Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 56

BETTER SAFE

THAN SORRY

The COATING ADVISERS'

SAFETY HANDBOOK
Edition 2 Issued by: Product Solution Performance/CACT, Copenhagen October 2003
This Handbook belongs to:

Please Note:

Our ISO-9001 Quality Assurance System requires us to inform you that your
possession of this Handbook does NOT make you a registered holder of the
Handbook.

You will therefore NOT automatically be updated when new versions are
released and are kindly requested to keep yourself updated at own initiative.

The COATING ADVISERS' SAFETY HANDBOOK


is issued from
HEMPEL A/S, Copenhagen
Product Solution Performance/CACT

2nd Edition, October 2003


® HEMPEL A/S, 2003
INTRODUCTION

Dear Coating Adviser

This Handbook is made with the sole purpose of increasing the health and safety
awareness of Hempel Coating Advisers.

Worksites have inheriant risks that can seriously affect health in both the short term
in the form of accidents and the long term in the form of exposure to hazardous
substances.

It is vital to Hempel that Coating Advisers, spending a substantial part of their time
on foreign sites, are highly aware of the associated potential risks.

The Handbook has short descriptions of personal protection equipment, what


equipment to use in a series of typical work situations and how to conduct oneself in
order to avoid or minimise risk including minimising physical damage from
accidents.

The descriptions are in no way covering each and every aspect. Therefore always
apply common sense and follow your own instincts, seek advice when uncertain and
decline entering into situations which appear risky.

HEMPEL expects:
* That the personal protection equipment is used according to the
recommendations.
* That all local laws and regulations are complied with including the "who and
where" of the safety organisation on site.
* That the Coating Adviser seeks advice from the TSD Manager if in doubt.
* That any Coating Adviser at all times considers himself his own closest safety
representative.

It is the hope of the authors that the Handbook will increase awareness and inspire to
learn more about how to avoid risks to health and safety.

Intro ed1 17/10/2002 NLJ


TABLE OF CONTENTS TOC1
Page

1 Introduction I1
2 Material Safety Data Sheets
* Safety Data Sheets M1
* Safety Data Sheets, continued M2
* Accidents - What to do in case of .... M3
* Determining appropriate personal protection equipment M4
* Hazard identification of the product M5
3 Safety equipment
* Clothing, Boiler suits S1
* Helmets S2
* Footwear S3
* Gloves S4
* Respiratory protective masks S5
* Eye/Ear protection S6
* Skin protective cream S7
* Medicine box S8
* Oxygenometers S9
* Explosiometers S10
4 General good practice
* Around the paint products P1
* Around the application equipment P2
* Around yourself P3
* Around the work-site P4
* Around the fire/explosion risk P5
* Around the application of antifoulings P6
5 Newbuilding/New construction situations
* Section/Block - Shell vertical areas N1
* Section/Block - Open horizontal areas N2
* Section/Block - Confined spaces N3
* Assembly - Vertical areas N4

Continues
TOC1, ed3 29/09/2003 EMi
TABLE OF CONTENTS TOC2
Continued Page

* Assembly - Open horizontal areas N5


* Assembly - Confined spaces N6
* On-line Application N7
6 Docking/Refurbishment situations
* Ballast tanks/Void spaces R1
* Chemical tanks/Oil tanks R2
* Outside shell R3
* Constructions at height R4
- Wind turbines, Antennas and Offshore
* Cargo holds/Silos interior R5
7 Inspection of constructions in service
* Ballast tanks T1
* Chemical tanks/Oil tanks T2
* Outside shell below water, Diving Support T3
* Outside shell above water T4
* Constructions at height T5
- Wind turbines, Antennas and Offshore
* Cargo holds/Silos interior T6
* Containers T7

8 First Aid
* Basic rules, Physical damage F1
* Basic rules, Inhalation F2
* Basic rules, Digestion F3
9 The Coating Advisers Travel/Safety Kit
* List of contents U1

---oooOOOooo---

TOC2, ed1 16/10/2002 EMi


MFP ed1 16/10/2002 EMi
SAFETY DATA SHEETS M1
Some hazard information will be provided on labels, but the safety data sheet
provides you with much more detailed information.
The information in the SDS will help you to make sure that the product is used safely
by informing you about the product's hazards, on how it should be handled, stored
and disposed of and explaining what should be done in the case of an accident.

Hazard A potential source of harm.


Risk The likelihood of the dangerous properties of a chemical causing
harm (to people or the environment).
Category of A description of hazard to health, fire/explosion and/or the
danger environment.
Classifica- Precise identification of the hazard of a chemical by assigning a
tion category of danger and/or risk phrases using set criterias.
Risk phrase A standard phrase which gives simple informaiton about the hazards
(R-phrase) of a chemical in normal use.

The use of the Safety Data Sheet (SDS):


Get information about the hazards of the product:
Section 3: Hazard identification shows the classification of the product identified in
section 1 (identification of the preparation and of the company). The hazards are
given by the use of standard warning symbols and R-phrases. Also the flammability
is a part of the classification.

Determine appropiate personal protection equipment to avoid accidents due


to exposure:
To avoid accidents due to exposure - swallowing, inhalation, contact with skin and
eyes - information about exposure controls and personal protection is given in
section 8.

Accidents:
In case of doubt seek medical advice! Bring the label or the Safety Data Sheet with
the patient. More precise instructions will be given in the SDS in section 4.

Determine firefighting measures:


Section 5 informs about fire fighting measures. In general water jets should not be
used as this may spread the fire.

Prevent release to the environment:


Section 7 - Handling and storage gives general advice in this respect.

M1 ed1 14/10/2002 MA
SAFETY DATA SHEETS M2
Handling of disposal and/or spillage:
Section 6 contains guidelines in the case of spillage. In general spillage must not be
flushed into sewers or streams but should be collected with a non-combustible
absorbent material (granulate, sand or earth).

Section 13 is about disposal considerations. Typically spillage, remains and non-


cleaned cans should be regarded as chemical waste and be discarded in accordance
with national legislation.

M2, ed1 14/10/2002 MA


Safety Data
Sheets Accidents - what to do in case of.... M3

In case of doubt seek medical advice! Bring the label or the Safety Data Sheet with
the patient. Underneath is given general advice. More precise instructions will be
given in the SDS in section 4.

Inhalation:
Move the patient into fresh air and keep the patient under
surveillance. If the patient is unconscious and not breathing
administer artificial respiration. If the patient is breathing, move
the person into the recovery position and keep warm.
Send for a doctor or ambulance immediately.

Contact with eyes:


Remove contact lenses, if any. Flush immediately with water for
at least 10 minuttes. Keep the eye wide open. If necessary seek
medical help or assistance.

Contact with the skin:


Remove contaminated clothing immediately and wash
contaminated skin with soap and water. Skin cleanser may be
used. Never use thinner or solvent as these degrease the skin.
In case of burns flush with water until the pain ceases. While
flushing, remove clothing from the affected area unless it is
burnt into the skin.
If hospital treatment is necessary, flushing must continue during
transfer and until hospital staff takes over the treatment.

Swallowing:
Do not provoke vomitting. If vomiting occurs, keep the patient's
head low to prevent vomit from entering into the lungs.

M3, ed1 14/10/2002 MA


Safety Data Determining appropiate personal
Sheets M4
protection equipment:

Below You will find general advice:

In general there is always a need for good ventilation.

As spray-mist must never be inhaled, respiratory equipment


must always be used.

The content of solvents - and which ones are present - are


shown in section 2 (information on ingredients) in the SDS.

In section 8 there is information about occupational exposure


values. These are concentrations that must not be exceeded
when working. When above the limits suitable respiratory
equipment must be worn.

Even though a paint may not be classified as an irritant or


corrosive it may cause irritation on contact with your eyes.
It is therefore recommended that suitable goggles or a face
shield is worn to protect against splashes.
Always wear protective clothing and gloves when spraying. Do
not use protective creams under, or instead of gloves.

Section 8 in the SDS informs more detailed about exposure controls and personal
protection.

M4, ed1 14/10/2002 MA


Safety Data
Sheets Hazard identification of the product. M5
By law all hazardous paint product labels must have details of Health and Safety
precautions. A product's hazard is given by use of standard warning symbols and R-
phrases. Also the flammability and environmental hazard is a part of the classification
To help you understand the label, the warning symbols most commonly found are
listed below with a brief description.

Toxic
The material may cause toxic effects if inhaled, eaten or in contact with
the skin and/or may be carcinogenic, mutagenic or toxic to reproduction
The R-phrases in section 3 and 15 in the SDS indicate which hazards.
Corrosive
The material may cause burns when in contact with the eyes and skin.

Harmful
The material may cause harm if inhaled, eaten or in contact with the
skin. The R-phrases in section 3 and 15 in the SDS indcate which
hazards.
Irritant
The material may cause skin rash, severe eye irritation and/or irritation
in the respiratory tract if spray-mist is inhaled and/or it is a sensitizer.

Highly flammable / flammable (without symbol)


This material may cause a fire if close to open flames or sparks.

Dangerous for the environment


This product may be toxic to the aquatic environment

Lead containing products are typically toxic.


Epoxies are irritants and contact with the skin may cause sensitization.
Isocyanates may cause sensitization in the respiratory tract when inhaled.
Exposure to solvent vapours may cause damage to several organs and the nervous
system.
More detailed information on the effects are given in section 11.
Flash point and weight-% organic solvents are given in the SDS in section 9:
Physical and chemical properties.

M5, ed1 14/10/2002 MA


SFP ed1 16/10/2002 EMi
Safety Equipment Clothing S1

A good quality boiler suit, either cotton or polyester/cotton is the foundation for the
coating advisers' working clothes.
The main purpose is:
Preventing contamination from coming in contact with you.
The boiler suit is the safest combination of good protection and a good storage for
inspection equipment. Its close fitting design also reduces the risk of getting snagged.

When entering areas with ongoing paint spray application, use of an additional
disposable boiler suit is strongly recommended, and in some cases mandatory.

Also when doing inspections in freshwater tanks a new, disposable boiler suit is
mandatory.

Protection Symbol:

S1 ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Safety Equipment HELMETS S2

The safety helmet is the most important safety equipment for your head. Most work-
sites today specify the use of a safety helmet when away from the office and rest
areas.
Also during in-service inspections a helmet should be used, especially in double
bottom tanks and when climbing complicated constructions. Even if you bang your
head more often against the beams and bulkheads when wearing a helmet it saves
you that single troublesome experience and the recuperation time caused by just one
mistake without a helmet.

The helmet you use MUST be a safety helmet and of approved standard.
Furthermore, it must be undamaged. Never tie it so tightly to your head that it cannot
come off relatively easily. Otherwise you might get strangled if the helmet gets
caught on something.

Protection Protection
Reason:
against: Symbol:
Falling Objects
Banging your
head into Protect your head from physical damage
constructions
Getting your
head jammed

When your helmet has been in use for 3-5 years it should be renewed.
If it has been damaged or it has been exposed to a hard blow, replace it immediately
.

S2 ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Safety Equipment FOOTWEAR S3

Work-sites are not clean places like home.


Even though many sites today keep a very high degree of discipline in keeping the
site clean and tidy, your job often requires that you enter areas where materials may
be lying or stored temporarily or where temporary protrusions e.g. reinforcement bars
are present.

Inspections are often carried out in wet and slippery areas.


You will therefore need footwear that protects your feet against nails, welding rods or
the like, against equipment that is dropped on your feet and against e.g. plates which
could squash your feet.

Furthermore, you may need footwear that protects you against water in tanks and
that are anti-slip.
The following footwear is therefore required, and is sometimes specified by the owner
or the contractor before allowing you to enter the site.:

Type of Protection
Description
Footwear Symbol:
Safety Shoes/ These must have steel protection for your toes
Boots and ankles.
They should extend upwards also to protect
the upper part of your foot and have anti-slip
properties. However, note that a too coarse
sole may make walking on gratings risky.
NOTE:
Exposed steel The footwear should be easy to put on and of
caps are NOT course comfortable for a whole HEMPEL
allowed off-shore, working day
at refineries etc.
A pair of Needed for in-service inspections of tanks.
Wellingtons Use for water e.g. ballast tanks only. Use
(Rubber boots) Safety shoes for oil tanks and chemical tanks
(see below).

Wellingtons should have anti-slip properties as


tanks usually are muddy and very slippery.

Soft Cover for A soft cover which can be put on the safety
Safety Shoes shoes should be used when inspecting
chemical tanks in order to avoid damage to the
coating. Put on when entering the tank and
take off when leaving to keep it clean of dust
and dirt. Always use in potable water tanks.

S3 ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Safety Equipment Gloves S4

Your hands are exposed to a variety of aggressive factors.


These range from physical factors like scuffing, cutting, jamming and impact to
chemical contamination which have a degreasing an drying effect .
The result could be infections, temporary inability or even invalidity.

Selection of proper gloves will help you to minimize the risk of such damage, but you
might need different types of gloves depending on the type of environment.

Protection Protection
Reason:
against: Symbol:
Mechanical Leather gloves are the best suited for
abuse mechanical abuse.
Scuffing, Cutting, They should also protect your wrists.
Jamming and
Impact

Chemical Leather gloves can be used also for protection


abuse against droplets of liquid paints.
Solvents, Liquid In case of severe spillage of either solvents or
paints liquid paint the leather gloves need to be
removed immediately from your hands in order
to avoid the effect of solvent penetration.

When handling empty drums or waste and


when handling chemicals, rubber gloves
should be used. You might want to carry
cotton gloves inside the rubber gloves to
absorb sweat from your hands.

Thick nitril gloves are used for epoxy paints,


etc. Thin nitril gloves are used to protect the
subject from your hands.

S4 ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Safety Equipment MASKS S5

Masks are used to protect your breathing against dust, aerosols and fumes.
THEY DO NOT PROTECT YOU AGAINST LACK OF OXYGEN
Most common types of masks for your job are:
* short term filtering masks
* half-face masks with replaceable filter cartridges
(Recommended)

Protection Protection
Reason:
against: Symbol:
Dust The most dangerous part of the dust is the fine
particles which you can hardly see.
E.g. inspections This is retained by your lungs and may
during and after eventually lead to reduced respiratory function.
abrasive blasting As long as the dust has not been removed or
and mechanical has become wet it may become airborne just
cleaning by your movements.

In-service Old dirty tanks may contain bacteria or fungi


inspections of which, if inhaled, may cause diseases. Do not
tanks take that risk.
Dust, Aerosols Aerosols are small liquid particles in the air.
and Fumes/ They are also retained in the lungs if inhaled.
Vapour
E.g. during They could contain the solid material of e.g.
ongoing paint paints being applied like bio-active material
application from Antifoulings.

Fumes/vapour Fumes are most often the solvents from the


paint film.
E.g. inspections These solvents are continuously released for
between coats quite a long period and especially in confined
spaces with little ventilation. The solvent
concentration can build up and easily exceed
the threshold value for humans.

MASK SPECIFICATIONS
Type Must be able to protect against
Dust FINE dust
Dust, Aerosols, FINE dust, aerosols and organic fumes/
Fumes/vapour: vapour. Usually combifilters.
Fumes/vapour: Organic fumes/vapour

S5 ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Safety Equipment EYE/EAR PROTECTION S6

Your eyes and ears are your most important inspection tools and you could not do
your job without them.
At the same time damage to your eyes and ears can easily be permanent from which
you will suffer also after you have finished your job.
Therefore it is very important for you to protect your eyes and ears properly at all
times during job execution.

Protection Protection
Reason:
against: Symbol:
Noise Noise makes permanent damage both by
noise level and time of exposure. Ear
protection should therefore always be worn in
blasting halls, steel workshops, engine rooms
and other places with a high consistent noise
level.

Ear protection should be worn throughout any A MUST


noisy period. Even omitting protection for just
1% of the period may reduce the protective
effect by 50%.

Particles, dust Spray particles from paint application can be


droplets and very disturbing for your eyes. Two-component
aerosols paints continue to cure and will after some
hours give you the feeling of dust in the eyes
for a long period. Therefore wear goggles
during mixing and spray applications as well
as during abrasive blasting operations, and in
the vicinity of these operations. A MUST
When working with repair of equipment
including airless equipment which might be
under pressure, always wear safety goggles.
Also grinding and cutting operations can send
off dangerous metal particles, from which the
eyes must definitely be protected.
Safety goggles do not protect against fumes.
In this case only full-face fresh air respiratory
masks are adequate.

Normal glasses cannot be regarded as safety goggles.


Only poly carbonate glasses with side protection should be used. Replace if
damaged by e,g, solvents or the like.

S6 ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Safety Equipment Skin Protective Creme S7

Skin protective creams comprise barrier creams, cleaning creams and skin
maintenance creams.
Creams are short term protection against dust, dirt, oil and grease, paint particles
and water-containing materials influencing pH-value like cement and other alkaline
materials and very mild acids, but not any kind of strong concentrated acids or
alkalines.
Use only the right types of protective cream for the job.

Protection
Description: Purpose:
Symbol:
Barrier creams Your hands are protected by a natural layer of
fat.
It may be penetrated by chemicals, be NONE
degreased by solvents and oil or damaged by
particles. Once penetrated or removed a
passage will exist for microbes to enter the
skin and cause infection and exema.
Is a supplement to proper gloves.
Cleaning creams These creams are specially designed to
remove contamination, causing the least
possible damage to the skin.

Do not use sawdust or anything similar as it NONE


will wear away part of the outer skin and
thereby increase the risk of infections and
exema. Also desinfectants such as chlorine
and hydrogen peroxide are prohibited as they
will destroy the outer parts of the skin.

Skin These creams should be used after cleaning


maintenance the skin to help restore the natural protective
creams layer of fat and humidity.
NONE

S7 ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Safety Equipment MEDICINE BOX S8

Work only, when you do not feel sick. It is much too dangerous to do inspections
when you are concentrating on your body and not your job.

For this you would need the correct medicine and our company doctor has
composed the following medicine chest, which should carry only
legal types of medicine, i.e. no drugs or other illegal substances.
However always check local regulations.

Some of the names may be Trade Names, but usually chemists are
able to identify such, and offer you identical types.

Medicine Against

1: Antistina Privin Irritation or allergy in the eyes.


2: Brentan Creme Skin Irritation
3: Ciloprin Earache
4: Diproderm Sun rash and allergy.
5: Fenoxcillin Infection in throat and lungs.
6: Fusidin Wound infection
7: Imodium Diarrhea.
8: Chloramphenicol Infection in the eyes.
9: Codimagnyl Pain
10: Lucosil Infection of the urine tract
11: Pronoctan: Sleeping pills.

*: 2 pcs injection syringes

*: Water repellent plasters

Administration of the medicine is not indicated as it may vary from Brand to Brand.
Always read and follow the instructions with the medicine very carefully

Your personal safety kit will only contain eye wash and a mini first aid kit, due to
limitations like "use before" dates etc.

S8 ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Safety
Equipment Oxygenometers S9
The normal level of oxygen in atmospheric air is approximately 21%. In order to keep
a proper and comfortable working condition the oxygen content should not fall below
approx. 19%.
On the other hand if the air is richer in oxygen content than approx. 23%, then a risk
of fast oxidation and subsequent explosion can occur for certain materials.

Especially in confined spaces there can be a significant risk of insufficient oxygen


content, as processes like e.g. rust formation and biological acticity e.g. in sludge
consume oxygen.
It is therefore of the outmost importance that tanks which have been in service are
checked and released by a responsible officer before being entered.
If such tanks are heavily corroded or filled with sludge and debris or are not
ventilated, then an oxygenometer should be carried by personnel during all
inspections.

- A carbon filter mask will not protect against insufficient oxygen -

What to How to prevent an accident


look out for:
Before * Before entering the confined space count the number of people/
entering persons entering, and note who has the oxygenometer. Check that
the batteries are working.
The meter is * Inform all other members of the inspection party. Thereafter leave
giving off a the confined space, count heads and report to responsible officer.
warning

Multi-instruments S9-S10 are available.


143

NOTE:
Lack of oxygen CANNOT be perceived by
human senses.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

HELMET

S9, ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Safety
Equipment Explosiometers S10
In order to avoid the risk of an explosion, the concentration of ignitable fumes must
be kept below the lower explosion limit (LEL).
This limit depends on the type of fumes, and typically it will be in the order
of 0.5-5%.
In order to be safe the environment should always be kept below 10% of the LEL.

Before entering confined spaces that have carried flammable liquids, it is of


the outmost importance that they have been measured and released by a
responsible officer and that ventilation has been established and is running.

During paint application and until the coating has dried completely ventilation must
also be running continuously.
Most solvent vapors are more heavy than air and therefore
NOTE: tend to collect at the bottom of the confined space.
Ventilation exhaust must always be taken there.

What to look How to prevent an accident


out for:
Before * Has the confined space been released by a responsible officer?
entering * Is there a guard and life saving equipment just outside the
confined space?
* Check that you are not bringing non-explosion proof materials or
lighters, etc. into the space.
* Count the number of persons/people entering.
Behavior * No smoking or open fire.
during spray * Check that spray guns are earthed and that lighting is explosion
proof.
painting * Stop work if painters are not exercising normal good painting
practice.

Multi-instruments S9-S10 are available. 6

NOTE:
Lower explosion limit CANNOT be
perceived by human senses.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT

S10, ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


PFP ed1 16/10/2002 EMi
General good
practice Around the paint products P1

Read the Technical data sheets and the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS)
carefully as they contain information related to how to protect yourself and
what to do in case of an accident.
Familiarise yourself with the different code markings.

Storage * Do not store the paint in direct sunlight.

* A paint locker must be well ventilated and the light installed must
be explosion proof. The locker must be in compliance with local
legislation.

* When painting, protect the cans from dust and dirt.

* Keep the lids closed during storage.

* Secure all cans from falling down in bad weather.

* Do not leave thinners in open cans during storage.

* Using thinner will often lower the flash point and create a
higher potential risk of explosion.

* Extra ventilation is required when using thinners as cleaning agent.

* Do not smoke or use open fire when handling paints.

* Spillage must be removed/cleaned immediately. The waste


must be stored in special containers - personal protection as gloves/
goggles and often respirators must be used when handling paints.

P1 ed2 11/10/2002 KSB


General good
practice Around the paint application P2

Brush & Roller

* Is relatively harmless to use but gloves and goggles should be used during
cleaning and application. A certain amount of ventilation is necessary.

Spray equipment:
* Good maintenance - repairs before break down means improved safety.

* Only tested hoses, spray guns and fittings designed for max. output pressure
for each individual pump must be used.

* It is important that the pump is grounded to the subject to avoid explosion/fire


from sparks created by static electricity - also during cleaning.

* Safety nozzle tips to be used on airless equipment.

* Do not point an airless gun at anybody.

* Be careful when using a powerful agitator/mixer to avoid paint/thinner splashing


anybody.

* Full personal protection, i.e. clothes, gloves and respiratory mask is necessary
when checking WFT during spray application.

P2 ed2 11/10/2002 KSB


General good
practice Around Yourself P3

* Read the Technical data sheets and the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS)
carefully as they contain information related to how to protect yourself and
what to do in case of an accident.

* Be familiar with and respect the rules and regulations on the site/yard where you
are working. Also familiarise yourself with the location of safety equipment and.
their use.

* Keep all your personal protection equipment in good order and use them.

* Do not forget cream for skin protection.

* Keep yourself fit - eat and drink with caution.

* Maintain a yearly medical check-up.

P3 ed2 11/10/2002 KSB


General good
practice Around the work-site P4

* Keep the work-site clean and tidy.

* Do not smoke during paint application or in the vicinity of open cans.

* Maintain safety and explosion proof lights.

* Maintain proper ventilation.

* Do not allow unauthorised persons on the site.

* Do not accept hot work close to the work-site or at the reverse side of a steel
plate.

* Take care of paint hoses. Avoid kinks in the hose and avoid placing them on
sharp edges.

* Ensure that a work permit is issued.

P4 ed2 11/10/2002 KSB


General good
practice Around the fire/explosion risk P5

* Check the location of the nearest emergency station and telephone alarm
numbers to the fire brigade/rescue team.

* Check the location of the nearest fire station and telephone number.

* Be familiar with and respect the local safety rules and regulations.

* Be aware of Lower Explosion Limit (LEL) and the explosion risk especially
in confined areas with stagnant air.

* Excess concentration of dust - especially in combination with a low RH - can,


when the mixture of dust and air is within a certain limit, explode.
Ventilation is necessary.

* Only approved safety lamps to be used where any risk of explosion is present.

* Extra care (more ventilation and frequent readings) to be taken when working
with volatile paint/solvents.

P5 ed2 11/10/2002 KSB


General good
practice Around the application of Antifoulings P6

The new generation of antifouling paints use various biocides to make them
effective against marine organisms.
By their very nature these biocides are toxic and can irritate the skin on contact.
Effects are worse if the paint it ingested or inhaled.
Avoiding contact with the wet paint or spray dust is the best way to avoid irritation
casued by contact.
The following precautions should be observed:

DO's AND DON'Ts


DO
* Wear an overall with full length sleeves and legs.
* Wear a second disposable overall with a hood.
* Keep the buttons and zips done up and the hood over your head.
* Wear long sleeve gloves and boots.
* Make sure there are no gaps or exposed skin at wrist and ankle.
* Wear a full face mask or a half mask, goggles and barrier cream.

DO
* Keep everyone out of the area except the application team.
* After application is finished hose down overspray on staging,
propeller wrapping, etc, with water and remove it.

DO
* Wash before eating, drinking or smoking.
* Shower before going home or as soon as possible if in contact with
paint or dryspray.

DO
* Throw away your disposable overall every day.
* Wash your face mask and inside your helmet every day.
* Wear a clean overall and helmet sweatband every day.
* Replace your gloves as soon as the inside looks dirty.

DON'T
* Allow paint or dryspray to come into contact with your skin.
* Allow paint or dryspray to remain in contact with your skin for more
than half an hour, especially if your skin is wet or sweaty.
ref 1: Personal Health Protection During Application of Antifoulings. - CEPE
ref 2: SAFE USE OF TIN-FREE , MARINE ANTI-FOULING COATINGS - HSE, UK

P6 ed1 29/09/2003 NM
NFP ed1 16/10/2002 EMi
Newbuilding:
Block Stage Shell vertical areas N1
Vertical areas of blocks (sections) and tank farms are most often accessed from
crane stools, cherry pickers, sky-climbers or fixed staging.
The major risks are falling from a height, getting stuck or being hit from something
from above.

What to look
How to prevent an accident
out for:
Crane stools * Do not go up in heavy or gusty winds.
* Go up only together with an authorised person qualified for
communication with the crane operator.
* Check that the stool is properly maintained and that all mounting
devices are present and tied correctly.
Cherry Pickers * Do not go up in heavy or gusty winds.
* Check that the cherry picker is parked correctly out of the way of
other traffic including crane rails.
* If fixed with drop stands, these must be lowered, locked and
standing on solid ground.
* Go up only together with an authorised person qualified for
handling the cherry picker - and let him operate the machine.
* Do not operate, if you are not properly instructed/certified.
* If required by local rules, always wear a safety belt or harness.
* Be aware of items above you.
Sky-climbers * Check that the stool is properly maintained and that all mounting
devices are present and tied correctly.
* Do not go up in heavy or gusty winds.
* If required by local rules, always wear a safety belt or harness.
* Be aware of items above you.
Fixed staging * Check that the staging is securely fastened
* While climbing always check that ladders and planks ahead of
you are intact, securely supported and fastened before entering
* Beware of the presence and condition of guard rails; do not lean
on them unless checked for proper fixation.
* Do not enter scaffolds, if ladders are marked with red "scarf tags"
* Always look behind you before stepping backwards.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

N1, ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Newbuilding:
Block Stage Open horizontal areas N2
Open horizontal areas of blocks are normally accessed via climbing ladders and
staging.

The major risks are falling from a height due to insufficient guard rails, falling into
insufficiently covered/marked holes in the hull and stumbling over protrusions, tools
or wires on the floor.

What to look How to prevent an accident


out for:
Guard rails * Check that guard rails are set up where necessary and are
intact. In case not, avoid to pass such areas.
* Do not lean over or climb beyond guard rails. Find other
methods of checking such areas, e.g. from a cherry picker.

Holes * Constantly look around you to keep an eye out for possible
unprotected holes.
* Always look behind you before stepping backwards.
* Coverings for holes should look safe and be well mounted
before you cross them.

Protrusions, * Constantly look around you to notice the location of protrusions,


wires, cables wires, cables and tools.
* Always look behind you before stepping backwards.
* Be aware of items above you.

Ladders and * Check that the staging is securely fastened.


staging * While climbing, always check that ladders and planks ahead of
you are intact, securely supported and fastened before entering
them.
* Beware of the presence and condition of guard rails. Do not lean
on them unless they have been checked to see that they are
properly fixed.
* Always look behind you before stepping backwards.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

N2, ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Newbuilding:
Block Stage Confined Spaces N3
Confined spaces of blocks are normally accessed via ladders and staging. Inside the
spaces further ladders and staging may be used. Protrusions like stringers, knees
and bulkheads as well as holes are often many.
The major risks are falling from a height, falling into insufficiently covered/marked
holes, stumbling over protrusions, tools or wires.
The following exposures should also be observed:
Exposure to excessive amounts of dust, noise from abrasive blasting, abrasive
residues, paint particles and solvent fumes from paint application can be harmfull.

What to look
How to prevent an accident
out for:
Holes * Constantly look around you for possible unprotected holes.
* Always look behind you before stepping backwards.
* Coverings for holes should look safe and be well mounted
before you cross them.
Protrusions, * Constantly look around you to notice the location of protrusions,
wires, cables wires, cables and tools.
* Always look behind you before stepping backwards.
* Be aware of items above you.
Ladders and * Check that the staging is securely fastened.
staging * While climbing, always check that ladders and planks ahead of
you are intact, securely supported and fastened.
* Beware of the presence and condition of guard rails. Do not lean
on them unless checked for proper fixation.
* Always look behind you before stepping backwards.
Abrasive dust * Do not enter areas where abrasive blasting is ongoing, unless
absolutely necessary. In that case wear a dust filter mask.
* Use dust protective mask, when entering areas where fine
cleaning after non-metallic abrasives has not yet taken place.
Paint particles * Use carbon filter and protective goggles when entering areas
and where paint work is ongoing or has just finished.
solvent fumes * Check that ventilation is working and extracting air from the
bottom of the confined space.
Noise * Use ear protection when working around abrasive blasting and
water jetting areas.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

N3, ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Newbuilding:
Assembly Vertical Areas N4
Vertical areas of during assembly are most often accessed from crane stools, cherry
pickers, sky-climbers or fixed staging.
The major risks are falling down, getting stuck or something falling on you from above
.

What to look
How to prevent an accident
out for:
Crane stools * Do not go up in heavy or gusty winds.
* Go up only together with an authorised person qualified for
communication with the crane operator.
* Check that the stool is properly maintained and that all mounting
devices are present and tied correctly.
Cherry Pickers * Do not go up in heavy or gusty winds.
* Check that the cherry picker is parked correctly out of the way of
other traffic including crane rails.
* If fixed with drop stands, these must be lowered, locked and
lodged on solid ground.
* Go up only together with an authorised person qualified for
handling the cherry picker - and let him operate the machine.
* Do not operate it alone unless certified by the project manager.
* If required by local rules, always wear a safety belt or a harness.
* Be aware of items above you.
Sky-climbers * Check that the stool is properly maintained and that all mounting
devices are present and tied correctly.
* Do not go up in heavy or gusty winds.
* Look up for items above you.
Fixed staging * Check that the staging is securely fastened.
* While climbing always check that ladders and planks ahead of
you are intact, securely supported and fastened before entering.
* Beware of the presence and condition of guard rails. Do not lean
on them unless they have been checked and are properly fixed.
* Always look behind you before stepping backwards.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

N4, ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Newbuilding:
Assembly Open horizontal areas N5
Open horizontal areas on assembly are normally accessed via gangways or climbing
ladders and/or staging.
The major risks are falling downt due to insufficient guard rails, falling into
insufficiently covered/marked holes on the decks, stumbling over protrusions, tools
or wires on the floor or hitting your head into protrusions.
Furthermore, flying debris from other activities should be observed, like dust from
grinding operations and tools falling. The effect of UV-light from weld arcs should be
considered.

What to look How to prevent an accident


out for:
Temporary * Check that guard rails are intact. In case not avoid such areas.
guard rails * Do not lean over or climb beyond guard rails. Find other
methods of checking such areas, e.g. from a cherry picker.

Holes * Constantly look around you to notice possible unprotected holes.


* Always look behind you before stepping backwards.
* Coverings for holes should look safe and be well mounted before
you cross them.
Protrusions, * Constantly look around you to notice the location of protrusions,
wires, cables wires, cables and tools.
* Always look behind you before stepping backwards.
* Be aware of items above you.
Ladders and * Check that the staing is securely fastened.
staging * While climbing always check that ladders and planks ahead of
you are intact, securely supported and fastened before entering
them.
* Beware of the presence and condition of guard rails. Do not lean
on them unless they have been checked and are properly fixed.
* Always look behind you before stepping backwards.
UV-Light * UV-Light from welding/cutting can harm your eyes. Never look
directly into such light.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

N5, ed2 11/10/2002 EMI


Newbuilding:
Assembly Confined Spaces N6
Confined spaces of blocks are normally accessed via ladders and staging. Inside the
spaces further ladders and staging may be used. You should keep an eye out for
protrusions like stringers, knees and bulkheads as well as holes.
The major risks are falling from a height, falling into insufficiently covered/marked
holes, stumbling over protrusions, tools or wires.
The following exposures should also be observed:
Excessive amounts of dust, noise from abrasive blasting, abrasive residues, paint
particles and solvent fumes from paint application.
What to look
How to prevent an accident
out for:
Holes * Constantly look around you for possible unprotected holes.
* Always look behind you before stepping backwards.
* Coverings for holes should look safe and be well mounted before
you cross them.
Protrusions, * Constantly look around you to notice the location of protrusions,
wires, cables wires, cables and tools.
* Always look behind you before stepping backwards.
* Be aware of items above you.
Ladders and * Check that the staging is securely fastened.
staging * While climbing always check that ladders and planks ahead of
you are intact and securely supported and fastened.
* Beware of the presence and condition of guard rails. Do not lean
on them unless checked for proper fixation.
* Always look behind you before stepping backwards.
Abrasive dust * Do not enter areas where abrasive blasting is ongoing, unless
absolutely necessary. In that case wear a dust filter mask.
* Use dust protective mask, when entering areas where fine
cleaning after non-metallic abrasives has not yet taken place.
Paint particles * Use carbon filter and protective goggles when entering areas
and where paint work is ongoing or has just finished.
solvent fumes * Check that ventilation is working and extracting air from the
bottom.
Noise * Use ear protection when working around abrasive blasting and
water jetting areas.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

N6, ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Newbuilding: On-line Application N7
On-line application means that application takes place in stations and the items are
moved from station to station. Thus inspection is taking place at fixed locations.
The major risks are exposure to solvent vapours, falling into ditches, getting stuck on
or hit by moving items or parts and the risk of fire and explosion.
Furthermore, when checking of coating or surface preparation procedures is
required, beware of exposure to paint spray, abrasive dust and noise.

What to look
How to prevent an accident
out for:
Solvent * Use carbon filter mask when entering painting areas and
vapours flash-off zones located before the final drying oven.

Paint spray * Further to a carbon filter mask for solvent protection, use
goggles when entering the spray booths during application.

Abrasive dust * Use dust protective mask, when in need for entering abrasive
blasting cabins.
* Never enter a blasting cabin while work is in progress.
Noise * Use ear protection when working around abrasive blasting areas
or at the steel workshop.
Moving items * Always keep out of the line track and watch out when crossing it.
Items may move without notice.
* Do not enter items, while they are on track, unless you know
exactly when they are going to move.
* Production has priority. Always give way for production people,
items and equipment.
* Never enter items like containers, when located above ditches.
You may fall down through the crossmembers.
Automatic * Do not stand too close to automatic equipment. It may start
equipment without notice.
Fire/Explosion * On-line production may be very intensive and high
concentrations of solvents may occur locally.
Always check that ventilation is working correctly and do not
carry items which can cause sparks when entering such areas.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

N7, ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


RFP ed1 16/10/2002 EMi
Docking/
Refurbishment Ballast tanks/Void spaces R1
Before entering tanks/void spaces for evaluation you must check with the ships/sites
responsible officer, that the tanks/void spaces have been ventilated and released for
access. Inform him which tanks you will be in.
Never enter the tank(s) alone. Bring an additional small torch light for emergency.
The major risks in this phase are lack of oxygen, accumulated noxious gases, falling
from a height, falling into insufficiently covered/marked holes and stumbling over or
hitting protrusions.
Also, tanks may be full of mud and surfaces may therefore be very slippery. Bottom
areas may still contain water.
What to look out
How to prevent an accident
for:
Oxygen and * Verify with responsible officer that the tanks/void spaces
gases have been released for access. Follow safety procedure for
first time entry into the tanks/void spaces.
Inspection of condition

* Bring an oxygenometer in case of any doubt at all.


Slippery * Wear your safety boots and gloves. Do not enter areas
surfaces which are too slippery to safely walk on.
Holes * Constantly look around you for unprotected holes.
* Always look behind you before stepping backwards.
Access * Always make sure to have at least one safe grip with your
hands, when you climb.
* Check condition and mountings of ladders and gangways,
before you enter them.
* Coverings for holes should look safe and be well mounted
before you cross them.
Ladders and * Check item on page N6
During the work

staging
Abrasive dust * Check item on page N6

Paint particles / * Check item on page N6


Solvent Fumes
Noise * Use ear protection when working near abrasive blasting and
water jetting areas.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

R1, ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Docking/
Refurbishment Chemical tanks/Oil tanks R2
Before entering tanks/void spaces for evaluation you must check with the ships/sites
responsible officer, that the tanks have been ventilated and released for access.
Inform him which tanks you will be in.
The major risks in this phase are lack of oxygen, accumulated noxious gases, falling
from a height, and stumbling over or hitting protrusions.
Also, tanks may be contaminated with residual cargo and muddy oil/dirt and be very
slippery.
What to look out
How to prevent an accident
for:
Oxygen and * Verify with responsible officer that the tanks have been
gases/fumes tested and released for access. Follow safety procedure for
first time entry into the tanks.
* Cargo absorbed into the coating may release fumes for a
long period. Use your carbon filter mask if in doubt.
Inspection of condition

Slippery * Wear your safety boots and gloves. Do not enter areas
surfaces which are too slippery to safely walk on.
Microbiology * Some tanks, like waste water tanks and tanks in biological
contamination industries, may be contaminated with a microbiological flora,
that could affect your health. Use the carbon filter protective
mask.
Access * Check for any entrance warnings before entering the tank.
* DO NOT climb up to stringers or balance on small support
beams.
* Check condition and fixation of ladders and gangways,
before you enter them.
* Coverings for holes should look safe and well mounted
before you cross them.
During the work

Ladders and * Check item on page N6


staging
Abrasive dust * Check item on page N6
Paint spray and * Check item on page N6
solvent fumes
Noise * Use ear protection when working around abrasive blasting
and water jetting areas.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

R2, ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Docking/
Refurbishment Outside shells R3
Vertical areas are during evaluation and work most often accessed from crane
stools, sky climbers, cherry pickers or fixed staging.
The major risks are falling from a height, getting stuck or items falling on you from
above.
What to look out
How to prevent an accident
for:
Crane stools * Do not go up in heavy or gusty winds.
and sky climbers * Go up only together with an authorised person qualified for
communication with the crane operator.
* Check that the stool is properly maintained and that all
mounting devices are present and tied correctly.
* Do not operate unless you are properly instructed/certified.

Cherry Pickers * Do not go up in heavy or gusty winds.


* Check that the equipment is parked correctly out of the way
of other traffic including crane rails.
* If fixed with drop stands, these must be lowered, locked and
located on solid ground.
* Go up only together with an authorised person qualified for
handling the equipment - and let him operate it.
* If required by local rules always wear a safety belt. or
harness.
* Do not operate unless you are properly instructed/certified.
* Look up for items above you.
Fixed staging * Check that the staging is securely fastened.
* While climbing always check that ladders and planks ahead
of you are intact, securely supported and fastened before
entering.
* Beware of the presence and condition of guard rails. Do not
lean on them unless checked for proper fixation.
* Always look behind you before stepping backwards.
Abrasive dust * Check item on page N6
Paint spray and * Check item on page N6
solvent fumes
Noise * Use ear protection when working around abrasive blasting
and water jetting areas.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

R3, ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Docking/
Refurbishment Constructions at heights R4
Evaluation of areas that are high up is most often performed with the help of crane
stools, hanging baskets etc.
The major risks are falling down or something falling on you from above.
Many operating companies have very strict rules for working under these
conditions. Such rules must be strictly observed.
What to look out
How to prevent an accident
for:
Crane stools, * Do not go up in heavy or gusty winds.
sky climbers and * Go up only together with an authorised person qualified for
hanging baskets communication with the crane operator - for baskets have a
ground communicator and agree signals with him
beforehand.
* Check that the stool/basket is properly maintained and that
all mounting devices are present and tied correctly.
* Beware of items above you.
* Do not operate unless you are properly instructed/certified.
Fixed staging * Do not go up in heavy or gusty winds.
and ladders * Check that the staging/ladder is securely fastened.
* While climbing always check that ladders and planks ahead
of you are intact, securely supported and fastened before
entering.
* Beware of the presence and condition of guard rails. Do not
lean on them unless checked for proper fixation.
* Check that you are able to reach the next rest areas, while
climbing.
* Constructions may move in the wind. Always hold on to
something.
* Always look behind you before stepping backwards.
Abrasive dust * Check item on page N6
Paint spray and * Check item on page N6
solvent fumes
Noise * Use ear protection when working around abrasive blasting
and water jetting areas.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

R4, ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Docking/ Cargo holds/Storage tanks/
Refurbishment R5
Silos interior
Cargo holds, storage tanks and silos interior are large open rooms designed for
containing dry bulk material. They are usually accessed via cherry pickers from the
tank top/bottom or from fixed staging.
The major risks are falling down or items falling on you from above.

What to look out


How to prevent an accident
for:
Cherry Pickers * If fixed with drop stands, these must be lowered, locked and
lodged on solid ground.
* Go up only together with an authorised person qualified for
handling the equipment - and let him operate it.
* If required by local rules always wear the safety belt. or
harness.
* Beware of items above you.
* Do not operate unless you are properly instruted/certified.
Fixed staging * Check that the staging is securely fastened
* While climbing, always check that ladders and planks ahead
of you are intact, securely supported and fastened before
entering.
* Beware of the presence and condition of guard rails. Do not
lean on them unless checked for proper fixation.
Abrasive dust * Do not enter holds/silos where abrasive blasting is ongoing
unless absolutely necessary. In that case wear a dust filter
mask.
* Use dust protective mask, when entering areas where fine
cleaning after non-metallic abrasives has not yet taken place
.
Paint spray and * Use carbon filter and protective goggles when entering holds
solvent vapour /silos where paint work is ongoing or has just finished.
* Check that ventilation is working and extracting air from the
bottom.
Noise * Use ear protection when working around abrasive blasting
and water jetting areas.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

R5, ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


TFP ed1 16/10/2002 EMi
Working in: BALLAST TANKS IN SERVICE T1
Before starting the inspection make sure you have agreed with the Master or Chief
Officer which tanks you are going to inspect - and that you report back, when you are
finished.
Never enter the tank(s) alone.
What to look
How to prevent an accident
out for:
Oxygen content * Oxygen content in recently opened tanks may be too low.
* The vessels responsible officer must have approved access to
the tank.
* Do not enter the tank as the first person and keep an eye on
the persons entering before you.
NOTE: Your protective mask will NOT protect you against
lack of oxygen.
Slippery surfaces * Ballast tanks often contain wet mud and the surfaces are very
slippery. Since there are many stringers and protrusions, a fall
may cause severe injury..
* Wear a pair of Wellingtons, coverall, gloves and your helmet
and be careful especially when climbing sloped surfaces and
through manholes.
Entry manholes * Ballast tanks are tanks with few access openings. Always
make sure that the vessels officer is informed about your
activities in order to avoid being locked in. Always work in a
party of at least two persons together and agree with the
officer to report back when you are finished.
Stringer deck * Stringer decks, especially in the fore peak tank, may have
holes holes which you can fall through and hurt yourself seriously.
* NEVER take a step backwards in these tanks without looking
behind you beforehand EVERY time, even if your are
concentrating on inspection or photographing.
* Bring a torch light with properly charged batteries as tanks are
most commonly not illuminated.
Ladders, * Old rusted ladders may not be safe. Always check the
stairways condition before using the ladders.
Access * Very narrow spaces exist in certain areas of ballast tanks.
Never enter where you cannot safely get out.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

T1 ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Inspection in
service CARGO TANKS IN SERVICE T2
Before starting the inspection make sure you have agreed with the ships/sites
responsible officer which tank(s) you are going to inspect - and that you report back,
when you are finished.

Never enter the tank(s) alone.


What to look
How to prevent an accident
out for:
Gases/fumes Cargoes transported and stored may give off gases or fumes
that may be noxious, even for some time after discharging due
to absorbtion in the coating. Even after tank cleaning this can
still occur.
Furthermore, the gases and fumes may build up to an explosive
mixture with the air. Therefore tanks must have been released to
you by the ships/sites responsible officer before inspection.
Even if the explosiometer test is ok, it does not mean that the
tank can be entered with a protective mask. If there is any doubt
at all, then use protective (airfed) mask.
Slippery surfaces Oil tanks often contain muddy oil and the surfaces are very
slippery.
Wear your safety boots, coverall, gloves and your helmet and be
careful especially when climbing ladders and sloped surfaces.
Photography Photography, especially when using a flash, should be done only
if approved by the vessels/sites responsible officer.

Microbiological Waste water tanks and tanks in biochemical industries may be


contamination contaminated with a microbiological flora that could affect your
health. Use protective mask.
Access Cargo tanks are large open areas with upper parts which are
difficult to get to and inspect closely. DO NOT, however, climb
up to the stringers or balance on small support beams, as the
risk of falling is by far too high.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

T2 ed2 14/10/2002 EMi


Inspection in Under Water Inspections
service T3
Operational Diving Support
Commercial diving operations are extensively carried out at in-docking locations
along side and offshore. Structural surveys, underwater hull inspections and
constructional tasks are among the most common.
Control of the operation rests with the Diving Supervisor who has the ultimate
responsibility for the safety of the divers.
The major risks involved are diver oriented.

What to look
How to prevent an accident
out for:
Organisation * Ask who the Supervisor is. Ensure that you have been made
aware of the dive plan for the operation. If in doubt at any
stage, consult the Diving Supervisor.
* It is important that the Master/Captain has been informed by
the dive team that the operation is in progress, so that they
can lock the propeller(s) and hoist the "Diver in the water" flag:
Alpha.
Equipment * DO NOT handle any diving equipment or associated items
unless instructed by the Diving Supervisor or the diver.
Hazards * Accessibility is determined by the Supervisor and diver(s). If
you observe a potential hazard that may put the actions of the
diver in danger, promptly rase the concern to the Diving
Supervisor.
* Access to the water is usually from the quayside, jetty, ladder
or dive support vessel. It is important to ensure that physical
hazards, if identified, have been reported to the Diving
Supervisor prior to the divers entering / egressing from the
water.

Life Line * It is common practice for the diver to have an umbilical or


lifeline to the surface. If operating the line, ensure that the line
remains secure in both hands so the motion of the diver can
be read.
* If successive pulses or tugs from the diver occurs, alert the
Diving Supervisor immediately.
Timing * Should the time of the dive as instructed by the Diving
Supervisor be nearing or complete, report to the Diving
Supervisor accordingly and await instructions.
Instructions * Should you receive any instructions from the Diving
Supervisor, repeat the instructions clearly in order to ensure
that the message was understood.

T3, ed1 05/12/2001 IW


Inspection in
service OUTSIDE SHELL T4
Inspections of outside shells means working up vertical sides and on sloped surfaces
like e.g. tank roofs as well as working near edges introducing the risk of a fall.

What to look
How to prevent an accident
out for:
Falling Attach yourself to the basket and close the gate when working
from cherry pickers.
NEVER balance on beams, rails, stringers and the like.
When working on roofs, always check the quality of rails
beforehand. Furthermore, if sloped, fit yourself with a lifeline.
In cold seasons - or when working on cold items - beware of ice
on the surfaces.
When climbing, always grip with at least one hand on something
that can hold your weight.
Make sure ladders, staircases and staging are intact and
properly fixed before climbing them.
Always look where you are walking including behind you, to
avoid stumbling over something unexpected.
Always use approved gangways and passages. Never make
shortcuts across unauthorised areas.
Look out for heavy winds that may catch you in narrow areas.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

T4 ed2 14/10/2002 EMi


Inspection in
service Constructions at heights T5
Areas very high-up are during evaluation most often accessed from crane stools,
hanging baskets, ladders or fixed staging.
The major risks are falling down or something falling on you from above.

Many operating companies have very strict rules for working under these
conditions. Such rules must be strictly observed.

What to look out


How to prevent an accident
for:
Crane stools, * Do not go up in heavy or gusty winds.
sky climbers and * Go up only together with an authorised person qualified for
hanging baskets communication with the crane operator - for baskets, have a
ground communicator and agree signals with him beforehand.
* Check that the stool/basket is properly maintained and that all
mounting devices are present and tied correctly.
* Be aware of items above you.
* Do not operate unless you are properly instructed/certified.
Fixed staging * Do not go up in heavy or gusty winds.
and ladders * Check that the staging/ladder is securely fastened.
* While climbing, always check that ladders and planks ahead
of you are intact, securely supported and fastened before
entering them.
* Beware of the presence and condition of guard rails. Do not
lean on them unless checked for proper fixation.
* Check that you are able to reach the next rest areas, while
climbing.
* Constructions may move in the wind. Always hold on to
something.
* Always look behind you before stepping backwards.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

T5, ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Inspection in
service Cargo holds/Silos interior T6
Cargo holds and silos interior are large open rooms designed for containing dry bulk
material. They are usually accessed via cherry pickers from the tank top/bottom,
from fixed staging or from climbing the installed ladder.
The major risks are falling down or something falling on you from above.

What to look
How to prevent an accident
out for:
Cherry pickers * If fixed with drop stands, these must be lowered, locked and
located on solid ground.
* Only go up together with an authorised person qualified for
handling the equipment - and let him operate it
* If required by local rules, always wear the safety belt or harness.
* Look up for items above you.
Fixed staging * Check that the staging is securely fastened.
* While climbing, always check that ladders and planks ahead of
you are intact, securely supported and fastened before
entering.
* Beware of the presence and condition of guard rails. Do not lean
on them unless they have been checked to ensure that they are
properly fixed.
The installed * This solution is often used when the cargo is still in the hold/silo.
ladder * DO NOT use this solution when cargo is being loaded or
discharged.
DO NOT walk on to cargo unless authorised to do so by
responsible officer in charge.
* Check that the ladder is intact and securely fastened.
Shape of * Cones and sloping walls may be extremely slippery. Use safety
construction lines/belt.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

T6, ed2 11/10/2002 EMi


Inspection in
service Containers T7
Containers are most commonly inspected in depots, where they are stacked empty
up to 7 pcs high. Typically they are inspected on the outside including base and roof
as well as inside.
During inspection the containers are usually brought down by a front-loader which
holds the container also during base inspection.
The major risks are falling from the roof and the container falling on you during base
inspection.
What to look
How to prevent an accident
out for:
Falling * Use a safe ladder extending min 0.5 m above the roof when
climbing onto it.
* DO NOT climb onto the roof using the doors.
* Lean the ladder at a cornerpost to secure it. If possible have
someone to hold it.
* DO NOT jump from one roof to the other. They may be wet and
slippery or flex upon landing.
Getting the * Put the container on fixed supports before walking underneath
container on it.
you * DO NOT walk under a container hanging from the front-loader.
* Before starting and when finishing the inspection of the base
clearly indicate your intentions to the operator.
Interior * Before opening the doors, check for any labels indicating
transportation of toxic materials.
* After opening the doors, allow natural ventilation for 1-2 minutes
before entering. If smell is persistent use carbon filter mask.
General. * Depots - and operation areas - are big vehicle country.
It is your responsibility to ensure that you are not in the way.
Therefore always look around corners before walking.
* DO NOT stand between two containers if there is a possibility
that one of them might be removed. You could be squeezed
between them when the loader grabs one.
* DO NOT inspect in strong or gusty winds. Stacked empty
containers may be caught by the wind and blown over.

YOUR NEEDED SAFETY EQUIPMENT:

T7, ed2 11/101/2002 EMi


FIRST AID
INSTRUCTION:

* LOCATE
* ASSIST
* CALL FOR HELP
* ALARM

FFP ed1 16/10/2002 EMi


FIRST AID
Basic Rules Physical injury F1
Physical damage may range from small scratches to situations where a person is
seriously hurt by falling or has been trapped underneath something.
In any case first aid performed correctly, until professional assistance has arrived, is
of the utmost importance.
Below are given some basic guidelines on how to assist - but first of all:
- DO NOT PANIC, try to keep calm and DO NOT bring yourself into danger -

Secondly: * Secure condition


* Call for help
* Improve condition

What to look
What to do
for:
Assistance If possible, ask somebody to call for professional assistance.
Note location and type of accident, as well as number of
casualties.
Is the person Remove the object trapping the person. DO NOT try to drag the
entrapped? person out.
Has the person If so, DO NOT try to move the person unless absolutely
hurt his back? necessary.
Is the person Try to stop or minimize the bleeding, if necessary by pressing
bleeding? your hands against the point of bleeding. Do not care about
hygiene.
Has the person Flush the burned area with cold running water until assistance
got severe arrives and a minimum of 15 minutes.
burns?
Has the person Immediately turn off electricity, before touching the person.
received an Check heart condition and provide heart massage and mouth-to-
electric shock? mouth breathing if heart is not beating. Continue until heart is
working or professional assistance is taking over.
Is the person If possible leave the person in the area until assistance arrives. If
located in a not hurt in the back make him as comfortable as possible and
confined keep him warm with blankets or jackets.
space?
Is the person Try to calm down the person by talking to him calmly.
conscious?
Is the person Observe that his breathing can take place, possibly bring him
unconscious? in recovery position.

F1, ed2 16/10/2002 EMi


FIRST AID
Basic Rules Inhalation F2
The lungs of a human body are very sensitive to foreign substances and are in
addition a fast way of transfer of such substances into other areas of the body.
The main risks during coating operations are lack of oxygen and exposure to dust,
solvent fumes and coating spray.
Below are given some basic guidelines on how to assist in case of an accident - but
first of all:
- DO NOT PANIC, try to keep cool -

What to look
What to do
for:
Assistance If possible, ask somebody to call for professional assistance.
Note location and type of accident, as well as number of
casualties.
Secure your DO NOT try to enter areas of low oxygen content unprotected.
own position You will need an air supplied mask.
A carbon filter mask is NOT sufficient.
Wear a carbon filter mask when entering areas of high solvent
fume concentrations.
Wear a dust filter mask when entering areas of high dust
concentrations.
Secure a lifeline to a safe area with somebody capable of
dragging you out if necessary.
Remove all potential causes of an explosion before entering
confined spaces for rescue. If available, check conditions with
the explosiometer.
Shut down all operating equipment except ventilation and
lighting that is already turned on.
Evacuate the Bring the person to an area with fresh air and cover him with
person blankets/jackets.
If unconscious, put him in recovery position.
Await professional assistance.
Documentation Find Product Safety Datasheet for the product(s) that has
caused the accident and give these to the hospital.

F2, ed2 16/10/2002 EMi


FIRST AID
Basic Rules Digestion F3
Digestion of abrasives, paint materials and related products seems very unlikely, but
as a good preventive rule never keep thinners, cleaners, oils or other liquids used for
the coating processes in unmarked non-original packing, especially NOT in bottles
used for drinking water.
Below are given some basic guidelines on how to assist in case of an accident - but
first of all:
- DO NOT PANIC, try to keep calm -

What to look
What to do
for:
Assistance If possible, ask somebody to call for professional assistance.
Note location and type of accident, as well as number of
casualties.
What did he Try to find out what the person was drinking:
drink?
* Alkaline
* Acidic
* pH-Neutral
* Organic solvent
* Poisonous (marked with a skull)
pH-neutral or Provoke vomiting, do not let the person drink anything.
Poison
(marked with a
skull)
Alkaline or DO NOT provoke vomiting. Immediately let the person drink a lot
acidic of fresh water.
Organic DO NOT provoke vomiting. Immediately let the person drink a
solvents lot, preferably milk, to counteract the degreasing effect of the
solvents.

F3, ed2 1/10/2002 EMi


The Coating Adviser's Travel/Safety Kit U1
A bag, max. 30 x 30 x 60 cm with pouch bag for cameras etc.

List of Safety Contents


1 Half mask Silicone mask v/ DIN 40 thread
2 Filter A2-P3 v/ DIN 40 thread
3 Disposable Thin vinyl/nitrile Glove, not Latex Gloves.
gloves Like Touch N TUFF 92-500 from Ansell Edmont.
4 Gloves Nitrile gloves with cotton flock internally.
5 Working Gloves Hog skin gloves
6 Creme Tube 200 ml, Traverbon ® (Stockhausen or Plutect 23
(Plum)
7 Cleansing Tube 200 ml, Slig ®Special (Stockhausen) or
Plulac (Plum)
8 Ear Protection
9 Safety Goggles
10 Helmet With short hat brim
11 Boiler suit Disposable paper, Tyvek® /KAPPLER or similar
12 Dust mask With air filter
13 First Aid kit Eye wash (pocket size), Mini first aid kit (for small scratch,
bruises).
14 Penlight Mity Light ® or similar Ex penlight as "Emergency light".
15 Cover shoes
16 Hobby Knife

Technical Contents
Refer to Coating Advisers Handbook

U1, ed1 10/01/2003 EMi

Похожие интересы