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Faculty of Humanities 

School of Education

Unit Outline

EDUC4020 Supporting Literacy and Numeracy Development for Diverse Learners


Semester 2, 2018

Unit study package code: EDUC4020 


Mode of study: Fully Online
Tuition pattern summary: This unit does not have a fieldwork component.
Credit Value: 25.0
Pre-requisite units: Nil

Co-requisite units: Nil

Anti-requisite units: EDUC4028 (v.0) EDC490 Supporting Literacy and Numeracy Development for Diverse Learners or
any previous version

Result type: Grade/Mark


Approved incidental fees: Information about approved incidental fees can be obtained from our website. Visit
fees.curtin.edu.au/incidental_fees.cfm for details.
Unit coordinator:

Title: Dr
Name: Cindy Smith
Phone: 08 9266 2765
Email: Cindy.Smith1@curtin.edu.au
Location: Building: 501 - Room: Level 4

Teaching Staff:

Name: Cindy Smith


Phone: 08 9266 2765
Email: cindy.smith1@curtin.edu.au
Location: Building: 501 - Room: 4th floor

Administrative contact: Name: Administrative Enquiries


Phone: 9266 2158
Email: EducationStudents@curtin.edu.au
Location: Building: 501 - Room: Level 3
Learning Management System: Blackboard (lms.curtin.edu.au)

Acknowledgement of Country
We respectfully acknowledge the Indigenous Elders, custodians, their descendants and kin of this land past and present. The Centre for
Aboriginal Studies aspires to contribute to positive social change for Indigenous Australians through higher education and research.

Syllabus
This unit is one of three in a suite of undergraduate Option units designed to prepare Initial Teacher Educators (ITE) to specialise in the
teaching of Literacy and Numeracy in diverse populations. Completing three of these units will provide graduates with a specialisation in this
area. This unit introduces literacy and numeracy as dynamic and evolving concepts and understood by individuals with a variety of learning
strengths and difficulties within their particular social, cultural and historical experiences. Students will explore literacy and numeracy
conventions and demands across the entire curriculum, not limited to only English and Mathematics. Students will begin to develop an
awareness of the need for teachers to support opportunities for literacy and numeracy development holistically.

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Bentley Campus CRICOS Provider Code 00301J
17 Jul 2018 The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS
School of Education, Faculty of Humanities
Faculty of Humanities 
School of Education
 

Introduction
Welcome to the Unit: EDUC 4020: Supporting Literacy and Numeracy Development for Diverse Learners.  Participants in this unit will
develop their skills and understanding of the process of literacy and numeracy understanding among learners from diverse cultures and
environments both from a historical and current viewpoint. As the first unit in a group of three units which deal with culturally diverse learners,
the participants will be well prepared to further explore how education is important to issues of social justice in the Australian society. 
Through the activities and study in this unit, participants will be better prepared in the area of Standard 1 (know your students and how they
learn) of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers, as well as Standard 2 (know the content and how to teach it), and finally, as
Standard 3.5 (use effective classroom communication). 

Unit Learning Outcomes


All graduates of Curtin University achieve a set of nine Graduate Attributes during their course of study. These inform an employer that,
through your studies, you have acquired discipline knowledge and a range of other skills and attributes which employers would value in a
professional setting. Each unit in your course addresses the Graduate Attributes through a clearly identified set of learning outcomes. They
form a vital part in the process referred to as assurance of learning. The learning outcomes notify you of what you are expected to know,
understand or be able to do in order to be successful in this unit. Each assessment for this unit is carefully designed to test your knowledge of
one or more of the unit learning outcomes. On successfully completing all of the assessments you will have achieved all of these learning
outcomes.
Your course has been designed so that on graduating you will have achieved all of Curtin's Graduate Attributes through the assurance of
learning processes in each unit.
Graduate
On successful completion of this unit students can: Attributes
addressed
1 Describe and discuss historical and contemporary literacy and numeracy theories, pedagogies and practices

2 Examine the literacy and numeracy demands and conventions across and within the curriculum

3 Appraise the currently used teaching and learning strategies for numeracy and literacy across disciplines, with
particular attention to effectiveness across culturally and intellectually diverse learners, according to available
research
4 Develop a lesson plan through the adaption and cross-curricular application of a currently accepted literacy and
numeracy curriculum to support culturally and intellectually diverse learners in the acquisition of literacy and
numeracy skills
Curtin's Graduate Attributes

Apply discipline knowledge Thinking skills Information skills


(use analytical skills to solve problems) (confidence to investigate new ideas)

Learning how to learn


Communication skills Technology skills (apply principles learnt to new situations)
(confidence to tackle unfamiliar problems)

International perspective Cultural understanding Professional Skills


(work independently and as a team)
(value the perspectives of others) (value the perspectives of others)
(plan own work)

Find out more about Curtin's Graduate attributes at the Office of Teaching & Learning website: ctl.curtin.edu.au

Learning Activities
Learning Activities
Overview

TOPIC TITLE ULOs B. Ed Primary AITSL standards


CLOs addressed
addressed  

1 Historical foundations of education worldwide, particularly as related to 1 2, 6, 7 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1,
literacy and numeracy. Does our current curriculum and methods 2.4, 2.5, 3.5, 4.1,
adequately prepare our students for the literacy and numeracy demands
of today’s world?

2 Exploring the literacy and numeracy needs of Australian citizens today.  1, 2, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1,
How has education in Australia evolved to meet the needs of society? Why 3,4 2.2, 2.3,  2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.5,
is it important to be fluent in words and numbers?  3.1; 3.2; 3.4, 4.1,

3 Examining curriculum and standards in Australian schools and 1, 2, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1,
internationally.  3,4 2.2, 2.3,  2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.5,

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Bentley Campus CRICOS Provider Code 00301J
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Faculty of Humanities 
School of Education
 

3.1; 3.2; 3.4, 4.1,

4 How does culture and family values influence learning in numeracy and 1, 2, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1,
literacy?  3,4 2.2, 2.3,  2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.5,
3.1; 3.2; 3.4, 4.1,

5 How does gender and environment influence learning in numeracy and 1, 2, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1,
literacy?  3,4 2.2, 2.3,  2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.5,
3.1; 3.2; 3.4, 4.1,

6 Differentiation- supporting numeracy and literacy learning through a 1, 2, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1,
strength based model.  3,4 2.2, 2.3,  2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.5,
3.1; 3.2; 3.4, 4.1,

7 Supporting numeracy and literacy across the curriculum with effective 1, 2, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1,
teaching strategies.  3,4 2.2, 2.3,  2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.5,
3.1; 3.2; 3.4, 4.1,

8 Planning instruction through universal design.  1, 2, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1,
3,4 2.2, 2.3,  2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.5,
3.1; 3.2; 3.4, 4.1,

9 Adapting curriculum to promote effective numeracy and literacy 1, 2, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1,
understanding.  3,4 2.2, 2.3,  2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.5,
3.1; 3.2; 3.4, 4.1,

10 Effective methods of collaboration across disciplines to support literacy 1, 2, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1,
and numeracy learning for diverse populations.  3,4 2.2, 2.3,  2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.5,
3.1; 3.2; 3.4, 4.1,

11 Promoting self directed learners in literacy and numeracy through effective 1, 2, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1,
  study skills 3,4 2.2, 2.3,  2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.5,
3.1; 3.2; 3.4, 4.1,

12 Learning for the real world- promoting students’ literacy and numeracy 1, 2, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1,
appreciation, supporting student transitions to vocational or post 3,4 2.2, 2.3,  2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.5,
graduate settings 3.1; 3.2; 3.4, 4.1,

13 Reflection 1, 2, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1,


3,4 2.2, 2.3,  2.4, 2.5, 2.6, 3.5,
3.1; 3.2; 3.4, 4.1,

Learning Resources
Library Reading List
The Reading List for this unit can be accessed through Blackboard.
Essential texts
The required textbook(s) for this unit are:

l Ashman, A. (2014). Education for Inclusion and Diversity 5th Ed. Australia: Pearson

This resource is also available as an e book: 


http://www.pearson.com.au/9781486009572
(ISBN/ISSN: 9781486005215)

Other resources
Allen J., (2010). The road to inclusion: integrating people with disabilities into the workplace: white paper: summary of Deloitte’s dialogue on diversity
roundtables. Ottawa, ON: Deloitte & Touche LLP
 
American Association of University Women. (2010). Why so few? Women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Washington,
DC: Author.
 
Ayres, M. M., Leaper, C. (2013). Adolescent girls’ experiences of discrimination: An examination of coping strategies, social support, and self-
esteem. Journal of Adolescent Research, 28, 479–508. doi:10.1177/0743558412457817 
             Breakwell, G. M., Vignoles, V. L., Robertson, T. (2003). Stereotypes and crossed-category evaluations: The case of gender and science
education. British Journal of Psychology, 94, 437–455.                doi:10.1348/000712603322503024 
Brown, C. S., Leaper, C. (2010). Latina and European American girls’ experiences with academic sexism and their self-concepts in mathematics

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Bentley Campus CRICOS Provider Code 00301J
17 Jul 2018 The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS
School of Education, Faculty of Humanities
Faculty of Humanities 
School of Education
 

and science during adolescence. Sex Roles, 63, 860–870. doi:10.1007/s11199-010-9856-5 


 
Ceci, S. J., Ginther, D. K., Kahn, S., Williams, W. M. (2014). Women in academic science: A changing landscape. Psychological Science in the Public
Interest, 15, 75–141. doi:10.1177/1529100614541236
             Lindsay, S. (2011). Discrimination and other barriers to employment for teens and young adults with disabilities. Disability Rehabilitation. 33,
1340-1350. 
Orders S, Duquette C. (2010). Enhancing access to post-secondary education in Canada: an exploration of early intervention initiatives in selected
countries. Ottawa, ON: Canadian Policy Research Network. 
              World Health Organization (WHO). Towards a common language for functioning, disability and health: ICF. Geneva  Switzerland: WHO; 2001.
 

Assessment
Assessment schedule
Unit Learning Late Assessment
Task Value % Date Due Outcome(s) Assessments Extensions
Assessed Accepted?* Considered?*
Essay 25% Week: Week 4 1,2 Yes Yes
1 Day: Thursday 23/8/2018
Time: 11:59 WST
Multimedia presentation 25% Week: Week 8 1,2,3 Yes Yes
2 Day: Thursday 20/09/2018
Time: 11:59 WST
Lesson Plan 50% Week: Week 13 1,2,4 Yes Yes
3 Day: Thursday 25/10/2018
Time: 11:59 WST
*Please refer to the Late Assessment and the Assessment Extension sections below for specific details and conditions.
Detailed information on assessment tasks

1. Choose one of the three essay questions posted on blackboard and thoughtfully respond in 1000 words (+- 10% this includes all
headings, in-text citations, captions and direct quotes, and excludes the reference list. Support each answer with a minimum of
four academic references. The essential text for this unit must be one of the references. Additional acceptable references
are research based articles from scholarly peer reviewed journals. One reference may be from a scholarly or government based
source with a purpose of supporting education. No websites with .com endings. APA 6th Ed format.
Save and submit your assessment as a Word.doc or docx with your name and student ID number in the file name (Sally
Brown_71245667). 
Do not save and submit as a pdf.
Criteria:
Your work will be assessed in accordance with how well you are able to:
l clearly demonstrate your understanding of the particular area of learning and diversity addressed in the essay question
l include strong, relevant examples of interaction of educational theory and practice
l write in a clear, scholarly fashion, incorporating key references and using accurate APA 6 referencing conventions

 
 
2. After identifying a specific minority/cultural population of students, describe specific research based teaching and
learning strategies to effectively teach numeracy and literacy across disciplines, considering the cultural background
and values of the chosen group of students.  Must be supported with a minimum of four academic references including
the essential text for this unit and three scholarly peer reviewed journal articles. Submission will be 1000 words (+- 10%
this includes all headings, in-text citations, captions and direct quotes, and excludes the reference list. APA 6th Ed
format. 
Save and submit your assessment as a Word.doc or docx with your name and student ID number in the file name (Sally Brown_71245667). 
Do not save and submit as a pdf.
Criteria:
Your work will be assessed in accordance with how well you are able to:
l clearly demonstrate your understanding of and respect for the background and values of the specific minority/cultural
population which you have identified
l include strong, relevant examples of interaction of development theory and classroom applications which can be utilized across
disciplines/content areas
l write in a clear, scholarly fashion, incorporating key references and using accurate APA 6 referencing conventions

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Bentley Campus CRICOS Provider Code 00301J
17 Jul 2018 The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS
School of Education, Faculty of Humanities
Faculty of Humanities 
School of Education
 

3. Utilising holistic strategies which support culturally and intellectually diverse learners in the attainment of literacy or
numeracy, create a lesson plan for a specific subject.  You may choose from the subjects listed on the WA curriculum,
and will be provided a lesson plan template.  
Save and submit your assessment as a Word.doc or docx with your name and student ID number in the file name (Sally Brown_71245667). 
Do not save and submit as a pdf.
Criteria:
Your work will be assessed in accordance with how well you are able to:
l clearly demonstrate your understanding of and respect of a generally culturally and intellectually diverse group of learners
l include strong, relevant research based examples of appropriate learning activities/experiences 
l complete appropriately all sections of the lesson plan template provided

Pass requirements
Please refer to Curtin University’s Assessment and Student Progression Manual for full details of all policies and procedures associated with
assessment at Curtin.  Each of your tutors and Unit Co-ordinators is obliged to observe this policy.
Assessment and Student Progression Manual
In order to pass this unit, all assessment tasks must be submitted and an overall mark of 50% or more must be achieved. It is not essential to
pass all assessments, although the overall Unit Learning Outcomes must be achieved in order to pass a unit.
Successful submission means that:

l If the assessment task comprises discrete components, such as:


¡ three components of a portfolio, involving separate tasks addressing different aspects of the Unit Learning Outcomes
¡ discrete sections such as test results and a report
¡ mandatory accompanying documentation such as a Parental Consent Form

then all components must be provided for the assessment to be deemed as submitted. Late penalties will apply until the complete
assessment is submitted.

l The electronic file must be readable. It is a student’s responsibility to ensure that assessments are complete and have been successfully
uploaded in a readable format. You are advised to check that your file can be opened and that all sections are present and readable.
Please seek assistance if you experience technical problems.

Students are strongly advised to ensure work is backed up to a separate, retrievable location, as extensions are unlikely to be granted for last-
minute computer failure.
 
Resubmissions
A student who has received a fail grade (less than 50%) for an assessment, but achieves at least 40% of the possible mark for an assessment
that was submitted by the due date, will be offered the opportunity to resubmit. Please note that:

l the maximum mark a resubmission can be awarded is 50% of the possible mark (for example, 25/50)
l only one assessment resubmission per unit is possible.
l the resubmitted work must be received by the due date.

Due dates include the standard published due dates, the resubmission due date advised by Unit Co-ordinators, and any dates negotiated
through pre-approved assessment extensions

Fair assessment through moderation


Moderation describes a quality assurance process to ensure that assessments are appropriate to the learning outcomes, and that students
work is evaluated consistently by assessors. Minimum standards for the moderation of assessments are described in the Assessment and
Student Progression Manual, available from policies.curtin.edu.au/findapolicy/

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Bentley Campus CRICOS Provider Code 00301J
17 Jul 2018 The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS
School of Education, Faculty of Humanities
Faculty of Humanities 
School of Education
 

Late assessment
Where the submission of a late assessment is permitted, late penalties will be consistently applied in this unit.
Where a late assessment is permitted for an assessment item or the entirety of the unit (refer to the Assessment Schedule table in this Unit
Outline) and the student does not have an approved assessment extension:

1. For assessment items submitted within the first 24 hours after the due date/time, students will be penalised by a deduction of 5% of the
total marks allocated for the assessment task;
2. For each additional 24 hour period commenced an additional penalty of 10% of the total marks allocated for the assessment item will
be deducted; and
3. Assessment items submitted more than 168 hours late (7 calendar days) will receive a mark of zero.

Where late assessment is NOT permitted for an assessment item or the entirety of the unit (refer to the Assessment Schedule table in this Unit
Outline) and the student does not have an approved assessment extension:

1. All assessment items submitted after the due date/time will receive a mark of zero.

EDUC4020 Supporting Literacy and Numeracy Development for Diverse Learners Page: 6 of 13

Bentley Campus CRICOS Provider Code 00301J
17 Jul 2018 The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS
School of Education, Faculty of Humanities
Faculty of Humanities 
School of Education
 

Assessment extension
Where an application for an assessment extension is permitted for an assessment item(s) within this unit (refer to the Assessment Schedule
table in this Unit Outline):

1. A student unable to complete an assessment item by/on the due date/time due to exceptional circumstances beyond the student's
control, must apply for an assessment extension using the Assessment Extension Application Form (available from the Forms page at
students.curtin.edu.au/administration/) as prescribed by the Academic Registrar.
2. The student will be expected to lodge the form with supporting documentation to the school representative nominated below.
3. Failure to submit this application in a timely manner, may impact upon the assessment process. For applications that are declined this
may have significant ramifications on the possible marks awarded.
4. An application may be accepted up to five working days after the due date/time of the assessment item where the student is able to
provide a verifiable explanation as to why he or she was not able to submit the application prior to the assessment due date/time.

Where an application for an assessment extension is NOT permitted for an assessment item(s) within this unit (refer to the Assessment
Schedule table in this Unit Outline):

1. All assessment items submitted after the due date/time will be subject to late penalties or receive a mark of zero depending on the unit
permitting late assessment submissions.

Nominated School Representative: EducationAssessExt@curtin.edu.au


A link to the Assessment Extension Application Form can also be found in the “Help” folder of your unit’s Blackboard site. You will need to go
to the Student Support Section titled “Essential Forms, Policies and Processes”.
All assessment extensions are governed by the guidelines contained in the Curtin University Student Assessment and Progression policy. 
Assessment and Student Progression Manual
 
Fair and Accurate Assessment
The assessment in all units is subject to stringent assessment moderation processes, whereby academic staff work collaboratively to calibrate
expectations and review a cross-section of submitted work to remain calibrated and confer on borderline grade or failing work.  In no
circumstances is only one academic staff member involved in the assessment of student work across a unit.
Any student who genuinely believes that assessed work has been unfairly or inaccurately marked, or that their final unit grade is inappropriate,
has the right to request a review of the mark or final result. If this review process is unable to resolve the issue, a formal assessment appeal
may be lodged.
It is expected that most situations will be able to be resolved without the need for a formal appeal.

l Step 1 – Initial Request for Review by marker or unit co-ordinator. This informal review will be to check that marking was accurate and
complete and may or may not involve a re-marking of the whole work. Marks cannot be reviewed downwards as a result of this
informal process.
l Step 2 – Formal Appeal. If the informal review fails to satisfy the student that their work has been fairly and accurately assessed, a
formal appeal can be lodged on the relevant form and submitted to the Head of School.  Students will be expected to provide full
details of:
¡ Their perceived basis for the appeal – for example, where in their work they believe they have demonstrated a higher level of
attainment
¡ The informal review process that has been engaged in and the outcome of any dialogue with tutors and Unit Co-ordinators.

It is important to be aware that formal assessment appeals must be lodged within ten working days of the result for the assessment task or
final grade for the unit being released.  Please read the Assessment and Student Progression Manual carefully for further information
concerning appeals against assessment decisions.

Deferred assessments
If your results show that you have been granted a deferred assessment you should immediately check OASIS for details.

Further assessment
Further assessments, if granted by the Board of Examiners, will be held between 12/12/2018 and 28/12/2018 . Notification to students will be
made after the Board of Examiners meeting via the Official Communications Channel in OASIS.
It is the responsibility of the student to be available to complete the requirements of a further assessment. If your results show that you have
been granted a further assessment you should immediately check OASIS for details.

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Bentley Campus CRICOS Provider Code 00301J
17 Jul 2018 The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS
School of Education, Faculty of Humanities
Faculty of Humanities 
School of Education
 

Reasonable adjustments for students with disabilities/health circumstances likely to impact on studies
A Curtin Access Plan (CAP) is a document that outlines the type and level of support required by a student with a disability or health condition
to have equitable access to their studies at Curtin.  This support can include alternative exam or test arrangements, study materials in
accessible formats, access to Curtin’s facilities and services or other support as discussed with an advisor from Disability Services
(disability.curtin.edu.au).  Documentation is required from your treating Health Professional to confirm your health circumstances.
If you think you may be eligible for a CAP, please contact Disability Services. If you already have a CAP please provide it to the Unit
Coordinator at the beginning of each study period.

Referencing style
The referencing style for this unit is APA 6th Ed.
More information can be found on this style from the Library web site: http://libguides.library.curtin.edu.au/referencing.

Privacy
As part of a learning or assessment activity, or class participation, your image or voice may be recorded or transmitted by equipment and
systems operated by Curtin University. Transmission may be to other venues on campus or to others both in Australia and overseas.
Your image or voice may also be recorded by students on personal equipment for individual or group study or assessment purposes. Such
recordings may not be reproduced or uploaded to a publically accessible web environment. If you wish to make such recordings for study
purposes as a courtesy you should always seek the permission of those who are impacted by the recording.
Recording of classes or course materials may not be exchanged or distributed for commercial purposes, for compensation, or for any other
purpose other than personal study for the enrolled students in the unit. Breach of this may subject a student to disciplinary action under
Statute No 10 – Student Disciplinary Statute.
If you wish to discuss this please talk to your Unit Coordinator.

Copyright
The course material for this unit is provided to you for your own research and study only. It is subject to copyright. It is a copyright
infringement to make this material available on third party websites.

Academic Integrity (including plagiarism and cheating)


Any conduct by a student that is dishonest or unfair in connection with any academic work is considered to be academic misconduct.
Plagiarism and cheating are serious offences that will be investigated and may result in penalties such as reduced or zero grades, annulled
units or even termination from the course. Assessments under investigation will not be given a mark until the matter is concluded. This may
result in the unit grade being withheld or a grade of Fail Incomplete (F-IN) until a decision has been made by the Student Disciplinary Panel.
This may impact on enrolment in further units/study periods.
Plagiarism occurs when work or property of another person is presented as one's own, without appropriate acknowledgement or referencing.
Submitting work which has been produced by someone else (e.g. allowing or contracting another person to do the work for which you claim
authorship) is also plagiarism. Submitted work is subjected to a plagiarism detection process, which may include the use of text matching
systems or interviews with students to determine authorship.
Cheating includes (but is not limited to) asking or paying someone to complete an assessment task for you or any use of unauthorised
materials or assistance during an examination or test.
From Semester 1, 2016, all incoming coursework students are required to complete Curtin’s Academic Integrity Program (AIP). If a student
does not pass the program by the end of their first study period of enrolment at Curtin, their marks will be withheld until they pass. More
information about the AIP can be found at: https://academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au/students/AIP.cfm
Refer to the Academic Integrity tab in Blackboard or academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au for more information, including student guidelines for
avoiding plagiarism.

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Bentley Campus CRICOS Provider Code 00301J
17 Jul 2018 The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS
School of Education, Faculty of Humanities
Faculty of Humanities 
School of Education
 

Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Expectations


Curtin students are expected to have reliable internet access in order to connect to OASIS email and learning systems such as Blackboard and
Library Services.
You may also require a computer or mobile device for preparing and submitting your work.
If you are having technical difficulties submitting your assessment (e.g. via Blackboard/Turnitin) please contact HUM-EDLTS@curtin.edu.au with
your student ID, Unit Code and the details of the assessment you are trying to submit.
For general ICT assistance, in the first instance please contact OASIS Student Support:
oasisapps.curtin.edu.au/help/general/support.cfm
For specific assistance with any of the items listed below, please contact The Learning Centre:
life.curtin.edu.au/learning-support/learning_centre.htm

l Using Blackboard, the I Drive and Back-Up files


l Introduction to PowerPoint, Word and Excel

Additional information
Student Support
Learning Centre

l Comprehensive support for many aspects of students’ learning is offered through face to face and online resources via the Learning
Centre
http://unilife.curtin.edu.au/learning_support/learning_centre.htm

 
Uni English

l This website has been designed to support students whose first language is not English. The Curtin University Uni English website
contains English language resources, activities, support information, and links to diagnostic assessment tests.
http://unilife.curtin.edu.au/learning_support/UniEnglish.htm

 
Counselling

l All Curtin students are entitled to access Curtin Counseling for free, confidential and professional services. This includes online students
who may require individual counselling for personal, psychological, or study-related issues (although please note that the counselling
service is not the appropriate avenue for pursuing assessment queries or debates).
http://unilife.curtin.edu.au/health_wellbeing/counselling_services.htm

Enrolment
It is your responsibility to ensure that your enrolment is correct - you can check your enrolment through the eStudent option on OASIS, where
you can also print an Enrolment Advice.

Student Rights and Responsibilities


It is the responsibility of every student to be aware of all relevant legislation, policies and procedures relating to their rights and
responsibilities as a student. These include:

l the Student Charter


l Values and Signature Behaviours
l the University's policy and statements on plagiarism and academic integrity
l copyright principles and responsibilities
l the University's policies on appropriate use of software and computer facilities

Information on all of the above is available through the University's "Student Rights and Responsibilities" website at:
students.curtin.edu.au/rights.

EDUC4020 Supporting Literacy and Numeracy Development for Diverse Learners Page: 9 of 13

Bentley Campus CRICOS Provider Code 00301J
17 Jul 2018 The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS
School of Education, Faculty of Humanities
Faculty of Humanities 
School of Education
 

Student Equity
There are a number of factors that might disadvantage some students from participating in their studies or assessments to the best of their
ability, under standard conditions. These factors may include a disability or medical condition (e.g. mental illness, chronic illness, physical or
sensory disability, learning disability), significant family responsibilities, pregnancy, religious practices, living in a remote location or another
reason. If you believe you may be unfairly disadvantaged on these or other grounds please contact Student Equity at eesj@curtin.edu.au or go
to http://eesj.curtin.edu.au/student_equity/index.cfm for more information
You can also contact Counselling and Disability services: http://www.disability.curtin.edu.au or the Multi-faith services:
http://life.curtin.edu.au/health-and-wellbeing/about_multifaith_services.htm for further information.
It is important to note that the staff of the university may not be able to meet your needs if they are not informed of your individual
circumstances so please get in touch with the appropriate service if you require assistance. For general wellbeing concerns or advice please
contact Curtin's Student Wellbeing Advisory Service at:
http://life.curtin.edu.au/health-and-wellbeing/student_wellbeing_service.htm

Recent unit changes


Students are encouraged to provide unit feedback through eVALUate, Curtin's online student feedback system. For more information about
eVALUate, please refer to evaluate.curtin.edu.au/info/.

To view previous student feedback about this unit, search for the Unit Summary Report at
https://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/student/unit_search.cfm. See https://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/info/dates.cfm to find out
when you can eVALUate this unit.

Recent changes to this unit include:


This unit is a newly developed unit.  Considerations in the development of the unit include: Curtin Course Learning Objectives, AITSL standards,
feedback from students and previous unit reviews.  

EDUC4020 Supporting Literacy and Numeracy Development for Diverse Learners Page: 10 of 13

Bentley Campus CRICOS Provider Code 00301J
17 Jul 2018 The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS
School of Education, Faculty of Humanities
Faculty of Humanities 
School of Education
 

Program calendar
Program Calendar – Semester 2 2018
Week Begin Topics Pre-readings Assessment
Date Due
(Listed (additional pre-readings to enhance learning will be posted on Blackboard)
Topics are
General,
Additional
information
will be
posted on
Blackboard

Orientation 23 July Orientation Week

1. 30 July Historical Read:   


foundations of
education  
worldwide,
Chapter 2: The Australian Educational Landscape Pages: 35-62
particularly as
related to  
literacy and
numeracy. Does Ashman, A. (2014). Education for Inclusion and Diversity 5th Ed. Australia: Pearson
our current
curriculum and  
methods
adequately  
prepare our
students for the
literacy and
numeracy
demands of
today’s world?

2. 6 August Exploring the Read:  


literacy and
numeracy needs  
of Australian
Chapter 1: Embracing Inclusion Pages: 2-33
citizens today. 
How has  
education in
Australia Ashman, A. (2014). Education for Inclusion and Diversity 5th Ed. Australia: Pearson
evolved to meet
the needs of  
society? Why is
it important to
be fluent in
words and
numbers? 

3. 13 August Examining    
curriculum and
standards in Read:
Australian
schools and  
internationally. 
https://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/

 
https://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/f-10-curriculum/general-capabilities/literacy/

 
https://research.acer.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?
referer=https://www.google.com.au/&httpsredir=1&article=1005&context=monitoring_learning

4. 20 August How does Read: Assessment


culture and
family values   1 Due
influence
Chapter 5: Inclusive Practices Pages: 131-161 Thursday,
learning in
numeracy and 23/08/2018
 
literacy? 
11:59 WST
Ashman, A. (2014). Education for Inclusion and Diversity 5th Ed. Australia: Pearson

5. 27 August Tuition Free Week

6. 3 How does Read:  

EDUC4020 Supporting Literacy and Numeracy Development for Diverse Learners Page: 11 of 13

Bentley Campus CRICOS Provider Code 00301J
17 Jul 2018 The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS
School of Education, Faculty of Humanities
Faculty of Humanities 
School of Education
 

gender and
September environment  
influence
Hand, S., Rice, L. & Greenlee, E. (2017). Exploring teachers’ and students’ gender role bias and
learning in
students’ confidence in STEM fields. Social Psychology Education. 20, 929-945. https://doi-
numeracy and
org.dbgw.lis.curtin.edu.au/10.1007/s11218-017-9408-8
literacy? 
 
Wonch Hill, P., McQuillan, J., Talbert, E., Spiegel, A., Gauthier, G., & Diamond, J. (2017). Science Possible
Selves and the Desire to be a Scientist: Mindsets, Gender Bias, and Confidence during Early
Adolescence. Social Sciences, 6(2), 55. MDPI AG. Retrieved from
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci6020055

7. 10 Differentiation- Read:  
supporting
September numeracy and  
literacy learning
Chapter 3: Resourcing Inclusion Pages: 64-101
through a
strength based  
model. 
Ashman, A. (2014). Education for Inclusion and Diversity 5th Ed. Australia: Pearson

 
 
 

8. 17 Supporting Read: Assessment


numeracy and
September literacy across   2 Due
the curriculum
Chapter 9 Literacies and numeracy Pages: 265-300 Thursday,
with effective
teaching 20/09/2018
 
strategies. 
11:59 WST
Ashman, A. (2014). Education for Inclusion and Diversity 5th Ed. Australia: Pearson

9. 24 Tuition Free Week


September

10. 1 October Planning https://mediaaccess.org.au/education/accessible-media-for-diverse-learners/universal-design-  


instruction for-learning
through
universal  
design. 
http://www.cast.org/

11. 8 October Adapting Read:  


curriculum to
promote  
effective
Chapter 9: Literacies and numeracy Pages: 265-297
numeracy and
literacy  
understanding. 
Ashman, A. (2014). Education for Inclusion and Diversity 5th Ed. Australia: Pearson

12. 15 Effective    
methods of
October collaboration  
across
disciplines to The IRIS Center. (2009). Cultural and linguistic differences: What teachers should
support literacy know. Retrieved from https://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/clde/
and numeracy
learning for  
diverse
populations.   

13. 22     Assessment
October Promoting self- 3 Due
The IRIS Center. (2008). CSR: A reading comprehension strategy. Retrieved from
directed
learners in
https://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/csr/ Thursday,
literacy and 25/10/2018
numeracy
through 11:59 WST
effective study
skills

EDUC4020 Supporting Literacy and Numeracy Development for Diverse Learners Page: 12 of 13

Bentley Campus CRICOS Provider Code 00301J
17 Jul 2018 The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS
School of Education, Faculty of Humanities
Faculty of Humanities 
School of Education
 

14. 29 Learning for the Read:  


real world-
October promoting  
students’
Chapter 11: Inclusive Practices Pages: 333-365
literacy and
numeracy Chapter 12: Social and interpersonal development in schools 367-399
appreciation,
supporting  
student
transitions to Ashman, A. (2014). Education for Inclusion and Diversity 5th Ed. Australia: Pearson
vocational or
post graduate  
settings
 

15. 5 Study Week


November

16. 12 Examinations
November

17 19 Examinations
November

EDUC4020 Supporting Literacy and Numeracy Development for Diverse Learners Page: 13 of 13

Bentley Campus CRICOS Provider Code 00301J
17 Jul 2018 The only authoritative version of this Unit Outline is to be found online in OASIS
School of Education, Faculty of Humanities

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