communication to communicate with them? Have
we need to contact others. Start the discussion by
you e\/er changed the way that you communicate
asking questions such as: Why do we contact others?
with these people? Why?
Name some personal reaslns. Name some professional
reasons. Write students' opinions on the board. 2. Read the Unit Question aloud. Give students a

Accept all answers. minute to silently consider their answer to the


question. Ask students who would answer yet to
2. Put students in pairs or small groups to discuss
stand on one side of the room and students who
*re first three questions.
would answer no to stafld on the other side of
i 3. Call on volunteers to share their ideas with the the room.
class. Ask questions to facilitate the discussion:
3. Direct students to tell a pattner, next to them ttreir
What do you do if you do not have access to
reasons for choosing that side of the issue.
I

your regular methods of communication? Is


communication with some people more important 4. Call on volunteers from each side to share their
than others? Why? opinions with the class.
4. Focus students' attention on the photo. Have a
volunteer describe the photo to the class. Read the
I questions aloud.

98 Unit'10
5. After students have shared their opinions, provide Writing letters It's nice to have It's slow
an opportuniqr for anyone who would like to a handwritten and you
change sides to do so. letter to keep. need paper,
6. Ask students to sit down, copy the Unit Question envelopes,
and make a note of their answers and reasons. and stamps.
They will refer to these notes at the end of Texting It's very quick Sometimes
the unit. and you can the number of
do it on your characters is
Activity B Answers, p. 187 phone. limited.
Possible answers: We absolutely need technology
Using social You can meet It's not always
to communicate long distance. lt is costly to rely on
networking other people. private.
traditional technologies like landline phones, and it
sites
takes too long to use traditional mail; lt is expensive
and slow to use traditional technologies. Regular
phones are very expensive and mail takes a long time.
D (10 minutes)
1. Put students in groups to discuss their choices.
TheQClossroom 2. Remind them to use reasons and examples to
@ co:,rrackz: support their opinions.
1. Play The QCllassroom.Use the example from the 3. Call on volunteers to report their group's opinions
audio to help students continue the conversation. and reasons for them.
Ask I{ow ih some of the students use the computer
to coffirflunlcate long distance? What did some of the
Expansion Activity: Different ways for different
stillents da before we had computer technology? Why people (10 minutes)
do thc students think someone miglt write a letter to
communic at e lon g di stanc e? 1. Keep students in their groups from Activity D.
2. Ask students to think about the different ways
Listening and Speaking 3, poge 188 that they communicate with others. Do they
C (10 minutes) communicate specific ways with specific people?
For instancg a student may communicate with
1. Tell students they are going to complete a
her mother mostly by telephone but communicate
chart about methods of communication. Ask
with her friends mostly by texting.
students to read ttre chart. Elicit any questions
about vocabulary. 3. Have students discuss ttreir answers with their
groups.
2. F;xplain that students should think about the
advantages and disadvantages of each method and
then write them in *te correct column.
3. Have students complete the chart individually.
Activity C Answers, p 188
Listening ond Speoking j, page 189
Method Advantaqes Disadvantaqes
Body language You can use it It can be IISTENING 1: An Unusual Language
or gestures anywhere. misunderstood.
It can only be
VOCABULARY tts minutes)
used face-to-
face. 1. Ask students to locate the bold words in each
Talking on the You can speak Itt not always sentence. Pronounce and have students repeat
telephone naturally, and convenient. the words.
make your 2. Have students read the sentences and choose the
meaninq clear. correct answer for each.
Writing emails Itt easier than You need
writing a letter. to have a
3. Call on volunteers to read the answers aloud.
computer.

Unit 10 99
4. Elicit the answers from the class'

Main ldea Answers, P. 190


I
1.c;2.a;3.b; 4.c;5.a

Tip for Success


Read the tip aloud. Remind students that talks
sometimes begin with a question that indicates the
&eimi[$'an-aryrofrtg{$ig.,"''' :' :',': speaker's main topic. Point out that speakers may
also use questions to signal a change in topic' The
.,',.:,Hiiie-hbheFli+*L sttIdefii corfl pteta,the',''''''
" questions serve as an introduction to the new content
aetiqitg irr${igually:nd,,then eornpa. 1,eafl lwcrs
Itrith.a.pitiner.Tetl the pairs.to Wite,.n additi$h$t . or pafi of the talk.
'sa,nrple sentenie{or each'\,vor* }lave vclunteem '
.write:one af,theii'sentences an the board, CQry€ct . ) Listening ond Speoking 3, Page 1 91
the sentences with the whole class, focusing on
lht.usg,Sf';lre rvEa:iabryhr,y.lArord:r,ather.tLrAn othsrr'''
llsren toB oe4lF lto:111tg)
grar$metiea1,issue5,r:.: :,.r :: . @co:,tractzs
1. Explain that students are going to listen to the

Vocabulary Answers, P. 189


1. a; 2. a; 3. c; 4. b; 5. c;
lecture agait
that they hear.
arrd check
-
the characteristics of Silbo

6. b; 7. a; 8. a; 9. a; 10. c 2. Ask students to read the statements' Elicit any


questions or difficulties about them.
5$ for additional practice with the vocabulary, have
J. Play the audio and have students check their
W students visit Q online Practice.
answers individuallY.
4 Elicit the answers from the class'
> Listening and Speoking 3, Poge 190 Listen for Details Answers, P. 191
PREVIEW LISTENING 1 (5 minutes)
Checked ilems:2,5,6,7
Direct students to read the information and look
at the photo. Ask How do you think Silbo might he For additional practice with listening
dffirent from other languages? (It appears that the comprehension, have students visit
Q Online Practice.
hands and fingers are used in forming the sounds'
which is unlike most other languages.)
Listening ond Speoking 3, Poge 192
Listening 1 Background Note
Silbo is a whistled language that is also known as
d WHAT DO YOU THINK? (lo minutes)
1. Ask students to read the questions and reflect on
Silbo Gomera, or Gomeran Whistle. Silbo is spoken
by the inhabitants of La Gomera in the Canary their answers.
Islands. The island's landscape is full of valleys Z, Seat students in small groups and assign roles: a
and deep ravines, making Silbo very effective for group leader to make sure everyone contributes,
communication. a note-taker to record the group's ideas, a teporter
to share the group's ideas with the class, and a
LISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (5 minutes) timekeeper to watch the clock.
Give students five minutes to discuss the
@ co:,rrackz+ questions. Call time if conversations are
1. Explain that students are going to listen to the winding down. Allow them an extra minute
lecture and circle the answer that best completes or t\rvo if necessary.
each statement.
4. Call on each group's reporter to share ideas with
2. Ask students to read the statements. Elicit any the class.
questions or difficulties about them.
3. Play the audio and have students circle their
answers individually.

L
What Do You Think? Answers, p. 192 B (10 minutes)
Answers will vary.
1. Tell students that they are going to choose *rree
1. Yes, because they are an important part of peoples'
vocabulary words from the Listening 1 vocabulary
culture; No, because very few people speak them
on pages 189-190 to write a definition for. Point
and they aren't useful.
2. There is probably a limit to how much you can say. out that they should include a phrase to inffoduce
3. Some advantages include being able to speak with the definition.
more people and gaining a better understanding of Review the example with the class. Identify
languages in general. the word that is defined in the sentence
(interpret). Elicit the word that signals the
definition (or). Point out that the commas are
Learning Outcome
the way that the pause is visually represented
Use the learning outcome to frame the purpose and to the reader or speaker.
relevance of Listening 1. Ask: What did you learn from
Have students write their definitions individually.
Listening 1 that prepares you to role-play an emotional
Walk around and help student as necessary. Do
e,,ent you hnve experi.enced?
not check answers yet.

Listening Skill: Recognizing and Activity B Answers, p. 193


Answers will vary.
understanding definitions (t s minutes) I

@ co:, rrack zo c (10 minutes)


1. Ask students to read the information about 1. Put students in pairs to take turns reading their
rccogntziag and understanding definitions. Elicit sentences and confirming the definitions.
any difficulties or questions.
2. Call on a pur of students to model the example.
2. Check comprehension by asking qrestions: What Remind the student reading the first sentence
two things should you listen for when you hear an to pause to signal that a definition is being
unfamiliar word? Why is it important to be able to introduced.
recognize when a speaker is going to give a defmition?
Have students ask do the activity. Then call
3. Tell students to follow along in their books while on volunteers to read their sentences to the
they listen to the excerpt from Listening 1. class. Elicit the definition and the phrase that
4. Ask students to read the words and phrases used introduced it.
to introduce definition.
dlQ for additional practice with recognizing and
5. Check comprehension by asking questions: HiF understanding definitions, have students visit
What phrase is used to introduce the definition of Q Online Proctice.
hard-wired? Which phrase is used to introduce the
definiti o n o/ prolif eration?
/ Listening ond Speoking 3, page 194

Listening and Speaking j, page 193 LISTENING 2: Message in a Bottle


A (15 minutes)
VOCABULARY tts minutes)
$ co:, rrack zz
1. Tell students they are going to listen to four 1. Pronounce the words in bold and have students
sentences and write the definitions they hear. repeat them.
2. Play the audio while students write the Ask students to read the definitions below the
definitions individually. Pause as necessary to give paragraphs. Elicit any questions or difficulties.
students enough time to wdte. Review ttre part of speech designations next to each
3. Pttt students in pairs to check their answers. word. Elicit that an idiom is figurative language.
Check the answers as a class. Elicit the meaning of figurative language (language
that is not used in a literal way).
Activity A Answers, p. 193
1. system ofsounds; 2. hand movement; 4. Ask students to read the paragraphs silently. Elicit
3. rules forforming grammatical sentences; any questions or difficulties.
4. system of writing for the blind or visually impaired
that is made with raised dots

Unit 10 101
Preview Listening 2 Answer, P. 195 !
5. Tell students to write the words in bold next to
Students'answers will vary' ln the listening, the
the phrase with the correct definition'
children stay in touch via letters and the unusual
{
6. Put students in small groups to compare their method of putting messages in bottles and then
answers. Call on volunteers to share their answers putting them in the ocean.
with the class.

VocabularY Answers, P. 194 Listening 2 Background Note


1. pen pal; 2. ancient; 3. sYmPathY;
4. out ofthe blue; 5. built up; 6' observe; ffr. u*i.ttt Greek philosopher Theophrastus is the
7. sealed; 8. assistance; 9. one-sided; first known person to have put a message in a bottle'
10. fighting an uPhill battle He released his bottled message around 310 BC as
an experiment to show that the inflowing Atlantic
Ocean is what formed the Mediterranean Sea'
Messages in bottles have also been used to signal
for help. For example, in May 20O5, a group of 88
people who had been shipwrecked off the coast of
Costa Rica sent out a cry for help in a message in a
exampti fightlng in uFhltt'battle'15'abvibt15ryfin' bottle. Their message was discovered and they were
idiorr. Direct students torread1he dSirihlonsr{hat*ra' rescued.
,rdesigiiated: idioiiis. FlEip them determine
synofiyms
in'the ldionr and in the-deJittition, e.g,r,flght}ng.ifld ' LISTEN FOR MAIN IDEAS (10 minutes)
stiuggling. Give'lower-tevel studqnls'addilional "
' : 3en{enc6}ts'hgtF th.gm d6terfniaE'ttimniitg"':'''
@ cor, rrack zs
t,,AccaidtQg1o'nty'tnsther.*yjn$'ta:keep. my':'r' 1. Tell students they are going to listen to the report
, 1,.,t+year+t* brslhe/s Ie*m clean is fightigg' q{.l'" about how the children in tvvo different schools
uphill battle.
'2;- t ;;r,waiching.my favorite,qhew wfen' ost !'f communicate. Explain that they should indicate
.,,. . thq.bln*;,our, Vbroke. , l, ,, . :,. ... whether the sentences ate T or F'
l'lave hiqher'Evel students complete the actlvll:t. . 2. Ask students to read the sentences' Elicit any
indirriduat$'ahd' dfi:in cornpafe'6ii55,rsr5. ruith 1: "' difficulties with vocabulary ot concepts'
" psrt*er: T€ll'th,e''
piiirt td,'i{,iite a'5enfuhe'so*'*aeh 3. Play the audio while students work individually'
wdld: :Have vol:BrlteEr5 1M*te o n*'Gf their'sent€rtceg on
the'bo*r* Corred the tenteneesrldith'ifie'rc'hctre cl*ss'
4. Call on volunteers to share their answers'
'
focu$iil*on Jh*=u-Ee sf rh$vucahtrla+y,:wdfd:rfi het'"':l''+ I Listen for Main ldea Answers, p' 195
thanoihsr:srarnmatiffil.i$Ju€5i- : :, :'' . " :'
| ,.r, 2. F; 3. T; 4. F; s. T
dil$ for additional practice with the vocabulary, have
{itr students visitQOnline Practice.
llSTEry FOB
DFTNqf.-*in'1"') --

$ co:,rrackzo
I Listening and SPeoking 3, Page 195 1. Tell students they are going to listen again and
PREVIEW IISTENING 2 (s minutes) circle the correct answer to each question'
and look 2. Ask students to read the questions and answer
1. Direct students to read the information
choices. Elicit any questions or difficulties'
at the photo. Ask How do you think the children
communicate with each other? 3. Play the audio while students do the activity
individuallY.
2. Ask students to check the ways they think the
children stay in touch. Point out that they can 4. Go over *re answers with the class'
check more than one. Tell them to check their I Listen for Details Answers, P. 195
I r.c; 2.b;3.a; 4.b;5.b
answers after theY listen.
I

dP For additional practice with listening


tiEt comprehension, have students visit
Q Online Practice.

102

I
) iistening dtflt Nge i 96 ) Listening ond Speoking 3, page 1 97

dry(10ru Vocabulary Skill: ldioms


Direct students to read the information and
(5 minutes)

A 1.
examples silently.
1. A*ffibrcad the questions md rflct on
2. Check comprehension'. Are idioms figurative or
'+-"
literal language? What qre the two idioms presented?
2. Sc*ftfusmall groups andaigntdes: a What do they mean? What is the origin of the idiom
gqrE:o make sure everJnone omibutes, out of the blue? What is the origin of is a snap?
a ret&m record the group's ideas a rEpo6sl Why is it importafi tu understand und use idioms?
tnfuft3mtp's ideas with tjhe rlsRa and a
riEfrEEbwatch the clock A (10 minutes)
3- G[rtrfrve minutes to discts th 7. Ask students to read the directions, ttre sentences
gU. CaIl time if conversatims at and definitions silently. Elicit any questions or
rirtg&wn. Allow them an exta minute difficulties.
rmilresary. 2. Put students in pairs to read ttre sentences and
{. GICa.h group's reporter to share ideas with match the idioms with their definitions.
ftdh. J. Call on volunteers to share their answers.
ffrrffnsrers, p. 196 Activity A Answers, p. 197
rLdff-cwerswill vary.
L ilIdedont know where the bottles will end I
1.e; 2.d;3.b; 4.c;5.a
rp,af people will receive them, which makes
liksting.
l grlqts may have had pen pals in class or on
5wn. i: :
r" witl t
. Grqup lower-level students and assist them
etagt<. Help ihem tp find.parts of the !d!om' :

that relate to their meanings. Foi example all ears


B (llldres) : contairiS the word iars,:rffiieh are'useSf+r'listeninq.
1- Hasrdents continue working their small Ears,aie'related to tha concept of listening in the ' ''
the questions in Activity B. Tell definition fi$tening care{utly.
3:cFto discuss
, , r Have hlgher-level studen* w.ork in small grbtrpsr',',,-
hb choose a new leadeL tecorder, reporter,
dffimekeeper. tq ralqite 4,nqw. senlence fgrl ldiqm, lelis!!,tlrgqpar a, :
qlqssn&guJiw sn wh€ther the idiom is apprppriate in .:
fuqrction 1, recap the main points from the
r ;ng Ask:What is Silbo? Wlry is this type of :',,;t!i!$-sentgnc.,e. . ; ..,:'.,' i

t ry? ruitable for the islanl?


3- Crtro the new reporter to share the group's Listening ond Speoking 3, poge 198
ffi[s to the questions. Ilfol!..Ss_
lflyBAnswers, p. 196 Have students read the tip aloud. Elicit some idioms
ffianswers: students may akeady know. If students are unable to
L flsemethods of communication developed provide any, suggest some simple ones, for example,
heanse they were effective means of on the run (in a hurry) ot cut to the chase (leave out the
ornunicating. unnecessary details).
2 Hand social networking sites have made
qnrnunication faster and in the case of social B (15 minutes)
lErrorking, more pu blic.
t. Keep students in pairs, but have students complete
the sentences individually.
Lean-qgOutrome Have students compare their answers with their
Use the kling outcome to frame the purpose and partrrcr. Call on volunteers to read their answers.
relevre d Listenings 7 and 2 that prepares them Have pairs ptacttce the conversations.
for the rdeplay. flsk'. What did you learn from the
list@t fu prepares ylu to role-play a phone call?
Wlw ffiywbarn that will help you to define content
fm yolrt*-fuy?

Unit 10 103
Activity B Answers, p. 198 4. Call on volunteers to share their answers. Accept
l. off the top of my head; 2. hold my tongue; all answers that can be supported.
3. Drop (me) a line; 4. all ears; 5. get off my chest
Activity A Answers, p. 200
Possible answers:
) Listening ond Speaking 3, page 1 99 1. Making a phone call is less efficient than sending a
text message. Making a phone call is not as efficient
as sending a text message.
2. Riding a bicycle is more dangerous than driving
a car. Driving a car is not as dangerous as riding
Grammar: Comparatives (15 minutes) a bicycle.
3. Putting a message in a bottle is less reliable than
1. Ask students to silently read the informaflon on making a phone call. Putting a message in a bottle
comparatives and the examples. is not as reliable as making a phone call.
2. Check comprehension by asking qrestions: Why 4. Answers will vary.
do we use comparatives? When do we use -er instead
of more than? When do we use as...as? When do we (10 minutes)
B
ase less that instead olf not as ... as?
7. Keep students in pairs. Ask students to quickly
). To make this information clear for students,
read the situations and example. Elicit any
write the following adjectives on the board:
questions or difficulties in vocabulary.
fast and fficient. Elicit how to make a
comparative with each. 2. Have students tell their partrle.ir which method of
communication they would use in each situation
fast ) fastea as fast as, not as fast as
and why. Remind them to use a comparative
fficient ) more fficient, as fficient as, less fficient, instead of simply saying the method of
not as efficient as communication.
4. Ask students to read the information on irregular 3. Have pairs discuss their answers. Call on
adjective forms again. Point out that these volunteers to share their opinions with the class.
adjectives can also be used with as... as and not as...
os. For example, not as good as, as bad os, etc. Activity B Answers, p.200
Answers will vary.

SkillNote
dO for additional practice with comparatives, have
Have students read the note aloud. Point out that \# students visitQOnlineProctice.
it is important to understand and use comparatives
correctly since comparing two things, ideas, or people
Listening and Speaking 3, poge 201
is very common. It's also helpful when discussing
emotion because we tend to think in extremes when Pronunciation:
we're upset. Unstressed connecting words (10 minutes)

Listening ond Speaking 3, page 200 $ co:, rract :o


1. Tell students that words used to connect ideas are
A {15 minutes) often unsffessed. Point out [hat they are called
1. Tell students they are going to use the words and connecting words.
adjectives in parentheses to write tvvo sentences 2. Review the meaning of stress by asking students
with the same meaning. to identifu the stressed word in a sentence. Say:
2. Review the example with the class. Elicit the Cell phones are smaller than regular phones, stressing
comparative structures used in each sentence (not the words cell, smaller, an.d regular.

as...as and more than). Elicit that these sentences -)- Elicit that these words were sffessed, or were
are true. emphasized by a change in volume. Ask students
3. Ask students to write their sentences individually. to tell you why these words were stressed (because
Point out that they should create ttreir own they carry the main information or meaning of
comparison for number 4. Put students in pairs to *re sentence). Point out that unstressed words are
check their answers. not stressed because they don't carry information.
4. Play the audio while students follow along.

104 Unit 10
A (10 minutes)

@ co:,rrack:t
1. Tell students they are going to listen to the
sentences and write the connecting words
they hear.
2. Ask students to read the sentences. Elicit any
questions or difficulties. Ask students to read the
sentences again and predict the words that belong
in the blanks.
3. Play the audio while students check their
predictions.
4. Check the answers as a class.
Activity A Answers, p. 201
I
1. than; 2. and 3. as...as; 4. that; 5. than

B (5 minutes)

@ cor,rrack:t
1. Tell students they are going to listen again and
repeat the sentences. Remind them not to sffess
the connecting words.
2. Play the audio, pausing for students to repeat.
arp for additional practice of unstressed connecting A (15 minutes)
t5t words, have students visit Q online Practice. $ cor, rrack :a
1. Tell students they are going to listen to
and complete a conversation. Ask them to
) Listening ond Speaking 3, page 202
quickly read the conversation. Elicit any
Tip for Success questions or difficulties.
Have shrdents read the tip aloud. Elicit the types of 2. Play the audio while students complete the
sentences and intonation students learned in Unit 9. conversation. Pause as necessary to give students
Point out that the intonation they use can either