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Artigo Original DOI:10.5902/2179460X27337

Ciência e Natura, Santa Maria v.40, e1, 2018


Revista do Centro de Ciências Naturais e Exatas - UFSM
ISSN impressa: 0100-8307
ISSN on-line: 2179-460X

Recebido: 25/05/2017 Aceito: 22/09/2017

Essential oil yield and composition of native species of the Myrtaceae family
from “Campos Gerais” of the Atlantic Forest in Parana State

Wanderlei do Amaral1, Cícero Deschamps2, Luiz Everson Da Silva3, Humberto R. Bizzo4,


Marco Antonio Silva Pinto4 e Luiz Antonio Biasi2
1
Universidade Federal do Paraná, Departamento de Engenharia Química, PR, Brasil
2
Universidade Federal do Paraná, Departamento de Agronomia, PR, Brasil
3
Universidade Federal do Paraná, PR, Brasil
4
Embrapa, Brasil

Abstract

The Myrtaceae family has great occurrence in Brazil, mainly in the Atlantic Forest of the South and Southeast
regions and presents potential for essential oil production. This work aimed to evaluate the essential oil yield and
composition of the species Myrciaria delicatula, Campomanesia xantocarpha, Campomanesia aurea, Calyptranthes
clusiifolia, Myrcia splendens, Eugenia osoriana, Myrciaria tenella, Myrceugenia reitzii, Calyptranthes concinna e
Myrcia arborensis from a segment of the Atlantic Forest of Parana State. The sample collections for essential oil
extraction, photographic records and herbarium specimens preparation for botanical species identification were
made at the Private Reserve of Natural Heritage (PRNP) Butuguara in Palmeira (PR), with “Campos Gerais”
formations. The identification and the official deposit of the species were made ​​​​at the HFIE Herbarium. The essential
oil extraction was carried out by hydrodistillation of fresh and dried leaves using a Clevenger type apparatus and
the chemical composition was analyzed by gas phase chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC/MS).
Myrceugenia reitzii showed eesential oil yield superior to other species and the essential oil yield of all species
increased after drying. The chemical composition in the samples showed mono and sesquiterpenes , being the
sesquiterpenes in higher percentages. The drying conditions affected the essential oil composition of the for the
majority of the evaluated species.

Keywords: Medicinal and aromatic plants. Terpenes. Atlantic rain forest


Ciência e Natura v.40, e1, 2018

1 Introduction

The study of the diversity and complexity of chemical structures found in nature provides important tools for molecular
biology, biochemistry, medicine and ecological chemistry. Essential oils are complex mixtures of volatile substances, lipophi-
lic, usually odoriferous and liquid [1], widely used to impart aroma and flavors to food products and oral hygiene, perfumery
and cleaning products. They are also sources of active principles for the pharmaceutical industry [2-5]. The essential oils in
plants are related to ecological functions of defense and attraction of pollinators among others, and undergo quantitative and
qualitative variation in response to environmental conditions [6].
In Brazil, the production of essential oils does not meet the demand, besides, the national and international perfumery market
has been showing interest in new essences [7-8]. According to Bandoni [9] it is estimated that approximately 65% ​​of the market
of essences comes from cultivated species and 1% from wild species. Yunes [5], defends the importance of intensifying the
studies of the Brazilian flora, in an interdisciplinary way, aiming at the identification of promising species for the production
of volatile oils, for use as inputs in obtaining chemical entities to be included in new medicines available to the Health system
Besides, Brazil has more than 43 thousand described plant species, with an endemism rate of 56%, and the Atlantic Forest
Biome presents the largest number of plant species among Brazilian biomes, with more than 19,000 species, of which 7,600
species are endemic [10]. On the other hand, the general fields have a very particular structure, function and dynamics and
represent a highly interactive ecosystem [11], whose existence is conditioned by abiotic factors, anthropic action and natural
disturbances such as frost, specially the fire [12]. These changes in environmental factors influence the secondary metabolism
of plant species and consequently the production and composition of the essential oils [13-14]. Post-harvest factors, such as
drying, also affect the production of essential oil in aromatic species.
Myrtaceae is one of the most important botanical families in Brazil, especially in the Atlantic Forest, mainly with 642 spe-
cies in the South and Southeast regions [10], with great potential in the production of volatile oils of economic interest [15]. It
is also known for its important role in the phytosociology of South and Southeastern Brazil Forests [16-17], being one of the
predominant groups of the arboreal component of the Atlantic Forest [18-19]. Species of this family are used by the population
for medicinal purposes, where they are used mainly in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders and infectious states [20].
Gubert evaluated the content and composition of aromatic species of the family Myrtaceae in the coastal region of Paraná
State, observing the presence of constituents of mono and sesquiterpene classes. There are several floristic and structural stu-
dies for the Atlantic Forest Biome, but the native aromatic flora, especially the Campos Gerais of the State of Paraná, is little
known. In this work, the content and chemical composition of the essential oil of samples of fresh and dried leaves of native
species of the family Myrtaceae in the Campos Gerais of the Atlantic Forest of the State of Paraná were evaluated.

2 Material and Methods

Plant material collection and identification

The plant material used for essential oil extraction consisted of leaves, which were collected in the “Private Natural Heri-
tage Reserve Butuguara” (PRNP), a segment of the Atlantic Forest of Parana state, South of Brazil. This area is located at 25 º
20.884 ‘S and 049 ° 47.258’ W, with altitudes ranging from 985-1145 meters and soil classified as Cambissol and Lithosol and
the climate as “Cfb”, with annual average temperatures around 17 ° C, frequent frosts and rainfall of 1,200 mm year. Collec-
tion and transport of plant material in the reserve were made under license of the Environmental Institute of Parana (Number
284/11). Ten species were collected based on the aroma and the botanical group with aromatic characteristics mentioned in the
literature (Table 1). Individual species location was georeferenced and photographic records for identification were made. The
dried specimens were transported to the Herbarium of the “Faculdades Integradas Espírita (HFIE)”, where it were herborized.
Duplicates were sent to “Curitiba Bothanic Museum (MBM)” and Federal University of Parana (UPCB) herbariums. Samples
of approximately 1 kg of leaves and terminal branches were randomly collected from at least 10 plants of each species. The
dried samples were obtained after maintaining the plant material at 40° C for 24 hours in an electric dryer (FANEM – Mod.
320 SE) with air circulation.

Essential oil isolation

The essential oil samples were obtained by hydrodistillation during 4 hours and 30 minutes in a Clevenger type apparatus
using 100 g of fresh or 50 g of dried plant material in 1 L of distilled water, with 3 replications. After extraction, the essential
oil samples were maintained in the freezer until the analysis.
Amaral et al. : Essential oil yield and composition of native species of the Myrtaceae family from “Campos Gerais”
of the Atlantic Forest in Parana State

Essential oil analysis

The identification of the essential oil chemical constituents was made by gas phase chromatography coupled to mass
spectrometry (GC/MS). The samples were diluted in dichloromethane in the proportion of 1% and 1.0 mL of the solution was
injected with a flow division of 1:20 in an Agilent 6890 chromatograph (Palo Alto, CA) coupled to mass selective detector
Agilent 5973N. The injector was maintained at 250° C. The separation of the constituents was obtained in the HP- 5MS ca-
pillary column (5% phenyl -95 % - dimethylpolysiloxane, 30 m × 0.25 mm × 0.25 µm) and using helium as carrier gas (1.0 mL
min-1). The oven temperature was programmed from 60 to 240 °C at a rate of 3 °C min- 1. The mass detector was operated in
electron ionization mode (70 eV) at a rate of 3.15 min-1 scan and mass range of 40 to 450 u. The transfer line was maintained
at 260 °C, the ion source at 230° C and the analyzer (quadrupole) at 150° C.
The diluted samples were injected into an Agilent 7890A chromatograph equipped with flame ionization detector (FID),
operated at 280° C for quantification. The same column and analytical conditions described above were employed, except
for the carrier gas used, which was hydrogen at a flow rate of 1.5 mL min- 1. The percentage composition was obtained by
electronic integration of the FID signal by dividing the area of each
​​ component by the total area (area %). The constituents
identification was obtained by comparing their mass spectra with those of Wiley library (Wiley, 1994; NIST, 2013 [22-23]
and also with their linear retention indices which were calculated from injection of a homologous series of hydrocarbons (C7
- C26) and compared with literature data [24].

Table 1 - General Data of Myrtaceae Native Species Family Collected, Palmeira, PR, 2011/2012

Localization** Collection
Scientific Name Voucher*
date
Latitude Longitude Altitude
Myrciaria delicatula (DC.) O. Berg 8.425 S 25° 21.095’ W 49° 47.896’ 1.078 14/05/11
Campomanesia xantocarpha O. Berg. 8.821 S 25° 21.094’ W 49° 47.897’ 1.085 14/05/11
Campomanesia aurea O. Berg. 8.254 S 25º 20. 444’ W 49º 48.052’ 1.063 14/02/11
Calyptranthes clusiifolia O. Berg 8.816 S 25° 19.982’ W 49° 48.371’ 1.018 27/09/11
Myrcia splendens (Sw.) DC. 8.817 S 25° 19.982’ W 49° 48.371’ 1.018 27/09/11
Eugenia osoriana Mattos & D. Legrand 9.011 S 25° 20.938’ W 49° 47.141’ 1.140 25/02/12
Myrciaria tenella (D.C) O. Berg 8.999 S 25° 19.885’ W 49° 48.284’ 1.019 17/10/11
Myrceugenia reitzii D. Legrand 9.020 S 25° 20.958’ W 49° 47.132’ 1.065 04/02/12
Calyptranthes concinna DC. 9.007 S 25° 20.953’ W 49° 47.077’ 1.124 25/02/12
Myrcia arborensis O. Berg 9.012 S 25° 20.947’ W 49° 47.127’ 1.140 25/02/12

* Number of the specimen for the identified exsicata, as found in the HFIE Herbarium of the FIES in Curitiba, PR
** Coordinates of collection of the species, this presents an average error of 15 m distance to the environment of the point

Data analysis

Variances were tested for homogeneity using the Bartlett’s test and the the Scott - Knott test (P<0.05) for mean comparison
procedures were performed using the statistical software “ASSISTAT”, release 7.6 Beta [25].

3 Results and Discussion

Essential oil yield

There was no significant interaction between the species and drying factors, but there was a significant difference in the
essential oil content among the species (Table 2). The Myrceugenia reitzii species had a higher average essential oil content
(1.59%), while the others had a mean essential oil content of 0.02 to 0.19%. The only species that did not show essential oil
after hydrodistillation extraction was Myrcia arborensis. The species Myrcia splendens presented essential oil only in fresh
leaves, whereas Campomanesia xantocarpha only after drying (Table 2).
Besides the difference between the species, there was also drying effect on the essential oil content of the species, being
higher after drying (Table 3). Assis [26] also observed in Eugenia uniflora (Myrtaceae) the increase in the essential oil content
after the drying of the leaves. In this family, the essential oil is stored in secretory cavities and leaf parenchyma cells [27-28].
With the drying there was water release and rupture in plant tissues, which may have contributed to the extraction of the essen-
Ciência e Natura v.40, e1, 2018

tial oil. Gubert [21] evaluating essential oil contents of fresh leaves of Campomanesia xantocarpha and Myrceugenia reitzii in
the coast of Pará found levels of 0.01 and 0.04%, respectively. These contents were lower than those found in Campos Gerais
Paranaense (Table 2), but the C. xantocarpha species collected in Campos Gerais Paranaense only showed essential oil after
drying the leaves. Lima [29] evaluating Myrtaceae species in the cerrado of Botucatu (SP), found in the dry leaves of Myrcia
splendens contents of 0.24%. In this work, the species Myrcia splendens only presented essential oil in fresh leaves (0.02%),
well below that found in Botucatu (SP).

Table 2 - Essential oil content (%) of leaves of native species of the Myrtaceae family in the Campos Gerais of the Atlantic Rain Forest of
the Paraná State, South of Brazil

Species Oil yield

Campomanesia aurea O. Berg. 0,17 b


Campomanesia xantocarpha O. Berg. 0,02 d
Myrciaria delicatula (DC.) O. Berg 0,19 b
Calyptranthes clusiifolia O. Berg 0,15 b
Calyptranthes concinna DC. 0,16 b
Myrcia splendens (Sw.) DC. 0,01 e
Eugenia osoriana Mattos & D. Legrand 0,19 b
Myrciaria tenella (D.C) O. Berg 0,08 c
Myrceugenia reitzii D. Legrand 1,59 a
Myrcia arborensis O. Berg -
CV% 26,28

**The averages followed by the same lowercase letter in the column and uppercase letter in the row do not differ estatistically by the Scott-Knott test at 5% probability.

Table 3 - Average content of essential oil (%) in fresh and dried leaves of native species of the family Myrtaceae in the Campos Gerais of
the State of Paraná
Samples Oil Yield
Fresh 0,27 b
Dried 0,32 a

**The averages followed by the same lowercase letter in the column and uppercase letter in the row do not differ estatistically by the Scott-Knott
test at 5% probability.

Essential oil Composition

101 constituents were identified in the essential oil samples of fresh and dry leaves, corresponding to the identification
of 81% of the constituents (Table 4). These samples presented 18.3% and 15.0% monoterpenes, 2.2% and 3.1% oxygenated
monoterpenes, 17.2% and 15.0% sesquiterpenes, 42.0% and 40.8% of oxygenated sesquiterpenes in the samples in fresh and
dry leaf samples, respectively. The species Myrciaria delicatula, Campomanesia aurea, Calyptranthes clusiifolia, Myrciaria
tenella and Calyptranthes concinna were predominantly sesquiterpenes. The species Campomanesia xantocarpha, Eugenia
osoriana and Myrcia splendens presented only sesquiterpenes in their composition and only the species Myrceugenia reitzii
presented a higher percentage of monoterpenes in the essential oil samples.
The major constituent in the samples of essential oils obtained from fresh leaves of Myrciaria delicatula were α-pinene
(24.9%) and α-cadinol (10.3%), in contrast with, khusimol (11.7%) and epi-zizanone ( 8,7%) in Campomanesia aurea, α-pinene
(13.7%) and β-pinene (10.1%) in Calyptranthes clusiifolia, α-pinene (20.5%) and (E) -β-caryophyllene (17.2%) in Myrciaria
tenella, β-pinene (30.9%) and α-pinene (27.8%) in Myrceugenia reitzii, α-cadinol (27.9%) and globulol (16.1%) (17.9%) and
α-cadinol (8.5%) in Calyptranthes concinna and globulol (16.7%) and viridiflorol (10.1%) in Myrcia splendens.
The species Calyptranthes clusiifolia and Eugenia osoriana after drying maintained their chemical composition stable in
relation to their major compounds (Table 4). Other species have undergone more significant changes, such as Myrciaria de-
licatula, which presented a decrease in the percentage of α-pinene from 24.9% to 11.2% and α-cadinol from 10.3% to 8.5%,
showing only after drying Khusimol (10.6%) and vetivenic acid (11.8%). The species Campomanesia aurea after drying did
not present khusimol and epi-zizanone, but mustacona (9.9%) and caryophyllene oxide (9.2%). The species Myrciaria tenella
decreased the percentage of α-pinene from 20.5% to 14.6% and from (E) -β-caryophyllene from 17.2% to 9.7%, showing only
after drying the safrole constituent ( 7.3%). The composition of the essential oil of M. reitzii on the coast of Paranaense pre-
sented as major components spatulenol (22.8%) and globulol (16.8%) [21], whereas in Campos Gerais Paranaense the species
Amaral et al. : Essential oil yield and composition of native species of the Myrtaceae family from “Campos Gerais”
of the Atlantic Forest in Parana State

did not present globulol, as major components but α-pinene (27.8%) and β-pinene (30.9%) (Table 4). Lima [29] found in the
cerrado of Botucatu (SP) for Myrcia splendens the major components β-pinene (12.21%) and ortho-cimene (11.09%), presen-
ting a higher percentage of monoterpenes. In the Campos Gerais, the majority of the species presented globulol (16.7%) and
viridiflorol (10.1%), with a higher percentage of sesquiterpenes, differing from the results found in the state of. It is considered
that several environmental genetic factors may have influenced the composition of the essential oils in these species [13].

Table 4 - Relative percentage of the chemical components in the essential oil from fresh and dried samples of native Myrtaceae Family of
the Campos Gerais of the Paraná State Atlantic Forest, 2012

Speciesc
Compounds C. M.
IRa IRb M. deli C. aure C. clusi M. tene M. reit E. osor C. conc
xanto sple
α-tujeno 925 924 --- --- --- 0,5(0,5) --- --- --- 0,2(0,3) ---
α-pinene 937 932 24,9(11,2)d --- --- 13,7(14,2) 20,5(14,6) 27,8(21,1) --- 6,6(9,5) ---
Sabinene 972 969 --- --- --- --- --- --- --- 0,6(0,8) ---
β-pinene 975 974 --- --- --- 10,1(9,7) 1,0(0,8) 30,9(22,5) --- 6,2(9,1) ---
Myrcene 990 988 --- --- --- 1,7(1,6) --- 1,1(0,6) --- 1,6(2,4) ---
α-felandreno 1005 1002 --- --- --- 0,8(0,8) --- --- --- (0,3) ---
δ-3-carene 1009 1011 --- --- --- --- 1,3(1,3) --- --- --- ---
α-terpinene 1016 1018 --- --- --- 0,4(0,4) --- --- --- (0,2) ---
p-cymene 1023 1022 --- --- --- 0,4(0,4) --- --- --- 0,9(0,6) ---
Limonene 1027 1024 --- 1,6 --- 5,0(4,8) 2,4(2,3) 2,2(1,5) --- 3,3(4,5) ---
1,8-cineole 1029 1030 --- --- --- 1,3(1,6) --- --- --- --- ---
γ- terpinene 1056 1054 --- --- --- 0,9(0,9) --- --- --- 0,2(0,3) ---
Terpinolene 1086 1088 --- 0,6 --- 0,4 0,5(1,8) --- --- --- ---
α-pinene oxide 1099 1099 --- --- --- --- --- 0,6(1,0) --- --- ---
Linalol 1100 1095 2,5 --- --- 1,0(1,0) --- --- --- --- ---
trans-
1136 1135 --- --- --- --- --- (2,8) --- --- ---
pinocarveol
Pinocarvone 1161 1160 --- --- --- --- --- 1,8(2,8) --- --- ---
4-terpineol 1178 1174 --- --- --- 1,7(1,6) --- --- --- 1,9(1,3) ---
α-terpineol 1190 1186 --- --- --- 1,3(1,4) --- 4,3(3,9) --- --- ---
Mirtenal 1196 1195 --- --- --- --- --- 1,5(1,5) --- --- ---
Verbenone 1208 1204 --- --- --- --- --- 1,5(1,9) --- --- ---
Sabine trans-
1252 1253 --- --- --- --- 0,6(0,3) --- --- --- ---
hydrate acetate
Safrole 1285 1285 --- --- --- --- (7,3) --- --- --- ---
α-copaene 1371 1374 --- --- --- --- 0,7(0,3) (0,4) --- 0,5(0,3) ---
β-elemene 1391 1389 1,2 0,9 --- --- --- --- 3,7(2,9) 0,9(0,3) ---
α-gurjunene 1401 1409 --- --- --- --- 0,7(0,3) --- --- 0,5 ---
(E)-β- 1,8
1417 1417 3,5(1,6) 5,1(7,2) (2,7) 6,7(5,7) 17,2(9,7) 1,3(0,5) 4,1(7,8) 5,6
caryophyllene (1,1)
β-copaene 1430 1430 --- --- --- 1,0(0,7) --- 2,0(0,5) 1,3(1,5) 1,2(0,3) ---
Aromadendreno 1435 --- (1,0) --- 1,8(1,4) 2,5(1,5) --- --- --- ---
α-humulene 1450 1452 1,1(0,9) 1,4(1,2) (1,1) 1,9(1,3) 2,9(1,7) 0,6(0,7) 1,0(1,5) 0,6(0,3) ---
Allo-
1454 1458 --- 0,7(0,9) --- --- 1,0(0,4) --- (0,5) 0,9(0,4) ---
aromadendreno
4,5-di-epi-
1465 1471 --- --- --- --- (0,7) --- --- --- ---
aristolochene
γ-muurolene 1474 1478 --- (1,8) --- 0,9(0,6) --- (0,5) 1,5(1,9) 0,5 3,1
Ar-curcumene 1480 1479 --- --- --- --- --- --- 4,2(5,0) --- 2,2

continuation...
Ciência e Natura v.40, e1, 2018

Table 4 - continuation..
Speciesc
Compoounds C. M.
M. deli C.aure C. clusi M. tene M. reit E. osor C. conc
RIa RIb xanto sple
β-selinene 1483 1489 1,3(1,3) 3,4(1,8) --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
cis-β-guaiene 1492 1492 --- --- --- --- --- 0,5 2,9(5,3) 7,4(4,0) ---
Bicyclo-
1493 1494 2,8(1,4) 3,8(5,6) (5,1) 2,3(1,6) 3,7(4,0) --- (1,1) 0,7(0,3) ---
germacrene
Viridiflorene 1497 1496 --- --- --- --- --- --- (0,5) --- ---
α-muurolene 1498 1500 1,0 --- --- 0,8 --- --- (0,8) --- ---
δ-amorphene 1504 1511 --- --- --- 0,9 --- --- --- --- ---
γ-cadinene 1509 1513 --- (1,6) (1,4) 0,9(0,7) --- --- (1,5) 4,5(2,7) ---
Cubebol 1509 1514 --- --- --- --- (0,4) --- --- --- ---
trans-
1518 1521 --- --- --- --- 4,4(2,4) --- --- --- ---
calamenene
δ-cadineneo 1520 1522 1,2(0,8) 3,0(3,2) (3,7) 3,4(2,7) (0,3) --- --- --- 2,7
trans-1,4-
1527 1533 --- --- --- 0,9 --- --- --- --- ---
cadinadiene
α-calacorene 1541 1544 --- --- --- 1,2(1,2) --- --- --- --- ---
Dracunculifoliol 1541 1541 --- 1,3 --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
Elemol 1549 1548 --- --- --- --- --- 0,8(1,1) --- --- ---
Elemicin 1553 1555 --- --- --- --- --- --- --- 17,9(22,9) ---
Germacreno B 1555 1559 --- (2,0) --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
Geranoyl
1559 1562 --- --- --- --- 2,6(1,4) --- --- --- ---
Butanoate
(E)-nerolidol 1563 1561 5,4 (2,6) --- --- --- --- 1,1(0,9) --- 4,7
Maaliol 1566 1566 --- --- (2,7) --- --- --- 2,0(1,4) --- ---
Espatulenol 1575 1577 5,6(3,1) 1,6(4,0) (13,0) 9,1(9,7) 11,4(7,0) 16.9(23,5) 10,3(5,8) 5,6(4,9) 7,9
Caryophyllene
1580 1582 --- (9,2) (14,5) --- 10,8(5,6) --- --- --- ---
oxide
Globulol 1586 1590 6,9(2,1) 6,0(5,7) (5,0) 6,4(6,5) 2,2(1,2) --- 16,1(12,1) 7,7(4,6) 16,7
Viridiflorol 1587 1592 2,7(1,9) 3,1 --- --- --- --- --- --- 10,1
Cubeban-11-ol 1590 1595 1,4 --- --- --- --- 1,8(2,2) 6,6(5,0) 5,1(2,4) 1.0
Guaiol 1595 1600 2,0(2,9) --- (2,3) --- --- --- --- --- ---
Rosifoliol 1596 1600 --- (1,8) (2,8) --- 1,8(1,0) (1,1) 1,9(1,5) 2,9(1,7) 4,7
Khusimone 1598 1604 2,4(1,0) --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
Humulene oxide
1604 1608 --- --- (2,2) --- 1,8(1,2) --- --- --- ---
II
Jumenol 1614 1618 (1,6) --- --- --- --- --- --- --- 2,4
1-epi-cubebol 1622 1627 1,9(1,2) 4,4(3,8) (6,2) 2,5(2,9) 2,4(1,6) --- 2,3(2,2) 0,9(0,6) 2,1
Eremoligenol 1629 1629 1,4(1,3) --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
γ-eudesmol 1630 1630 --- --- (1,1) --- --- --- 1,7(1,6) (0,5) ---
Epi-α-muurolol 1638 1640 3,9(2,9) (3,2) (9,3) --- --- --- --- 4,3(2,4) 6,9
α-muurolol 1640 1644 3,8 --- --- --- 0,6 (1,7) 7,2(6,2) --- 2,2
Cubenol 1640 1645 --- --- --- --- 1,7(0,9) --- --- --- ---
β-eudesmol 1646 1649 3,1(3,2) --- (6,0) --- --- --- --- --- ---
α-cadinol 1647 1652 10,3(8,5) 5,0(6,9) (10,2) 2,6(3,3) --- --- 27,9(25,5) 8,5 7,4
Selin-11-en-4-ol 1647 1654 --- --- --- --- (2,7) --- --- --- ---
Epi-zizanone 1661 1668 8,2(6,4) 8,7 --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
Muscatone 1674 1676 --- (9,9) --- --- --- --- --- --- ---

continuation...
Amaral et al. : Essential oil yield and composition of native species of the Myrtaceae family from “Campos Gerais”
of the Atlantic Forest in Parana State

Table 4 - continuation..

Speciesc
Compoounds C. M.
M. deli C.aure C. clusi M. tene M. reit E. osor C. conc
RIa RIb xanto sple
Germagrena-
4(15),5,10(14)- 1683 1685 --- --- (2,8) --- --- --- --- --- ---
trien-1-alpha-ol
Ciperotundone 1687 1695 --- (5,3) --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
Vetiselinenol 1717 1730 --- 2,5 --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
Khusimol 1735 1741 (10,6) 11,7 --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
Drimenol 1755 1766 --- --- --- --- --- --- --- 2,6 ---
(E)-
1784 1793 (2,2) --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
isovalencenol
Vitevenic acid 1805 1811 (11,8) --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---

24,9 2,2 --- 32,2 24,4 62,0 --- 19,4 ---


Monoterpenes (%)
(11,2) (---) (---) (31,6) (19,5) (45,7) (---) (27,4) (---)
Oxygenated 2,5 --- --- 5,3 0,6 9,7 --- 1,9 ---
Monoterpenes (%) (---) (---) (---) (5,6) (7,6) (13,9) (---) (1,4) (---)
13,5 19,6 --- 24,4 34,4 4,4 18,7 20,9 19,7
Sesquiterpenes (%)
(6,9) (27,3) (16,3) (17,6) (23,0) (2,6) (30,3) (11,1) (---)

Oxygenated 59,0 45,8 --- 20,6 35,3 19,5 77,1 55,5 66,1
Sesquiterpenes (%) (60,7) (52,4) (78,1) (22,4) (22,6) (29,6) (62,2) (40,0) (---)

Total compounds 98.9 67,6 --- 83,7 94,7 96,1 95,8 97,9 85,8
identified (%) (78,8) (79,7) (94,4) (78,2) (72,7) (92,3) (92,5) (80,4) (---)

IR = Retention Index calculated; b IR= Retention Index of literature; c Species: M. deli= Myrciaria delicatula (DC.) O. Berg; C. aure= Campomanesia aurea O. Berg.; C. xanto=
a

Campomanesia xantocarpha O. Berg.; C. clusi=Calyptranthes clusiifolia O. Berg; M. tene= Myrciaria tenella (D.C) O. Berg; M. reit= Myrceugenia reitzii D. Legrand; E. osor=
Eugenia osoriana Mattos & D. Legrand; C. conc= Calyptranthes concinna DC; M. sple= Myrcia splendens (Sw.) DC. .
d
Values ​​in parentheses correspond to the composition of the essential oil from dried samples.

4 Conclusions
4 Conclusions

Among the evaluated species, Myrceugenia reitzii presents average content of superior essential oil .The essential oil content
in samples of Myrtaceae family species is higher after drying. The chemical composition of the essential oil of the species
presents mono and sesquiterpenes, being the sesquiterpenes occur in a greater percentage in these species. On the other hands,
drying affects the chemical composition of the essential oil of the species studied.

Acknowledgment

This research was supported by the funding from the Graduate Program in Agronomy of University of Parana. The authors
acknowledge the funding by CAPES – Brazilian Agency Foundation for Research, Brazil – who sponsored the senior author’s
graduate studies. We are also gratefully acknowledge the “Environment Institute of Parana State” for providing the license to
collect and transport the plant material from “The Private Reserve of Natural Heritage Butuguara”, Parana State.

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Wanderlei do Amaral
Universidade Federal do Paraná, PR, Brasil
Contribuição do autor: coleta, extração, analise química e redação do texto
Email: wdoamaral@hotmail.com

Cícero Deschamps
Universidade Federal do Paraná, PR, Brasil
Contribuição do autor: redação do texto e coordenação geral da equipe
Email: cicero@hotmail.com

Luiz Everson Da Silva


Universidade Federal do Paraná, PR, Brasil
Contribuição do autor: redação do texto, análise química da composição das espécies
Email: luiz_everson@yahoo.de

Humberto R. Bizzo
Embrapa, Brasil
Contribuição do autor: analise cromatográfica
Email: humberto.bizzo@embrapa.br

Marco Antonio Silva Pinto


Embrapa, Brasil
Contribuição do autor: análise cromatográfica
Email: marco.pinto@embrapa.br

Luiz Antonio Biasi


Universidade Federal do Paraná, PR, Brasil
Contribuição do autor: redação do texto, análise quimica da composição das espécies
Email: biasi@ufpr.br

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