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Transformative Partnerships

A Replication Guide for Building LGU-Initiated Gawad Kalinga Communities


Transformative Partnerships: A Replication Guide for Building
LGU-Initiated Gawad Kalinga Communities

Writer
Maricel Genzola

Technical and Editorial Team


Marion Villanueva, LGSP
Myn Garcia, LGSP
Mags Maglana, LGSP
Sef Carandang, LGSP
Issa Cuevas-Santos, CFC-GK

Cover Design and Layout


Redge Abos

Transformative Partnerships: A Replication Guide for Building LGU-Initiated


Gawad Kalinga Communities
Copyright � 2005 Philippines-Canada Local Government Support Program (LGSP)

All rights reserved.

The publishers encourage the use, translation, adaptation and copying of this
material for non-commercial use, with appropriate credit given to LGSP.

Although reasonable care has been taken in the preparation of this book, neither
the publisher and/or contributor and/or writer can accept any liability for any
consequence arising from the use thereof or from any information contained
herein.

Printed in Manila, Philippines.

Published by:

Philippines-Canada Local Government Support Program (LGSP)


Unit 1507 Jollibee Plaza
Emerald Avenue, Pasig City
1600 Philippines
Tel. Nos. (632) 637 3511 to 13
www.lgsp.org.ph

This project was undertaken with the financial support of the Government of
Canada provided through the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA).
A JOINT PROJECT OF

SA KABUH
AAN AY
IW A
AS

N
NG

AT
MBANSANG PA

PAG
PAPAUNLA
PA

D
EP
NA
R

S
UB
L IK A N G P ILIP I

Department of the Interior National Economic and Canadian International


and Local Government (DILG) Development Authority (NEDA) Development Agency

IMPLEMENTED BY

Agriteam Canada Federation of Canadian


www.agriteam.ca Municipalities (FCM)
www.fcm.ca
Contents
Foreword 7
Acknowledgements 9
Preface 11
Acronyms 13
Glossary of Terms 15

I. The Replication Guide for LGU-Initiated GK Communities 17


II. LGUs and Shelter Provision 20
III. Gawad Kalinga: An Overview 23
IV. The LGU-Initiated Approach to GK: An Overview 27
V. Developing and Managing the GK Multisectoral Partnership 36
VI. The GK Component Programs 48
VII. Annexes 69

Annex A.1 71
Executive Order issued by the Butuan City Mayor creating Butuan City-Led
Multisectoral Shelter Program Management Team

Annex A.2 74
Sample Standard Comprehensive GK MOA with LGUs

Annex B 84
Memorandum of Agreement/Partnership between and among the City Government
of Butuan, Couples for Christ, and the Philippines-Canada Local Government
Support Program

Annex C 90
GK Multisectoral Structure

Annex D 91
Construction Committee Scope of Work

Annex E 96
Communication Plan for the Balangayan Butuan: Panimalay Sa Katawhan GK
Community Development Program, Shelter Component

Annex F 102
Resource Mobilization Plan for Balangayan Butuan Gawad Kalinga Approach

Annex G 105
Manual on the Accounting System for GK-Missionville
Annex H 129
Beneficiary Payback (Balik-Kalinga) Addendum 1, Manual on the Accounting System for Missionville

Annex I 139
Butuan City’s Policies & Procedures for the Selection of Home Partners for Balangayan Butuan: Panimalay Sa
Katawhan – Gawad Kalinga Approach

Annex J 141
Criteria for Selection and Prioritization of Sites for GK Projects

Annex K 142
Sample SB Resolutions supporting & adopting the LGU-GK Project

Annex L 144
GK Guidelines for Community Living

Annex M 146
Sample Cluster Plan, Cluster Plan Isometric and Site Development Plan

Annex N 148
GK House Designs

Annex O 157
Sample Gantt Chart, sample Money S-Curve, PERT-CRM Chart and sample Construction Schedules
Foreword
The Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG) welcomes the latest in the
series of Knowledge Products developed by the Philippines-Canada Local Government Support
Program (LGSP), Transformative Partnerships: A Replication Guide for Building LGU-Initiated
Gawad Kalinga Communities. The Guide broadens the options of local government units that
want to address the lack of quality housing for the poor and other development issues in their
communities through the replication of the Gawad Kalinga (GK) approach.

Borne of the collaboration among the Couples for Christ (CFC), LGUs, other local stakeholders
and LGSP, the Guide is an addition to a growing toolkit on community development that
features shelter provision as an entry point. It provides information and instructions that
interested local governments, caretaker structures of CFC and other users can follow to apply
GK as a comprehensive initiative for community development.

Characterized by multi-stakeholder involvement, the GK is consistent with the intent of Article


62 of the Local Government Code that stipulates the direct involvement of POs, NGOs and
the private sector in the plans, programs, projects or activities of local governments. Such
an approach allows the pooling of resources and talents, an opportunity that deserves to
be explored by LGUs that are hard pressed to meet the many competing priorities of their
constituents. On the other hand, mobilizing LGU commitment and resources in order to house
the poor will generate considerable impact.

More than a shelter initiative, Gawad Kalinga affirms that poor communities, with the support
of local governments, government agencies, civil society groups like the CFC and the private
sector, can succeed at transforming themselves. Local governments can facilitate that process
by initiating the implementation of GK in their communities.

DILG, therefore, congratulates the Philippines-Canada Local Government Support Program


for its efforts in promoting enhanced shelter provision through the LGU-initiated approach to
building sustainable communities.

ANGELO T. REYES
Secretary
Department of the Interior and Local Government

7
8
Acknowledgements
This knowledge product is a result of the collaboration of the following institutions and
individuals that promoted a multistakeholder and community-based approach to shelter
provision and community development:

Alix Yule, Marion Villanueva and Basile Gilbert for providing the necessary direction and
guidance

Maricel Genzola for facilitating the roundtable discussion, for conducting interviews and
research, and for writing this replication guide

Tony Meloto, Bong Garrucho, Issa Cuevas-Santos and Luis Oquinena of the Couples for
Christ-Gawad Kalinga for championing the collaboration with LGUs, for their input to the
replication guide, and for the support

LGSP team members Atty. Eve Jiz, Abe dela Calzada, Paz Moneva, Victor Ozarraga, Tess Gajo,
Merlinda Hussein, Antonio Tantioco, Aser Realubit, Edgar Catalan, Gemma Borreros and
Cecille Isubal for anchoring the LGSP-GK partnership in their respective regional offices

LGU representatives Boy Rosales and Boy Pellerin for providing input and feedback that
helped in the finalization of this replication guide

Mags Z. Maglana for providing overall content supervision and coordination with the
technical writer

Myn Garcia for providing technical and creative direction and providing overall supervision
of the design, layout and production

Chris Monnon for providing editorial support towards finalizing the replication guide

Sef Carandang for providing technical support and for effective coordination with the design,
layout and production team

Redge Abos for art direction, cover design and layout

9
10
Preface
Transformative Partnerships: A Replication Guide for Building LGU-Initiated Gawad
Kalinga Communities traces it beginnings to 2003, when the Philippines-Canada Local
Government Support Program (LGSP) entered into a partnership with the Couples for
Christ – Gawad Kalinga (CFC-GK) Community Development Program. The partnership was
brokered under the Samahan strategy of LGSP, which called for the mobilization of private
sector and civil society resource and support to enhance the capacity of LGUs in service
delivery.

Gawad Kalinga (GK) was envisioned to enhance the capacity of participating local
government units (LGUs) to mobilize multistakeholder involvement in the provision of
shelter, health, education and livelihood assistance to marginalized communities. At some
point, fifteen (15) LGUs signed up for the GK Samahan, the immediate highlight of which
was the construction of houses for selected communities using resources mustered through
the multistakeholder approach. The collaboration led to the construction of 600 socialized
housing units in the participating cities and municipalities.

Because of the successful interaction with local governments, CFC-GK and LGSP recognized
the advantage of popularizing the GK approach among the ranks of LGUs. This replication
guide was developed to provide a concise and step-by-step process of replicating the
GK strategy for community development. Not only does the guide capture the different
processes and approaches of GK, but it also provides principles and tips to ensure that the
implementation will remain consistent with the spirit with which GK was conceived and with
the legal mandates of local governments.

This replication guide comes at a time when local governments are starting to fully carry
out their programs of governance for the period 2004-2007. Around 800 LGUs all over the
country have formulated their Executive and Legislative Agenda (ELA) through participatory
methods, and are set to address local challenges through priority programs, projects and
activities. Ensuring access to shelter for the growing number of homeless constituents
remains a priority challenge and concern for many LGUs.

Many marginalized communities today require and actively seek support for their efforts
to transform the conditions of their lives. A multistakeholder approach will express the

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confidence and encouragement of partners from different sectors of society on the capacities of these communities
and also secure the necessary assistance. By initiating and hosting Gawad Kalinga in their areas and inviting local CFC
chapters and other partners, LGUs will have expanded the options for developing sustainable communities.

LGSP hopes that LGU and CFC partners will find the replication guide a useful reference.

Philippines-Canada Local Government Support Program (LGSP)

Partnership with local government is crucial to the success of Gawad Kalinga (GK) in its vision of GK777, which is to
build 700,000 homes in 7,000 communities in 7 years!

Effective community development can only happen through a multi-sectoral effort that focuses on the empowerment
of communities so that they may help themselves and each other. It highlights the model of development that is
participatory and consultative. It leverages contributions from different stakeholders: from the poor communities;
land, site development and other resources from local and national governments; and professional and volunteer
services from the private sector, beginning with the GK caretaker teams.

It is highly important to emphasize that the Philippines may be financially handicapped but is rich in human and
natural resources. These resources are available in every local government unit (LGU) including 5th and 6th-class
municipalities. They only need to be inspired with fresh ideas and new models, motivated by a common vision, and
led by strong political will, to unleash their potential for self-reliance and good local governance.

Gawad Kalinga villages are working models of peaceful and productive communities that the affected people
themselves helped build and, which can be easily replicated in every barangay of every municipality throughout the
country. This replication guide developed by the Philippines-Canada Local Government Support Program (LGSP), is a
useful resource for local governments that want to undertake partnerships with GK and initiate the process of building
sustainable GK communities. It will also be useful to GK teams that want to collaborate with local governments. The
GK strategy enables local governments to meaningfully address the serious issue of homelessness, increase in number
of slums and other social problems directly related to poverty and in the process transform lives.

If all LGUs come on board, supported by the private sector and squatter communities themselves, this country will rise
out of poverty!

Gawad Kalinga (GK)

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Acronyms
BAT Bayanihan Action Teams
BP Batas Pambansa
CARBDP Cotabato-Agusan River Basin Development Project
CFC Couples for Christ
CHB Concrete Hollow Block
CLUP Comprehensive Land Use Plan
CMP Community Mortgage Program
CP Cash Payback
CSO Civil Society Organizations
DENR Department of the Environment and Natural Resources
DOST Department of Science and Technology
ECC Environmental Compliance Certificate
ECG Elders Core Group
EO Executive Order
GI Galvanized Iron Sheets
GK Gawad Kalinga
GSIS Government Service Insurance System
HDMF Home Development Mutual Fund (also Pag-IBIG)
HLRB Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board
HUDCC Housing and Urban Development Coordinating Council
HUDO Housing and Urban Development Office
KB Kapitbahayan
LCE Local Chief Executives
LGSP Philippines-Canada Local Government Support Program
LGU Local Government Units
LMB Land Management Bureau
MOA Memorandum of Agreement
MM Medical Mission
NAMRIA National Mapping and Resources Information Authority
NGA National Government Agencies
NGO Non-Governmental Organization
NHA National Housing Authority

13
NHMFC National Home Mortgage Finance Corporation
Pag-IBIG Home Development Mutual Fund (also HDMF)
PCUP Presidential Commission for the Urban Poor
PERT CMP Project Evaluation Review Technique/Critical Path Method (PERT/CPM)
PNP Philippine National Police
PO People’s Organizations
SB Sanggunian Bayan
SEP Sweat Equity Payback
SFC Singles for Christ
SSS Social Security System
STMA St. Thomas More and Associates
TATAG Shelter and Site Development Program
TESDA Technical Education Skills Development Authority
TLRC Technology Livelihood Resource Center
TWG Technical Working Group
UDHA Urban Development & Housing Act
YFC Youth for Christ

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Glossary of Terms
Bayanihan Filipino term meaning “community spirit”
GAWAD KABUHAYAN GK Livelihood Program
GAWAD KALUSUGAN GK Health Program
Kaagapay refers to Social Services
Kaayusan refers to Peace and Order
Kabuhayan refers to Food Self-Sufficiency and other
Livelihood Programs
Kalinisan at Kagandahan refers to Beautification & Cleanliness
Kalusugan refers to Basic Community Health Care and First Aid
Kapitbahayan refers to Community Empowerment
Kasiyahan refers to Community Socials
Oikos Society a Social Ministry of CFC concerned about the state of
the environment in the world today
Padugo literally bloodletting; to make sacrifices
SAGIP GK Education Program from the Filipino term
meaning “to save a life”
SHELKB CFC’s Gawad Kalinga’s Shelter & Environment,
Health, Education, Livelihood and Kapitbahayan
Community organizing
SIBOL GK Education Program; literally “to grow”
SIGA GK Education Program; literally “to light”
TATAG GK Shelter Program; literally “to build” or
“to establish”
Tekton Guild a Social Ministry of CFC, an association of Christian
entrepreneurs, professionals and workers
Ulamas Islamic (religious) scholars
Ustadzes Learned/scholarly Muslims

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ONE
The Replication Guide for
LGU-Initiated GK Communities
What is the Replication Guide for LGU-initiated GK Communities
(GK Replication Guide)?
The GK Replication Guide is a reference that guides users in the step-by-step process of
replicating the Gawad Kalinga (GK) Community Development Program, in particular through
an approach that harnesses local government initiative. This guide takes into consideration
the condition and capacities of local governments. It covers the full range of activities related
to starting up the partnership, and to planning, implementing, monitoring and finally
evaluating the GK partnership initiative.

Why is it important for LGUs to partner with GK?


Under the Local Government Code of 1991, LGUs are responsible for coordinating and
delivering basic, regular and direct services to their constituents. Providing low-cost housing
projects is among the services for which LGUs are responsible.

The Couples for Christ (CFC)’s vision of Gawad Kalinga is to contribute to nationbuilding
through GK777 — a vision of building 700,000 homes in 7,000 communities in the next 7
years. Gawad Kalinga’s component services include shelter, health, education, livelihood,
and kapitbahayan (community organizing & empowerment). As of 2004, GK succeeded
in already assisting 400 communities or almost 10,000 homes in impoverished mountain
villages and urban and rural slums in Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao.

Characterized by multi-stakeholdership, GK is consistent with the intent of Article 62 of


the Local Government Code that stipulates the direct involvement of POs, NGOs and the
private sector in the plans, programs, projects or activities of local governments. This
approach promotes the pooling of resources and talents, an opportunity that LGUs hard
pressed to meet the many competing priorities of their constituents should explore. On
the other hand, mobilizing LGU commitment and resources in order to house the poor will
generate considerable impact and empower marginalized communities to meaningfully
tranform themselves. LGUs play a major role in convening multistakeholder structures and in
generating participation of and support from different stakeholders.

17
Why was the GK Replication Guide conceptualized?
Recognizing LGU shelter mandates and the potential of GK to address such, the Philippines-Canada Local
Government Support Program (LGSP) partnered with the CFC to introduce GK as a strategy to local governments
that endeavored to respond to homelessness and other community development concerns in their areas. Fifteen (15)
LGSP partner LGUs responded and initiated partnerships with local CFC chapters, other local stakeholders to create
multistakeholder structures that oversaw the selection of GK beneficiaries; and developed and implemented plans to
provide services to the communities. The collaboration led to the construction of more than 600 low-cost housing
units in the 15 LGUs.

The success of the 2004 LGSP-CFC-LGU partnership highlighted the viability and advantages of a distinct LGU-initiated
approach to implementing Gawad Kalinga. Mindful of the growing number of LGUs that expressed interest in and
openness to GK, LGSP and CFC agreed to develop and produce a guide that would aid in the replication of the LGU-
initiated approach to GK.

What are the objectives of the GK Replication Guide?


The GK Replication Guide intends to:

• Provide information on GK as a comprehensive initiative for community development


�• Provide an overview of the different approaches that have been successfully applied in establishing the GK
• Document essentials steps, processes and tools that may guide municipalities, cities and provinces interested in
replicating GK as a strategy for housing and helping marginalized constituents in their respective localities
�• Provide concise and specific guidance for GK replication to ensure consistency of implementation.

Who are its users?


The target users of the GK Replication Guide are interested local government units or LGUs (in particular, provinces,
cities and municipalities), the Gawad Kalinga caretaker teams of the CFC, and other strategic partners who will be
involved in the LGU-initiated approach to replicating GK.

The GK Replication Guide will be useful to:

1. LGU local chief executives (LCE) who:


• Are newly elected or reelected and intend to make a difference in their administration through innovative
solutions to the problems of homelessness and poverty
�• Look at shelter as a component of an integrated approach to poverty alleviation that also includes education,
health and livelihood to ensure the improvement of the lives of their constituents.

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2. The technical working group or multisectoral team composed of representatives from the local government, the
civil society organizations (CSOs) and the private sector – business groups – who:
• Are supportive of the LCE’s resolve to collectively address the increasing incidence of informal settlements
• Have an appreciation of the local needs and potential resources that can be mobilized.

What are the key sections of the GK Replication Guide?


• Section I (The Replication Guide for LGU-Initiated GK Communities) provides an overview of the nature,
objectives, uses and users of the Guide
• Section II (LGUs and Shelter Provision) outlines the key responsibilities of LGUs with respect to shelter
• Section III (Gawad Kalinga: An Overview) discusses the CFC Gawad Kalinga vision, its achievements and the
different ways of implementing GK
• Section IV (The LGU-Initiated Approach to GK: An Overview) introduces the LGU-initiated approach, its
advantages and benefits and the requirements for its implementation
• Section V (Developing and Managing the GK Multisectoral Partnership) takes the users in a phase by phase
discussion on how to implement the multisectoral partnership embodied by GK
• Section VI (The GK Component Programs) describes the component services of the GK holistic approach to
community development
• Section VII (Annexes) provides sample forms, templates and guidelines that are useful in developing and
managing the GK multisectoral partnership

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TWO
LGUs and Shelter Provision
What are the mandates of LGUs in Shelter Provision?1
In the Philippines, LGUs are mandated to provide programs and services promoting the
general welfare of their constituents. LGUs are responsible for coordinating and delivering
basic, regular and direct services to their constituents. The provision of low-cost housing
projects is among the services for which LGUs are responsible.

The Local Government Code or RA 7160 stipulates LGU mandates on shelter through the
following provisions under Rule V on Basic Services & Facilities:

1. Art. 24. Devolution. – (a) Consistent with local autonomy and decentralization, the
provision for the delivery of basic services and facilities shall be devolved from the
National Government to provinces, cities, municipalities, and barangays so that each
LGU shall be responsible for a minimum set of services and facilities in accordance with
established national policies, guidelines, and standards.

2. Art. 25. Responsibility for Delivery of Basic Services and Facilities. – The LGUs shall,
in addition to their existing functions and responsibilities, provide basic services and
facilities devolved to them covering, but not limited to, the following:

For the Province


Planning and implementation of the programs and projects for low cost housing and other
mass dwellings except those funded by the Social Security System, Government Service
Insurance System, and the Home Development Mutual Fund. National funds for these
programs and projects shall be equitably allocated to the regions in proportion to the ratio of
the homeless to the population.

For the City


All services and facilities provided by the municipality and the province and…. And, in
addition thereto…

The Urban Development & Housing Act (UDHA), also referred to as RA 7279, guarantees
security of land tenure for the socialized housing beneficiaries, and decent shelter for the
underprivileged.

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The UDHA designates LGUs as implementers of social housing programs. With their participation, it is envisioned that
LGUs shall be more responsive to the housing needs of their respective communities.

The success of the socialized housing program is dependent on the LGU leadership’s management of important
details on social housing and welfare, community development, people’s participation, resource mobilization, and
partnership among its stakeholders.

The Urban Development & Housing Act defines the following as LGU responsibilities:

1. Prepare a Comprehensive Land Use Plan aimed at achieving the objectives of the UDHA; (Sec.
6 & 39)
2. Conduct an inventory of all lands and improvements thereon within their respective localities
in coordination with the Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board (HLRB) and with the
assistance of the appropriate government agencies; (Sec .7)

3. Update the inventory every three (3) years and furnish the Housing and Urban Development
Coordinating Council (HUDCC) a copy of its inventory including updated ones for planning
purposes; (Sec. 7)
4. Identify, in coordination with the National Housing Authority (NHA), the HLRB, the National
Mapping and Resources Information Authority (NAMRIA), and the Land Management Bureau
(LMB) of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) lands for socialized
housing and resettlement areas for the immediate and future needs of the underprivileged
and homeless in urban areas; (Sec. 8)
5. Certify as to the blighted status of lands, which shall be considered as one of the factors in the
evaluation of the market value of land for socialized housing; (Sec. 13)
6. Identify and register all qualified socialized housing beneficiaries within their respective
localities; (Sec. 17)
7. In pursuit of balanced housing development, enter into joint venture projects with private
developers; (Sec. 18)
8. Provide basic services and facilities (potable water, power/electricity, an adequate solid waste
disposal system, and access to primary roads and transportation facilities) in the socialized
housing or resettlement areas in cooperation with the private sector and concerned agencies;
(Sec. 21)
9. Provide the program beneficiaries of their duly designated representatives, in coordination
with the Presidential Commission for the Urban Poor (PCUP) and concerned government
agencies, the opportunity to be heard and to participate in the decision-making process over
matters involving the protection and promotion of their legitimate collective interests: (Sec.
23)
10. In cooperation with the Philippine National Police (PNP), the PCUP and PCUP- accredited
urban poor organizations in the area, adopt measures to identify and effectively curtail the
illegal activities of professional squatters and squatting syndicates; (Sec. 27)

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11. Implement, in the coordination with the NHA, the relocation and resettlement of persons
living in danger areas such as esteros, railroad tracks, garbage dumps, riverbanks,
shorelines, waterways and in other public places such as sidewalks, roads, parks and
playgrounds; (Sec. 29)
12. Provide, in coordination with the NHA, relocation or resettlement sites with basic services
and facilities, and access to employment and livelihood opportunities sufficient to meet
the basic needs of affected families; (Sec. 30)
13. Assist the National Home Mortgage Finance Corporation (NHMFC) in initiating the
organization of Community Mortgage Program (CMP) beneficiaries; (Sec. 33)
14. Promote, in coordination with the HUDCC, NHA, the Technology Livelihood Resource
Center (TLRC), Department of Science and Technology (DOST) and other concerned
agencies in the production and use of indigenous, alternative, and low-cost construction
materials and technologies for socialized housing; (Sec. 34)
15. Submit a detailed annual report, with respect to the implementation of the Act, to the
President and House of Representatives; (Sec. 41)
16. May impose an additional one-half percent (0.5%) tax on the assessed value of all lands in
urban areas in excess of Fifty Thousand Pesos (Php 50,000). (Sec. 43)

Other Policy Guidelines on Shelter Provision:

1. NHA- MC # 1070: Policy Guidelines for the Implementation of the Resettlement


assistance Program to the LGUs

2. NHA- MC # 2000: Revised Guidelines and Procedures for the Implementation of the Local
Housing Program

3. OP – EO # 131: Declaring Open to Disposition for Socialized Housing Purposes Certain


government-Owned Lands Defined under R.A. # 7279, Otherwise Known as the Urban
Development and Housing Act of 1992, and Providing for Disposition Thereof

1
For more information on LGU Mandates on Shelter refer to Enhancing Shelter Provision at the Local Level (Service Delivery with
Impact: Resource Books for Local Government), LGSP, 2003.

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THREE
Gawad Kalinga: An Overview
What is Gawad Kalinga?
Gawad Kalinga (GK) is a Filipino term for “giving care and hope.” Through GK, the
Couples for Christ helps the poor build “integrated, holistic and sustainable communities”
all over the country as CFC’s expression of faith and Christian responsibility. CFC has
brought into its communities Gawad Kalinga’s components of shelter, health, education,
livelihood, and kapitbahayan (community organizing & empowerment), which form the
acronym SHELKB.1

Although Gawad Kalinga began with Couples for Christ, its vision is to unite all sectors of
society to work together towards nation building in the spirit of bayanihan. Even though
CFC is a Christian community, GK does not discriminate against people of different faiths,
race or religion.

GK’s target is GK777 – the vision of building 700,000 homes in 7,000 communities over
a period of 7 years. The factors that are critical to the successful achievement of the
vision are the empowerment of GK teams nationwide to implement the work and massive
partnerships with all sectors to transform slums into peaceful and productive communities.

What is its History and Accomplishments?


What are the Beginnings of GK?
CFC built its first Gawad Kalinga community in the depressed community of Bagong
Silang in Caloocan City in 1995. In the next six years, the group built almost one thousand
homes, five (5) basketball courts, eight (8) deep wells, six (6) schools and two (2) libraries
in Bagong Silang, and more projects are underway.

More than building infrastructure, the GK program through the efforts of CFC members
has effected major changes in the lives of the residents of Bagong Silang. Although the
residents are still considered financially poor, they now have more hope, dignity and self-
respect.

The transformation of Bagong Silang became the model for other CFC chapters who were
challenged to replicate its success in their own locales and in every part of the country
where there are poor people.
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What have been the Accomplishments of GK to date?
By December 2004, GK succeeded in assisting 400 communities or almost 10,000 homes in impoverished mountain
villages and urban and rural slums in Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao.

GK communities are found in Pasig City and Tondo in Metro Manila, Bulacan, Negros Occidental; Zamboanga City,
Bukidnon, Leyte, Batangas, Cagayan de Oro City, Cebu, Sultan Kudarat, North Cotabato, and Tarlac, among others.2

What are the Programs of Gawad Kalinga?


Gawad Kalinga’s component programs are Shelter and Site Development (TATAG), Health (GAWAD KALUSUGAN),
Education (SIBOL, SAGIP and SIGA), Livelihood (GAWAD KABUHAYAN), and Community Organizing and
Empowerment (KAPITBAHAYAN).

1. Shelter and Site Development Program (TATAG)


TATAG is GK’s way of building colorful, durable and secure homes for the poorest of the poor. TATAG in the
Filipino language means “to build” or “to establish.” The program also provides other physical structures to
give the community a complete set of basic amenities such as path walks and drainage systems, water and toilet
facilities, a school, a livelihood center, a multi-purpose hall and a clinic. In some areas, community structures such
as basketball courts and libraries are also constructed once basic infrastructure priorities are addressed.3

2. Health Program (GAWAD KALUSUGAN)


GAWAD KALUSUGAN, which means “to provide health” in Filipino, is GK’s program for community health care.
The health profile of every family in a GK community is gathered and monitored by the GK volunteer team of
doctors and paramedical practitioners. Residents are also trained to be community health volunteers. Health
interventions are provided to respond to specific as well as common concerns of the residents.4

3. Education Program (SIBOL, SAGIP and SIGA)


GK provides value-based education for pre-school children, aged 3 to 6 years old through its program called
SIBOL, which means “to grow” in the Filipino language.

GK provides a support program for street children of elementary age, from 7 to 13 years old. This support
program provides academic tutorials, sports and creative workshops to help them discover their talents and
potentials. Regular sessions on proper grooming and a values formation program called SAGIP, which means “to
save a life,” are also included to ensure that these children become responsible adults.

The SIGA program is a two-pronged intervention for 14 years old and above. Scholarships are provided to those
with the mental aptitude to pursue higher education. Alternately, a strong youth rehabilitation program is set in
place in the community. Juvenile delinquents are provided with a range of activities and counseling sessions to

24
help them live productive lives to avoid committing youths to rehabilitation institutions. They are then integrated
into the social mainstream and are eventually gainfully employed. SIGA in the Filipino language means “to light.”5

4. Livelihood Program (GAWAD KABUHAYAN)


Through GAWAD KABUHAYAN (translated as “to give livelihood” in Filipino), GK conducts livelihood and skills
training, provides start-up capital and materials through microfinance and micro-enterprise opportunities, and
assists in the marketing of the products of GK communities.

GK homeowners are encouraged to achieve food self-sufficiency through backyard farming, urban agriculture and
poultry raising.

The GK homeowners “pay” for their homes through “sweat equity” by building their neighbor’s house side by
side with the GK volunteers. Building homes and common facilities also teaches the poor new masonry and
carpentry skills. This not only builds community spirit but also contributes to greater peace. After all, how can a
GK homeowner fight with the neighbor who helped him build his house?6

5. Community Organizing and Empowerment (KAPITBAHAYAN)


Every GK community is organized into a Kapitbahayan Neighborhood Association, which is established to
inculcate stewardship and ensure accountability, cooperation, unity and community spirit among community
members. The members decide on the guidelines for community living. This encourages new leaders who
espouse the values of the association to emerge and develop.7

To promote sustainability, a continuum of capability building interventions is provided to the GK community. The
association members are involved in the discussion and decision-making on projects to be undertaken.

What are the different ways in which GK is implemented?


In its thrust to replicate and disseminate the GK Community Development Program, CFC has partnered with a wide
range of local, national and international institutions to translate the GK vision into a reality. Among its partners are:

• Local Government Units (LGUs)


• Non-Government Organizations (NGOs)
• Private Sector
• Corporate Foundations
• National government agencies such as the Office of the President
• Legislators
• Academic institutions.

25
Currently, most of the GK initiatives are carried out through the CFC chapters all over the country and abroad (or what
is termed as a CFC-initiated and anchored GK implementation).

Local CFC chapters, either at the provincial or local level, take the lead role in providing decent housing to selected
GK Kapitbahayan members. The CFC chapters take it upon themselves to mobilize resources from their own members
or from its partner communities through the padugo system (literally “bloodletting”) where members pledge support
for a GK community. The CFC chapters also generate support from friends, business associates, local officials or other
resource institutions. To most CFC members, their involvement in a GK project is the expression of their Christian
faith in action “not just caring but sharing.”8

LGUs are emerging as a key partner in GK replication. CFC recognizes the extensive reach of LGUs and the impact
of mobilizing LGU commitment and resources in order to house the poor. Financing for the GK projects may
be generated through the use of the LGU funds or from voluntary contributions of LGU employees, concerned
stakeholders and businesses operating within the locality.

The Home Development Mutual Fund (HDMF or more commonly referred to as Pag-IBIG) is a major funding source
that the LGU and even other GK partners can tap. HDMF extends housing finance to formally employed community
members who have no capacity to build their own homes without external assistance. GK currently has a partnership
with Pag-IBIG, which is a breakthrough, and will help achieve GK’s targets.

1
News Feature on Couples for Christ’s Website:
Gawad Kalinga in Cyberdyaryo issue of August 21, 2003.
2
Ibid.
3
Gawad Kalinga Website
4
Ibid.
5
Ibid.
6
Ibid.
7
Ibid.
8
Featured Article on the People Power Web Page on Couples for Christ:
Gawad Kalinga by Alfred A. Araya Jr.

26
FOUR
The LGU-Initiated Approach
to GK: an Overview
What is the LGU-initiated Approach to GK Implementation? How is it distinct from
other GK approaches?
In CFC-initiated and anchored GK sites, the CFC chapters initiate, develop and manage
GK projects. A chapter takes responsibility for covering all aspects of the GK work, from
identification of site and beneficiaries, assigning of CFC members to various committees and
tasks, preparation of the detailed plans, mobilization of resources, and the implementation
and monitoring of plans.

The LGU-initiated approach to the implementation of GK takes a different mode. The


LGU plays a major role in convening the multi-stakeholder structure and in mobilizing
support and participation from different stakeholders in the execution of the different GK
programs. Beneficiaries are identified in consultation with the GK multisectoral team and
the prospective beneficiaries, and taking off from the LGU list of target socialized housing
beneficiaries. LGU leadership in identifying and developing the resettlement site into a
habitable community is vital. LGU guidance is likewise needed in formulating and working
out details of the development plans with the community, the roles of the GK Kapitbahayan
members, and the repayment arrangements. LGU resources can be directed to jumpstart the
full implementation of the different GK programs in the community.

The LGU–initiated GK implementation approach translates into reality a critical provision of


the Local Government Code under Article 62 on the Role of People’s Organizations (POs),
NGOs and the Private Sector. “LGUs shall promote the establishment and operation of
people’s organizations NGOs and the private sector, to make them active partners in the
pursuit of local autonomy. For this purpose, POs, NGOs and private sector shall be directly
involved in the following plans, programs, projects or activities of LGUs.” These are in the
areas of: local special bodies, delivery of basic services and facilities such as provision of low-
cost housing projects, and financial and other forms of assistance, to name a few.

It is incumbent in this delivery approach that LGUs mobilize their respective constituencies
– their own employees, the different churches, academe, CSOs, homeowner associations
of subdivisions or villages, business establishments or groups, or concerned individuals for
active participation or support.

27
The critical Roles of the LGUs in initiating the GK in their locality include:

1. With guidance from the GK team, initiating the formation of the multisectoral structure (Multisectoral Board or
a Socialized Housing Committee or a Project Management Team or a Technical Working Group or any name the
LGU deems proper). The multisectoral structure is primarily concerned with ensuring that the GK project gets
done.
2. Organizing the different committees and defining their responsibilities. It is recommended that, at the minimum,
the following committees be set up: Legal, Administration, Resource Mobilization, Program, Media and
Communication, Construction, Pay Back or Collection
3. Mobilizing support and participation from different stakeholders
4. Ensuring that the shelter initiative complies with the necessary legal requirements, permits and approvals from
national agencies, such as, NHA, (UDHA), DENR, HLURB, etc.
5. Providing funds from internal sources as reflected in their Annual Investment Plans
6. Providing legislative support to the GK project such as the allocation of resources, and the recognition of the GK
project and partnership with various institutions.

There are many examples of the LGU-initiated mode in implementing GK, and many of them are in Mindanao. The first
among them is Iligan City with the assistance of the local CFC chapter.

Other LGUs were invited to participate in a shelter project of the Philippines-Canada Local Government Support
Program (LGSP) promoting the adoption of the GK multisectoral approach as among the effective strategies in shelter
delivery.

These LGUs are:


• Region VI: Escalante City; San Jose, Antique
• Region IX: Dapitan City; Molave; Zamboanga del Norte
• Region X: Linamon and Tubod in Lanao del Norte
• Region XI: Padada, Davao del Sur; Nabunturan and Maragusan, Compostela Valley
• Region XII: President Roxas and Cotabato City, North Cotabato
• Region XIII: Butuan City; Surigao City; San Francisco, Agusan del Sur
• Region XIV: Datu Paglas, Maguindanao.

What are the Advantages of the LGU-initiated GK Implementation?


The LGU-initiated approach to GK implementation has advantages as articulated by Local Chief Executives of LGUs that
were involved in GK and by their partners.

28
A local government, whether municipality, city or province:

�• Has the mandate to prepare a comprehensive shelter plan that would contribute to the achievement of the
objectives of UDHA and address local shelter needs in a planned, systematic and programmatic way
�• Has resources that it can allocate to support shelter projects. The LGU can fund site development activities of GK
housing sites, or support program implementation through the designation or hiring of a project engineer; or
provide financial support to the continuing education and training activities of the GK community
�• Can initiate partnerships with various resource institutions
�• Has the capacity to leverage housing funds from other funding sources (i.e., from other government agencies,
from bilateral/multilateral institutions, and from non-government organizations) to build more homes, provide
basic amenities to more households, and to afford shelter tenure to more communities
�• Has a local shelter board to provide direction and policy support to its housing programs
�• Has the power to designate the use of public lands for housing programs, or through its power of eminent
domain can proclaim a private land as a housing site. This can lower the cost of the land that will be passed on to
the home partners for payment.
�• Can readily mobilize barangay officials to provide various types of support to GK
�• Can hasten the preparation and securing of legal requirements and permits in developing a housing site or even
in availing of a syndicated housing loan
�• Can provide technical assistance for low-cost housing given the presence of LGU engineering and planning offices
�• Can tap or direct programs of the government in livelihood, health and education to support GK community
�• Can muster and pool human resource from among LGU personnel to support all facets of GK management
�• Can institutionalize good practices in shelter provision by incorporating them in LGU systems
�• Can provide opportunities for its staff to put into practice their insights or realizations from the LGU-initiated
or managed Moral Recovery Program. The City of Iligan has its own Moral Recovery Program called Corporate
Fellowship Program as operationalized by its Human Resource Management Office
�• Can establish its own payback mechanism using different modes of computations not limited to the linear
computation, and a different set of terms and conditions such as the inclusion of an interim or grace period for
community empowerment.

What are the Requirements of an LGU-initiated Approach to GK Implementation?


The LGU-initiated approach to GK implementation has several requirements for it to be successful:

1) Foremost among these is a LCE who has:


�• A vision of a slum-free municipality or city,
�• The political will to translate the vision into a reality by incorporating shelter provision in his/her Executive
and Legislative Agenda and securing the corresponding budgetary and implementation support

29
�• The commitment to designate a GK team within the LGU and organize the Multisectoral GK structure that
would plan and implement the GK project in partnership with GK and other partners; and to allocate budgets
and mobilize other LGU resources needed to carry out and complete the project
�• The openness to explore and try out innovations in addressing local shelter concerns
�• The willingness to initiate and strengthen partnerships with other stakeholders in carrying out the LGU’s
shelter objectives.

2) A functioning multisectoral group to plan, implement and monitor the status of the LGU’s shelter program
3) Simple and operational program/project structure and systems
4) Adequate and timely resources provided to the GK project. This includes financial, manpower, technical and
material resources
5) A committed GK project team operationalizing a well-defined project plan.

The following brief provides a snapshot of the experiences of the local governments of Iligan City, Butuan City and
Datu Paglas in implementing GK as a shelter provision and community development strategy.

30
A Brief on LGUs that Initiated Gawad Kalinga in their Areas
Butuan City, Agusan del Sur Iligan City, Laneo del Norte Datu Paglas, Maguindanao

Introducing the �• Housing as one of the �• Housing as a priority concern �• Housing is articulated in the
GK Program to priority areas in the mayor’s as reflected in the City LGU’s Executive Agenda.
the LGU Executive Agenda. Development Strategy. �• The high incidence of informal
�• There is a need to relocate �• The City Government of settlements and the influx of
3,483 families on the west Iligan had a partnership internally displaced persons/
bank of the Agusan River. with the Couples for Christ families from adjoining
This is part of the major – Gawad Kalinga Program municipalities.
infrastructure undertaking in five barangays. These are �• The initial housing program of
– the construction of in Barangays Tomas Cabili, the LGU was not fully appreciated
floodwalls on both the east Tambacan, Buru-un, Tibanga and supported by the people.
and west banks under the and Santiago. �• LGSP, a capacity development
Cotabato – Agusan River �• A fire razed Santilmo (a program, facilitated the
Basin Development Project community of informal introduction of the CFC-GK
(CARBDP). settlers) near the pier area on strategy and program to the
�• The Couples for Christ the eve of the Iligan City Fiesta, Mayor, other elected officials and
had an ongoing GK project Sept. 28, 2002 leaving 258 department heads.
involving 20 units. families homeless. �• Presence of a shelter plan
�• A forum between the City �• Mayor’s invitation to the CFC prepared by the Datu Paglas
Government and CFC was to do a Gawad Kalinga Project Shelter Board which served as
conducted for possible in the relocation site for the entry point for the GK Program
partnership in addressing affected families.
housing and poverty-related
problems.
�• LGSP, a capacity
development program,
facilitated the exposure trip
of the mayor and other city
officials to different Gk sites.

Roles of the �• Visionary �• Visionary �• Visionary


Local Chief �• Direction-setter �• Direction-setter �• Direction – setter
Executive �• Resource mobilizer �• Resource mobilizer
�• Advocate of the spirit of
volunteerism

Roles of the �• Key stakeholder, PMT �• Key stakeholder of the Program �• CFC of Tacurong served as
CFC member mentor, linkage builder and
�• Project implementer coordinator of the GK – LGU
�• Trainer activities

31
Butuan City, Agusan del Sur Iligan City, Laneo del Norte Datu Paglas, Maguindanao

Role of the �• Chaired the Project �• Not defined �• Chairwoman of the Project
LCE’s Spouse Management Team Management Committee.
�• Actively supported the LGU
– GK Project from planning,
implementation & evaluation.
�• Provided support in ensuring
the implementation of post-
construction activities such
as beneficiary strengthening,
monitoring progress of values
education and finishing
touches on the shelter projects
(landscaping etc.)
�• Key initiator of projects and
programs for the GK Community

LGU – GK • Multisectoral Gawad Kalinga • Multisectoral Group • Project Management Committee


Structure Program Project Management with Technical Working Groups.
Team (PMT) GK and LGSP as technical
advisors

Local GK • GK National, CFC, LGSP, • CFC and selected department • Selected department heads of the
Composition Urios College, NHA, GUIDE heads of the LGU LGU which composed the Shelter
Foundation Board

LGU Office – in • Butuan City Housing Office • Iligan City Housing Office • Municipal Planning and
– Charge of Development Office
Housing

Presence of • Community Organizer • Community Organizer • Maguindanaon Development


community Foundation, Inc (MDFI) provided
organizer/ Community Organizing support
facilitator

Presence �• Done by the Community �• Done by the Community �• Done by the LGU’s Community
of a value Organizer & members of Organizer & members of CFC’s Organizer and members of
formation CFC’s different ministries different ministries the religious sector especially
program & the ulamas and ustadzes. The
person in Islam-based value – formation
charge program was held every Friday.

32
Butuan City, Agusan del Sur Iligan City, Laneo del Norte Datu Paglas, Maguindanao

LGU - GK �• Forum between the City �• Nov. 18, 2002 - Mass at GK The Shelter Plan facilitated the fast and
Milestones Government led by the Missionville Project Site efficient progress of work and became
Mayor and with CFC to �• Nov. 22, 2002 - Start of the basis for the LGU-GK programming.
explore partnership backfilling works at Phase 1 • April 11, 2003 - An initial planning
�• Site Visits of LGU to different �• Nov. 26, 2002 - meeting was held last in Manila
GK sites (Iligan, Tangub & Groundbreaking & Start of to formalize the GK-LGSP-LGU
Cagayan de Oro). House Construction partnership.
�• Participation of City Mayor �• Dec. 24, 2002 - 1st turnover of • May 6, 2003 Introduction of GK to
LGU
& LGU employees to the ten completed units
• May 20, 2003 - Final site
National Build 3 & First GK �• Jan. 2003 - meeting with City
identification. GK Team organized,
Shelter Congress in Manila Council & department heads;
committees took charge of the media
�• GK Project site visits in Metro first lunch forum
and information, resource generation,
Manila - GK Bagong Silang, �• Feb. 14, 2003 – 2nd turnover of construction, administration support,
GK Amparo, Towerville, CAA, 60 completed units payback monitoring and legal, and
Brookside, Arkong Bato. �• April 20, 2003 – 3rd turnover of the GK program components of the
�• Strategic planning & team 38 completed units project.
building sessions of City �• June 14, 2003 – 4th turnover of • Study Visit to Cagayan Breakfast
Government with CFC, NHA, 23 completed units Forum
HUDCC. �• Sept. 28, 2003 – 5th turnover • Site visits of LGU Group to different
�• Project Launching. of 12 completed homes; GK sites
completion of two-classroom • June 8, 2003 - Pre-Build Day for two
building; multipurpose model/pilot houses.
building and a health clinic. • June 20, 2003 - Partnership Meeting
on Shelter with Housing Agencies in
Manila
• July 8, 2003 - held the Lunch Forum
generating commitment for 20 houses
which was matched by Couples for
Christ totaling to 40 houses.
• July 12, 2003 – Meeting with GK,
MDFI and LGU on Community
Organizing
• Participation in National Build Day
• July – December – Video and case
study documentation of GK Project
• July – December Visits of potential
partners
• August 9-10, 2003. The Build Day:
groundbreaking and start of house
construction.
• November 16, 2003 – Turnover
of GK-LGU 42 Housing Units to
Beneficiaries (through drawing of
lots) and Tie-up with LGU-GK-DSWD-
ARMM for construction of additional
200 housing units

33
Butuan City, Agusan del Sur Iligan City, Laneo del Norte Datu Paglas, Maguindanao

Challenges in � �• LGU expropriated the land �• Apprehension over the entry


GK Implemen- �• Backfilling and site of another religious group in a
tation development costs – LGU and predominantly Muslim area
contactors �• Initial site identification
�• Initial “buy-in” of the mayor, �• Contextualizing the formation of
SB and Departments GK values in Islam
�• Difficulty explaining GK and �• Demand of other barangays to
mobilizing beneficiaries start GK in their areas
�• Expanding the original team to
serve the three (3) other GK sites

Presence of �• LGU-GK Housing Program �• Manual on Accounting System �• Aside from the Shelter plan
Written & & Plans to include acknowledgement developed before the entry
Operational Set �• Roles & Responsibilities of & documentation of non- cash of GK, the current GK – LGU
of GK Policies Different Committees with contributions partnership, management
& Systems Corresponding Plans �• Payback Scheme (Addendum to and implementation used the
�• Lot Acquisition Scheme the Accounting Manual) processes, methodologies and
(CIGLA) & its Implementing �• Guidelines re GK Missionville policies generally espoused
Rules & Regulations to Health Clinic by GK in its shelter program.
include Disposition Policies �• Detailed Housing Plan & However, this is done with some
for Residential Lots Structural Design with modifications considering the
�• Resource Mobilization Plans corresponding bill of materials realities and context of the LGU.
�• Communication Plan & cost estimates �• The LGU plans to develop its
�• Payback Schemes own systems and mechanisms
�• Beneficiary Selection Policies with assistance of LGSP and GK.
�• Demolition & Relocation NHA also hopes to provide some
Policies training on the development of
�• Policies & Procedures for these operational policies and
Occupancy of Home Partners procedures for shelter.
�• Detailed Housing Plan &
Design with corresponding
technical specifications &
cost estimate

34
Butuan City, Agusan del Sur Iligan City, Laneo del Norte Datu Paglas, Maguindanao

Present GK • Continue Implementation • Expansion of the GK Housing �• Implementation of the GK-


Thrusts of the Balangayan Butuan: Program to all the barangays of DSWD-ARMM-LGU Partnership to
Panimalay Sa Katawhan the City provide housing to three other
Project targeting the families barangays. Expected total number
living in the CARBDP affected of shelter to be constructed in
areas along the west bank of Datu Paglas under the GK mode:
the Agusan River 242.
�• Integrating other GK programs
(Education, Health, Livelihood).
Datu Paglas identified as
a National Pilot for Food
Sustainability and Production
for Rice, High Value Crops and
Livestock. Currently, they have
finished the one hectare study
on vegetable gardening with
integrated livestock production.

35
FIVE
Developing and Managing the
GK Multisectoral Partnership
The critical phases of the LGU-initiated approach to GK implementation are the following:

1. Mobilization Phase: This includes preparatory activities related to orienting the LGU
on GK leading to the eventual adoption of GK as a multisectoral strategy in shelter
provision.

2. Planning Phase: This pertains to activities that will help the stakeholders flesh out the
details of the GK approach as a community development program that would be carried
out by the LGU together with the multisectoral group. This includes:
• formulation of the workplans
• installation of management systems and procedures such as the identification of
indicators to serve as bases of monitoring and evaluation
• creation of the corresponding operational program and project level structures with
a set of defined roles and responsibilities for every position or committee specified
in the organigram.

Under this phase, resource mobilization strategies have to be identified or formulated.


Two examples are the padugo, and the breakfast forum.

A Communication Plan that will “maximize public outreach and participation”1 also
needs to be prepared.

3. Implementation Phase: This entails the implementation of the activities by the


concerned committee or person as spelled out in the plan. This also involves monitoring
the status of the plans by the LCE and/or the multisectoral group based on an agreed set
of indicators.

4. Expansion Phase: This involves assessing the initial GK project and the experience of
the multisectoral group; identifying the achievements and the factors that affected the
group’s performance; and exploring the possibility of covering other areas using the GK
approach.

36
1. Mobilization Phase
Objectives of the Phase: Critical phases of the LGU-initiated
approach to GK implementation:
�• To introduce to LGUs the GK program and its partnership approach in 1. Mobilization
achieving development 2. Planning
�• To encourage local government and CFC to give initial commitments 3. Implementation
4. Expansion
for program start up
�• To form an initial team from the LGU and CFC (if there is an existing
CFC community) for partnership start-up.

Based on experience, there are various ways to initiate the LGU-


based approach to GK implementation. The following options may be
considered:

a. The LCE may initiate the partnership, as in the experience of the


City of Iligan. Mayor Frank Quijano of Iligan City requested the local
chapter of the CFC to assist in the relocation and resettlement of a
community razed by fire, and in the development of the resettlement
site to include the housing for the resettled families.
b. It may be an initiative of the local chapter of the CFC. In its first
phase of partnership with the Butuan City LGU, the local CFC
chapter instigated a GK project and involved the LGU in the GK
implementation, which was formalized in a Memorandum of
Agreement (MOA).
c. It may be a third party, a capacity development program like the
Philippines-Canada Local Government Support Program (LGSP) that
will initiate and pave the way for an LGU and CFC partnership for a
GK project. In the Datu Paglas experience, LGSP together with the GK
National Secretariat staff met with Mayor Ibrahim “Totoy” Paglas of
Datu Paglas. The CFC of Tacurong coached the LGU of Datu Paglas on
the rudiments of starting, planning and implementing a GK Project.
The value-based education program for the home partners and their
families is based on the teachings of Islam.
d. It may be an outright partnership under a multisectoral approach
just like the Butuan City’s Balangayan Butuan Program Management
Team, which is implementing the Balangayan Butuan: Panimalay
sa Katawhan Project. The City Government took the lead role in
implementing the relocation and resettlement of families living in

37
the areas affected by the CARBDP (Cotabato-Agusan River Basin
• The initial talks with the LGU are Development Project) along the west bank of Agusan River. GK is a
designed to orient the LCE on key strategy in the effort and the CFC is a major stakeholder.
the GK project — its objectives,
process and benefits — and to
mobilize the LCE’s support as What are the steps that CFC-GK and the LGUs must take to initiate
lead implementer. This must be the partnership?
done together with the Project
Director and the CFC Chapter
Head in the area. CFC-GK Preparations
GK National or the CFC local chapter conducts the following:
• It is important to make courtesy a. Meeting with CFC Council
calls to barangay officials and to
b. GK Presentation to CFC Elders Core Group (ECG)
the parish priest or the Islamic
religious head (the Imam) to c. Meeting with “host” CFC sector leadership (CFC Chapter heads and all
present Gawad Kalinga. More ministries coordinators) to explain the project & partnership.
than informing them about the d. Identify the working groups (GK Project Team & support groups for
project, there must be efforts to
encourage partnership in the programs & KB organizing)
GK work. However, the progress e. Schedule a meeting with the LGU representative.
of the GK work must not be
held back if they are not very
In the absence of a CFC chapter in the area, the LGU can consider looking
supportive at the start.
into the presence of CFC chapters in the neighboring areas. If so, LGU can
draw on the CFC-GK team from the nearest city or municipality to provide
technical assistance or to coach the multisectoral group in operationalizing
its GK project. GK National can provide information on this.

Introducing GK to the LGU


a. Courtesy call by CFC with development partners, such as LGSP, to the
LGU, preferably to the LCE
b. CFC and the development partner then orient the LGU through the
LCE on the GK objectives, process and benefits
c. At this point, LCE, if interested, signifies willingness to proceed.
CFC and the development partner then give concrete suggestions
on how to move the partnership forward. Among these will be the
presentation of the GK to the Municipal or City Council and the
designation of a point person to coordinate the multisectoral effort.
d. CFC and the development partner present the GK project to the
Municipal or City Council (Sanggunian Bayan or Panglungsod) and to
local agency/department heads. The desired result at this point is to
interest the Council and agency/department heads in GK.
e. The Mayor identifies key LGU persons to initially coordinate with GK

38
pending the formation of the multisectoral structure and designates
them as GK Project Team or a Technical Working Group (TWG). The The following are important points to
task of coordinating or doing secretariat functions may be assigned cover in the presentation and discussion
about GK:
to the Municipal Planning & Development Office or to the Housing
and Urban Development Office (HUDO). Logically, the designated • GK is NOT just about shelter. It
department head acts as the lead person of the secretariat or in the promotes integrated, holistic and
case of Butuan City, an Administrative Committee was organized. sustainable development. Planning
for implementation of other
f. With the approval of the LCE, the LGU’s Municipal Planning &
programs must be done together
Development Office or the HUDO drafts an Executive Order (EO) with the shelter planning.
creating the multisectoral team • GK is not about just about building
g. Once reviewed and approved by the Mayor or his legal staff, the houses but community building
and healing of relationships
Mayor issues the EO creating the multisectoral team, specifying the through intensive value formation
members of the team from the LGU, NGO sector and/or the national coupled with concrete programs.
government agencies, and defining the multisectoral team’s basic • GK’s concept is to leverage funds
so that whatever resources the
roles and responsibilities. (Please refer to Annex A.1 Executive Order
LGU can offer can be multiplied to
issued by the Butuan City Mayor creating the Butuan City-Led expand the program further.
Multisectoral Shelter Program Management Team. Annex A.2 is a • GK is a multisectoral movement. It
sample standard comprehensive GK MOA with LGUs.) is open to working with partners
who believe in the same vision of
nation building through concrete
2. Planning Phase local work.
Objectives of the Planning Phase: • Although GK began with CFC
and works well if an active CFC
�• To launch and make operational the GK multisectoral partnership
community is present, it is not
�• To organize and define the roles and responsibilities of the necessary to have an active CFC
committees under the multisectoral GK structure (Administrative, chapter in the actual locality
Construction, Legal, Media and Communication, Payback, Program, to start GK. One option is for a
CFC chapter from a nearby area
Resource Generation)
to “mentor” a composite GK team
�• To prepare a program of work/action for the different committees composed of representatives from
�• To establish simple GK project management systems and procedures LGU and CSOs, as demonstrated by
and the corresponding structures the Datu Paglas experience.
�• To formulate a clear policy on cost recovery and identify payback
mechanisms both at the local government and community association
levels
�• To identify various effective resource mobilization strategies and
activities such as the padugo and the breakfast forum.

The initial tasks of the GK Project Team are to prepare and carry out the
initial GK plan of work, which includes the following:
a. Conduct an effective information campaign on GK to LGU
departments to raise resources and discuss possible involvement
39
b. Preparation and conduct of the breakfast forum or a similar strategy.
The practice of identifying the Draw up a list of strategic CSOs, business sector, individual families,
beneficiaries of the area varies from
academe, and other sectors of society that can be invited to the
one place to another. There are
at least several generally accepted breakfast forum and to join the GK multisectoral partnership
ways of doing this. The LGU
designated team together with the c. The designated lead person from the LGU meets with the CFC
CFC mentor team:
representative and other CSOs, business organization, academe, to
• Conduct a demographic draft a MOA establishing the partnership and defining the roles and
profile and determine the responsibilities of each of the parties concerned for the GK initiative.
poorest of the poor families of
(Please refer to Annex B - Memorandum of Agreement/Partnership
the area
• Identify the poorest between and among the City Government of Butuan, Couples for
community of the area Christ, and the Philippines-Canada Local Government Support
• Identify families living in Program)
danger zones
• Identify families who had been
victims of calamities, i.e. flood, Once the partnership has been established, the multisectoral team can
fire or war.2 regularly meet to work on the following important concerns:
a. Creation of the GK multisectoral structure (i.e., working committees)
delineating roles and responsibilities of all parties involved. This is
broader than the original TWG or Project Team created by the LCE at
the start of the GK project. The multisectoral structure should involve
all signatories to the MOA and other volunteers. (Please refer to
Annex C on the GK Multisectoral Structure)

b. Each working committee should discuss and internalize its


functions and its relationships with other committees. On this
basis, each committee should develop a plan of action. It is also
recommended that a coordinator or point person be designated for
each GK component. (Please refer to Annex D for the Construction
Committee’s Scope of Work, Annex E for the Communication Plan &
Annex F for the Resource Mobilization Plan)

c. Formulation of simple GK project management systems to include


project tracking systems to follow costing, accounting system,
beneficiary payback or repayment schemes, monitoring and
evaluation. (Please refer to Annex G for Iligan City’s GK Accounting
System, and Annex H for Iligan City’s Beneficiary Payback)

40
d. Formulation of the guidelines for the selection of beneficiaries/
community and site selection for GK Projects or the adoption of the The following are important
targeted beneficiaries of the LGU’s Comprehensive Shelter Plan, if considerations in the selection
of project sites, which may be
available. The guidelines should reflect a clear selection criteria and
categorized as onsite or as relocation
process. The multisectoral team should carefully guard the integrity or an offsite:
of the selection criteria and process. (Please refer to Annex I Butuan • GK pilot site should have
City’s Policies & Procedures for the Selection of Home Partners for residents that are classified as
Balangayan Butuan: Panimalay Sa Katawhan – Gawad Kalinga poorest of the poor.
• GK pilot site should be
Approach)
proximate to the city/
municipality center and
e. Creation of a beneficiary screening committee or an Administrative accessible to volunteers and
Committee that will have beneficiary selection as part of its roles. partners.
• Land and site development must
Membership of this committee will come from the multisectoral be affordable for the intended
team composed of representatives from CFC, major partners and the homeowners.
beneficiary community.

f. Classification of beneficiaries into SEP (sweat equity payback) or CP


(cash payback). (Refer to the Beneficiary Selection Guidelines under
the TATAG portion)

g. Identification or formulation of strategies to mobilize multisectoral


community support.

The support may come in the form of talent or technical expertise;


manpower assistance or involvement in any or all of the GK phases;
provision of financial and material assistance needed for the house
construction or for any other community facilities to be put up; or
simply sharing information about the GK project with others and how
one can help.

h. Identify strong LGU counterparts for GK program start-up and


expansion

i. Identify building sites for the GK project

j. Identify training needs and schedules for host CFC sector or TWG
regarding GK Kapitbahayan-Community Organizing.

41
k. Gathering and analysis of pertinent data regarding the site, especially the particular area/cluster of homes that GK
is targeting for the first phase of TATAG. This must be done together with the TATAG Coordinator. 3 (Please refer
to Annex J for a Criteria for Selection and Prioritization of Sites for GK Projects)

l. Coordinate with the local CFC chapter covering the target area to ask for assistance in community organizing
and the Kapitbahayan membership track and to start a Christian Life Program for prospective beneficiaries. The
Christian Life Program will also be offered to families who would like to explore membership in CFC but is not a
requirement to become part of the GK program.

m. In the absence of a local CFC chapter, the LGU takes on the lead role in community organizing together with
a “mentor” GK team from a nearby town or province. The TWG or the Project Management Team assigns a
community organizer to every GK site.

n. For non-Catholic GK communities, the predominant religion of the home partners is used as the basis of its value-
based education program. In the Datu Paglas experience, an ustadz took charge of the value education based on
universal values using Islamic doctrines and teachings.

o. Community organizing efforts in the target community need to be started early. This is to ensure that social
preparation activities are conducted to facilitate transfer to the new site or re-blocking activities for onsite projects.
Social preparation may take the form of creating social structures, undertaking community discussions and
fostering agreements, or resolving issues and concerns of home partners. Some of the Kapitbahayan (KB) trainings
on value formation may be provided during this phase.

p. Preparatory activities for the other GK programs can be done simultaneously alongside community organizing.
These are the SIBOL, SIGA and SAGIP programs.

q. The multisectoral team and the Mayor present the GK partnership’s work plan, the project management systems,
procedures and structure to the Sanggunian and department heads and seek approval, and mobilization of
support and/or involvement through an ordinance.

r. Prior to the presentation of the proposed GK partnership project, key members of the multisectoral team may
undertake “ground working” activities with identified key or all Sanggunian members and department heads to
secure their support.

s. It is expected that after the presentation and discussion, the SB will enact a legislative instrument, whether in the
form of an ordinance or a resolution, signifying approval of the LGU-GK Partnership. (Pls. refer to Annex K for
sample SB Resolutions supporting & adopting the LGU-GK Project).

42
What are the different resource generation activities utilized by CFC or by the LGUs in implementing
the GK approach?
A unique feature of the GK in generating resources for the partner GK community is the padugo or literally
bloodletting or to sacrifice. Home partners as well as CFC members are enjoined to contribute talents, “muscle
power,” and material resources such as money, household items, plants or other things relevant to the use of the GK
community or of a household. Both the CFC-anchored and the LGU-initiated GK projects have utilized this to build the
commitment of the home partners in the GK approach and processes.

Padugo is utilized in the other GK Programs and takes different forms. In the context of the SIBOL, SAGIP and SIGA
programs, it can mean hosting meetings in one’s house, and sponsoring a round of simple snacks for those attending.
Another unique approach is the conduct of the breakfast forum (or a lunch forum as appropriate). It is initiated by the
local CFC chapter or by the LGU as a resource mobilization strategy for the proposed GK project. It intends to gather
prospective donors or partners in a special event, which can be held in the morning (i.e., a breakfast forum) or even
over lunch.

To organize the forum, the multisectoral group, in consultation with the mayor, draws up a list of invitees. The list
can include CFC members, business associates or representatives from businesses operating within the locality, NGOs,
civic organizations, friends, recognized leaders, and philanthropists.

The LCE plays a critical role during the forum. In most cases, s/he gets to introduce the GK project – its objectives,
processes, benefits, the resources needed to make the GK project a reality, and how it is linked to the LGU’s
development agenda.

3. Implementation Phase

The key activities are:


a. Hosting of a GK breakfast forum or a similar activity to start resource mobilization. The forum can serve as a kick-
off activity of the Resource Mobilization Committee particularly in mobilizing support of other stakeholders of the
community.

b. Conducting Kapitbahayan (KB) community organizing efforts. The community organizer conducts regular home
visits to individual home partners, and regular meetings and/or ground working activities with the officers as well
as the with the different Bayanihan Action Teams (BAT) to ensure that agreed tasks are carried out. If there are
obstacles encountered, the community organizer conducts coaching activities or strategizes with the person or
BAT concerned.

c. Schedule capacity development activities, some examples of which are below, for the whole team or the involved
committees:

43
• Team Building and Effective Planning
Objectives of the Implementation Phase: • Shelter and Site Development
• To make the multisectoral GK • Mobilizing Media as a GK Partner
structure operational
• To ensure the coordinated • Documentation
implementation of the plan of • Resource Generation
work of the different action teams • KB Community Organizing and Empowerment.
or committees towards achieving
the goals of the multi-stakeholder
partnership The trainings will equip the multisectoral group or committee members so
• To prepare a plan of action for the that they would be able to perform their respective functions.
GK Build Day
• To continue the community
With the use of the acquired competencies from the trainings and the use
organizing efforts with a special
focus on the Organizational of the various manuals, the different committees can conduct trainings
Formation Phase meant for the partner community over a period of time. The community
• To monitor the implementation of organizer ensures the attendance of the concerned home partners:
the different committees’ plan of
work.
• Livelihood development
• GK-Tek livelihood values formation
• GK Education
• GK Health
• Kapitbahayan Leadership and Skills Training
• Team Building with local barangay for synergy.

d. The GK multisectoral structure carries out its tasks through the


working committees (i.e., TATAG, Resource Mobilization, etc).

e. A Build Day is held. The Build day is another special event in a


GK project. It is a day for launching the GK initiative. It is also a
chance to demonstrate to the public through media coverage how a
collective undertaking of concerned and caring citizens can “build” a
community. Volunteers are encouraged to mobilize for the Build Day.
They are grouped and assigned to work on putting up a particular
house - the basic frame, the roof, the walls, the basic amenities, and
painting the house with bright colors, which is a distinctive GK touch.

f. The conduct of regular monitoring and evaluation of the multisectoral


team is critical at this phase. Using the agreed indicators or measures
of performance, the multisectoral team will be able to identify

44
problem areas and act on it accordingly. The monitored concerns may
be referred to the mayor especially if this involves resource provision The components of a simple Monitoring
& Evaluation Scheme are:
or requires his/her attention as LCE.
Objectives – Specific statements of an
In the GK context, what and how is monitoring and evaluation done? end to be achieved during a stated period
Monitoring is a continuing function done specially during the of time
.
implementation phase by the stakeholders – the LCE, the LGU Input – Resources & activities that
Technical Working Group, the GK multisectoral team and even the GK are supplied for program operations.
- Kapitbahayan. These are combination of personnel,
equipment, and funds for specific
activities or concerns. The utilization of
Monitoring is “determining whether the project is being implemented inputs is measured against the plan.
as planned, and if problems arise, necessary modifications can be made
to avoid difficulties.” It is done to provide periodic assessment of project Outputs – Results of the utilization of
inputs. The actual delivery of outputs is
operations to the GK stakeholders. compared against the stated targets.

The multisectoral team, the LGU TWG, as well as the GK officers and Effects – Changes generated in the target
population. Actual effects are compared
members can do evaluation periodically. This may be every quarter, six
against target desired outcomes.
months, or one year. A separate one is conducted at the end of the project
life or upon project completion. Impact – Final total result, taking into
account direct & indirect effects and
allowing for diffusion & imitation that
Evaluation is “a process and selective exercise which seeks to determine
produce changes in the community as
as systematically and as objectively as possible the effectiveness, relevance, a whole as compared to the baseline
and impact of the activities in the light of the objectives of a project” such assessments of the community.
as the GK. It looks into the outputs; the partnerships established and
Factors that facilitated or hindered the
sustained; the policies that have to be formulated or revised; as well as achievement of the objectives.
advocacy points identified and pursued.
Recommendations to address concerns
or in relation to policy development.
It is necessary that a simple Monitoring & Evaluation Scheme be
formulated to serve as a guide in assessing the effectiveness of an
intervention in addressing a problem.

1
Communication Plan for the GA Butuan: Panimalay sa Katawhan Program,
Shelter Component.
2
A Thesis on “ Voluntary Organization and Community Development: A Study
on Couples for Christ “Gawad Kalinga” Community Development Program”
by Jose Roi Riveral Verallo III, August 2003.
3
Ibid.

45
Objective Inputs Outputs Effect Impact
(Used as reference of both (These items are (This is both a (This is an evaluation (This is an evaluation
monitoring & evaluation) monitored weekly or monitoring and item, addressed at item best verified
monthly) evaluation concern; the end of the year after two years of
best done at the end of or a defined project project completion)
a period – six or twelve duration)
months)

GK –TATAG Ex. Revolving fund for Implementation Presence of a well �• Security of


At the end of 24 months, housing or livelihood, of plans related to – managed and shelter tenure
the GK community of Interventions of a Kapitbahayan & TATAG developed settlement to # of home
name of place would Community Organizer, with: partners from
have been developed into technical & training � Conduct of activities •� Decent houses # community
a humane and habitable assistance in the of the different CFC and beautiful associations
settlement, completed following areas: ministries related to: surroundings �• Improved
and turned over to the �• Brightly colored housing &
residents as indicated by: �• Continuous • Value formation houses and community
provision of • Organizational landscaping of facilities
• # of houses built value formation, formation or environment �• Conflicts settled
with complete basic Christian life or strengthening �• Functional storm based on higher
amenities. one according to • Physical & drainage canals interest for
• Water facilities the religion of the development of �• Residents common good
installed community, the community adhering to �• Living in
• Road network & �• Management & • Mobilization of stipulation of the harmony
pathways established strengthening of home partners’ agreement for despite cultural/
• Operational storm & the organization, participation in community living social/ religious
drainage canal � Estate GK activities differences
• Presence of flowering management, & • Livelihood At least 85% collection
&/or fruit bearing projects development of payments or
trees &/or plants �• Systems �• Presence compliance with SEP
• Presence of a multi- development & of ongoing provisions
purpose hall serving installation in the projects/activities
the needs of the mobilization of
SIBOL, SAGIP &/or home partners in GK Kapitbahayan –
SIGA the different GK � Implementing the
activities respective plans of
GK Kapitbahayan �• Systems the BATs
� A functioning set of development in � Regular conduct of
officers & BATs the documentation meetings
� Operational Agreement of monthly
for Community Living payment of
as evidenced by home members in cash
partners’ compliance or in sweat equity
with provisions and/or in remitting
� Regular conduct of payments
meetings of officers &/
general assembly

46
Objective Inputs Outputs Effect Impact
SIBOL �• Presence of a �• Presence of an �• Increased readiness
structure that can ongoing SIBOL of preschoolers
be used for SIBOL Program for elementary
activities �• A core of at least 30 education
�• Presence of a Trained SIBOL participants
SIBOL team regularly attending
�• Presence of an & participating in its
operational plan of different activities
SIBOL activities �• Presence of learning
materials (books and
toys) for the use of
the children

SAGIP �• Presence of a �• Presence of an �• Decrease in the • Out of school


structure that can ongoing SAGIP incidence of out of youth are afforded
be used for SAGIP Program school children access to the formal
activities �• A core of at least 30 education system
�• Presence of a Trained SAGIP participants
SAGIP team regularly attending
�• Presence of an & participating in its
operational plan of different activities
SAGIP activities �• Presence of learning
materials for the use
of the children

SIGA
�• Presence of a core of �• Presence of a �• Presence of an �• Decrease in the �• Out of school
SIGA team structure that can ongoing SIGA incidence of out of youth are afforded
�• Family profile form be used for SIGA Program school youth access to the formal
1 per member activities �• A core of at least 30 education system
accomplished �• Presence of a Trained SIGA participants �• Decrease in
• A core of at least SIGA team regularly attending the incidence
30 youths actively �• Presence of an & participating in its of juvenile
participating in the operational plan of different activities delinquency or
program’s activities SIGA activities �• Presence of learning youth-related
materials for the use crimes
of the youth

GAWAD KALUSUGAN �• Presence of a �• # of children �• Decreased incidence • Improved family


health program immunized as against � # of malnourished and community
done regularly and the target children health
provided to the GK �• # of pregnant
residents mothers having their
�• Presence of a core of prenatal checkups
medical practitioners �• # of lectures &
� Presence of an learning activities
on – going health conducted during
education program the period & # of
attendees

47
SIX
The GK Component Programs
This section describes the different component of programs, with the exception of the
Livelihood Program (GAWAD KABUHAYAN). Interested parties are encouraged to contact
CFC-GK for more information on the Livelihood as well as other GK component programs.

Contact Information:
Email: info@gawadkalinga.org • website: www.gawadkalinga.org
Tel No: (632) 727-0682 to 87 local 47 • Fax No: (632) 723-1603

GK SHELTER PROGRAM

What is the GK Shelter Program (TATAG)?


The GK Shelter Program or TATAG is an innovative way of building or improving the houses
of the poor.

What is the Objective of GK-TATAG?


GK-TATAG seeks to build as many simple but beautiful houses as possible. This can only be
achieved by designing inexpensive yet humane housing for the poor.

Beautiful and brightly colored are just some of the inherent characteristics of a TATAG
house. Beauty exudes the level of excellence and the degree of commitment of Gawad
Kalinga to concretely uplift the quality of life of the poor. GK houses are built with a mind for
combination of color, landscaping and workmanship.

The GK approach subscribes to the belief that shelter support should be humane, that is
that they are fit for human dwelling and decent living. The houses should be able to support
basic functions such as security for the family and their possessions, privacy (sleeping room),
sanitation (kitchen), and proper hygiene (toilet and bath).

Since the demand for housing far exceeds current available resources, available resources
should be prudently utilized to build as many housing units as possible using indigenous or
alternative building materials and employing efficient housing designs. TATAG houses are
core or starter houses, inexpensive but quality units to which further improvements can be
added by the homeowner.

48
How do we begin the TATAG?
The initiating party such as the LGU has to do the following steps:

• Organize a TATAG team with members from concerned department heads, elected officials, representatives from
the civil society sector such as the NGOs or a selected core from the multisectoral group
• A TWG should be assigned to survey the site with particular attention to the technical aspects of the project – soil
type, topography, and other concerns
• Prepare and accomplish the required legal documents and submit the same to the appropriate offices or agencies
for the required permits and licenses. The Environmental Compliance Certificate (ECC), building permits,
approval of the subdivision plans, and other permits should be worked out
• Finalize the nucleus of the first house to be constructed or repaired
• Draft the TATAG area development plan. A technical team composed of engineers and Kapitbahayan officers can
undertake this task
• Draft the individual house design
• Document the “before” status of the houses through photos
• Present housing design to the beneficiaries and discuss occupancy guidelines
• Finalize the housing design
• Signing of the Kapitbahayan occupancy guidelines
• Start construction of the unit/s
• Turnover of the newly constructed or repaired houses

LGU Role during the Initiation of the TATAG:

The LGU has:


• To organize a TWG or a Project Management Team
• To gather the baseline information of the community, particularly the socio-economic
situation
• To document the community realities prior to the start of the GK partnership
• To prepare a simple write-up of the GK partnership operations: the goal, policies, structure
and corresponding systems and procedures
• To utilize the participatory approach and to involve the community in the planning,
implementation and evaluation of the project
• To have a clear policy statement for cost recovery and repayment scheme and to
communicate such to the GK home partners

49
What are the Key Elements of TATAG?
The houses should be in clusters of at least ten (10).
• GK TATAG is about community building. Although building houses that are not proximate to each other or are
not in clusters will still be of help to beneficiaries, it will not achieve the higher goal of community building. The
nucleus of houses is a starting point to rebuilding a whole community
• TATAG houses in a clustered area can be a model and set the standard of excellence for the rest of the community
to aspire for. A critical mass of houses can affect the disposition and the mindset of the beneficiary community and
inspire them to better their lives
• A GK-TATAG site can be categorized into two: onsite (existing community) and new relocation (no existing
community)

Housing-related interventions in depressed communities can be classified as the following:


• New construction
• Major repair
• Minor repair

The house should be a starter or transition house. The infrastructure should provide a toilet and bath, kitchen and
at least one room. It is a structure that the family can further improve. The target price should be set at Php 40,000
per house; actual cost of the construction should not exceed Php 45,000. This will impact on the kind of building
materials, the floor area, and the amount of skilled labor required in constructing the house.

The priority is to provide humane and decent shelter. It will be pointless to construct beautiful houses that would
deprive other families of the opportunity of having shelter as well. GK partners are cautioned about the desire and
enthusiasm to make things better for the beneficiary family, but would mean adding unnecessary features to the house
that would only increase the cost. Unless donated or the occupants are willing to shoulder the cost, the following
measures are not encouraged:

• Installing tiles for the bathroom (a good concrete finish will do)
• Installing tiles for the kitchen sink (a good concrete finish will do)
• Double walling (It is considered a luxury; the materials can instead be used as a main wall for other houses)
• Larger floor areas (more than 20 sq m) are an unnecessary expense. Families can expand their homes on their
own once their financial capacities have increased
• Installing a ceiling, this is an expense that the beneficiary can shoulder

The houses should be brightly painted:


• This is an expense in house construction that is often taken for granted or worse, omitted. Color does not only
bring life to the house and eventually to the whole community but it also protects the cladding materials from
heat and rain

50
• TATAG houses bear the colors of hope
• Beauty is an expression that the community has shifted from a • As the houses are constructed, the
“survival” mindset to a life full of dignity beneficiaries should go through
the values formation program to
dismantle the “barong-barong”
What Working Structure should be adapted in carrying out the mentality and enable them to
TATAG plans? function as stakeholders in the
The TATAG structure should have a TATAG Coordinator who will act building of the community

as the lead person in this undertaking. The Coordinator shall have the • TATAG is not just about the
following responsibilities: building of the physical structure;
it is restoring the dignity of
the family by building genuine
1. Choose the composition of the TATAG project team, for approval by
relationships.
the GK Director or by the LCE
2. Coordinate with other department heads or committee chairs for
technical support
3. Ensure implementation of the TATAG plan of works
4. Work with the GK Project Director to encourage CFC and Ministries
participation, or just like the case of Iligan City, the LGU mobilized
its employees to participate in almost all stages of the GK Project
planning, implementation and monitoring

The TATAG Coordinator will be supported by several sub-committees with


specific functions.

Site Development:
• Surveys the area, assesses community facilities and utilities
• Decides on areas for construction; monitors work progress
• Ensures that TATAG beneficiaries are involved in construction

House Construction:
• Conducts home visits and recommends families for home repair
• Monitors the progress of the work
• Oversees safekeeping of materials/inventory
• Decides on areas for improvement in every house
• Schedules workload/schedule of repair
• Coordinates with TATAG Project Coordinator

Beautification &Aesthetics:
• Ensures that area is maintained, kept clean and beautiful
• Ensures that the area is full of ornamental plants; paint is maintained
51
Documentation:
• Ensures that all houses are captured on film before any improvement is done
• Documents the process of construction in film
• Creates a file per house (profile, before/after photos)
• Coordinates with Kapitbahayan Community Organizer for family profile

How will Beneficiary Selection be done?


The selection of beneficiaries for the first cluster of houses is as critical as choosing the GK area itself. It is important
however to understand what “poor” means in the context of GK’s community development towards nation building.

Gawad Kalinga has the two target groups as beneficiaries.

Poorest of the Poor:

a. These are families whose houses are made of dilapidated materials like cardboards and iron sheet that are not
stable enough to withstand moderate wind. The floor is not concrete; there is no proper toilet/bath and the roof is
leaking. Plastic sacks, sign boards/cartons/used ply boards are used as wall cladding.
b. Usually, they do not have the capacity to pay for the house or lot even if they have a steady source of income. What
little income they have is expended on food, transportation and water. Housing is the last priority for them.
c. Homeless families are among the poorest of the poor. They could also be located in dangerous areas or are
squatting on private or government lots. They could be families that formerly came from slums and who were
relocated to sites that have become slums.
d. For the poorest of the poor, the mode of repayment should be SEP. However, this should be carefully monitored.
Beneficiaries need to be made to understand that they are also fully paying for their home, but just through a
different scheme.

Paying Beneficiary:

a. They have the capability to pay but do not have the capacity to build or construct a house on their own. These are
low wage earners like security guards, janitors, some government employees, construction workers, farm workers
or farmers.
b. They are usually renting, or residing in relocation sites but whose houses are unfinished structures, without
proper toilet/bath facilities and kitchens.
c. The cost of the house may range from Php 7,000 to Php 45,000, depending on the beneficiary’s capability to pay
d. Fund sources may include loans from SSS, GSIS or Pag-IBIG or through the Community Mortgage Program.

Final selection should be based on the following criteria:


a. The beneficiaries should be willing to undergo the values formation program, participate in the building of
houses and/or community facilities and other community organizing activities and be an active member of the
Kapitbahayan Neighborhood Association.

52
b. The beneficiaries should reside in the chosen cluster of houses intended for construction or repair.
c. Beneficiary should be identified as either poorest of the poor or paying beneficiary.
d. Beneficiary is willing to adhere to the Guidelines for GK Community Living (Refer to Annex L for the Provisions
specified under the Guidelines for Community Living).
e. May or may not be CFC members, may or may not be a member of any other religion or faith group as long as
they are a poor resident in the identified beneficiary community.

What is Site Development? What are the considerations in Site Development?


Site development means arranging the external physical environment in complete detail. It involves locating structures
and activities. It sets limits to the things that people can do and makes possible what they otherwise could not.
Whether onsite development or a new relocation area, site development plays an important role in building the
community.

It is basically operationalizing the provision of the UDHA in developing a new settlement with basic amenities.

What is a typical GK cluster?


A typical GK cluster has the following parameters:

1. Average lot size:


• For row houses: 32 sq m (minimum)
• For duplex module: 48 sq m (minimum per unit)
• For single detached: 50 to 60 sq m
2. Path walks should not be more than 2 m
3. Several houses can share in a single septic tank
4. Fences are discouraged, and the use of shrubs is encouraged. Shrubs foster friendly relationships with neighbors
and require less maintenance
5. For onsite development, a similar configuration can be followed for a lower number of houses say 4 per cluster
6. This cluster of houses can be grouped as the “household”

(See Annex M for sample Cluster Plan, Cluster Plan Isometric and Site Development Plan and Annex N for GK
House Designs.)

What basic GK structures should be put up in the community?

1. Houses:
• Row houses
• Duplex type of houses
• Single detached houses

53
2. Multipurpose Hall:
• This will serve as the main venue for teachings, trainings and meetings like prayer assemblies, fellowship or
Kapitbahayan gathering
• Floor area should be 60 sq m minimum size
• Security of tenure should be considered. The area should be utilizable for the next three to five years without
any fear of unjust eviction
• TATAG colors should be employed
3. SIBOL School:
• The suggested floor area is 40 sq m to accommodate at least 20 students per class
• It should have at least one toilet
• TATAG colors should be employed
• Security of tenure should be ensured
4. Potable Water Supply:
• To serve the majority of the community, the well or distribution center should be strategically located
• The water should be tested and adjudged as potable
5. Path Walks:
• The path walks should preferably be made of cement or brick pavers (blocks or crazy cut where grass can be
integrated into the pattern). The complete concreting of the path walks is discouraged
• This should add aesthetic value to the overall look of the community
• Patterns can be made on the pavers like leafs pattern
6. Park/playground:
• Preferably the park or playground should be located in front of the SIBOL school so the children can play
there. A key element of the park is a grassy open space with ornamental plants. If possible, the following
should be provided: additional benches, and landscaping accents like broken jars, rocks or boulders
7. Common gardens:
• Each family can be given a plot to plant vegetables for food self-sufficiency
8. Landscaping/beautification:
• Some ideas are putting hanging baskets on the front and back of the houses; creatively using available space
such as common areas between rows of houses and transforming them into mini parks; and an individually
designed sign or “gateway” to the GK community
• Intercropping ornamental plants for aesthetic purposes and vegetables for food self-sufficiency addresses
two concerns: maximizing the productivity of every available space and at the same time contributing to the
beauty of the environment

What is GK’s Site Planning Process?


1. Site Inventory: This involves obtaining information about the area such as available facilities and structures (e.g.,
multipurpose, chapel, day care, gym. basketball courts, clinic, empty spaces) and identifying issues and concerns
such as flooding, vehicular flow, security, among others.

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2. Project Development: This entails setting the objectives of the project, being clear on what to build in order
to address the needs of the community, and to reinforce the GK programs for education, health and livelihood.
Beauty functions and cost should be considered in keeping with the principle of “maximizing the minimum”.
3. Design Alternatives: Generating alternate designs with a schematic diagram will broaden the range of ideas to
choose from. This will provide the TATAG team with a more comprehensive understanding of how structures will
be built and developed. Indigenous or local elements can be incorporated in house designs.
4. Selection: From among the several designs, the TATAG committee will select the one that has adaptability. In
anticipation of changes since the site will always undergo modifications, the design should facilitate re-adaptation.
5. Implementation of the Final Design: This involves executing the plans and commencing the construction.
6. Monitoring and Evaluation: Once the plan is operational, there is a continuous need to review the
implementation, ascertaining whether circumstances have changed and adjustments might have to be made.

What are the Considerations in Site Planning?


The following should be considered in site planning:

1. Functions: The structures should be able to support and complement the different activities and programs of the
GK community. The structures should satisfy standard safety guidelines.
2. Community Life: The structures should not limit social interaction between community members. The goal is to
encourage relationship building among families, and thus, making the whole community a bigger “family”.
3. Beauty: Brightly colored structures and landscaped environment should be visually coherent.
4. Cost Efficiency: The development should be achieved and maintained at the least cost of labor and material
resource. It is encouraged that the team go for the cheapest options given the functions to be served and the
standards to be met. The use of indigenous and appropriate materials and technology is encouraged.
5. Environmentally Healthy: The site development plan should be designed in such a manner that it is ecologically
balanced and should provide for sewerage, canals, and waste disposal.

Are there Specifications for GK House Construction?


The following are some specifications in the use of materials, reinforcements to be made, and measurements.

Foundation pad and other work items below floor level


Final elevation of finish floor line shall be at least 0.20 meter higher than the natural ground line or that of the street
level, whichever is higher. This is to make sure that surface run-off or rainwater will not go inside the new house. The
construction of open canals or trenches is recommended in extreme cases where rainwater is known and expected to
pass through the location of the new house.

1. Footings shall be laid a minimum of 0.60 m below natural ground line for good soil - solid or fractured adobe or
compacted clay - and 0.9 m from natural ground line for sandy soil or loose clay.

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2. Wall footings shall be 0.2 m thick by 0.4m wide and can be un-reinforced if on good soil. Otherwise, 2 pieces - 9
mm diameter reinforcing bars along the length for the footing and 9 mm diameter @ 0.4m on center reinforcing
bars along its width can be used. Reinforcements should be raised at least 0.075 m from the soil for concrete cover
as protection from corrosion. Concrete mix shall be “1 part cement: 3 part sand: 5 parts gravel (by volume)”,
taking 1 bag of cement to be 1 cubic foot.
3. Unless soil from the inside of the house is substantially higher that the outside or vice versa, 4 inches thick
concrete hollow blocks (CHB) can be used. Reinforcement shall be 9 mm diameter deformed bars spaced at 0.8 m
for vertical bars and every 3rd layer of CHB for the horizontal reinforcement. Mortar mix can be measured as 1 part
cement: 4 (up to 6) parts S-I sand or white sand.
4. The stab-on-fill or slab-on-grade shall be at least 6 cm thick concrete on well-compacted soil so that reinforcement
can be omitted.

Steel frame, roof framing & roofing works


1. To ensure the stability of the structure of the TATAG houses being built, it is recommended that a steel frame be
constructed to serve as the basic structural unit. This frame is made up of light gage channels which laymen call
“C-Purlins”. Using at least Gage 20 x 2” x 4” C-Purlins, the frame can be built by spot welding together 2 pieces to
form a box or tubular-like section. For as long as the configurations indicated in the isometric drawing included
in the plans are used, this steel shape can take the loads of the usual 18 to 25 sq m house. It is recommended
that the steel sections be primer-coated on all surfaces - using red oxide or red lead primer before welding and
fabrication.
2. The same Gage 20 x 2” x 4” C-Purlins will also suffice as purlins to support the roofing sheets and can span a
maximum of 5 m when spaced at a maximum for 0.7 on center. Note that for purlins with span longer that 4.0 m,
stiffeners for the edges of the “C” section should be provided at every 0.50 m on center using scrap pieces of the
deformed bars welded to said edges. Anchoring of the steel frame into the concrete shall be done by embedding
a 0.3 m long part of the box section - welded with dowels - into a “concrete pedestal” of 0.2 x 0.2 m in cross-
sectional dimension. Pouring of concrete inside the vertical portion can provide extra rigidity to the thin steel
section and can also help in preventing corrosion.
3. Roofing sheets can be commercially available corrugated galvanized iron (GI) sheets. Thickness recommended
is Gage 26. Fastening should be done using teks screws and the tool required is a reversible electric drill with a
tek screw adaptor as accessory. Use of teks screws is accomplished faster and allows for better resistance to uplift
caused by strong winds.

Walls, jambs, doors and windows


1. With the use of steel frames, walls are designed mainly for partitions. This gives flexibility to use any material that
is best suited for each GK area with due consideration to availability and price of materials, and skill among the
beneficiaries or residents of the area.
2. Estimates for both CHB walls and dry walls (fiber reinforced cement boards on metal studs and tracks) for
partitions. Estimated figures for the “all CHB” scheme are based on the assumed use of 4” hollow blocks with

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the same reinforcement as the base walls and with both faces with plain cement plastered finish. Those for the
“Dry wall” scheme are based on the use of 4.5 mm thick “Hardiflex” – a brand of fiber- reinforced cement boards
riveted or screwed to metal studs and tracks - 0.50mm thick x 63 mm deep is recommended. The use of coconut
lumber is discouraged due to aesthetics, environmental considerations and limitations of coco lumber. For
instance, coco lumber is prone to termite infestation, drying, rotting and warping. The excess pieces of boards can
be used for the fascia boards for senepa – usually set at 0.2 m width.
3. Doorjambs shall be fabricated from sun dried (kiln-dried, if affordable) 2” x4” good lumber - tanguile, lauan, or
guijo are possible species. Apply a coat of black coal tar on the face of the jamb, if to be set beside the CHB wall to
prevent chemical reaction of lumber in direct contact with cement
4. The use of 4.5 mm thick “Hardiflex” cement board - instead of plywood on 2” x 2” good lumber frames is
recommended for doors.
5. Glass jalousie windows (glass blades on aluminum jalousies mechanisms) are recommended due to economy and
practicality of use.

Electrical works
1. Service entrance for electric service connection up to the meter base and then to the 30-ampere safety switch
inside rigid PVC conduits.
2. Provision of at least 4 light outlets - incandescent light bulbs on 4” receptacles with toggle switches.
3. Provision of at least 4 duplex-type, surface-mounted convenience outlets, using wires in PVC flexible conduits to
guard the wires from house rats.

Plumbing Works
1. Included here are sewer and ventilation lines for the toilet - with I pail-flush type toilet bowl and a bath area with
floor drain - and kitchen sink. In the Payatas 13GK and Brookside GK areas, both in Quezon City, the kitchen sinks
are fabricated using an enamel-coated sink installed on a wooden table. This design allows the users to transfer
the kitchen module from the interior to the exterior part of the house for flexibility of space usage.
2. The septic tank can be made up of a concreteICHB vault or a pair of plastic drum containers embedded into the
soil. The use of one septic tank for every 2 houses is recommended for economy.

Painting Works
1. The use of high-quality paint brands is recommended, such as Boysen - noting the advantage of track record and
reputation in the industry and what many describe as “less coats for the same finish.”
2. Semi-gloss latex paint is recommended for a better finish and for housekeeping efficiency given better wash-
ability. Dirt does not easily adhere to semi-glossy surfaces as compared to flat or matte surfaces.
3. The work scope of minimum painting includes the house exterior walls, doors, jambs and windows.

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LGU Role during Construction:
The critical role of the LGU during the construction phase is to ensure that the
provisions stipulated in the Batas Pambansa (BP) 220 are considered in providing low-
cost housing projects benefiting the poor.

What tools can be provided in monitoring progress during the construction phase?
There are three critical aspects of Construction Management:

• Time Management - Time control is ensuring that works are executed within a planned time. Tools found to be
very useful are: GANNT Chart, Cash Flow Chart and PERT CPM. (See Annex O for sample GANTT Chart, sample
Money S-Curve, PERT-CRM Chart and sample Construction Schedules)
• Cost Management - Cost control is ensuring that the value to complete the project is commensurate with the
work done. It is controlling the expenses in order to complete the work elements within their respective budget.
• Quality Management - Quality control is ensuring that all construction and installation works are done within
sound engineering practice and are in conformity with the plans and specifications. It is a scheme for assuring that
the project will be delivered as designed. One such tool is the Quality Control Assurance Plan.

GK HEALTH SERVICE (GAWAD KALUSUGAN)

What is the GK’s Health Service (GAWAD KALUSUGAN)?


GAWAD KALUSUGAN may be expressed in terms of various forms of services but definitely, the services should
respond to the stated priority needs of the community. The Missionville Clinic in Iligan City is an example of a GK-
operated Health Program.

The features of the GK Missionville Clinic:

1. The Goal: Create a community of healthy families and promote the optimal functioning of every child, youth,
adult and the elderly.
2. The Principle: Primarily, health is the responsibility of every individual. To attain the dream of a healthy
tomorrow, everyone should take part and be involved in working for its fulfillment.
3. The Structure:
• GK Provincial Gawad Kalusugan Coordinator is responsible for the organization and smooth implementation
of the services and will coordinate with the GK Missionville Project Director who is responsible for the GK
Clinic physical facilities and Kapitbahayan support
• GK Project Director will appoint a Gawad Kalusugan Coordinator and a core of at least seven (7) health care
volunteers
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• Gawad Kalusugan Coordinator and Health Care Volunteers will undergo orientation and regular training on
Basic Health Care Programs and First Aid. They will form the core group assigned to the take charge of the
Clinic
• The Provincial Head of Gawad Kalusugan will provide pastoral oversight and other support as maybe
necessary
4. The Services: This will depend on the resources from the LGU, NGOs and CFC Medical Mission:
• Clinic: Free consultation will be conducted on a regular basis and medicines will be distributed, if available
• Education: Regular lectures on health problems and issues, on preventive and corrective health programs will
be conducted
• Referrals: Will be available when hospitalization is needed through networking
• Hospital Assistance: In cases of confinement, medicines and other medical supplies will be provided if
available
• Bloodletting in partnership with PNRC: Donor cards shall the given to donors

LGU Role in the delivery of GK Health Services:


The critical role of the LGU in the delivery of GK health services is to provide the necessary
support: ensuring medicine supply, ensuring regular visits of doctors, and assigning a regular
health team to the community health center, if the population of the GK community warrants it.

What is the GK’s Education Services?


This involves providing formal and non-formal interventions to the children and youth of the GK community. The
services are subdivided into different age groupings of children and youth in order to ensure a more focused approach
and are provided by CFC members through the different ministries.

For LGUs without any CFC presence, the CFC chapters in nearby LGUs can provide training and technical assistance in
the development, setting up and management of these programs. The LGU can also utilize the resources and expertise
of other local partners for the health program.

The LGU can expand the components of its present programs and services to be more encompassing and holistic,
similar to one with CFC involvement.

The GK Education model has the SIBOL for pre-schoolers, the SAGIP for those in elementary or belonging to the age
group of 7 to 13 years old, and the SIGA for those 14 years and above.

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What is the SIBOL?
SIBOL targets pre-schoolers belonging to the age group of four to six years of age. It primarily provides a structured
set-up but within a “play environment.”

What is the SAGIP?


The SAGIP targets children ages 7-13 coming from families who belong to the low-income bracket or whose parents
have no steady source of income. They may be out of school youth who spend their days roaming the streets, their
lives having neither purpose nor direction. Some of them may be in school yet they take their studies lightly. SAGIP
aims to include children who are talented and want to further develop their talents in arts, theater, singing, dancing
and sports through the program’s workshops and activities.

The criteria for selection of SAGIP participants include children of TATAG beneficiaries, SIBOL graduates, and are
children of Kapitbahayan homeowners.

SIBOL has the following elements in its interventions that are considered as critical in restoring the dignity of the kids:
identity, family, friends and future.

What are the different Components of the SAGIP?


The different components of SAGIP are:

� • Education component which includes values formation and formal education


� • Health component
� • Sports & Creative component
� • Special activities
� • Parent component

How is the SAGIP started?


The LGU or the CFC chapter should:

�• Form a working team by selecting a SAGIP Manager and identifying volunteers such as Singles for Christ (SFC) or
mature Youth for Christ (YFC) who can be the ate’s & kuya’s of SAGIP
� Facilitate the training and planning of the Team by meeting regularly with the CFC Cluster/Sector Coordinators for
integration
�• Conduct a profiling of the potential members based on an earlier survey done on the children and youth
population of the GK community
�• Identify a conducive site for the weekly SAGIP activities
�• Schedule a parents’ orientation on the vision, components and key features of the Program
�• Conduct the series of planned activities

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What is the SIGA?
The SIGA is a continuing and holistic program targeting the youths belonging to the 14 – 21 age group who are
either children of TATAG homeowners, Kapitbahayan and CFC members residing in the area. It also targets juvenile
delinquents, gang members, drug and alcohol dependents and out-of-school youths in the GK community and nearby
areas. It is a set of interventions designed to help the youth develop a sense of responsibility and awareness over critical
issues concerning God, the self, family, and the community. Furthermore, the youth are given a better chance at life.

What are the different components of the SIGA?


The different components of SIGA are:

�• Pastoral formation to include spiritual growth and values formation


�• Creative & Sports Development such as the performing and literary arts, physical education and sports development
�• Social awareness and involvement, which entails the conduct of the CFC Social Ministries Training Tracks that cover
Sexual Integrity Programs, Health Education & Activities, Chastity Education, and Environment Consciousness
�• Education Component
�• Rehabilitation Component
�• Livelihood Component to include skills training, enterprise development, and micro-finance program

What needs to be done to start the SAGIP Program?


The LGU or the CFC chapter should:
�• Select the SIGA from Program Managers/Couple Coordinators
�• Meeting and planning with the YFC Provincial/Sector Coordinator, if there is an existing YFC program. If not, a SIGA
Program Manager may be appointed and can plan the timetable and implementation of the program
�• Organize SIGA Team
�• Identify an activity area
�• Training of SIGA Team
�• Conduct initial activities and identify potential members in the area
�• Conduct Youth Camp
�• Conduct activities as indicated in the Program Plan such as teaching day, creative and sports workshops, chapter
assembly, birthday party, fellowship, cluster and kasangga assemblies, and the SIGA weekends

What is the GK’s Kapitbahayan?


The GK Kapitbahayan basically revolves around community empowerment. It develops the knowledge, skills and attitudes
of the community members as a result of their continuing experience in working together as a collective entity, and the
technical and training assistance provided to the home partners in managing one’s self, the family, and the community.

Every GK community is organized into a Kapitbahayan Neighborhood Association that allows members to put into
practice the values of stewardship and ensure accountability, cooperation, unity and community spirit.

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Kapitbahayan brings about a new level of organizational functioning and culture. The guidelines for community
living are discussed and agreed upon by the members. New leaders who espouse the values of the association start to
emerge. Peace is achieved not by force, but by mutual adherence to an agreed set of values. This new culture is the key
to the community’s sustainability, and sets the community on the road to self-reliance.1

The Kapitbahayan brings back the old Filipino bayanihan spirit. It is a mechanism for sustainable development as it
institutionalizes the principle of helping the poor help themselves.2

What is “Kapitbahayan”?
It is a Tagalog word coming from two root words; “kapit” meaning to hang onto or to hold together, and “bahay”
which means house or home. It simply means a neighborhood of homes (family/individuals) working together for the
common good and relying on each other for support and strength. Their relationship is based on trust, respect and
preferential concern for others.

What are the Indicators of a GK Kapitbahayan Community?3


The indicators relate to the Five Point Vision of a GK community. These are:

1. Faith community
• Mutual respect for each other’s faith
• Expression of faith
• Common love for God
• Expressed in care and value for each other

1.1. Kapitbahayan members come from different religious beliefs


1.2. They pray together and each one has an active prayer life
1.3. “Non-conversion” stance
1.4. Respect for each other’s faith – openness to work together
1.5. Openness to accept a CFC caretaker team

2. Peace Zone
• Adheres to common values
• Violence and crime are eradicated
• Conflicts settled based on higher interest for common good
• Living in harmony despite cultural, social or religious differences

2.1. Joint/collaborative activities among groups (typically warring groups)


2.2. Issues/sources of conflict are addressed and mechanisms for resolution are instituted

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2.3. Conflict management/resolution measures that are effective for key issues are identified
2.4. Association versus community life, the concern is for the common good
• environmental cleanliness
• crime
• interpersonal relationship – “pakialam, caring, initiative”

3. Productivity center
• Human and natural resources are developed and tapped
• Community is self-sufficient
• Poor are not just recipients but givers/benefactors

3.1. Jobs
3.2. Backyard food self sufficiency/urban agriculture
3.3. Livelihood projects
3.4. Time is utilized for the good of the community (community volunteer work within their site and among
other poor communities)
3.5. Thinking: hope/wish/aim/vision for the community

4. Tourist Spot
4.1. Decent houses and beautiful surroundings
4.2. Replication for neighboring communities
4.3. Brightly colored houses and landscaping of environment
4.4. Hospitable to visitors, responding to visitors positively
4.5. Sharing about the story of transformation and culture

Core Principles for GK Kapitbahayan4


1. “Bayanihan” which means “collective efforts of heroism in a community.” Heroism does not only pertain to a
single outstanding individual that wants to help his community but the whole community working together to
achieve success for all.
2. “Less for self, more for others, enough for all.” Everyone in the community, no matter how poor, always has
something to share or contribute according to his heart and means. No one is too poor that he/she has nothing to
give.
3. “All members are equal partners.” There is no discrimination among the poor regardless of one’s religion,
community status or level of education. The willingness to participate is given the highest value, and each one is
encouraged to give their share in community building.
4. “Solidarity” has to do with “being a family”. It is accepting that the good of one person has to do with the good
of all. This simply means that each one ought to have a preferential concern for others.

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5. “Empowering community.” The work is not about dole-out or charity, but about uplifting the dignity of
individuals by building their capability to respond to the opportunities and choices and by enabling them.

How does one go about immersion in the GK community? How should organizing be undertaken?
Community organizing is a process that involves various recurring activities but each one should be purposeful. GK
has captured the different facets of its organizing strategy in several phases.

Integration Phase:
• House visits and initial talks with some prospective beneficiaries
• Organize informal consultation meetings with key persons in the community
• Gather or validate baseline study of the target community members
• Familiarize oneself with the site and with the residents
• Build relationships

Values Formation Phase:


• Implement the KB 4 session membership track for prospective KB members
• Implement the ten week monthly Values Formation Track in partnership with CFC sector or a value formation
program based on the religious beliefs of the community where the GK area belongs, similar to the Datu
Paglas experience
• Implement weekly activities indicated in the values formation modules to encourage people to work together
• Observe possible leaders of Kapitbahayan who embrace the vision and are willing to participate actively in the
various projects
• CFC Chapter can also start to conduct the Christian Life Program for those who already wish to attend to
complement and deepen the KB Values Formation Track .

Organizational Formation or Structure Building Phase:


• Alongside the other major activities, community organizing efforts are pursued at the community level. The
focus of activities is in creating the organizational structure to facilitate accomplishment of tasks.

GK Kapitbahayan Structure:
• During the early stage of the Organizational Formation or Structure Building Phase, an interim structure is
set up. The GK Project Management Team may initially appoint the officers. After six to twelve months of GK
implementation, the GK community residents are in a better position to select who among the officers or
community leaders are actively performing their functions or not.

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• The following officers are initially selected and then elected by the community:

President – servant leader to all the members:


a. Oversees all projects to be implemented by the various committee heads
b. Meets with the different teams and takes an active role in the planning for the priority projects of Gawad
Kalinga in the community
c. Leads the monthly meetings of Kapitbahayan
d. Serves as the voice of the KB members especially in identifying the needs in the community

Vice President – supports the President in all projects to be undertaken:


a. Assists committee heads whenever needed in actual implementation
b. Reminds the President and Community Organizer about timetable and activities to be implemented

Secretary – documents minutes of the meetings and keeps track of the attendance of members in meetings to
determine who are active

Treasurer – manages the fund of the KB Association

Bayanihan Action Team Leaders – Organize BATs: Bayanihan Action Teams are committees that can implement
community projects for the good of all. They can identify a BAT leader, and membership is open to all
residents of the community, as long as they have finished or are willing to undergo the ingoing values
formation track

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The following BATs must be organized to address the identified concerns:

Kalinisan at Kagandahan (Beautification & Cleanliness):


a. Ensures that the homes and the various roads and community facilities are always clean and well
maintained, and the plants always in bloom
b. Organizes community members to involve them in maintaining the cleanliness inside the home
c. Coordinates with CFC Office on Women and GK Coordinators in ensuring the beauty and
cleanliness within the homes and the whole community

Kaayusan (Peace and Order):


a. Creates a security task force for the community that can respond to minor disasters (i.e., fire),
calamities and other possible threats of violence (i.e., gang wars, fights)
b. Ensures that the GK area is a peace zone and is crime and drug free
c. Coordinates with St. Thomas More and Associates (STMA) & Sword of Gideon and GK Coordinators
to implement various programs

Kasiyahan (Community Socials):


a. Creates the Kapitbahayan Community Board for announcements
b. Keeps track of the birthdays of the members so that members can greet each other
c. Organizes simple social events on special occasions to bring the community together

Kapatiran (Tatag Homes and Site Development):


a. Organizes a group of carpenters and volunteers who will work on the TATAG home building and
site development. Volunteers who are unskilled may be trained by the local TESDA. The national
office of TESDA has entered into an MOA with GK for this purpose.
b. The KB Community Organizer in partnership with the TEKTON GK Coordinator, together with one
identified local KB leader will also monitor and track the payback in sweat equity to ensure that this
is in place

Kalusugan (Basic Community Health Care and First Aid):


a. Organizes a group of paramedical volunteers who have a basic knowledge of first aid to respond to
the health needs of the community

Kabuhayan (Food Self-Sufficiency and other Livelihood Programs):


a. Ensures that each family has a vegetable garden for basic food self-sufficiency
b. Coordinates with Oikos Society for the various teaching tracks and technology that can be shared
with the community

Kaagapay (Social Services):


a. Ensures that the needs of each family are taken into consideration and channels the right support of
aid from the volunteers to the right families
b. Ensures that there is no “favoritism” and ensure that support is made accessible to all community
members
c. Coordinates with the KB President for decisions on how the support should be distributed

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• The BATs must be empowered to plan and implement their own projects that can have direct
impact on their community. These projects must be agreed upon by the whole group and
the community organizer will ensure that they are according to the vision and ideals of the
Kapitbahayan
• The BATs will be an opportunity for the members to work together and put into practice the
Filipino values of Bayanihan. It will also enable relationship building, and help the Community
Organizer to gauge the readiness of the community to elect a good set of officers who will be the
guardians of the KB Vision

GK Kapitbahayan Election:
• The KB Election should be done when the KB Community Organizer feels that the KB members
are ready to elect responsible leaders. The Election should follow the principles included in the
Kapitbahayan Manual

Empowerment of Leaders:
• Identified KB leaders from the community will undergo a series of leadership trainings to empower
and enable them to lead their community towards becoming self-sustainable
• The vision is for the KB Association to become a registered PO, with the ability to engage leaders in
government and civil society to promote the greater good of all and to work towards the efficient
delivery of basic services to their community
• As POs, they should become not just beneficiaries, but full partners, not just for the good of their
community but towards nation building. There should be no false pride in the community because
of what they have achieved. Instead, they should also reach out to other communities

Process of Strengthening of Kapitbahayan Leaders & Officers:


• Leaders and officers of the Kapitbahayan will be encouraged and supported in developing their
leadership and other capacities to hone their skills in participatory community building
• They will also be partners of the various CFC Social Ministries to enhance and support the work of
each BAT5

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1
Ibid.
2
A Thesis on “ Voluntary Organization and Community Development: A
Study on Couples for Christ “Gawad Kalinga” Community Development
Program” by Jose Roi Riveral Verallo III, August 2003.
3
A Write – up on Pilot Sites for GK-Ateneo Partnership
4
Kapitbahayan Manual
5
Kapitbahayan Manual

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Annexes
Annex A.1 71
Executive Order issued by the Butuan City Mayor creating Butuan City-Led Multisectoral
Shelter Program Management Team

Annex A.2 74
Sample Standard Comprehensive GK MOA with LGUs

Annex B 84
Memorandum of Agreement/Partnership between and among the City Government of
Butuan, Couples for Christ, and the Philippines-Canada Local Government Support Program

Annex C 90
GK Multisectoral Structure

Annex D 91
Construction Committee Scope of Work

Annex E 96
Communication Plan for the Balangayan Butuan: Panimalay Sa Katawhan GK Community
Development Program, Shelter Component

Annex F 102
Resource Mobilization Plan for Balangayan Butuan Gawad Kalinga Approach

Annex G 105
Manual on the Accounting System for GK-Missionville

Annex H 129
Beneficiary Payback (Balik-Kalinga) Addendum 1, Manual on the Accounting System for
Missionville

Annex I 139
Butuan City’s Policies & Procedures for the Selection of Home Partners for Balangayan
Butuan: Panimalay Sa Katawhan – Gawad Kalinga Approach

Annex J 141
Criteria for Selection and Prioritization of Sites for GK Projects

Annex K 142
Sample SB Resolutions supporting & adopting the LGU-GK Project

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Annex L 144
GK Guidelines for Community Living

Annex M 146
Sample Cluster Plan, Cluster Plan Isometric and Site Development Plan

Annex N 148
GK House Designs

Annex O 157
Sample Gantt Chart, sample Money S-Curve, PERT-CRM Chart and sample Construction Schedules

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Annex A.1
EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 76
Series of 2003

AN ORDER CREATING THE BUTUAN CITY-LED MULTI-SECTORAL SHELTER PROGRAM MANAGEMENT TEAM

WHEREAS, the City of Butuan, LGSP and CFC agreed, as a spearheading step, to jointly implement a complementation
project specific to the Butuan City Shelter Program’s resettlement component in accordance to the Memorandum
of Agreement entered into among the three parties in --- May 2003;

WHEREAS, this complementation project is generically known as the Butuan City-led Multisectoral Shelter Program
wherein multisectoral partnerships are being cultured and nurtured to combine resources towards a synergy of
effects;

WHEREAS, there is a need to create a management entity to provide focus to the crafting, implementation, review and
assessment as well as the re-crafting of the Butuan City-led Multisectoral Shelter Program;

WHEREAS, a salient feature to the MOA is the formation of a Multisectoral Shelter Program Management Team, by
virtue of an executive order, that will address specific and multi-faceted issues and concerns relative to the
implementation of LGU priorities along the areas of resettlement and its respective development;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, LEONIDES THERESA B. PLAZA, Mayor of Butuan City, by virtue of the power vested in me by law,
do hereby order the following:

Section 1. The Butuan City-led Multisectoral Shelter Program Management Team is hereby created with the following
structure and composition:

1.1 Multisectoral Shelter Program Management Team (MSPMT)

1.1.1 Chair - LCE Appointee

1.1.2 Co-chairs - CHDO Head of Office and SP Committee Chair on Housing and Human
Settlements

1.1.3 Members - LGSP, CFC, NHA, HUDCC, CBO, CPDO, Private Sector Representative,
Academe, Urban Poor Federation, housing CSO, CAO, CEO, City Legal

1.1.4 Secretariat - CHDO

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1.2 Multisectoral Shelter Program Executing Agency (MSPEA)

1.2.1 Chair - CHDO Head of Office


1.2.2 Co-chair - CFC-PPD
1.2.3 Members -Multisectoral Committee Chairs on Media and Information, Resource
Generation, Estate Management, Construction, Administration, Legal, GK
Programs
1.2.4 Secretariat - CHDO

1.3 Project Director - Butuan City


1.4 Project Co-Director - CFC

1.5 Multisectoral Shelter Program Committees- Each committee shall have a chair and co-chair coming
from the City and from the CFC respectively.

1.5.1 Media and Information


1.5.2 Resource Generation
1.5.3 Estate Management
1.5.4 Construction
1.5.5 Administration
1.5.6 Legal
1.5.7 GK Programs

Section 2. The respective management and implementation structures of the Butuan City-led Multisectoral Shelter
Program shall perform the following functions:

2.1 Multisectoral Shelter Program Management Team (MSPMT)


- sets the direction and provide policies for the implementation of the
Butuan City-led Multisectoral Shelter Program
- approves MSPEA developed and recommended criteria and processes;
- enters into agreement with homepartners prior to awarding of Certificate
of Ownership of housing unit to the same;

2.2 Multisectoral Shelter Program Executing Agency (MSPEA)


- implements the policies set by the MSPMT and oversee the program
implementation through the project director and co-director;

- processes and raises issues and concerns surfaced by the various


committees to the MSPMT for appropriate action;

- Develop criteria and process of beneficiary selection; and,

- Recommends to the City key persons for the various program


committees.

2.3 Project Director and Co-director- “hands-on” and direct management and supervision for the entire
implementation of the project.
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2.4 Multisectoral Shelter Program Committees. The Chair and Co-chair shall recommend to the MSPEA
multisectoral constitution of their respective committees.

GENERAL: develop and recommend Committee-specific Action Agenda; Implement for the
MSPEA, MSPMT approved Committee Action Agenda

SPECIFIC:

2.4.1 Media and Information – provide necessary support to milestone accomplishments of the
PROGRAM through media mileage

2.4.2 Resource Generation – pools in necessary resources from various key housing project
partners;

2.4.3 Estate Management – ensures appropriate cost-recovery, and conservancy of PROGRAM


homelots and housing units.

2.4.4 Construction – develops and recommends appropriate housing designs and accompanying
program of works

2.4.5 Administration – Records-keeping, documentation, auditing, appropriation and


disbursement of necessary resources

2.4.6 Legal – ensures all program activities has no legal impediments

2.4.7 GK Programs – infuse into the PROGRAM the Shelter, Health, Livelihood and Community
Organizing technologies of the Gawad Kalinga

Done this __________ day of May 2003, in the City of Butuan, Caraga Region, Philippines.

LEONIDES THERESA B. PLAZA


City Mayor

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Annex A.2
MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS:

This AGREEMENT made and entered into this __ day of ___________ 2003 in ____________________
_______________, by and between

The CITY/MUNICIPALITY OF ____________________, a local


government unit existing under Philippine Laws with principal office at the ____
____________________, represented by the HON. ____________________
City/Municpality Mayor and duly authorized by the Sangguniang Panglunsod/
Resolution No. __________ (hereinafter referred to as the “LGU”)

– and –

The GAWAD KALINGA COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION,


INC., a non-stock, non-profit entity under the process of incorporation under the
laws of the Philippines, with principal office at 349 Ortigas Avenue, Greenhills East,
Mandaluyong City, represented by ANTONIO P. MELOTO, (hereinafter referred to
as the “GK Foundation”)

W I T N E S S E T H : That –

WHEREAS, the Philippines Constitution confers upon the State the sovereign authority to undertake, for the
common good, in cooperation with the Local Government Units (LGU’s) and Private Sectors a continuing program of
urban land reform and housing renewal which will make available at affordable cost decent housing and basic services to
underprivileged and homeless citizens of this country more particularly in urban centers and resettlement areas.

WHEREAS, socialized housing which is intended to address the housing need of homeless, disadvantaged
groups, is a priority program of government pursuant to its agenda of poverty alleviation;

WHEREAS, it is the policy of government to promote the active participation of and pursue partnership with
the private sector, non-government organizations and other sectors for the purpose of sharing resources and expertise
thereby optimizing opportunities for implementation of development projects which promote the welfare of the poor.

WHEREAS, GK FOUNDATION is a private foundation which undertakes the role of building Christian
Communities in depressed areas with primary objective to become a catalyst in uplifting the material and spiritual
welfare of the poor; restore the dignity of the human person; empower families and youth through values formation
and skills training for a better quality of life; and build communities of stewards for sustained development and social
transformation through networking and creative evangelization.

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WHEREAS, GK FOUNDATION has established a program known as THE GAWAD KALINGA (GK for brevity),
an integrated community development program which aims to address the totality of man’s needs (physical, financial,
educational, emotional, social, cultural, spiritual) for his total liberation from poverty. It is also a venue for the poor to
embrace new values of caring for themselves, their families and their communities starting with values formation and
education. Its ultimate goal is to uplift the quality of life of the poor by helping them develop new habits that promote
beauty, cleanliness, livelihood and good order in their homes and surroundings and encourage them to make a positive
contribution in Nation Building.

WHEREAS, GAWAD KALINGA is Couples for Christ’s and GK Foundation’s response to God’s call to “Bring
glad tidings to the poor”, to promote a Filipino tradition by imbibing the “Bayanihan spirit” and the promotion
of volunteerism and cooperation among team members and to establish model communities in the regional areas as
showcase areas.

WHEREAS, TATAG, the Shelter and Environment Program component of GK aims to build on a SELF-HELP
basis, houses/traditional indigenous dwellings and DAYCARE CENTER for all GK beneficiaries who are considered the
poorest of the poor, unprivileged and homeless citizens of the country.

WHEREAS, the LGU and GK FOUNDATION agreed to implement jointly, in coordination with other appropriate
government agencies and private entities, the said housing and GK programs in the GK sites to be subsequently
identified by the LGU and GK FOUNDATION.

NOW THEREFORE, for and in consideration of the foregoing premises and covenants and subject to the
terms and conditions hereinafter set forth, LGU and GK FOUNDATION, by these presents, do hereby bind themselves,
AGREE and ADOPT this Memorandum of Agreement which will serve as the basic guidelines, mechanics and definition of
responsibilities of the parties herein, for the smooth implementation of the GK Project.

ARTICLE I
Definition of terms

Section 1.01 Definition of terms – For purposes of this Agreement:


a) “LGU” refers to the City/Municipality of ___________________ and its instrumentalities.
b) “GK FOUNDATION” refers to Gawad Kalinga Community Development Foundation, Inc.
c) “GK” refers to Gawad Kalinga, a movement towards a slum free Philippines, that integrates people–
empowering activities moving towards building integrated, holistic and sustainable communities, focusing first and
foremost on depressed areas throughout the Philippines. It’s major program components include TATAG, SIBOL, SAGIP,
SIGA, LUSOG, Gawad Kabuhayan and GK Kapitbahayan.
d) “Low–cost Housing” refers to GK FOUNDATION’s housing “TATAG” program or project covering
houses and lots or home lots only undertaken by the GK FOUNDATION in partnership with the Government and private
sectors for the benefit of the GK beneficiaries at the most reasonable cost based on the needs and financial capability of
the beneficiaries and appropriate and most liberalized loan repayment schemes.
e) “GK SIBOL” refers to GK FOUNDATION’s preschool program which focuses on children ages 3-5 years
old, preferably children of TATAG beneficiaries and their neighbors, or siblings of SAGIP and SIGA beneficiaries
f) “GK SAGIP” (Sagipin ang Galing Isip at Pangarap ng Kabataan) refers to GK FOUNDATION’s street
children program which focuses on children ages 7-13 years old and provides them with basic values formation, health
and nutrition program, creative and sport workshop and trainings.
g) “GK LUSOG” refers to GK FOUNDATION’s health program which focuses on the malnutrition problem
of children and teaches the parents the values of proper diet and nutrition. In this program, the health profile of every
family beneficiary is being monitored and every problem is given proper medical attention.

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h) “Gawad Kabuhayan” refers to GK FOUNDATION’s livelihood program through which livelihood
skills are provided, capital and materials are furnished and the market for the products produced is also given. Food self-
sufficiency is also encouraged by putting up vegetable gardens and urban/rural agriculture.
i) “GK KAPITBAHAYAN” refers to the neighborhood association of GK beneficiaries registered with the
Securities and Exchange Commission and other appropriate government agencies as urban poor organization for the
purpose of inculcating upon the beneficiaries the values of stewardship and accountability, team effort and cooperation,
unity and community spirit. It is the mechanism for sustainable development as it institutionalizes the principle of helping
the poor help themselves.
j) “GK BENEFICIARIES” refers to the “underprivileged and homeless citizens” whose income or
combined household income falls within the poverty threshold as defined by the National Economic Development
Authority (NEDA) and who does not own housing facilities. This includes those who live in makeshift dwelling units and
do not enjoy security of tenure.
k) “GK SITES” refers to the location, areas and sites jointly identified by the LGU and GK FOUNDATION
as appropriate housing location for the GK beneficiaries. It includes existing areas for priority development, on-site
development, blighted lands, zonal improvement sites, slam improvement and resettlement sites, and in other areas that
way be identified by the LGU and GK FOUNDATION as suitable for GK project.
l) “Areas for Priority Development” refers to those areas declared as such under existing statutes and
pertinent executive issuances.
m) “Blighted Lands” refers to areas where the structures are dilapidated, obsolete and unsanitary,
tending to depreciate the value of the land and prevent normal development and use of the area.
n) “On-site Development” refers to the process of upgrading and rehabilitation of blighted and slum
areas with a view of minimizing displacement of dwellers in said areas.
o) “Zonal Improvement Program” or ZIP refers to the program of the National Housing Authority of
upgrading and improving blighted squatter areas within the cities and municipalities of Metro Manila pursuant to existing
statutes and pertinent executive issuances.
p) “Slums Improvement and Resettlement Program” or (SIRP) refers to the program of the National
Housing Authority of upgrading and improving blighted squatter areas OUTSIDE OF Metro Manila pursuant to existing
statutes and pertinent executive issuances.
q) “Project Funds” refers to those funds made available from the allowable list of programs and projects
(social and economic infrastructures) chargeable against the CY 2002 Priority Development Assistance Fund (PDAF),
Lump-sum appropriation under the Department of Public Works and Highway (DPWH) budget, donations and allocations
from the local government unit concerned.
r) “DONATIONS” refers to moneys, chattels, real properties, services, and other things for value
voluntarily given to the ‘GK Program’ by any individual, association, partnership, cooperation, both local or foreign.
s) “Sweat Equity” refers to a mode of loan repayment by a GK beneficiary wherein his daily work input
in the program is given a monetary value depending on the prevailing minimum daily wage in the area. It may also refer
to the monetary value of his services wherein the beneficiary has no regular family income. His pay can be divided into
percentages for pay for work and credit for work.
t) “Community Mortgage Program” (CMP) refers to a mortgage financing program of The National
Home Mortgage Finance Corporation (NHMFC) which assists legally organized associations of underprivileged and
homeless citizens to purchase and develop a tract of land under the concept of community ownership. The primary
objective of the program is to assist residents of blighted lands on depressed areas to own the lots they occupy, or where
they choose to be relocated and eventually improve their neighborhood and homes to the extent of their affordability.
u) “Land Assembly or Consolidation” refers to the acquisition of lots of varying ownership through
purchase or expropriation for the purpose of planned and rational development and socialized housing program without
the individual property boundary restriction.
v) “Expropriation” refers to the taking by government of private property upon payment of just
compensation for distribution to qualified beneficiaries.

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w) “Joint Venture” refers to the commitment or agreement by two (2) or more persons to carry out
a specific single business enterprise for their mutual benefit and for which purpose they combine their funds, land
resources, facilities and services; and
x) “Project” refers to the GAWAD KALINGA-GOVERNMENT PARTNERSHIP FOR HOUSING (GK-GP).

ARTICLE II
The Project

Section 2.01 The Project shall be known as the GAWAD KALINGA - GOVERNMENT PARTNERSHIP FOR
HOUSING (GK-GP). It primarily entails the implementation of socialized housing projects designed to provide a simple,
decent and affordable housing to families belonging to the disadvantaged sector and the unprivileged and homeless
citizen. It involves contributions and sharing of expertise by the parties. The program encourages the participation of local
government units and other entities who may wish to contribute their resources and expertise to the project.

Specifically, the project shall involve the following:

a) Inventory and identification of GK sites for low cost / socialized housing within the territory of the LGU.
After the inventory, GK FOUNDATION and LGU, in coordination with other appropriate government agency, if necessary,
(NHA, HLURB, NMRIA and LMB), shall identify lands for socialized housing and resettlement areas for the immediate
and future needs of GK beneficiaries who are the underprivileged and homeless in the urban/rural areas, taking into
consideration the degree of availability of basic services and facilities, their accessibility and proximity to job sites and
other economic opportunities and the actual members of registered GK beneficiaries.
b) Pre-qualifications and identification through census and tagging activities of the target GK beneficiaries
within the locality of the LGU.
c) Extension of GK shelter program to existing areas for priority development, zonal improvement site,
slum improvement and resettlement sites, and in other areas that may be identified by GK FOUNDATION and LGU as
suitable for GK low cost housing.
d) Preparation of a development plan, feasibility study, social preparation, architectural and engineering
De-Sign for the development and construction of the GK site in its housing components.
e) Fund raising for property acquisition, development and housing construction. For this purpose,
designation of reputable depositary bank and signatories to checks, withdrawals, and other instruments of credit.
f) Dispositions and documentations of all developments, both in process and completed, in GK sites
including all the GK program components.
g) Arrangements for land acquisition of the GK site and its housing components by the GK beneficiaries
through various modes or schemes of acquisition (Sweat Equity, Donation, Community Mortgage Program (CMP), Land
Assembly or Consolidation, Joint Venture and Expropriation).
h) Organization of Gawad Kalinga Kapitbahayan in GK site to serve as an instrument of change, renewal
and transformation of individual, families and whole community by:

i) Empowering the GK beneficiaries to take responsibility for the life of the community
and the sustainability of the initiatives undertaken by the GK FOUNDATION.
ii) Building community spirit and concern among beneficiary families.
iii) Organizing residents to plan for sustainable livelihood projects for income
augmentation/ generation; and
iv) Establishing a support environment for the GK beneficiaries.

i) Establishment of the major components of the GK FOUNDATION GK Programs namely., TATAG,


SIBOL, SAGIP, SIGA, GAWAD KABUHAYAN and LUSOG which address the important concerns of GK beneficiaries on
shelter, education, health and nutrition, and livelihood.
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j) In consultation with the LGU and its instrumentalities, continuous holding by GK FOUNDATION of
spiritual values formation, other programs, seminars and symposium to GK beneficiaries for their spiritual, physical,
mental, and social growth and upliftment.

Section 2.02 The Project shall also involve the development of other properties, owned, managed and
controlled by the LGU and its instrumentalities which may form part of the components of the project.

ARTICLE III
Responsibilities of the parties

Pursuant to the purposes and objectives of this Memorandum of Agreement, the parties herein agreed
to cooperate and coordinate with each other in undertaking the specific requirements relative to the
implementation of the Project and shall perform the following:

Section 3.01 The CITY/MUNICIPALITY OF ______________ shall:

1.a. Undertake through land research on the properties of LGU and ensure that prior to its
conduct of further studies on the proposed project, it is legally feasible for development as
GK sites.
1.b. Undertake the preparation of a Development Plan and Pre-feasibility study, including the
legal and technical aspects of the possible GK sites.
1.c. With the concurrence of GK FOUNDATION of the feasibility study, financial, architectural and
engineering plans including cost estimates, implement the Project based on the approved
cost sharing program, architectural plans, specifications, estimations and designs.
1.d. Undertake the land development and construction works for the Project to be undertaken
on a phase by phase basis in accordance with the work program stipulated in the Feasibility
Study.
1.e. Determine that the project shall be within the zones designated in the land use plan or in the
zoning map. Prioritize the processing of the applications for the conversion of agricultural
lands identified by LGU as suitable for low-cost housing projects and which have been
classified into residential pursuant to the LGU’s zoning ordinances or land use plans.
1.f. Review and rationalize its existing land use plans and housing programs to determine the
suitability of the project which may substantially affect urban or rural land use patterns,
transportation and public utilities, infrastructure, environment and population movements.
1.g. With the concurrence of GK FOUNDATION, undertake and process the land acquisition
of the GK site in favor of the GK beneficiaries or their duly organized GK Kapitbahayan
through various modes or schemes of acquisition namely., Sweat Equity, Donation,
Community Mortgage Program (CMP), Land Assembly or Consolidation, Joint Venture and
Expropriation.
1.h. Secure all the necessary permits and licenses, if any, and waive all fees required for the
immediate implementation of the project.
1.i. Identify and provide various relocation options to disqualified families, pursuant to the
criteria set on Beneficiary Selection by GK FOUNDATION.
1.j. Coordinate with appropriate government shelter agencies and other national and local
government entities including financial institutions in the execution and completion of the
Project.
1.k. Assist GK FOUNDATION and other government and private entities in identifying GK
beneficiaries.

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1.l. Enter into a specific contract with GK FOUNDATION covering specific roles and responsibilities
in the pre-project and project implementation phases.
1.m. Authorize the SECOND PARTY to undertake the construction of ______ units, up to a maximum of
_____ units, on the identified site at _________________;

1.n. Release, upon the signing of this Agreement, to the SECOND PARTY its counterpart financial costs,
computed at ___________ pesos (P__________.00) per unit for the first _______ units for a
total of ___________________ pesos, plus engineering supervision and other costs of _______
______________ or in the total amount of ________________________________ pesos, in
accordance with government budgeting, accounting and auditing rules and regulations;

1.n. Assist GK FOUNDATION in the social preparation, qualification, and identification of the
target beneficiaries including actual relocation activities.
1.o. Assist GK FOUNDATION in resolving issues that may arise in the execution of the Project.
1.q. In consultation with GK FOUNDATION, identify the designation of a certain area to be used
as the general headquarter of the enter-agency taskforce to be created specifically for the
purpose of the housing project in the identified property.
1.r. Coordinate and assist with inter-agency components in disseminating information relative to
the relocation of the occupants in the Property and to facilitate the peaceful turnover of units
to qualified beneficiaries.
1.s. Ensure that all local government agencies that exercise jurisdiction over the Property shall
faithfully assist and aid in pursuing the housing project.
1.t. Determine the guidelines for the maintenance of peace and order in the vicinity and ensure
faithful observance of the said guidelines.
1.u. Provide adequate police visibility and assistance to ensure that no form of lawless violence
will transpire as well as to rid the area of criminal elements.

Section 3.02 GK FOUNDATION shall:


2.a. Formulate and Implement a policy for qualified/bonafide GK beneficiaries.
2.b. Undertake the preparation of a socio-economic survey of all on-site families, the result of
which shall be used as basis for the listings of on-site families, qualification and identification
of GK beneficiaries, and the project’s final feasibility study.
2.c. Formulate the criteria on GK beneficiaries selection in consultation with the LGU and other
government agencies, if necessary.
2.d. Based on the proposed GK sites by LGU, determine the allocation and provision of at least
______________________ sq.m. (_________) located at __________________
________ which shall be utilized for the development and construction of a sustainable
community with appropriate mix-use components and structures identified as appropriate
GK community components of a well defined Master Plan comprising of in-city resettlement,
socialized and low-cost housing units
2.e. Coordinate with the LGU the verification for purposes of research and authentication the
status of the Properties proposed as GK sites.
2.f. Secure from LGU all available legal documents in order to facilitate title research on the
property.
2.g. Assist LGU in laying/setting the social preparation for the Project.
2.h. Provide technical assistance for low cost housing; preparation of housing standard
specifications and cost estimates which include:
79
Engineering
a) Conceptual
b) Indicative costs
c) Detailed designs and working drawings

Construction Management
a) Cost controls
b) Cost programming
c) Progress report
d) Arrangement with suppliers for the purchase of construction materials on reasonable
costs.

2.i. Provide volunteers for community organizing and values formation to GK beneficiaries on all
GK programs; provide workers for house construction/repair and site development; provide
workers in landscaping and finishing materials; provide volunteers for weekly community
based education program; provide volunteers for community health care; provide volunteers
to initiate more partnerships for the development of the GK community; organize GK
Kapitbahayan.
2.j. Organize GK programs namely, SIBOL, SAGIP, TATAG, SIGA, GAWAD KABUHAYAN, and
LUSOG and other allied services of the social ministries of GK FOUNDATION in coordination
with the LGU and other appropriate government agencies.

ARTICLE IV
Project Funding

Section 4.01 Funds for the GK projects shall come from the following sources:

a) Local Government Fund


b) Grants, bequests and donations, whether from local or foreign sources.
c) Domestic and foreign investments or financing through appropriate arrangements.
d) Funds from financial institutions through their special development loan windows, by allocating
certain amounts they may deem sufficient for the purpose, for direct lending to LGU in order to finance the project, or for
investment in bonds, securities, and other forms of obligations which may be issued or floated by the participating LGU;
and
e) Fees or commissions paid by real estate corporations, entities or proprietorships under a Joint Venture
scheme known as the “Balanced Housing Development” whereby the developers may utilize GK housing program
as an alternative compliance under RA 7279 which requires the developers to develop an area for socialized housing
in accordance with the standards prescribed by BP 220 equivalent to at least twenty percent (20%) of their total main
subdivision area or total subdivision cost.

For this purpose, the parties may endeavor to work out and secure clearance from the Housing Land Use
Regulatory Board (HLURB) the adoption of the GK housing program specifications in lieu of the basic standards
prescribed by BP 220 and coordinate with other government shelter agencies and associations of real state developers
and contractors for a possible establishment of an expanded framework of housing plan.

80
ARTICLE V
Bookkeeping and Reportorial Requirements

Section 5.01 The parties shall keep regular books of accounts and maintain separate and accurate records
of their transactions involving development/improvement of GK sites, slums, and resettlement areas, and services in
connection with the construction of the housing units, whether houses and lots or house only, in accordance with
bookkeeping law, rules and regulations.

ARTICLE VI
Establishment of a project coordinating office

Section 6.01 The parties hereto agreed on the establishment of the Project Coordination Office (PCO)
which shall be composed of the authorized representatives of GK FOUNDATION and LGU. The PCO shall monitor,
coordinate and insure the proper implementation and execution of this Memorandum of Agreement in accordance with
the ‘Schedule of Activities’ attached herewith and made an integral part of this agreement. It is hereby understood that
the parties to this Agreement as well as any member of the PCO shall not be held liable for any delay in the implementation
of this Agreement caused by any supervening event beyond their control.

ARTICLE VII
Personal Liability of the Parties

Section 7.01 It is expressly agreed that the parties and their successors-in-interest shall respectively use
their judgment and discretion in all things, and shall in no case whatsoever, be personally liable either in action or non-
action.

ARTICLE VIII
Amendments

Section 8.01 This agreement may be amended and modified from time to time, in any particular whatever
by an instrument in writing, signed, sealed, and acknowledged by the parties, which amendment on modification shall be
then attached to the original of this instrument.

ARTICLE IX
Effectivity

Section 9.01 This agreement shall take effect upon signing hereof and shall terminate by mutual consent.
Likewise, this agreement may be renewed by mutual written agreement of the parties.

ARTICLE X
Execution of Contracts

Section 10.01 Every written contract made by the parties, reference shall be made to this instrument and
every person or corporation or entities contracting with the parties shall look to the funds and property herein created
for payment of any debts, note, judgment or decree of any money that may otherwise become due and payable.

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Section 10.02 Any agreement or agreements entered into by and between the parties and a third party or
entity which are inconsistent with the intent and purposes of this Memorandum of Agreement or any of the provisions
hereof shall be automatically considered null and void without full force and effect.

ARTICLE XI
Separability Clause

Section 11.01 If any provision or provisions of this agreement shall be declared illegal, invalid or void by any
court of competent jurisdiction, such judicial decision shall not render illegal, invalid, or void any other previsions of this
Memorandum of Agreement.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the PARTIES herein have hereunto signed this Memorandum of Agreement this __
day of _____ 2003 at _______________, Philippines.

CITY OF ______________ GAWAD KALINGA COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT


FOUNDATION, INC.
By: By:

HON. _____________ ANTONIO MELOTO


City Mayor GK FOUNDATION Director

SIGNED IN THE PRESENCE OF:

________________________ ________________________

REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES)


) S.S.

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ACKNOWLEDGMENT

BEFORE ME, a Notary Public for and in ______________________, personally appeared the following:

NAME: CTC #: DATE / PLACE:

City of Iloilo
Rep. by Mayor
HON. _______________

Couples for Christ


Rep. by GK FOUNDATION Director
ANTONIO MELOTO

known to me and to me known to be the same persons who executed the foregoing Memorandum of Agreement
consisting of ________ (____) PAGES including this page of Acknowledgment signed by the PARTIES and their
instrumental witnesses at the left-hand margin of each and every page hereof and at the foot of this Acknowledgment
and they acknowledged to me that the same is their free voluntary act and deed and that of the corporations they
represent respectively.

WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL on the date, year and place first above-written.

NOTARY PUBLIC
Doc. No. ___;
Page No. ___;
Book No. ___;
Series of 2003.

File: C:\My Documents\STMA\STMA Gawad Kalinga\MOA GK FOUNDATION GK.doc

83
Annex B
MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT/PARTNERSHIP

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS:

This
MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT/PARTNERSHIP
Made and entered into by and between:

The CITY GOVERNMENT OF BUTUAN


A local government unit in Caraga, Philippines
Created and existing under Republic Act No. 523, and herein represented
Per SP Resolution No._________ by its City Mayor

HON. LEONIDES THERESA B. PLAZA

-and the-

COUPLES FOR CHRIST


A non-stock, non-profit corporation existing under
Philippine Laws, with office at the J.C. Aquino St. Butuan City, Philippines,
And herein represented by its Agusan del Norte Gawad Kalinga Area Head,

SALVADOR S. CALO, JR.

-and the-

PHILIPPINES-CANADA LOCAL GOVERNMENT SUPPORT PROGRAM


(PC LGSP Caraga Region XIII
A capacity building program funded by the Canadian International development Agency
and executed by the AgriTeam Canada, with office at 3rd Floor, BBL Building, Montilla Boulevard, Butuan City
and herein represented by its Regional Program Manager,

VICTOR A. OZARRAGA

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WITNESSETH: That

WHEREAS, the CITY GOVERNMENT OF BUTUAN, hereinafter referred to as the CITY, is concerned with the poor
living conditions of many of its constituents and as a priority in the Executive Agenda, aims to facilitate
the upliftment of families towards a better quality of life through a land , housing and community
development program;

WHEREAS, the COUPLES FOR CHRIST, hereinafter referred to as the CFC, through its CFC Gawad Kalinga program has
the aim of providing a better quality of life for families by helping them build homes that provide a sense
of security and well being, teaching then livelihood skills, and organizing them into a model community,
embodying the Filipino “Bayanihan Spirit”;

WHEREAS, the Gawad Kalinga, although started by the CFC, is not a program solely owned by the CFC but a movement
for holistic and sustainable community development that should involve all sectors of the society;

WHEREAS, in 2001, the CITY and the CFC were signatories of the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) entered into
by the different socialized housing stakeholders of Caraga Region under the Philippines-Canada Local
Government Support Program (PC-LGSP) assisted project entitled, “Mobilizing Key Stakeholders in
Implementing Pilot Socialized Housing Projects”, and the CFC entered into another MOA to implement
the Gawad Kalinga program in Pagatpatan, Butuan City;

WHEREAS, for the fiscal year 2003-2004, the PC-LGSP will implement in five LGUs including Butuan City the project
entitled, ”Institutionalizing Socialized Shelter Development in Caraga Region”

WHEREAS, the national office of the PC-LGSP has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the national office of the
CFC to implement the CFC Gawad Kalinga Program in selected LGSP-LGUs including Butuan City;

WHEREAS, the CITY and CFC, in order to attain their respective missions, and perform the roles identified in the MOA
of the PC-LGSP Project, have agreed to enter into this working agreement to implement socialized land,
housing and community development projects, within the territorial jurisdiction of Butuan City, based on
the vision, mission, philosophy, principles and framework of an LGU-led Multisectoral Shelter Program,
herein after referred to as the PROGRAM, building on the Gawad Kalinga approach;

NOW, THEREFORE, it is hereby Agreed By and Among the Parties Hereto That:

ARTICLE I. GENERAL AGREEMENT

Sec. 1 Program Implementation – The parties agree to commit themselves to Collaborate in


implementing the Butuan City – led Multisectoral Shelter Program through:

Sec. 1.1 Formation of a Multisectoral Shelter Program Management Team (MSPMT)


that will set the direction and provide policies for the implementation of the
Multisectoral Shelter Program. The CITY shall issue an executive order creating the
MSPMT. The MSPMT shall be composed of representatives from the CITY, CFC,
LGSP and other key housing stakeholders that the CITY shall choose in coordination
with the CFC and LGSP.
85
Sec. 1.2 The CITY shall form the Multisectoral Shelter Program Executive Agency (MSPEA)
which will be composed of representatives from the CITY, LGSP and CFC. The
MSPEA will implement the policies of the MSPMT and oversee the Multisectoral
Shelter Program project co-directors and program co-managers. The MSPEA shall
recommend to CITY the persons (one each from the CITY and CFC for every
position) the Gawad Kalinga inspired shelter, health, education, livelihood, linkages
and community organizing (Kapit Bahayan) components of the Multisectoral Shelter
Program.

ARTICLE II. ROLE OF THE CITY

Sec. 2. Land Equity- The CITY shall, in addition to the FOUR THOUSAND SQUARE METERS (4,000 sq.m.) that
it initially allocated and designated as the pilot site for Gawad Kalinga project in Barangay Pagatpatan,
shall provide at least ONE HECTARE of land as the site of the Butuan City-led Multisectoral Shelter
Program.

Sec. 3 Land Development – The CITY and/or with the assistance of the National Housing Authority or any
other agency shall be responsible for the development of the sites in accordance with approved
subdivision plan and development permit and the standards set by Batas Pambansa No. 220.

Sec.3.1 CITY shall make available the use of its equipment such as, but not limited to water tanks, dump trucks,
road rollers, graders, and pay loaders for the Gawad Kalinga- inspired Butuan City-led Multisectoral
Shelter Program.

Sec. 4 Off-Site Development – The CITY shall be responsible for the development of the access road and shall
cause the delivery of water and electric power supply services to the project.

Sec. 5 Land Disposition. The CITY shall assign the subdivision lots to qualified families (or HOMEOWNERS)
that will be identified by the CITY and CFC.

Sec.6 Land Documents – The CITY as the repository of land documents shall provide/allow the MSPMT free
access of the land documents and information for the full and effective implementation of the housing
program

Sec.7 The CITY, based on the set of criteria and process developed by the MSPEA and approved by the
MSPMT, the MSPEA shall identify and recommend from among the list of potential HOMEWNERS the
possible recipients of the PROGRAM.

Sec. 7.1 Selection – The CITY shall choose the HOMEOWNERS from the shortlist submitted
by the CFC.

Sec. 8 The CITY shall take active participation in the construction of the Gawad Kalinga-inspired houses and
in the implementation of the GK programs infused in the PROGRAM.

ARTICLE III. ROLE OF THE CFC

Sec. 9 House Construction. The CFC shall commence construction of houses immediately after the signing/
approval of this agreement. The design of the houses shall be low cost, decent and durable..
86
Sec.9.1 House Certificate of Ownership.
9.1.1 Provincial Build & National Build- The CFC shall grant to the
HOMEMAKERS a Certificate of Ownership of the housing unit specifically
for the Provincial and National Build Phases of the PROGRAM. This
Certificate of Ownership shall entitle the HOMEMAKERS to own and
occupy after the latter shall have been able to sign and enter into
agreement with the MSPMT.

9.1.2 Expansion Phase- After the June 1,2003 National Build, Expansion Phase
shall commence. At this stage, the CITY shall grant to the upcoming
HOMEMAKERS a Certificate of Ownership of the housing unit which shall
entitle the HOMEMAKERS to own and occupy after the latter shall have
been able to sign and enter into agreement with the MSPMT.

Sec. 10 LGU Capacity Building – The CFC Shall Share with the CITY its Gawad Kalinga programs, including its
systems and procedures, and work with the CITY in the implementation of the Gawad Kalinga program
and the sub-programs:

SIBOL (pre-schoolers)
� SAGIP (street children)
� SIGA (youth development)
� SIKAP (livelihood)
� Kapitbahayan (neighborhood strengthening)

Sec.11 Administrative/Technical Staff – the CFC shall provide the administrative/technical staff. Volunteer or
paid, to implement all its programs.

ARTICLE IV. ROLE OF THE PC-LGSP

Sec. 12 Capacity Building – The PC-LGSP shall implement capacity building activities for both the CITY and the
CFC, and shall provide funds for the said activities.

Sec.12.1 The PC-LGSP shall assist in strengthening the GK systems and procedures of the
CFC. It shall also assist in strengthening the Housing and Development Office of the
CITY.

Sec. 13 Demonstration Projects – The PC-LGSP shall also provide funds for demonstration project, including
funds for basic services, such as livelihood, water and sanitation, health, and education.

ARTICLE V. PC-LGSP, CITY AND CFC PARTNERSHIP

Sec. 14 The parties, according to their respective capacity and resources shall extend full support to the joint
land and housing program, as well as in the implementation of other Gawad Kalinga programs;

Sec. 15 The parties shall jointly adopt such further system and procedures as may be necessary or expedient to
flesh out this Memorandum of Agreement/Partnership and to implement in full the land, housing and
community development project;
87
Sec.16 This Memorandum of Agreement/Partnership shall serve to establish, enhance and strengthen the
partner relationship among the LGSP, the CITY and the CFC, which is brought together by the common
concern for and commitment to serve the people of God, especially the poorest among the poor,
through a land, housing and community development program;

Sec.17 This Memorandum of Agreement/Partnership shall be effective upon the signing of the same.

Sec. 18 This Memorandum of Agreement/Partnership may be amended only in writing, duly signed by
authorized representatives of all the parties hereto and approved by the Sangguniang Panlungsod.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto, through their duly authorized representatives, have signed on this ______
________ day of ____________, 2003, at Butuan City, Philippines.

CITY OF BUTUAN COUPLES FOR CHRIST


Represented by: Represented by:

HON. LEONIDES THERESA B. PLAZA SALVADOR S. CALO, JR


City Mayor Provincial Area Director

PHILS. CANADA-LGSP
Represented by:

VICTOR A. OZARRAGA
Regional Program Manager

Signed in the presence of:

HON. ANGELO S. CALO MACARIO P. DURANGO,JR


Butuan City Vice-Mayor Gawad Kalinga Provincial Project Director

1st Indorsement
14 May 2003

Respectfully endorsed to the Honorable Members, Sangguniang Panlungsod, this City, through Hon. Angelo S. Calo, Vice
Mayor, Presiding Officer, the herein final draft of the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) regarding the Butuan City-LGSP-
CFC tripartite agreement for the Butuan City-led Multisectoral Shelter Program with the attached basic communication of

88
Mr. Victor A. Ozarraga, Regional Program Manager of LGSP, dated 12 May 2003, hereby requesting for favorable authority
to sign the same.

In lieu of the urgency for the perfection of this MOA as required in the 17-18 May 2003 Provincial Build of the Gawad
Kalinga Program, the undersigned earnestly request that a Special Session be convened to treat this concern.

LEONIDES THERESA B. PLAZA


City Mayor

89
Annex C
MULTISECTORAL APPROACH

GK Advisory Committee

GK Project Team

Media & Information Resource Generation Construction Admin Payback Legal GK Programs

• Advocacy • Design • Finance/ • Permits/


• Follow up / • Training Audit Licenses
Monitoring • Construction • Sponsor • Loan
• Management Relations Processing
• Logistics • Process • Legal
• Landscaping Document Assistance

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Annex D
CONSTRUCTION COMMITTEE

POLICY STATEMENT:

The Construction Committee being the anchor of all the infrastructure concerns of the Balangayan Butuan GK,
shall manage and ensure the adequate and appropriate provision of all the infrastructure and infrastructure-
related needs of the program.

Being as such, this committee shall act on the following functions per infrastructure component to wit:

I. GROUNDBREAKING

A. Operational Structure

1. The Construction Committee composed of the City Government (e.g. CHDO, City Engineer’s
Office, City Architect’s Office, City Administrator’s Office), CFC, LGSP, Key Housing Agencies
(NHA, HLURB, HUDCC), Butuan City Water District and ANECO Representatives ensures:

� the formulation of groundbreaking teams tasked to identify preparatory activities on:

a. document development team to ensure BUILD DOCUMENT requirements


(e.g. Master Development Plan Per Build , House Perspectives, Cost Estimates,
Construction Schedule, build Subdivision Scheme, ) are adequately prepared

b. site development team to ensure that road networks and homelots for the BUILDS
are filled, and appropriate survey works conducted on a PER BUILD basis;

c. groundbreaking collaterals preparation team (e.g. capsule, tripod, shovel, stage,


tent, chairs, sound system, streamers, parking area, and the likes) are pre-identified
for Administrative Committee to secure and manage on a “per groundbreaking”
basis;

B. Process

1. the Ground Breaking will be celebrated through a brief ceremony to include history and
Work Program of the GK-Balangayan Butuan BUILD, BUILD DOCUMENTS presentation, and
fellowship among BUILD PARTNERS

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2. The Ground Breaking will be participated in by all BUILD partners composed of technical,
financial, and home partners

3. Ensuing right after the Ground Breaking will be staking and lay-outing in preparation for the
actual BUILD

C. Results

1. Two (2) has. of land officially marked for actual development;

2. At the end of the Ground Breaking, all required construction documents for test-building
would have been prepared and made available;

3. Official start-up for site development

II. TEST BUILD

The test build shall include construction of four (4) housing units equipped with landscaping, outdoor kitchen, and
laundry pens

A. Operational Structure

Per Sponsor Point Person shall be identified to coordinate with the construction committee
regarding sponsors concerns on house construction as well as undertake withdrawals of
construction materials from the bunkhouse.

The Executing Agency Chair directs the Construction Committee to undertake the test build and
install a Construction Secretariat Support in-charge to enhance accuracy of the prepared program
of works, materials and labor estimates for the housing unit construction, outdoor kitchen,
landscaping, laundry pen and water tub.

The Test Build in-charge installs:

1. An overall foreman for the construction of four (4) housing units as one set of units that will
share a common septic tank;

2. four (4) skilled workers (e.g. one mason, one welder, electrician and one carpenter) and two
(2) helpers per housing unit (please refer to attached program of works and cost estimates)
shall be identified from the list of 1st Build homepartners

3. one (1) bunkhouse personnel for materials receipt and release

B. Process

1. CONSTRUCTION

� The construction team proceeds in simultaneously building the four (4) units following the work program under the
supervision of the foreman
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The construction foreman shall be rendering reports weekly to the Secretariat Support Anchor for Construction who
will be updating the Committee Chair for any upgrades or updates therein

� Daily monitoring of the construction activities by the foreman will enhance the prepared work program and cost
estimates

2. BUNKHOUSE MANAGEMENT

� The bunkhouse in-charge shall receive on document delivered items by the sponsors and release the same on a per
day basis

� The unit’s foreman shall advise the sponsor’s point person on what materials will be withdrawn from the bunkhouse
for the following day’s use only

� Only sponsor’s point person shall be allowed by the bunkhouse in-charge to withdraw construction materials

� The bunkhouse in-charge shall report updates to the Secretariat Support Anchor weekly, who will provide updates
to the committee chair and then, the executing agency

3. LANDSCAPING, OUTDOOR KITCHEN, AND CLOTHESLINE DEVELOPMENT

� The housing unit construction foreman shall extend his functions to the development of the landscape, outdoor
kitchen and clothesline and as such, shall render weekly reports of the same to the Secretariat Support Anchor for
Construction

� For test build phase purposes, labor requirements for landscaping, outdoor kitchen, clothesline development will
be provided by homepartners on a voluntary basis (pahina) for them to comply with their Pre-Occupancy Agreement
requirements

� Materials for landscaping such as boulders, paint and sand shall be provided by the City Government while cement
will be provided by other Balangayan Butuan partners and planters, by homepartners

� Laborers who are also the homepartners, along with the construction foreman will proceed with the development of
the landscape, outdoor kitchen and clothesline following the work programs prepared for each

C. Results

1. after the test build, four (4) housing units will be built, equipped with landscaping,
outdoor kitchen, and clothesline

2. systems and processes are installed and tested ready for bigger scale construction

3. prepared construction documents such as perspectives, floor plan, cost estimates and
work program enhanced and tailored-fit to the pacing of existing workforce and other
resources

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III. BUILD: ACTUAL CONSTRUCTION (survey works, road networks, homelots filling, house, landscape,
drainage, water and power supply, kitchen, water tub, clothesline

Operational Structure and Process

� Construction Committee shall supervise the Build through the Secretariat Support Anchor for Construction who will
report to the Committee Chair concerns on construction

� Sponsors procurement as well as Balangayan Butuan procured materials shall be turned over for storing at the
bunkhouse under the custody of two (2) Bunkhouse personnel

� Number of Point Person is expanded as more sponsors partner in the Build. The Point Person maintains function to
retrieve materials from the bunkhouse and release salaries during Saturdays

� As in the test build, construction work must first be offered to Balangayan Butuan homepartners before offering it to
external workers

� The tested and customized construction document-guideline (please see Annexes) shall be administered in the
entire construction stretch

� Daily feedbacking by the overall foreman to the Secretariat Support Anchor for Construction is expected

� The Support Anchor shall provide weekly or as the need arises, feedback to the Committee Chair. The Committee
Chair feedbacks to the Executing Agency Chair for appropriate action.

Construction mode may either be:

1. by administration . The tasks of construction is managed by the Balangayan Butuan Executing


Agency through the necessary committees:

� Construction, to implement tested plans and construction systems


� Administration, to facilitate availability and compensation of personnel using the BB Program Committee Directory
of Skills and Construction Committee Sweat-Equity computation respectively
� BB Program Committee to facilitate addressing concerns that are homepartners’ related

2. contracted out to external workers at the early stages of the program given the reality that
the program is still on the process of building its Directory of Skills for construction needs.
Nevertheless, homepartners assigned to specific homelots must provide labor to their
respective units

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IV. INSPECTION AND TURN-OVER

A. Completed units will be subjected to two (2) inspections, one from the City Architect’s and City
Engineers’ Team, another will be from the homepartners together with respective foreman and BB
Program Committee representative

B. A Certificate of Completion shall be issued to external contractors if found that every item is of
standards based on the PMT approved specifications

C. The Homepartners on the other hand, if satisfied with their respective inspection, will sign in
conformation to the Homepartners’ Inspection Report

When all partners are satisfied, the units will be turned-over to the Balangayan Butuan management

95
Annex E
COMMUNICATION PLAN FOR THE BALANGAYAN BUTUAN:
PANIMALAY SA KATAWHAN GK COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

SHELTER COMPONENT

I. INTRODUCTION

A. Executive Summary

The Balangayan Butuan Program requires the development of a clear communication strategy to ensure that
consistent and accurate information is conveyed. This plan is developed to maximize public outreach and
participation and to be flexible so that all or portions of the plan can be implemented according to changing
needs.

The communication strategy is developed to focus on:

1. Intended beneficiaries of the program


2. Specific groups and individuals who are potential sponsors
3. Program partners and coordinating agencies
4. Members of the public in general
5. Members of the tri-media that should be contacted and informed

B. Background

Communication is essential, both to inform the public and constituents and to receive valuable input.
Communication ranges from personal interaction to prepared documents, maintenance of web sites, and
facilitation of messages through the media.

The Communication Plan is essential to the Balangayan Butuan Program, aiding in clarity of message, inclusion
of the public and stakeholders in the program and ensuring a harmonious effort for all concerned.

This plan is intended to serve as a road map, a guide to achieve the communication goals of the Program over
the next months of this initial phase. Like every plan, it is an organic, living creation that constantly needs to
be nurtured and updated as circumstances change and goals are achieved.

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C. Situation Analysis

The Balangayan Butuan Program which envisions to assist the 6000 families of the CARBDP affected areas is
still in the inception phase, yet, the provision of houses needs to be fast tracked due to the imminent danger
posed to the lives of the settlers in the area.

The stakeholders, including the beneficiaries, sponsors, program partners; the media and the public in
general still do not have a clear concept of what the program is all about yet it is an imperative that all
concerned should understand the concept that drives the program.

Balangayan Butuan is an LGU-led Multisectoral Community Development Program building on the Gawad
Kalinga of the CFC approach to socialized housing. Its goal is to provide a better quality of life for families
by helping them build homes that provide a sense of security and well-being, teaching them livelihood skills,
and organizing them into a model community, embodying the Filipino “Bayanihan Spirit.”

The Balangayan Butuan program is not intended as solely a government endeavor but a commitment from
various stakeholders who take it upon themselves to share their extra resources so that others may be
uplifted from subhuman conditions. The Butuan City LGU’s resources are limited by many pressing priorities.
The Balangayan Butuan program needs assistance from benevolent donors for it to achieve what it has set out
to do.

A well-organized communication agenda is a good tool for achieving the objectives of the program.

II. Key components of the Communication Plan

A. Goals and Objectives

1. Inform and involve as many stakeholders as possible, representing a diverse range of interest groups.

Objectives:

a. To inform key stakeholders about how they can actively participate in the Balangayan Program.
b. To cultivate personal relationships with key groups and individuals and create a flow of accurate
information back and forth throughout the process.
c. To raise awareness about important issues on housing and development
d. To garner broad public involvement and support for Balangayan Butuan Program

2. Print and electronic media covering the Program will communicate correctly and clearly the messages of
Program, helping to inform the public and key stakeholders

Objectives:

a. To educate key media representatives and provide a comprehensive base of knowledge that leads to
informed reporting on the Balangayan Program.
b. To cultivate personal relationships with key media and create a flow of accurate information.

97
c. To create and implement an efficient method of generating and submitting announcements of
meetings and public events to print and electronic media outlets.
d. To achieve maximum exposure in the media to increase public awareness of the Balangayan Program

3. Educate and inform community groups and the general public about the program

Objectives:

a. To build public awareness and promote discussion about the housing programs for underprivileged
citizens
b. To inform community groups about how they and their members can actively participate in the
program
c. To garner broad public involvement and support for program

B. Audiences

1. Intended beneficiaries of the program

One target audience of the Communication Plan is the intended beneficiaries who are settlers of
the CARBDP affected areas which are in the danger zone. They need to be informed to facilitate
understanding about the program and lessen friction that might arise out of misinformation and
misinterpretation

2. Specific groups and individuals who are potential sponsors

Some organizations, academic institutions, funding institutions and private individuals who are willing
to help the program through house sponsorship will also are targeted by the promotional campaigns
contained in the Communication Plan. Efforts should be made not only to develop relationships with key
individuals and organizations but also to encourage them to get other people or members of the group to
support the program.

3. Program partners and coordinating agencies

As a multistakeholder endeavor, the program needs to constantly update program partners on


developments so that they can fully participate in the implementation of activities and in the achievement
of program objectives. These groups often have effective networks for reaching the public and getting
them involved in the process.

4. Members of the public in general

The General Public needs to be informed about the program, its objectives and strategies so that they will
be able to give their support.

5. Members of the tri-media that should be contacted and informed

The media is a potent tool in broadening the mass base and increasing their awareness and understanding
of the program. It is critical to maintain regular communication with these key groups.

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C. Methodology

The goal of the communications plan is to involve all stakeholders in every stage of the implementation
process. The following strategies will be used to achieve the goals of the program:

1. Employ a multi-media and multi-level communication approach by developing and using a number
of communications activities employing various techniques and tools.

2. Use interactive communications tools and techniques wherever and whenever possible to involve
target publics in the communications process and increase their commitment to the program and belief in
its core values

D. Tools

This section describes the specific tactics -- communications tools and techniques -- that will be used in the
communications program.

1. Breakfast Forum. The Breakfast Forum is a meeting with potential sponsors over breakfast to discuss the
Program.

2. Personal Visits. Personal visits are conducted for individuals deemed to be potential sponsors who
would like to have a one-on-one discussion on the program

3. Build Forum. The Build forum is a meeting of sponsors and potential sponsors to give them a brief
overview of the program, to discuss issues and concerns and make or renew sponsor’s commitment.

4. Messages and talking points: Key messages are specific “take home” messages that should be stated at
every opportunity. Talking points provide the program advocates and action force with program-approved
language that can be used to respond to specific issues.

5. Website: Updates, notices, background information and maps can easily be posted on the site website,
creating a location where media can easily learn about issues, updates of the program. This site can also
be used to archive media releases, correspondence, and other materials.

6. Press Conferences

7. Press/Briefing kits

8. Brochure: This brochure provides an introduction to the program.

9. Informational one-pagers: Information presented on key subjects. Informational one-pagers will be ever
changing, reflecting the program’s development, issues and concerns. They may be included in briefing
kits or handed out on their own.

10. Maps, charts and perspective, depicting the resettlement location and house unit color scheme.

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11. FAQ sheets: Frequently asked questions based upon questions asked by the public.

12. Editorial fact sheets: Information in bullet format for editorial use. Facts, figures, and easily understood
pieces of key information. The intended use is to provide writers easy access to necessary information in
a useful format. Fact sheets will be ever changing, reflecting the topic of interest. They may be included in
press kits or handed out on their own.

13. Press releases: Sent out to announce an event or development. May be used prior to or concurrent with
an event

14. Calendar press releases: Simple “who, what, where” format announcing public meetings, activities to
concerned stakeholders

15. Media advisories: Activity or event notice sent to media and constituents with the intent to have them
cover the story. Notice to editors and assignment editors that a potential story opportunity will take place
and their coverage is encouraged. They can also be used to provide public notice of an event.

16. PowerPoint presentation: Computer presentation on the program

17. Feature Story and/or Op-Eds Topics/Information: Ideas for possible program-related feature stories to
appear in local newspapers, publications will be identified and provided to writers/reporters to promote
awareness about Program

18. Flyers: Flyers and handbills will periodically be prepared for posting on community bulletin boards and
provided to locations throughout the area announcing upcoming Balangayan Program events as well as
key public meetings.

19. General Mailing/Distribution Lists: In order to keep both groups and individuals informed of upcoming
public meetings and activities, the site will establish a general mailing/email/fax list that can be used to
periodically disseminate such information.

20. Radio and TV spots

E. Resources

Currently, resources to implement the Communication Plan are taken from the budget allocation of the City
Housing and Development Office.

There may be exceptions as programs are developed and unseen opportunities unfold, but the current level of
personnel and budget is expected to produce the desired results at least through FY97.

The major question mark is in the area of the City’s television station, since equipment needs are considerable and the
future unclear at this time.

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Audience Message Strategy/ Frequency
Tools and Duration

Program Stakeholders, Impart the importance & Orientations Once a week


Management partners urgency on problems at hand Video
which is providing decent presentations
housing to the homeless and
that priority of more than
6,000 families living within the
CARBDP affected project.

Beneficiaries should give


Beneficiary importance and appreciate Once a week
Outreach the efforts not only to the Orientations
Beneficiaries implementing government Video
agencies but also to the presentations
community that help in
providing them decent shelter.

Sponsorship Sponsors, donors Donors will understand why Orientations Once a week
Blitz they have to extend assistance Video
to this effort because in the Presentations
long run they will also benefit
the impact on the reformed
community.

Media Media Partners Giving our media partners Media Relations Daily
Promotions the opportunity to help in News Media
our problem that beset in our Guide
society. News Releases
News Conferences
Special Events
Prints
Once a week

Community Public The problem does not belong Orientations Once a week
Outreach to one sector only, but actually Video
belong to the entire society Presentations
because it affects the whole
community, so every individual
within the community should
extend a hand for the solution
of the problem

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Annex F
RESOURCE MOBILIZATION PLAN FOR BALANGAYAN BUTUAN
GAWAD KALINGA APPROACH

I. INTRODUCTION

Ga’am Butuan is an LGU-led Multisectoral Shelter Program building on the Gawad Kalinga of the CFC
approach to socialized housing. The program’s cardinal principle is institutionalizing the giving of resources
and development of the culture of sharing in building integrated, holistic and sustainable communities.
Its goal is to provide a better quality of life for families by helping them build homes that provide a sense
of security and well-being, teaching them livelihood skills, and organizing them into a model community,
embodying the Filipino “Bayanihan Spirit.”

For starters, it aims to build homes for each of the displaced families from the CARBDP affected areas who
will be relocated in Barangay Pagatpatan. As a multi-stakeholder undertaking, each partner has a role to
play, with the local government unit of Butuan providing the land equity, land development services, use
of equipment in the construction of houses, development of access roads, electrification and water facilities
and identification of beneficiaries, land disposition, and documentation. It takes active participation in
the construction of houses and capacity building. Other parties including the Couples for Christ and the
beneficiaries help in the construction of houses. Private persons are also tapped for housing materials and
construction supplies.

The Ga’am Butuan program is not intended as solely a government endeavor but a commitment from various
stakeholders who take it upon themselves to share their extra resources so that others may be uplifted from
subhuman conditions. The Butuan City LGU’s resources are limited by many pressing priorities. The Ga’am
Butuan program needs assistance from benevolent donors for it to achieve what it has set out to do.

Thus, it needs to formulate a resource generation plan for a focused and comprehensive accessing of
resources.

II. OBJECTIVES

The Program’s resource mobilization plan has three primary objectives:

A. To ensure predictable, adequate and stable growth of program resources;


B. To expand the donor base
C. To increase the amount of resources currently provided by the Local Government Unit for the Program
through other sources

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Taken together, these objectives will reinforce and strengthen the Program’s ability to respond to the urgent
need for housing units from the families living in the CARBDP affected areas.
Using its sound program framework as the foundation for its fundraising strategy, Ga’am Butuan will work
to secure greater funding for the construction of housing units, provision of livelihood opportunities and
enhancement of education and health services in the relocation area.

III. STRATEGIES

To achieve its objectives, the Program shall employ the following strategies:

D. Develop a schedule for resource mobilization

E. Compile a list of potential partners and assess their potential roles in resource mobilization

F. Develop and produce a funding appealing information package in coordination with the Media and
Information Committee.

G. In coordination with the Media and Info Committee, the Resource Generation Committee shall launch
well-targeted advocacy campaigns intended to inform a broad target about the program.

H. Develop a core group of influentials and advocates who have access to funding sources

I. Conduct visits/discussions with potential donors

J. Explore alternative funding approaches


IV. POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

K. All resource mobilization activities that will be undertaken must be sanctioned by the Ga’am Program
Management Team

L. A record of these activities should be kept including the results and outputs derived.

M. Any commitment made by a sponsor shall be put in writing by signing the commitment slip indicating the
kind of donation to be made, namely:

1. Number of housing units


2. Labor force
3. Construction materials
4. Program support streamer or banner

N. The sponsor shall indicate the mode of delivery

103
O. Monetary contributions shall be deposited in the Ga’am Trust Fund

P. For contributions of construction materials, donors have the option of depositing these at the Program
bunkhouse in Barangay Pagatpatan, or deliver the materials to the construction site as these are needed.

Q. Institutional contributions or contributions of funding agencies shall follow the donor agencies
guidelines.

104
Annex G
CFC Gawad Kalinga
Multisectoral Partnership
MANUAL ON THE ACCOUNTING SYSTEM FOR GK-MISSIONVILLE

MISSIONVILLE
Tibanga, lligan City

August 29, 2003

TO: GAWAD KALINGA-MISSIONVILLE COUNCIL

SUBJ: MANUAL ON THE ACCOUNTING SYSTEM FOR GK~MISSI0NVILLE

In line with our thrust of ensuring he complete reporting and recording of our Funds, we have developed the Manual on
the Accounting System for GK-Missionville. This Manual will show a clear system of accountability for the management
of funds and property of GK-Missionville to protect the integrity of Couples for Christ and Government Partners in the
implementation of Gawad Kalinga Project. This will guide us also in directing our day to day operation for transparency
and proper reporting.

Because of the rapid implementation of the project with the support of multisectoral partners, supporting documents of
related financial transactions are done constructively to adhere to the proper system of accounting. Hence, form designs
formulated are in the manual to systematize recording.

This manual shall be used by GK-Missionville thus be reviewed periodically and accordingly revised to suit the particular
requirement of the project.

May we request formal approval in the implementation of the Manual. God bless us all in our work of NATION-
BUILDING!

In Christ,
Noted by:

Finance Team:
CAMILO G. EMPLEO
Finance-Chairman
MARILOU A. ENGRACIA
TEODOMERO CORONEL

APPROVED FOR IMPLEMENTATION:

_______________________________
105
MANUAL ON THE
ACCOUNTING SYSTEM FOR
GK-MISSIONVILLE

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I INTRODUCTION Page

Sec. 01 Objectives of the Manual 1


Sec. 02 General Finance Guidelines 1

PART II GENERAL FINANCE GUIDELINES


Sec. 03 General Finance Guidelines 1-2

PART III ACCOUNTING OF FUNDS &DONATIONS FROM


CFC COMMUNITY, PRIVATE INDIVIDUALS,
ENTITIES &NGOs -Handled by Couples For Christ

A. CASH RECEIPTS SYSTEMS AND PROCEDURES

Sec. 04 Depository Account 3


Sec. 05 Sources of Revenues and Cash Receipts 3
Sec. 06 Finance/Accounting Unit 3
Sec. 07 Official Receipts 3
Sec. 08 Deposit of Cash Receipt 3
Sec. 09 Direct Deposit of Donations to the Bank 3
Sec. 10 Bank Reconciliation 3
Sec. 11 Cash Receipt Process 4

B. DISBURSEMENTS SYTEMS AND PROCEDURES

Sec. 12 Disbursements 4
Sec. 13 Request For Funding 4
Sec. 14 Disbursement Voucher 4
Sec. 15 Check Disbursement Process 5
Sec. 16 Payment In Cash 5
Sec. 17 Liquidation of Cash Advances 5
Sec. 18 Return of Cash and Reimbursements 6
Sec. 19 Cash Disbursement Process 6

106
Page

PART IV ACCOUNTING OF FUNDS & DONATIONS FROM


GOVERNMENT PARTNERS -Handled by LGU

A. CASH RECEIPTS SYSTEMS AND PROCEDURES


Sec. 20 Sources of Funds 7
Sec. 2l Calamity Fund Release 7
Sec. 22 Release of PDAF 7

B. DISBURSEMENTS SYTEMS AND PROCEDURES


Sec. 23 Disbursing Officer 7
Sec. 24 Disbursement Process 8

PART V ACCOUNTING OF NON-MONETARY DONATIONS


Sec. 25 Donation of Housing Unit 8
Sec. 26 Other Non-Monetary Donations 8

PART VI INVENTORY PROCESS AND CONTROL


Sec. 27 Inventory Process 9
Sec. 28 Excess Inventory . 9

PART VII OTHER ACCOUNTING POLICIES & GUIDEL1NES


Sec. 29 Petty Cash Fund 9-10
Sec. 30 Fundraising Projects 10
Sec. 31 Financial Reports 11

ANNEXES

Annex No.
1 Official Receipt (OR)
2 Disbursement Voucher (DV)
3 Liquidation Report (LR)
4 Request For Funding (RFF)
5 Donation Cost Profile (DCF)
6 Acknowledgement Receipt Form (ARF)
7 Equipment Utilization Report (EUR)
8 Report of Disbursement (RD)
9 Petty Cash Voucher (PCV)

107
Part I

INTRODUCTION

Sec. 01 Objective of the Manual – The GK - Missionville Accounting System Manual presents the basic policies,
guidelines and procedures to be adopted in its day to day transactions and operation. It seeks to provide the
key guidelines in developing an appropriate accounting system. The objectives of the manual are to prescribe
the following:

a) Show a clear system of accountability for the management of the funds and property of GK-Missionville
to protect the integrity of Couples for Christ and multisectoral partners in the implementation of Gawad
Kalinga Project.
b) Uniform guidelines and procedures in accounting for the funds consistent with audit guidelines.
c) Design of accounting forms as tools for transparency, accountability and proper reporting.
d) Preparation of financial statements for presentation to GK – Missionville Council, donors and other end-
users.

Sec. 02 Coverage - This manual shall be used ‘by GK-Missionville thus be reviewed periodically and accordingly be
revised to suit the particular requirement of the Project.

Part II

GENERAL FINANCE GUIDELINES

Sec. 03 General Finance Guidelines – The Manual has the following basic
financial guidelines, to wit:

a. Memorandum of Agreement & Creation of Finance Team – Couples for Christ (CFC) and the City Of
lligan (LGU) has agreed to implement jointly, in coordination with other appropriate government
agencies and private entities, the GK program thru a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA). Administrative
Order 19, Series of 2002 by the City Mayor directed the City Accountant as Head of the Project Finance
Committee. Two (2) personnel from the City Accounting Department are also assigned at the project site
on a fulltime basis to work on the accounting, financial reporting &other related activities.

b. One Fund Concept- This system adopts the one fund concept. Separate fund accounting shall be
done only when specifically required by the Project when otherwise necessitated by circumstances and
recommended by the Finance Team, subject to the approval by the GK-Missionville Council.

c. Depository Accounts- To account systematically and clearly all funds intended for GK-Missionville and the
sources of all its funding, there are two separate depository checking accounts being maintained:

1. For Funds & Monetary Donations from Couples for Christ Community, Private Individuals, Entities
& NGOs - Depository bank is at Bank of Philippine Island C/A# 9355-8175-01 under the name of
Couples for Christ-Gawad Kalinga. CFC maintains only one account for all its GK funds in all sectors
of Iligan City. Certification from Home Office Manila is needed in opening an account. There will
be two authorized signatories on all checks. Any two signatures from the incumbent CFC Provincial
Council members are required.

108
2. For Funds & Monetary Donations from Government Partners –Depository bank is at Banco Filipino
CA# 10581-700181-9 under the name of Gawad Kalinga- Missionville. There will be two authorized
signatories on all checks by the following approving incumbent officers:

Franklin M. Quijano - Chairman, GK Missionville Council


Camilo G. Empleo – City Accountant
Ernesto M. Balat – City Treasurer
Carlos D. Subang - Vice-Chairman, GKM Council
Joe Arthur E. Aberilla - Project Director

d. Funds should be utilized for expenses as specified in the approved project budget and bill of materials.
If expenditures exceeds allocated amount, Resource Generation Team in coordination with Finance
Team shall see to it that other funds are available to finish the project. If there will be savings on cost,
any savings shall be used to purchase materials for the construction of additional houses and shall be
supported with proper documents.

e. Procurement of materials shall undertake the standard procedures required by the Commission on
Audit: Canvass for purchases not more than P50,000.00; bidding/sealed canvass for purchases more than
P50,000.00.

f. All non-monetary donations like labor/services and materials shall be monetized and assigned cost for
recognition in the records and reports. Gawad Kalinga-Missionville Council reserves the right to decline
from receiving donations from individuals/groups/companies that do not uphold the values that Couples
for Christ stands for.

g. Books of Accounts shall be maintained monthly: Cash Receipts; Cash/Check Disbursement Books, General
Journal & Ledger.

h. Financial transactions are recorded on a timely basis. All financial transactions are supported by
documents.

PART III

ACCOUNTING OF FUNDS & DONATIONS FROM CFC COMMUNITY, PRIVATE


INDIVIDUALS, ENTITIES & NGOs - (HANDLED BY COUPLES FOR CHRIST)

A. CASH RECEIPTS SYSTEM AND PROCEDURES

Sec. 04 Depository Accounts - Only one depository account in line with the one fund concept is maintained by CFC
for all its Gawad Kalinga Projects in Iligan City. Hence, all funds and monetary donations for GK-Missionville
is deposited intact at Bank of Philippine Island checking account no. 9355-8175-01 in the name of CFC-Gawad
Kalinga.

Sec. 05 Sources of Funds and Cash Receipts for GK-Missionville –The main
sources of funds that are received by CFC for GK-Missionville in the implementation, sustenance and
expansion of the Project are as follows:

1. “Padugo” Cash donations from CFC community in Iligan


2. Cash donations from CFC community in the Philippines and some foreign countries
109
3. Cash donations from private individuals (non - CFC members)
4. Cash donations from private companies & NGOs
5. Cash donations from Priority Development Assistance Fund (PDAF) of Legislators (i.e. Sen. Francis
Pangilinan)
6. Others i.e. Fund raising projects

Sec. 06 Finance/Accounting Unit - A Finance Officer and a Bookkeeper compose the Finance Unit of CFC-GK. They
directly report to the GK Management Team. All Gawad Kalinga Projects of CFC is monitored and accounted
for separately thru subsidiary ledgers per area including that of GK-Missionville.

Sec. 07 Official Receipts - CFC Accounting Unit is responsible for the cash receipts and subsequent deposit to
the banks all cash receipts for OK-Missionvile. The receipt shall be in the form of pre-numbered Official
Receipt (OR). The OR is issued in 2 copies: OR-l (original) to Donor/Payee; OR-2 (duplicate) to Bookkeeper/
Accounting.

Sec. 08 Deposit of Cash Receipt - CFC Accounting Unit shall deposit intact all collections with the authorized
depository bank daily or not later than the next banking day. Deposit Slips shall be done in 2 copies: Original
- Bank; 2 –Accounting.

Sec. 09 Direct Deposit of Donations to the Bank - Donors who wish to deposit their donations direct to the Bank
usually informs CFC Center in advance of their cash donations. Finance Officer shall confirm deposit and issue
OR. Anonymous donations are accounted for during bank reconciliation.

Sec. 10 Bank Reconciliation - To determine the accuracy of the Cash in Bank balances, a monthly reconciliation of the
book and bank is done monthly by the CFC Accounting Unit. Bank statements are required to be filed monthly
by Bookkeeper.Sec. 11 Cash Receipt Process - The cash receipt process as follows:

PROCESS PERSON RESPONSIBLE


a) Receives cash and issues Official Receipt Finance Officer/CFC Accounting Unit
b) Deposit collection in the authorized
depository bank. Records deposit in the Finance Officer/CFC Accounting Unit
Cashbook-Cash in bank
c) Forward to Bookkeeper copies of ORs and Finance Officer/CFC Accounting Unit
validated deposit slips.
d) Prepare Journal Vouchers (JV), record in
the Cash Receipt Book, Subsidiary Ledger Bookkeeper/Accounting Unit
Per Donor (SL) and General Ledger (GL).
Prepares Monthly Bank Reconciliation
Statement

The CFC Finance Officer authorized to handle cash and/or accountabilities is bonded. The bond should
be adequate in amount to cover possible losses or shortages that may arise in the handling of cash and/or other
accountabilities.

110
B. DISBURSEMENTS SYSTEMS AND PROCEDURES

Sec. 12 Disbursements - Disbursements of GK-Missionville funds refer to the settlement of payables and obligations.
Disbursements shall be paid by check supported with pre-numbered Disbursements Vouchers (DV). All
disbursements are made by check prepared by CFC Accounting Unit.

Sec. 13 Request For Funding - In payment of obligations, the Finance Officer assigned at the Project site prepares the
Request for Funding (RFF) per donor/project. RFF is a summary of vouchers per donor with corresponding
supporting documents, properly endorsed for payment by the Project Monitoring Team duly approved by
the Project Director and Vice-Chairman of GKM Council. Approval of RFF and vouchers as to the validity and
propriety of the disbursement shall require the following:
a. Supporting documents (SD) pertaining to the disbursement.
b. Review of the supporting documents by the Accounting Unit of CFC.
c. Approval by the Vice Chairman of GKM or in the absence, his authorized approving officer.

Sec. 14 Disbursement Voucher - Disbursement vouchers (DV) are pre-numbered and prepared in two copies: CV-
1 (original) to payee; CV-2 (duplicate) to Bookkeeper/Accounting. Schedule of submission of RFF is every
Monday and Wednesday and check issuances are made on the following day.

111
Sec. 15 Check Disbursement Process - The steps in disbursements through issuance of check is shown below:

PROCESS PERSON RESPONSIBLE


a) Gathers SD and submit to Finance Officer Program Manager/ Project Monitoring
1 (FO 1) at Project Site for voucher and Team/ Concerned Supplier
RFF preparation.
b) Checks completeness of SD. Prepares
voucher in 2 copies and attach SD. KM-Finance Officer
Prepares RFF. Forwards voucher & RFF to
Approving Officers.
c) Approves transaction and returns vouchers Project Director / GKM Vice Chairman
&RFF to Finance Officer.
d) FO1 forwards RFF & vouchers to CFC GKM-Finance Officer
Accounting Unit for check preparation.
e) Reviews RFF & SD, prepares DV and CFC Accounting Unit
check and forward to Approving Officers &
Check Signatories
f) Approves and sign RFF, DV & check CFC Approving Officers
g) Record check in the Check Register and
release check to claimant. Stamps “PAID” CFC Accounting Unit
the check and SDs. Forwards DV (Orig
copy) and SDs. to FOI; Files DV (copy-2).
h) Receives DV & SDs, checks if stamped
“PAID”. Records DV in the Cash GKM-Finance Officer
Disbursement Book and posts to SL
and GL. Files Documents and prepares
summary of disbursements. At the
completion of the project, prepares project
status/ completion report.
i) Conducts monthly reconciliation of cash CFC Accounting Unit &
book balances and SL per donor. GKM-Finance Officers

Sec. 16 Payment in Cash - Disbursement by cash shall be made from a cash advance drawn by a special disbursing
officer based en duly approved RFF & DV. This shall be recorded through a debit to Cash - Disbursing Officer
and a credit to Cash in Bank The cash advance should be utilized for expenses as specified in the approved DV
and should be controlled based on budget of expenditures.

Sec. 17 Liquidation of Cash Advances - To account for the disbursements from cash advances, the Disbursing Officer
shall prepare the Liquidation Report (LR) and submit the original and duplicate copy with vouchers to
the Finance Officer. The Finance Officer shall check and verify the report including completeness of the
supporting documents, signs the report and forward to the Project Director for approval. After the approval,
LR is forwarded to the Accountant and records the same in the Cash Disbursement Journal. Cash advances

112
shall be liquidated within 3 days from release of funds or completion of the project. Delay in submission
shall be explained in writing. No Officer is allowed to cash advance unless previous cash advance has been
liquidated.

Sec. 18 Return of Cash and Reimbursements - For liquidation where the amount of cash advance is equal to or more
than the expenses incurred, the LR shall be prepared by the Officer and comply Sec. 17. Cash on hand shall
immediately be returned to the CFC Center for issuance of OR. In case the amount of cash advance is less than
the expenses incurred, a DV shall be prepared to liquidate the previous cash advance and serve as a claim for
reimbursement of the deficiency in amount.

Sec. 19 Cash Disbursement Process - Disbursement process out of cash advances is as follows:

PROCESS PERSON RESPONSIBLE


a) Perform the same process based on Responsible Person
procedures stated in Sec 15 Steps a to h on
Check Processing Procedures
b) Encash checks and pay expenses. Disbursing Officer
c) Return unused cash to CFC Center. An
official receipt (OR) shall be issued to Disbursing Officer
acknowledge the return of unused cash and
indicate check no. of cash advance granted
on the face of OR. Record the refund as
credit to cash advance and attach OR to the
Cashbook-Cash Advances
d) Prepare Liquidation Report, attach SDs and
copy of OR for unused cash advance to CFC Disbursing Officer
Center. Sign “Certified Correct” portion
of Liquidation Report and submit to CFC
Center Accounting Unit.
e) Prepare JV to record the liquidation of
cash advance. Record JV in the Cash CFC Accounting Unit I
Disbursement. Post monthly to the GL/SL. Finance Officer
Files documents for audit.

113
PART IV

ACCOUNTING OF FUNDS & CASH DONATIONS FROM


GOVERNMENT PARTNERS (HANDLED BY LGU)

A. CASH RECEIPTS SYTEM AND PROCEDURES

Sec. 20 Sources of Funds and Cash Receipts- The main sources of funds that are received from government partners
for GK - Missionville in the implementation, sustenance and expansion of the Project are as follows:
1. Calamity Fund from LGD (allocation from 5% reserve from Annual City Budget
2. Priority Development Assistance Fund (PDAF) from Legislators
3. Others - PDAF from GMA

Sec. 21 Calamity Fund Release- Availability of calamity fund for use in the construction of houses is made thru cash
advance subject to liquidation. The cash advance process is supported with proper and legal documents i.e.
declaration of calamity in the area; SP Resolution on the granting of release. The regular standard procedure of
cash advance processing using NGAS is being adopted.

Sec. 22 Release of PDAF - Availability of PDAF from legislators and other Government Officials for use in the site
development and construction of houses is made thru cash advance subject to liquidation. The release of
the funds thru cash advance is supported with Special Advise Release Order (SARO) from the Legislature in
coordination with Department of Budget. (DBM). DBM sends notice of funding to LGU confirming that cash is
available for use. The regular standard procedure of cash advance processing using NGAS is being adopted.

B. DISBURSEMENTS SYSTEMS AND PROCEDURES

Sec. 23 Disbursing Officer - Disbursements of GK-Missionville funds refer to the settlement of payables and
obligations. The person who draw cash advance shall act as the Disbursing Officer and applies the standard procedure
of cash disbursement using NGAS.

Sec. 24 Disbursement Process. - Disbursement process out of cash advances is as follows:

PROCESS PERSON RESPONSIBLE


a) Perform the process of cash advance based
on NGAS. Disbursing Officer
b) Receives check from LGU cashier. Disbursing Officer
c) Gathers SD and submit to Finance Officer Concerned Supplier / Program Manager
(FO) at Project Site.
d) Checks completeness of SD. Prepares
voucher in 2 copies and attach SD. Prepares Finance Officer
RFF in 2 copies. Forwards voucher & RFF
to Approving Officers.
e) Approves transaction and returns vouchers Project Director / GKM Vice Chairman
& RFF to FO.

114
f) Forwards RFF, vouchers and SDs to Finance Officer
Disbursing Officer for payment. .
g) Checks validity/completeness. Pay expenses.
Returns 2Ddcopy of RFF & vouchers to Disbursing Officer
FO. Process SD for liquidation applying
NGAS.
h) Records transactions in the books and files Finance Officer
documents.

PART V

ACCOUNTING OF NON-MONETARY DONATIONS

RECOGNITION OF DONATION

Sec. 25 DONATION OF HOUSING UNIT - Several donors construct houses on site and turns over to GK-Missionville
upon completion of the units i.e. LGUs by department, La Salle, DEP-ED, GRANEX etc. Donor accomplishes
the Donation Cost Profile Form and submits to GKM Finance Officer as basis for recording of cost and donated
capital. All donations should be acknowledged by a certificate and letter signed by GKM Council Chairman and
CFC Provincial Area Head.

Sec. 26 OTHER NON-MONETARY DONATIONS – Donation in kind such as aggregates, plants, garden soil, etc. are
recognized thru the accomplishment of Acknowledgement Receipt. Form (ARF). For equipment utilization, the
equipment Utilization Report (EUR) is used to recognize donation. Costing of the donation is based on market
value or assessed value by the donor. All donations should be acknowledged by a certificate and letter signed
by GKM Council
Chairman and CFC Provincial Area Head. Issuances of Inventory follows the
Inventory Control Procedures, Section 27-28.

PART VI

INVENTORY PROCESS AND CONTROL

GENERAL PROCESS

Sec27. INVENTORY PROCESS – The following is the general process to be


followed in the control of inventory:

PROCESS PERSON RESPONSIBLE


a) Prepare Purchase Request (PR) Requisitioning Unit
b) Prepare the Purchase Order (PO) Purchasing Officer

115
c) Receive purchased item, enter in stock/
equipment cards. Forward delivery receipt/
invoices & other appropriate documents to Warehousing Unit
Finance Officer.
d) Inspect items, prepare Inspection &
Acceptance Report (IAR) Warehousing Unit
e) Record in the supply ledger cards coded by
donor. Warehousing Unit
f) Request release of materials.
g) Verify stock records, prepare Requisition & Warehousing Unit
Issue Slip (RIS) release supplies.
h) Records withdrawal in Supply Ledger Card. Warehousing Unit

Sec 28. EXCESS INVENTORY - Inventory count is conducted after completion of every project to determine
excess inventory. Any excess inventory shall be used for construction of additional houses not only for GK
Missionville but also to other GK areas and other end- users. Issuances shall be supported with approved
letter request by GK-Missionville Council.

PART VII

OTHER ACCOUNTING POLICIES & GUIDELINES

Sec. 29. Petty Cash Fund - A Petty Cash Fund (PCF) of P500.00 is set up to take care of minor disbursements, usually
consisting of day to day expenses involving small amount. The PCF is maintained in an imprest basis. At any
given time, the total cash on hand and the unreplenished disbursements should equal to the
amount of the fund. The following policies are to be implemented on PCF:
a. The funds area in the custody of any designated custodian. Access to and
responsibility for each of the funds are limited to the corresponding custodian.
b. A Petty Cash Voucher (PCV) is required for disbursement from the PCF. PCVs are approved by the Project
Director before any payment is made. Supporting documents, if any, are attached to the corresponding
PCV.
c. After payment, the PCV and its supporting documents are stamped “PAID” with the date of payment noted
thereon in ink.
d. Each payment from the PCF is limited to P500.00 only. Any disbursement in excess of this amount is made
by check.
e. Cashing of personal checks from the fund is prohibited.
f. The Petty Cash Custodian requests for replenishment by preparing the Report of Disbursement (RD) with
attach SDs. The check should be made payable to the order of the fund custodian.
g. The guidelines set forth in Sec.l0 on “Cash Receipts and Collection Process” and Sec.16 - 18 on “Payment
in Cash thru Cash Advances” and “Liquidation of Disbursements” shall be followed if applicable.

116
FUNDRAISING PROJECTS

Sec. 30 Fundraising Projects - Fundraising Projects are conducted usually by


the CFC Community to raise funds for the various programs of GK - Missionville.
Since fundraising projects would involve big transaction flow of cash receipts and
disbursements, the following accounting policies shall be adhered to maintain transparency and proper
recording:
1. For each fundraising project, a special project committee shall be created
which would compose of a Chairman, Secretary, Finance Officer, Auditor and other members.
2. The Committee shall come up with a projected cost or budget of expenses
approved by the Project Director & GK-Missionville Council as basis for any cash advance by the Finance
Officer if mobilization fund is really necessary.
3. The guidelines set forth in Sec.11 on “Cash Receipts and Collection Process” and Sec.16-17 on “Payment
in Cash thru Cash Advances” and “Liquidation of Disbursements” shall be followed.
4. All income derived from the Fundraising Project shall be turned-over to the CFC Center after accounting
all cash transactions. Offsetting of expenses from collection due to unforeseen transactions is
discouraged. Approval must be sought first from the Fundraising Chairman and noted by the Project
Director. Appropriate disclosure and documentation should be undertaken.
5. As part of documentation and reporting, the Finance Officer of the Fundraising Project shall prepare a
Statement of Cash Receipts and Disbursements to be checked by the auditor and approved by the project
chairman, copy furnished CFC Center and GKM Project Director.

FINANCIAL REPORTS

Sec. 31 Preparation of Financial Statements - Financial statements shall be prepared by the accounting unit at the end
of the calendar year as follows:
1. Statement of Assets, Liabilities and Fund Balances
2. Statement of Support, Income and Changes in Fund Balances
3. Monthly Bank Reconciliation
4. Photo Copies of Bank Statement

Interim Reports shall also be prepared to determine cost -to-date of the Project.

117
Annex G.1
GLOBAL MISSION FOUNDATION, INC.
349 Ortigas Avenue, East Greenhills, Mandaluyong City
Tel. Nos. 727-06-81 to 87 . 724-61-91 . 723-86-73 727-57-18
Fax No. 727-57-71
T1N # 003-741-831.000 - NON VAT

B
OFFICIAL RECEIPT No 647907
Date______________

Received from_______________________________________________
the amount of _______________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
__________________________________(P________________)
In payment of/or donation for:
Tithe____________________ P_______________
Retreat Fee_______________ _______________
Others___________________ _______________
________________________ _______________
________________________ _______________
________________________ _______________
TOTAL P_______________
Mode of Payment:

Cash
Check Bank _______________
Check No._________________
PMO
__________________
Cashier
The Couples for Christ GIobal Mission Foundation. Inc. Printed by
Is a registered Donee institution (BIR Ruling # 517.A
93) under BIR-NEOA Reg No 1-1 is eligible to
receive fully tax deductible contributions or donations.

1.000 Bklts. (50x3) 800,001-B-650,000-B


BIR Permit No: OCN: 3AIJ0000205353 1/23/02

118
Annex G.2
No.:
DISBURSEMENT VOUCHER
Date:
MISSIONVILLE

CLASSIFICATION OF DISBURSEMENT
O Cash Advance O Reimbursement O Other Payments
Name of Claimant: ID No./TlN:
Address: Responsibility
Center:
Particulars Amount

Amount Due à P
A Certified: B Completeness and propriety of C Cash available:
supporting documents/previous cash
advance liquidated:

Signature Over Printed Name/Position Signature Over Printed Name/Position Signature Over Printed Name/Position
D Approved For Payment; P________ E Received Payment:
Payment:
Check No.:_________
à Bank Name:________
Signature Over Printed Name/Position Signature Over Printed Name/Position Date
Date:______________

119
Annex G.3
No.
MISSIONVILLE DATE:
LIQUIDATION REPORT

DATE REFERENCE DESCRIPTION AMOUNT

TOTAL AMOUNT SPENT


AMOUNT OF CASH ADVANCE PER DV NO. _______________DTD._____________
AMOUNT REFUNDED PER O.R. NO. _________________DTD._______________
AMOUNT TO BE REIMBURSED
Submitted By: Approved By:

___________________________________ Project Director

Received By: Received By:


___________________________________
Finance Officer Accounting Unit

120
Annex G.4
Donor: __________________________________
REQUEST NO.____________________

REQUEST FOR FUNDING


Date: _________________ For the Period ____________________________

Voucher
Check No. No. Payee Amount Purpose

_________ __________ ____________________ ___________ _____________________________________


_____________________________________
_________ __________ ____________________ ___________ _____________________________________
_____________________________________
_________ __________ ____________________ ___________ _____________________________________
_____________________________________
_________ __________ ____________________ ___________ _____________________________________
_____________________________________
_________ __________ ____________________ ___________ _____________________________________
_____________________________________
_________ __________ ____________________ ___________ _____________________________________
_____________________________________
_________ __________ ____________________ ___________ _____________________________________
_____________________________________
_________ __________ ____________________ ___________ _____________________________________
_____________________________________
_________ __________ ____________________ ___________ _____________________________________
_____________________________________
TOTAL DONATION _____________
TOTAL___________ Less: Previous Disbursements_____________
This Disbursement _____________
Total Disbursement _____________
Prepared By: ________________ Approved By: ________________ NET BALANCE _____________

121
Annex G.5
MISSIONVILLE

DONATION COST PROFILE


HOUSE NO. _________ LOCATION: ___________________________________
TYPE OF CONSTRUCTION ________________________________________________
DONOR: __________________________________________________________________
ADDRESS: ________________________________________________________________
BENEFICIARY: _____________________________________________________________
DATE STARTED: ______________________ DATE TURNED-OVER __________________

COST PROFILE:
PARTICULAR COST ACTUAL
DIRECT MATERIALS ESTIMATE COST
1. Concrete Floor Stabs/Zocalo 2,370.00 _______
2. Structural Steel 7,690.00 _______
3. Steel Gasement Window 2,834.00 _______
4. Concrete Wall 5,514.00 _______
5. Roofing & Facia 4,695.00 _______
6. Flush Door 2,933.00 _______
7. Electrical Works 930.00 _______
8. Plumbing Works 2,328.00 _______
9. Painting Works 1,519.00 _______
10. __________________ _______
11. __________________ _______

Direct Materials, Total 30,813.00 _______

DIRECT LABOR
1. Fabrication/Installation of Steel Frames 2,525.00 _______
2. Masonry Works 3,300.00 _______
3. Electric Works 250.00 _______
4. Roofing & Facia 600.00 _______
5. Excavation & Foundation 600.00 _______
6. Plumbing / Septic Tank 300.00 _______
7. Painting Works 250.00 _______
8. Plant Box Works 300.00 _______
9. Door Plywood Installation 100.00 _______
10. __________________ _______
11. __________________ _______
12. __________________ _______

Direct Labor, Total 8,125.00 _______


122
OVERHEAD
1. Construction Management 1,012.00 _______
2. _____________________ _______
3. _____________________ _______
Overhead, Total 1,012.00 _______

TOTALS 40,000.00 _______

Certified Correct: Approved By:

123
Annex G.6
MISSIONVILLE
Tibanga, Iligan City

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT RECEIPT

( ) Donation in Kind ( ) Others DATE: __________________

This is to acknowledge receipt from _________________________________________


The following items delivered at GK-Missionville site:

Description Unit Qty Price/Unit Total

Purpose: __________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________

Delivered By: Received by: Noted By:

_____________________ __________________________ _________________


Donor/Donor’s Representative Warehouse Supervisor Project Director

Cost Accounting: Note: To be covered with RIS upon withdrawal/issuance

___________________ AR No. ________________

124
Annex G.7
MISSIONVILLE
Tibanga, Iligan City

EQUIPMENT UTILIZATION REPORT


For the Period Covered ________________________

Name of Contractor / LGU _____________________________________________


Address _____________________________________________
Location Where Equipment Was Used GK – MISSONVILLE, TIBANGA, ILIGAN CITY .
Type of Equipment _____________________________________________

Time
Date of Utilization From To Total Hrs. Rate/Hr. Total Cost

125
Purpose: For GK Missionville Project site development

I hereby certify this ____ day of ________ 200__, I hereby certify this ____ day of _____ 2003
the accuracy and correctness of the above report that we have verified and found correct the
and that the utilization of said equipment is free of above report.
Charge/donation in support to GK – Missionville
Project.

_______ __________________ ____________________________


Equipment Owner

126
Annex G.8
MISSIONVILLE

ROD# __________
REPORT OF DISBURSEMENT

TOTAL AMOUNT FOR DISBURSEMENT: ___________________________________________________


SOURCES OF FUNDS : _______________________________ DATE RECEIVED ___________________

DATE REF. PAYEE PURPOSE/DESCRIPTION AMOUNT

Note: Please attach supporting documents. You may use additional sheets, if needed. Thank you.

Prepared by: Checked by: Noted by:

____________________ __________________ ________________


Cash Custodian

127
Annex G.9
PCV No.:
(LOGO) MISSIONVILLE
PETTY CASH VOUCHER DATE:

CLASSIFICATION OF DISBURSEMENT
O Cash Advance O Reimbursement O Other Payments
Name of Claimant: Position Held:
Address:
Particulars

Amount Due à P

Prepared By: Approved by:

__________________________ __________________________
Signature Over Printed Name Signature Over Printed Name

____________________ _______________________
(Date) (Date)

Endorsed for Approval: Received Payment By:

__________________________ __________________________
Signature Over Printed Name Signature Over Printed Name

________________________ ________________________
(Date) (Date)

128
Annex H
Beneficiary Payback (Balik-Kalinga) Addendum 1, Manual on the Accounting System for Missionville

Missionville
Iligan City
BENEFICIARY PAYBACK SCHEME
(BALIK-KALINGA)
________________________________________________________________

I. OBJECTIVES:

Gawad Kalinga (GK) is not a dole out program. It has a flexible payback system for the beneficiaries. GK’s primary
objective in setting up a well-defined and fair
beneficiary payback scheme (Balik-Kalinga) is to ensure that the beneficiary can provide financial and sweat equity for
benefits received through the GK programs.

This will enable to continue and sustain its commitment to serve the financial needs of beneficiaries especially in
the’ areas of shelter, livelihood, health, education and, other GK programs. The payback scheme is a part of the
Memorandum of Agreement or Deed Restrictions of GK Kapitbahayan Neighborhood Association (KB), the community
organizing component of the GK Project that integrated all GK Programs.

II. PAYBACK SYSTEM:

The cost of individual unit Tatag House excluding lot is P40,OOO.OO, payment
schemes as follows:

A. Sweat Equity

1. Twenty-five percent (25%) of the total cost of Tatag house which is equivalent to Pl0,000.00 shall be paid-
thru Sweat Equity.
2. The daily work input in the program of a beneficiary is given a monetary value based on the prevailing
minimum daily wage of the City. The monetary value of their services shall be applied as payment to their
house. Doing more work in the program thru this scheme will shorten the repayment period.
3. Proper systems & procedures in the accounting, recording and reporting of the Sweat Equity of the
Beneficiaries shall be set up by the GK-Finance Team and Kapitbahayan Officers. Implementation shall be
supervised by the Finance Team.

B. Monetary Payback

1. Seventy-Five Percent (75%) of the total cost of Tatag house which is equivalent to P30,000.00 shall be paid
thru Monetary Payback.

129
2. Beneficiaries shall pay a minimum amortization of P50.00 per week or P200.00 per month for 12.5 years.
Payments shall commence three months after occupancy.
a. For those beneficiaries with regular source of income’ and cannot render the required sweat
equity, monetary payback is equivalent to P40,000.00 which is the total cost of the house.
However, they are bound by the MOA or Deed Restrictions to still follow the conduct for
community life and service.
b. The payback funds shall be divided into 70% for TATAG fund and the remaining 30% shall be
used by the Kapitbahayan for livelihood and the sustainability of other GK programs. This will
encourage them to payback.
3. Proper systems & procedures in the accounting~ recording and reporting of the Monetary Payback of
the Beneficiaries shall be set up by the Finance Team and Kapitbahayan Officers. Implementation shall be
supervised by the Finance Team.

III. RECORDING & ACCOUNTING SYSTEM:

Set up of system of recording and accountability for the sweat equity and
management of funds.

A. Sweat Equity-The following policies’ and procedures shall be’ adopted by


Kapitbahayan in recording and accounting of the equivalent monetary value of the sweat equity of the
beneficiaries:

1. A Request for Community Service Form (RCS) is a pre-numbered form designed to document the request
and equivalent monetary value of the sweat equity. RCS is being kept by the Secretary, sample in Annex 1.
2. The Requisitioning Team or Area accomplishes in two (2) copies the RCS indicating the Description/type of
Community Service/Work to be done, Place of Work, Inclusive Date of Scheduled Work, Inclusive Time and
the Number of Persons required to accomplish the work. RCS shall be prepared at least two days in advance
to give time for manpower sourcing.
3. The RCS is endorsed by the Head of the Requisitioning Team to the Kapitbahayan President for approval
and manpower sourcing. KB President coordinates with Bayanihan Action Team (BAT) to meet the
requirements. RCS is then approved or disapproved.
4. If approved, the KB President or concerned BAT Leader fills up the lower portion of the RCS indicating
the names of the beneficiaries who are qualified and have accepted the community service. The RCS is
then returned to the Requisitioning Team for monitoring/timekeeping of personnel. A logbook shall be
kept by the requisitioning team. After the work is done, the Timekeeper signs the RCS, the Head of the
Requisitioning Team approves the RCS and endorses the same document to the Treasurer for computation
of equivalent monetary value.
5. Equivalent monetary value of the community service:

Skilled Worker P150.00 - P200.00 per day


Laborer PI00.00 - P150.00per day

6. The Treasurer indicates in the RCS the equivalent monetary value of the sweat equity. The beneficiary signs
the RCS in approval of the computed monetary value of his sweat equity. The computation in the RCS shall
then be the basis of Treasurer in the issuance of the Sweat Equity Receipt (SER), sample copy in Annex 1.
7. The SER is a pre-numbered form which serves as receipt documenting the equivalent monetary value of
sweat equity to be given to the beneficiaries shall be pre-numbered and to be accomplished in 2 copies:
Original to the Beneficiary; Duplicate to the Treasurer.
130
8. RCS copies shall then be distributed to: 1st copy Treasurer & 2nd copy BAT - Kapatiran.
9. The Treasurer updates the beneficiary’s ledger based on the SER.
10. Community Services rendered before January 1, 2004 shall be reviewed by GK-Finance Team and
Kapitbahayan if sweat equity is applicable.

B. Monetary Payback - The following policies and procedures shall be adopted by Kapitbahayan in accounting and.
recording the monetary payback of the beneficiaries:

RECEIPTS
1. For proper internal control of cash, payment and collection shall be made only at the Kapitbahayan Office.
Only the Treasurer and Asst Treasurer can receive payments and issue an Official Receipt.
2. Payback collection schedule is as follows:

Weekly - Every Wednesday of the Week


Monthly - From 1st Wednesday of the Month up to the 1st
Wednesday of the following month.
Office Hours - 8:30 AM up to- 4:00 PM with Lunch break

3. Once payment is made the Treasurer issues a pre-numbered Official Receipt of CFC Global Mission
Foundation, Inc. to the Beneficiary. OR shall be prepared in 3 copies: Original - Payee; Yellow Copy –PMC
Center; Pink Copy - Treasurer.
4. At the end of the collection day, the Treasurer prepares the Summary of Payback Collection (SPC), sample
copy Annex 3, and have it checked by the Auditor. The cash collection shall then be deposited the following
day before 12:00 noon at CFC - Provincial Mission Center which in return issues an Acknowledgement
Receipt.
5. The Block Leader (BL) of the Day shall then update the individual beneficiary payback ledger based on the
audited Summary of Payback Collection. Balances should reconcile with ledger & Official Receipts.
6. The Treasurer shall maintain a cashbook of record receipts and disbursements of cash and prepares
Monthly Treasurer’s Report not later than the 7th day of the following month. Treasurer shall then report
status of cash every KB General Assembly. I

DISBURSEMENTS
Use of cash from Monetary Payback Col1ection shall follow the same
procedure adopted in the Manual On The Accounting System for GK-MissionvilIe “Part III Disbursement System
& Procedures Sections I-19”.

DELINQUENCY OF PAYMENT
a) A delinquent payback is considered delinquent when the beneficiary fails to pay the monthly amortization
on its due date which is on the 1st Wednesday of the following month.
b) The Treasurer is responsible for coordinating the collection efforts of the payback. This effort is also
delegated to the Block Leaders who are responsible to monitor non-payment of beneficiaries per’ block.
The Treasurer together with Block Leaders conduct monthly meeting and come up with a Monthly
Delinquency Report to be reported to the KB Officers and GK-Finance Team;
c) Action to be taken to minimize and collect Delinquent Payback:
1. A personal visit by the. Block Leader is made to beneficiaries to remind them of the weekly/monthly
payment.
2. Collection Efforts to be Made by the Block Leaders:
First Collection Notice - To be sent within the first Wednesday after the monthly payment is due.
Second Collection Notice - To be sent after the 2nd Wednesday after the monthly payment is due.
131
Third Collection Notice - To be sent after the 3rd Wednesday after the monthly payment is due.
3. Note that Block Leaders should follow up immediately when a promised payment is not received by
the Treasurer.
4. Delinquent beneficiaries should be referred to the K.B Officers for one-an-one and evaluation.
Community service under sweat equity is applicable as an option based on the result of the
evaluation on a case to case basis.
5. However, legal actions can also be applied for those beneficiaries who are found capable of paying
(based on the result of KB evaluation) but refuses to pay due to other unacceptable reasons.

C. Audit of Books by External Auditor

The Financial Statements of Kapitbahayan is following the period of fiscal year January - December. Annual
examination of KB Financial Statements shall be made by a volunteer external auditor or by the GK Finance
Team to maintain soundness, integrity and accountability of records. The Audited Financial Statements shall
then be reported to the membership body during its annual general assembly and to the GK Management
Council.

All terms and conditions set forth in this Payback Scheme were discussed during the several consultative
meetings held with the KB General Assembly (Minutes of Meeting on tile). All comments and feedback of the
draft by the GK Management Council and GK Construction Team were also taken into consideration in order
to come up with this Payback Scheme Policies and Procedures.

This guideline shall form part as Addendum 1 to our Manual on the Accounting
System for GK - Missionville. This Addendum shall be used by GK – Missionville Kapitbahayan thus be
reviewed periodically and accordingly to suit the particular requirements and conditions set forth by law i.e.
SEC and other end-users.

This Payback Scheme shall be effective January 1, 2004.

132
Endorsed for approval by:

MARILOU A. ENGRACIA / TEODOMERO CORONEL


GK – MISSIONVILLE FINANCE TEAM

Approved by:

GK - MISSIONVILLE Kapitbahayan Represented By:

Rolando Saguing / Jennifer Hora / Elsa Cabatuan / Adeluna Catiloc / C.Balaba


Kapitbahayan Officers

Roberto Cuyos Joe Arthur E.. Aberilla


GK-Missionville Community Organizer Project Director

Carlos D. Subang
Vice-Chairman
GK-MISSIONVlLLE COUNCIL

133
Annex H.1
MISSIONVILLE, lIigan City

REQUEST FOR COMMUNITY SERVICE FORM (RCS)

DATE __________________________________

REQUISITIONING TEAM : __________________________________________________________________


_________
D)ESCRIPTION OF WORK I COMMUNITY SERVICE: _______________________________________________
______
_____________________________________________________________________________________
____________
LOCATION OF WORK TO BE ACCOMPLISHED: __________________________________________________
_______
INCLUSIVE DATES REQUIRED: ______________________________ INCLUSIVE TIME:___________________
_____
NO. OF PERSONNEL REQUIRED: _____________________________________________________________
_______

REQ)UESTED BY: APPROVED BY:

________________________________ __________________________
______
HEAD, REQUISITIONING TEAM Kapitbahayan PRESIDENT
-------------------------------------------------------------------Listed below are names of beneficiaries who are qualified and have accepted
to render community service under the
sweat equity payback scheme. Names below shall report to the Requesting Team for Instruction and supervision.

BY _________________________________________
Kapitbahayan

To be filled up by KB To be filled up by Requisitioner To be filled by Treasurer


House ACTUAL Actual # of Rate per Equivalent Signature of
NAME No. DATES ON-DUTY Hours/Days Day Monetary Beneficiary
Value
1. /
2. /
3. /
4. /
5. /
6. /

134
Note: you may use other page if space is not enough.

Bookkeeper: Approved By: Computed By:

_______________________ ___________________________ _____________________


Requisitioning Team Head, Requisitioning Team Treasurer

135
Annex H.2
MISSIONVILLE
lligan City

SWEAT EQUITY RECEIPT

SER. NO. _________________ Date: __________________

This is to acknowledge that ________________________________________________________


House No.______; Block No.______ has rendered community service per RCS No.___________________
File with equivalent monetary value of ______________________________________. (P______________)
This SER will serve as official document to record the sweat equity of the beneficiary.

______________________________
Kapitbahayan TREASURER

136
Annex H.3
MISSIONVILLE
lligan City
SUMMARY OF PAYBACK COLLECTION
DATE: _____________________

Name HB OR# Amount Name HB OR# Amount Name HB OR# Amount


Indicate Row
# & Name

Subtotal
Grand Total
Summary Amount
Row 1 ______
Row 2 ______
Row 3 ______
Row 4 ______
Row 5 ______
Row 6 ______
Row 7 ______
Row 8 ______
Row 9 ______
Row 10 ______
Row 11 ______
Row 12 ______
Row 13 ______
Subtotal Row 14 ______
Grand Total
======

Prepared by_________________ Checked by____________________ Noted by__________________


Kapitbahayan Treasurer Kapitbahayan Auditor GK Finance Officer

Date Cash Remitted to CFC Center ________________ OR#___________ OR Date _____________________

137
Annex H.2
MISSIONVILLE
lligan City

Name of Beneficiary: _____________________________________________ Block No. ____________


Date of Turn – over: ____________________________________ Home No. ____________

BENEFICIARY PAYBACK LEDGER


MONETARY PAYBACK SWEAT EQUITY Posted
Date OR# Amount Balance S.E.R. # Amount Balance by
01/01/04 P30,000.00 10,000.00

138
Annex I
RESOURCE MOBILIZATION PLAN FOR GA’AM BUTUAN: PANIMALAY SA KATAWHAN
GAWAD KALINGA APPROACH

I. INTRODUCTION

Balangayan Butuan is an LGU-led Multisectoral Community Development Program building on the Gawad
Kalinga of the CFC approach to socialized housing. The program’s cardinal principle is institutionalizing the
giving of resources and development of the culture of sharing in building integrated, holistic and sustainable
communities. Its goal is to provide a better quality of life for families by helping them build homes that
provide a sense of security and well-being, teaching them livelihood skills, and organizing them into a model
community, embodying the Filipino “Bayanihan Spirit.”

For starters, it aims to build homes for each of the displaced families from the CARBDP affected areas who
will be relocated in Barangay Pagatpatan. As a multi-stakeholder undertaking, each partner has a role to
play, with the local government unit of Butuan providing the land equity, land development services, use
of equipment in the construction of houses, development of access roads, electrification and water facilities
and identification of beneficiaries, land disposition, and documentation. It takes active participation in
the construction of houses and capacity building. Other parties including the Couples for Christ and the
beneficiaries help in the construction of houses. Private persons are also tapped for housing materials and
construction supplies.

The Balangayan Butuan program is not intended as solely a government endeavor but a commitment from
various stakeholders who take it upon themselves to share their extra resources so that others may be uplifted
from subhuman conditions. The Butuan City LGU’s resources are limited by many pressing priorities. The
Balangayan Butuan program needs assistance from benevolent donors for it to achieve what it has set out to
do.

Thus, it needs to formulate a resource generation plan for a focused and comprehensive accessing of
resources.

II. OBJECTIVES

The Program’s resource mobilization plan has three primary objectives:

A. To ensure predictable, adequate and stable growth of program resources;


B. To expand the donor base
C. To increase the amount of resources currently provided by the Local Government Unit for the Program
through other sources

Taken together, these objectives will reinforce and strengthen the Program’s ability to respond to the urgent
need for housing units from the families living in the CARBDP affected areas.

139
Using its sound program framework as the foundation for its fundraising strategy, Balangayan Butuan will
work to secure greater funding for the construction of housing units, provision of livelihood opportunities and
enhancement of education and health services in the relocation area.

III. STRATEGIES

To achieve its objectives, the Program shall employ the following strategies:

A. Develop a schedule for resource mobilization

B. Compile a list of potential partners and assess their potential roles in resource mobilization

C. Develop and produce a funding appealing information package in coordination with the Media and
Information Committee.

D. In coordination with the Media and Info Committee, the Resource Generation Committee shall launch
well-targeted advocacy campaigns intended to inform a broad target about the program.

E. Develop a core group of influentials and advocates who have access to funding sources

F. Conduct visits/discussions with potential donors

G. Explore alternative funding approaches

IV. POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

A. All resource mobilization activities that will be undertaken must be sanctioned by the Balangayan Program
Management Team

B. A record of these activities should be kept including the results and outputs derived.

C. Any commitment made by a sponsor shall be put in writing by signing the commitment slip indicating the
kind of donation to be made, namely:

1. Number of housing units


2. Labor force
3. Construction materials
4. Program support streamer or banner

D. The sponsor shall indicate the mode of delivery

E. Monetary contributions shall be deposited in the Balangayan Trust Fund

F. For contributions of construction materials, donors have the option of depositing these at the Program
bunkhouse in Barangay Pagatpatan, or deliver the materials to the construction site as these are needed.

G. Institutional contributions or contributions of funding agencies shall follow the donor agencies guidelines.

140
Annex J
Criteria for Selection and Prioritization of Sites for GK Projects

Criteria Point

1 Acquisition Cost 35

Site is sold/ acquired at a relatively low price regardless of appraised


value

2 Topographic Suitability to Housing 20

Site is not flood-prone Ex. 5

Site is relatively free of environmental hazards like earthquakes, 4


pollution, etc.

� Site is classified as residential; and 4

� Site is compatible with zones adjoining (merged from separate 4


criterion)

� Site is mostly plain 3

3 Accessibility to Basic Infrastructure 20

� Site is accessible to, at least, power and water

� Site is accessible to roads, drainage, and other infrastructure

4 Accessibility to Basic Social Services 15

Site is accessible to schools, barangay health centers, hospitals, and


other facilities

5 Proximity to Livelihood 10

Site is relatively near to beneficiaries’ places of livelihood

Total Score 100

141
Annex K
(Excerpts from the Minutes of the 1st Joint PMT – EA Meeting held on 23 July, 2003 at the City Mayor’s Conference
Room, Butuan City)

PMT RESOLUTION NO. 02, FY 2003 – 2004


“ APPROVING THE CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE GA’AM BUTUAN PANIMALAY SA KATAWHAN
PROGRAM”

WHEREAS, GA’AM BUTUAN, the Gawad Kalinga-inspired Butuan City LGU-led multisectoral partnership was created by
virtue of E.O. 631 to address the housing needs of the priority poorest among the poor population of Butuan City;

WHEREAS, GA’AM BUTUAN identified the 6,413 households residing in the danger zone as priority homepartners of
the program relative to the urgent impact of the Cotabato-Agusan River Basin Development Project Closure in 2005;

WHEREAS, a basic requisite of the program is to come up with a feasible, comprehensive, holistic and sustainable
implementation framework;

WHEREAS, Gawad Kalinga has made available such a framework for the partnership to customize to suit the housing
and community development needs of the Butuan City homepartners;

WHEREAS, GA’AM BUTUAN partners had jointly customized and finalized the Gawad Kalinga Framework to evolve into
the GA’AM BUTUAN Conceptual Framework;

WHEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, as it is hereby resolved, to approve the GA’AM BUTUAN Conceptual Framework under
the CityBuild Phase of “Ga’am Butuan: Panimalay sa Katawhan” shelter program;

RESOLVED FURTHER, that the Ga’am Butuan Conceptual Framework shall be subject to further review and update;

RESOLVED FINALLY, that copies of this resolution and the Program Conceptual Framework be provided to all parties
concerned, for their information and guidance.

APPROVED unanimously this 23rd day of July, 2003 in Butuan City, Philippines.

SIGNED:

DEMOCRITO D. PLAZA, II
Chair
Project Management Team

142
(Excerpts from the Minutes of the 1st Joint PMT – EA Meeting held on 23 July, 2003 at the City Mayor’s Conference
Room, Butuan City)

PMT RESOLUTION NO. 03, FY 2003 – 2004

“ APPROVING THE PER COMMITTEE GUIDELINES FOR THE GA’AM BUTUAN PANIMALAY SA KATAWHAN
PROGRAM”

WHEREAS, GA’AM BUTUAN, the Gawad Kalinga-inspired Butuan City LGU-led multisectoral partnership was created by
virtue of E.O. 631 to address the housing needs of the priority poorest among the poor population of Butuan City;

WHEREAS, a salient feature of the E. O. 631 is the creation of seven (7) program committees namely: GB Programs;
Resource Generation; Construction; Media and Info; Estate Management; Legal; and, Administrative Committee;

WHEREAS, as a newly-organized partnership on housing and community development, requires the crafting of basic
guidelines for the program taken on a per-committee basis for it to comprehensively, holistically, and sustainably
operate;

WHEREAS, each committee had come together to formulate their respective guidelines;

WHEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, as it is hereby resolved, to approve the GA’AM BUTUAN Per Committee Guidelines
under the CityBuild Phase of “Ga’am Butuan: Panimalay sa Katawhan” shelter program;

RESOLVED FURTHER, that the Ga’am Butuan Per Committee Guidelines be subject to further review and update;

RESOLVED FINALLY, that copies of this resolution and the Program Per Committee Guidelines be provided to all
parties concerned, for their information and guidance.

APPROVED unanimously this 23rd day of July, 2003 in Butuan City, Philippines.

SIGNED:

DEMOCRITO D. PLAZA, II
Chair
Project Management Team

143
Annex L
GK GUIDELINES FOR COMMUNITY LIVING

1. Each Gawad Kalinga Homeowner is required to comply with and observe all the terms and conditions of this
Agreement and such other terms and conditions that may hereafter be agreed upon by the Gawad Kalinga
Kapitbahayan Neighborhood Association and its interim officers regarding the use, aesthetic appearance and
disposition of the house units, lots, streets, alleys, recreational parks and public utilities, whenever notice of such
new terms and conditions have been delivered or made known to him/her.

2. Each Homeowner must consistently attend the continuing values formation modules implemented through the
Kapitbahayan and be an active member of the Association.

3. Each Homeowner and other members of the household are also encouraged to be active members of the Fathers’
Circle and Mothers’ Circle, which implement programs for women empowerment, responsible parenthood, natural
family planning. counseling, etc.

4. Each Homeowner must strongly encourage their children to attend regularly in the SIBOL,SAGIP, or- SIGA
programs (whichever apply). These programs are essential to the integrated development of the family and will be
a key element in the continuing progress of the whole community.

5. Each Homeowner shall take responsibility for preventing the deterioration of his home unit and lot as well as ALL
facilities shared by the GK Kapitbahayan.

a. Educate all residents especially the children not to vandalize homes and facilities
b. Re-painting of houses and common facilities must regularly be undertaken by the Homeowners whenever
necessary.
c. Broken fences, windows, etc. must be fixed immediately to prevent further deterioration

6. Each Homeowner must maintain and even improve the beauty, sanitation and cleanliness of the whole community,
particularly sanitary facilities, pathways, alleys and streets.
a. Garbage must only be placed in proper garbage bins or other receptacles away from public view and be
brought out only at designated hours for collection. Trash must not be thrown in the alleys, pathways,
public areas, streets or any open space, nor shall it be allowed to accumulate in public view or inside the
home lots.
b. Walkways, pathways and alleys intended for communal use must be kept free from any obstructions
including but not limited to clothing, clothesline, equipment, motor vehicles and/or junk and scrap
materials. The Association may also opt to have a common area for the said purposes.
c. All residents and household members shall take good care of the landscaping and all plants and trees
within the residential unit and in the project grounds, mini parks, and around the community facilities
etc. as well as their protective enclosures.

144
Renovation and/or expansion of the exterior of the residential unit is not allowed without the prior consent of the
Kapitbahayan Neighborhood Association. The Association will consider all such applications for renovation and/or
expansion and, where it deems it necessary to decline such application on whatever grounds. it agrees to provide
reasons for such refusal. In this case, the Association will also offer advice on changes to the proposal that would allow
approval to be granted.

145
Annex M
Sample Cluster Plan, Cluster Plan Isometric and Site Development Plan

146
147
Annex N
GK House Designs

148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
Annex O
Sample Gantt Chart, sample Money S-Curve, PERT-CRM Chart and sample Construction Schedules

157
158
159
160