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ENG 6020: Composition Instructors’ Workshop

Course Description
From the course catalog: The Composition Instructors’ Workshop prepares instructors for teaching
writing in broad and local contexts. The course privileges writing pedagogy, including scholarly attention to
threshold concepts and best practices in writing studies, in addition to experiential learning, such as
classroom experience and observation. While working to construct important class materials, like syllabi
and lesson plans, instructors also craft professional documents such as teaching philosophies and
observation letters. Instructors enrolled in ENG 6020 take the course prior to or concurrently with teaching
GSW 1100, GSW 1110, or GSW 1120.

As we work together to develop the course materials you’ll need to teach your Fall 2017 GSW 1110:
Introduction to Academic Writing and Spring 2018 GSW 1120: Academic Writing, we will also explore the
real, lived experience of being/becoming a teacher of college writing. Our reading and writing this
semester will explore writing pedagogies, threshold concepts of writing studies, position statements and
guidelines for teaching writing, and examples from people and programs who demonstrate current best
practices in writing instruction. Additionally, we will explore these materials with a focus on how they might
or could relate to our local context at Bowling Green State University. Therefore, to further engage the
lived experience of writing faculty at BGSU, we will participate in professional development and service
opportunities on campus, conduct several classroom observations, and host local guest
speakers/facilitators in class. The desired learning outcomes and required course materials provided
below aim to further focus and support our learning together.

Course Learning Goals


By the completion of this course you will have learned to
• Demonstrate understanding of material presented in course readings by regularly
contributing to class discussions on Canvas or in person.
• Interpret understandings of best practices in writing instruction by participating in reflective
writing on course readings, observations, and discussions.
• Analyze feedback on student writing by producing a feedback analysis in which you explore
the decisions you made in responding to and assessing student writing.
• Critique classroom practices by completing multiple class observations and producing a
classroom performance narrative.
• Develop a pedagogical identity for teaching General Studies Writing courses at BGSU by
crafting an individual teaching philosophy supported by course readings, experience teaching
GSW 1110, and preparing to teach GSW 1120.
• Support your pedagogical practices by preparing an end-of-semester working teaching
portfolio.
• TBD as a class.
As teachers of writing we know that we often learn differently than we might have expected at the
beginning of a course or class session. As we grow in experience, we will work to collaboratively
develop additional course learning outcomes (signaled by the blank bullet point above) that reflect our
learning in the practicum.
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About the Instructors1

Kelly Moreland Dr. Lee Nickoson


morelak@bgsu.edu leenick@bgsu.edu
215D East Hall 215F East Hall
11-12 Mondays, and by appointment 10:30-11:30 Tuesday, and by appointment
Phone number (redacted) Phone number (redacted)
As a proponent of active learning, collaboration, and • Writing is not simply a functional art limited to
transfer, I strive to create classroom environments that the production of content; it is a critical, deeply
foster creativity and challenge students. I ask students to social, and always political practice.
take responsibility for their own learning by developing • Writing is making. And remaking.
and engaging in meaningful composing processes, and
• Writing is action.
importantly by questioning what it means to “write.” I
• Writing involves understanding connecting with
hope to embolden students to question traditional
another.
notions of writing, extending their processes beyond pen
and paper or alphabetic texts. By asking students to • Writing is a recursive practice: writers plan, draft,
engage in group work and peer review often I hope to (re)plan, (re)draft…
foster a classroom environment that encourages us to • Writing is play.
think of ourselves as a community of writers. • Writing is messy.
• Writing is a powerful means of making sense of
I also stress to my students that our main goal for each the world(s) in which we live.
course is to develop composing processes that will work These assumptions about what
beyond first year writing and beyond their college years. writing is and does challenge me to perform three
Just as I expect students to engage in various responsibilities: (1) to develop, organize, and implement
composing processes, I hope they will feel inspired to a curriculum that both affirms and also challenges the
think in new ways. Asking questions, finding answers, writing histories and experience learners bring to the
and forming educated opinions are integral pieces of course; (2) to model thoughtful, engaged, and rigorous
learning how to think critically. We think and write in intellectual curiosity about writing; and (3) to motivate the
order to communicate, and thus rhetorical situation and students with whom I am fortunate to work to challenge
principles are an important component of each project themselves as readers, thinkers, writers, and citizens.
my students create. My hope is that students will move
forward from my classes with a new confidence in their
writing that they will take with them to future projects and
places.

1 I also included photos, contact information/office hours, and teaching philosophies for our four Program Assistants, whose work is
integral to the ENG 6020 course. I have redacted that section to protect the PAs’ confidentiality.
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Bibliography of Course Readings
Adler-Kassner, Linda, and Elizabeth Wardle, editors. Naming What We Know: Threshold Concepts of
Writing Studies. Utah State UP, 2015.
“Assessing Student Multimodal Work.” Kent State University, 2017,
https://www.kent.edu/english/assessing-multimodal-student-work.
Conference on College Composition and Communication. “Principles for the Postsecondary Teaching
of Writing.” National Council of Teachers of English, March 2015,
http://www.ncte.org/cccc/resources/positions/postsecondarywriting.
Council of Writing Program Administrators. “WPA Outcomes Statement for First-Year Composition.”
17 July 2014, http://wpacouncil.org/positions/outcomes.html.
Council of Writing Program Administrators, National Council of Teachers of English, and National
Writing Project. “Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing.” Council of Writing
Program Administrators, Jan. 2011, http://wpacouncil.org/files/framework-for-success-
postsecondary-writing.pdf.
Downs, Douglas and Elizabeth Wardle. “Teaching About Writing, Righting Misconceptions:
(Re)Envisioning ‘First Year Composition’ as ‘Introduction to Writing Studies.’” College
Composition and Communication, vol. 58, no. 4, June 2007,
http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/Journals/CCC/0584-
june07/CO0854Teaching.pdf.
Driscoll, Dana Lynn, and Jennifer Wells. “Beyond Knowledge and Skills: Writing Transfer and the
Role of Student Dispositions.” Composition Forum, no. 26, Fall 2012,
http://compositionforum.com/issue/26/beyond-knowledge-skills.php.
Duffy, John. “Post-Truth and First-Year Writing.” Inside Higher Ed, 8 May 2017,
https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2017/05/08/first-year-writing-classes-can-teach-
students-how-make-fact-based-arguments-essay.
Gardner, Traci. “Converting to a More Visual Syllabus.” Bedford Bits, 2 July 2015,
https://community.macmillan.com/community/the-english-community/bedford-
bits/blog/2015/07/02/converting-to-a-more-visual-syllabus.
Gayle Morris Sweetland Center for Writing. “Using Peer Review to Improve Student Writing.”
University of Michigan, 2017, https://lsa.umich.edu/content/dam/sweetland-assets/sweetland-
documents/teachingresources/UsingPeerReviewToImproveStudentWriting/UsingPeerReviewto
ImproveStudentWriting.pdf.
Gee, James Paul. “Literacy, Discourse, and Linguistics: Introduction.” Journal of Education, vol. 171,
no. 1, 1989, pp. 5-17,
http://jamespaulgee.com/geeimg/pdfs/Literacy%20and%20Linguistics.pdf.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “No One Writes Alone: Peer Review in the Classroom, A
Guide for Instructors.” MIT Tech TV, 2011, http://techtv.mit.edu/genres/25-humanities-arts-
and-social-sciences/videos/14628-no-one-writes-alone-peer-review-in-the-classroom-a-
%20guide-for-instructors.
Reiff, Mary Jo, and Anis Bawarshi. “Tracing Discursive Resources: How Students Use Prior Genre
Knowledge to Negotiate New Writing Contexts in First-Year Composition.” Written
Communication, vol. 28, no. 3, 2011,
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/0741088311410183.
Sommers, Nancy. “Responding to Student Writing.” College Composition and Communication, vol.
33, no. 2, May 1982, pp. 148-156,
https://faculty.unlv.edu/nagelhout/ENG714f10/SommersStudentWriting.pdf.
Sommers, Nancy. “Revision Strategies of Student Writers and Experienced Adult Writers.” College
Composition and Communication, vol. 31, no. 4, Dec. 1980, pp. 378-388,
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http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/Journals/CCC/1980/0314-
dec1980/CCC0314Revision.pdf.
“Syllabus and Assignment Design.” Dartmouth Institute for Writing and Rhetoric, 15 April 2016,
http://writing-speech.dartmouth.edu/teaching/first-year-writing-pedagogies-methods-
design/syllabus-and-assignment-design.
Sasser, Tanya. “Teaching Revision vs. Editing.” Remixing College English, 24 Feb. 2014,
https://remixingcollegeenglish.wordpress.com/2014/02/24/teaching-revision-vs-editing/.
Takayoshi, Pamela, and Cynthia L. Selfe. “Thinking about Multimodality.” Multimodal Composition,
edited by Cynthia L. Selfe, Hampton, 2007, http://techstyle.lmc.gatech.edu/wp-
content/uploads/2012/08/Takayoshi-Selfe.pdf.
Wardle, Elizabeth, and Doug Downs. “Reflecting Back and Looking Forward: Revisiting ‘Teaching
about Writing, Righting Misconceptions’ Five Years On.” Composition Forum, no. 27, Spring 2013,
http://compositionforum.com/issue/27/reflecting-back.php.

Course Projects
Throughout the semester we will perform a variety of professional genres with the goals of gaining
additional professional experience and reflecting on that experience. Additional expectations for the
performance narrative and feedback analysis projects will be provided in the form of assignment
sheets during the semester.

Professional Development: Over the course of the semester you will be asked to participate in
and/or host a variety of professional development opportunities, such as attending Center for Faculty
Excellence (CFE) workshops, working on/at GSW’s Fall 2017 National Day on Writing Writing
Showcase, developing an issue of paideia: GSW’s Monday newsletter, and giving a group workshop
for GSW’s Brown Bag Colloquia. Such experiences are designed to aid in your professional
development not only as a teacher of writing, but as a faculty member associated with a particular
program and institution.

Course Observations, Reflections, and Conversations: Throughout the semester you will conduct
four class observations: of your Program Assistant, a GSW faculty member, and two of your peers.
You will compose an observation and response narrative for three of these class visits (for your peers
and your GSW faculty member partner), detailing the strengths of the instructor’s teaching. Just as
you will conduct these observations, you will also invite your PA, your peers, and a GSW faculty
member to observe your course, and therefore you will receive observations and response narratives
to include in your teaching portfolio as evidence of your teaching record. Such activities promote the
culture of teaching within GSW and allow us to experience a variety of approaches to teaching writing
as they occur here at BGSU.

Pedagogy Journal: Throughout the semester you will keep an informal Pedagogy Journal where you
keep track of your lesson planning and teaching and reflect on your experiences. The journal can
take whatever form you’d like: it could be a personal notebook or an electronic document
(alphabetically or digitally composed), or it could be published publically as a blog. For the journal you
should write at least one entry per week detailing that week’s teaching—what you did in class and
how you feel it went, perhaps with future class sessions in mind—and goal-setting for the next week.
Additionally, use the journal space to think through your (developing) identity as a writing teacher.
How do or might your practices in GSW 1110 inform your identity as a college writing instructor? How
do you envision teaching writing as part of your personal identity? Your pedagogy journal can, and
most likely will, inform the Teaching Philosophy you compose for your portfolio.
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Feedback Analysis: You will record a screencast of yourself providing feedback on one project and
reflect on your process. You may choose any of the projects you assign to your GSW students for this
analysis, and you may also choose whether you record your feedback on a rough draft or final draft.
For the analysis and reflection, you might consider why you present feedback as you do and how the
feedback is meant to support the student. Please compose the reflection as an audio narration of the
feedback video. Note: Before you complete your screencast, please remove all identifying
information from the student’s project and ask that student’s permission to use their project for your
analysis. When you submit the Feedback Analysis Project, you should include the video and proof of
written permission from the student.

Performance Narrative: During one of your peer observations, a colleague will video-record you
teaching your class. You will then compose a self-reflection (written or otherwise—audio, video, etc.)
based on the video, describing and reflecting on your practices. The reflection should include a
summary of your agenda for the class session, a self-analysis of the teaching you see in the video,
and goal-setting for future teaching. You may look to entries in your Pedagogy Journal to inform your
reflection.

Teaching Portfolio: The final project for ENG 6020 is a digital Teaching Portfolio that represents the
array of work you’ve completed this semester as a General Studies Writing instructor. You may
choose whether you would like to design your eportfolio using the Canvas portfolio tool or use
another electronic resource, such as a Wordpress blog. The portfolio is meant to support your
professionalization as a teacher of writing, which you might share with potential employers to provide
a record of your teaching. The portfolio should include a current curriculum vitae, a teaching
philosophy, at least three peer observation and response narratives (one from your PA, one from a
GSW faculty member, and one from a colleague in ENG 6020), your performance narrative and
feedback analysis projects (assignments for this class), and a sample teaching unit (e.g., your GSW
1110 course, including the syllabus, assignment sheets, and a sample lesson plan.) Additionally, you
will write a brief (one- to two-page) reflective introduction to your portfolio, describing the portfolio’s
contents and navigation as well as how the materials speak to each other and to your philosophy of
teaching writing. You are welcome to include additional materials (e.g., journal entries, feedback from
students, etc.) if you feel they contribute to your professional identity as a writing teacher; however,
additional materials are not required.
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Course Grading Contract
Grading
ENG 6020 is a practicum/workshop course designed for us to experience the teaching of General Studies
Writing courses as a community of writing experts. As such, the activities in the course are designed not
only to aid in our teaching of GSW 1110 and 1120 by guiding us through our composing of teaching
genres such as syllabi, assignment sheets, and lesson plans, but to guide us in our professionalizing as
writing experts. Because we view writing as both an activity and a field of study, and we recognize that we
all come to writing with different interests and levels of experience, the practicum course is designed to
allow us opportunities to grow as writing experts in a labor- and engagement-based environment. Like the
GSW 1110 courses you teach this semester, the ENG 6020 grade is represented by either an “S”
(Satisfactory/pass) or “U” (Unsatisfactory/no pass).

Also like the GSW 1110 courses you teach, you will earn a narrative grade for your effort in ENG 6020.
Lee will deliver your teaching portfolio and final semester narrative grades (A, B, C, D, or F) in the form of
an end-of-semester memo to you at the end of the course. You must pass ENG 6020 in order to maintain
your teaching position in the General Studies Writing Program.

As co-instructor of the course and administrator of our grading contract, Lee will formulate grades—
narrative and final—according to a rubric based on the eight habits of mind. The habits of mind (curiosity,
openness, engagement, creativity, persistence, responsibility, flexibility, and metacognition) represent
labor and effort: a willingness to take on new tasks, perhaps tasks outside of our comfort zones, and to
try. Thus, grades in this course are largely based on labor, effort, and engagement—to do well, we will
need to push ourselves out of our comfort zones and be open to trying new or different approaches to
teaching writing. We will need to engage fully in the course and live as the writing experts our students
need us to be. The table below represents a breakdown of how experiences will translate as final and
narrative course grades.

ENG 6020 Final Course Grade

A – Outstanding or excellent performance engaging with the habits of mind. Student-teacher


accumulates zero (0) non-participation days, zero (0) late project assignments, and zero (0)
missing or incomplete project assignments, and participates in at least three (3) professional
development opportunities.

B – Strong performance engaging with the habits of mind. Performance exceeds the
requirements for completing the course. Student-teacher accumulates two (2) non-participation
S
days, one (1) late project assignment, and zero (0) missing or incomplete project assignments,
and participates in at least two (2) professional development opportunities.

C – Satisfactory performance engaging with the habits of mind. Performance meets the
requirements for satisfactorily completing the course. Student-teacher accumulates four (4) non-
participation days, two (2) or more late project assignments, and one (1) missing or incomplete
project assignment, and participates in at least one (1) professional development opportunity.

D/F – Unsatisfactory performance engaging with the habits of mind. Student-teacher


accumulates five or more (5+) non-participation days, three or more (3+) late project
U
assignments, and two or more (2+) missing or incomplete project assignments, and does not
participate in any professional development opportunities.
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Exceeds Better than Average Meets Average Does Not Meet
Habits of Mind Expectations Expectations Expectations Expectations
A B C D/F
Student-teacher Student-teacher Student-teacher Student-teacher lacks
demonstrates demonstrates demonstrates basic a basic desire to know
Curiosity exceptional desire to appropriate desire to desire to know more more about the world.
know more about the know more about the about the world.
world. world.
Student-teacher Student-teacher Student-teacher Student-teacher lacks
demonstrates demonstrates demonstrates basic basic willingness to
exceptional willingness appropriate willingness willingness to consider consider new ways of
Openness
to consider new ways to consider new ways new ways of being and being and thinking in
of being and thinking of being and thinking thinking in the world. the world.
in the world. in the world.
Student-teacher Student-teacher Student-teacher Student-teacher lacks
demonstrates demonstrates demonstrates basic basic sense of
exceptional sense of appropriate sense of sense of investment investment and
Engagement
investment and investment and and involvement in involvement in
involvement in involvement in learning. learning.
learning. learning.
Student-teacher Student-teacher Student-teacher Student-teacher lacks
demonstrates demonstrates demonstrates basic basic ability to use
exceptional ability to appropriate ability to ability to use novel novel approaches for
Creativity use novel approaches use novel approaches approaches for generating,
for generating, for generating, generating, investigating, and
investigating, and investigating, and investigating, and representing ideas.
representing ideas. representing ideas. representing ideas.
Student-teacher Student-teacher Student-teacher Student-teacher lacks
demonstrates demonstrates demonstrates basic basic ability to sustain
exceptional ability to appropriate ability to ability to sustain interest in and
Persistence
sustain interest in and sustain interest in and interest in and attention to short- and
attention to short- and attention to short- and attention to short- and long-term projects.
long-term projects. long-term projects. long-term projects.
Student-teacher Student-teacher Student-teacher Student-teacher lacks
demonstrates an demonstrates the demonstrates the the basic ability to take
exceptional ability to appropriate ability to basic ability to take ownership of one’s
take ownership of take ownership of ownership of one’s actions and
Responsibility one’s actions and one’s actions and actions and understand the
understand the understand the understand the consequences of
consequences of consequences of consequences of those actions for
those actions for those actions for those actions for oneself and others.
oneself and others. oneself and others. oneself and others.
Student-teacher Student-teacher Student-teacher Student-teacher lacks
demonstrates demonstrates demonstrates basic basic ability to adapt to
exceptional ability to appropriate ability to ability to adapt to situations,
Flexibility
adapt to situations, adapt to situations, situations, expectations, or
expectations, or expectations, or expectations, or demands.
demands. demands. demands.
Student-teacher Student-teacher Student-teacher Student-teacher lacks
demonstrates demonstrates demonstrates basic basic ability to reflect
exceptional ability to appropriate ability to ability to reflect on on one’s own thinking
reflect on one’s own reflect on one’s own one’s own thinking as as well as on the
Metacognition thinking as well as on thinking as well as on well as on the individual and cultural
the individual and the individual and individual and cultural processes used to
cultural processes cultural processes processes used to structure knowledge.
used to structure used to structure structure knowledge.
knowledge. knowledge.

Narrative Grade Descriptions


A: Outstanding or excellent performance practicing the habits of mind.
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Through in-class and out-of-class work (discussion, small-group workshop, reading, writing, revising,
and presentation of written work and ideas), including participation in professional development
opportunities, you demonstrate an exceptional commitment to: know more about the world (Curiosity);
consider new ways of being and thinking in the world (Openness); invest and involve yourself in
learning (Engagement); use novel approaches for generating, investigating, and representing ideas
(Creativity); sustain interest in and attention to short- and long-term projects (Persistence); take
ownership of your actions and understand the consequences of those actions for yourself and others
(Responsibility); adapt to situations, expectations, or demands (Flexibility); and reflect on your own
thinking as well as on the individual and cultural processes used to structure knowledge
(Metacognition).
If you put in exceptional time and effort—participate fully and often, do all of the work, and
complete the final teaching portfolio—you will earn a narrative grade of A.

B: Strong performance practicing the habits of mind.


Through in-class and out-of-class work (discussion, small-group workshop, reading, writing, revising,
and presentation of written work and ideas), including participation in professional development
opportunities, you demonstrate a strong commitment to: know more about the world (Curiosity);
consider new ways of being and thinking in the world (Openness); invest and involve yourself in
learning (Engagement); use novel approaches for generating, investigating, and representing ideas
(Creativity); sustain interest in and attention to short- and long-term projects (Persistence); take
ownership of your actions and understand the consequences of those actions for yourself and others
(Responsibility); adapt to situations, expectations, or demands (Flexibility); and reflect on your own
thinking as well as on the individual and cultural processes used to structure knowledge
(Metacognition).
If you put in good time and effort—participate fully, do all of the work, and complete the final
teaching portfolio—you will earn a narrative grade of B.

C: Satisfactory performance practicing the habits of mind.


Through in-class and out-of-class work (discussion, small-group workshop, reading, writing, revising,
and presentation of written work and ideas), including participation in professional development
opportunities, you demonstrate a satisfactory commitment to: know more about the world (Curiosity);
consider new ways of being and thinking in the world (Openness); invest and involve yourself in
learning (Engagement); use novel approaches for generating, investigating, and representing ideas
(Creativity); sustain interest in and attention to short- and long-term projects (Persistence); take
ownership of your actions and understand the consequences of those actions for yourself and others
(Responsibility); adapt to situations, expectations, or demands (Flexibility); and reflect on your own
thinking as well as on the individual and cultural processes used to structure knowledge
(Metacognition).
If you put in regular time and effort—participate, complete work, and complete the final
teaching portfolio—you will earn a narrative grade of C.

D/F: Unsatisfactory evidence of performance practicing the habits of mind.


Through in-class and out-of-class work (discussion, small-group workshop, reading, writing, revising,
and presentation of written work and ideas), including participation in professional development
opportunities, you demonstrate an unsatisfactory commitment to: know more about the world
(Curiosity); consider new ways of being and thinking in the world (Openness); invest and involve
yourself in learning (Engagement); use novel approaches for generating, investigating, and
representing ideas (Creativity); sustain interest in and attention to short- and long-term projects
(Persistence); take ownership of your actions and understand the consequences of those actions for
yourself and others (Responsibility); adapt to situations, expectations, or demands (Flexibility); and
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reflect on your own thinking as well as on the individual and cultural processes used to structure
knowledge (Metacognition).
If you do not put in enough time and effort—rarely participate, do not complete work, and/or
do not complete the final teaching portfolio—you will earn a narrative grade of D/F.

A Note on Professional Development


Depending on your level of involvement, some professional development opportunities require more
effort than others. Depending on your level of involvement in an event, it may count for more than one
professional development experience to fulfill the requirements for the grading contract. Attending an
opportunity, such as a CFE workshop or a brown-bag workshop, would count as one experience.
Participating in an event—giving a (group or individual) workshop or presenting at a writing
conference/event—would count as two experiences. And signing up to be involved in the planning of
a particular event—such membership on a writing event planning committee—would count as three
experiences.
Attend Participate Sign Up

1 experience 2 experiences 3 experiences


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Course Schedule
This represents a tentative schedule. We may elect to revise the scheduled activities as the semester
progresses. If we do decide revisions are needed, we will post as an announcement and share the
revised schedule to the group.

Day/Date Together We Will Read/View/Write/Do


Week One Introduction to ENG 6020 Enjoy your first class with your
Day 1 Discuss: course syllabus, students ☺
plans, goals
Day 2 Introduction to Threshold Read: Adler-Kassner & Wardle
Concepts & Writing About Introduction & “Naming What
Writing Curricula We Know: The Project of this
Discuss: threshold concepts, Book,” pp. xvii-14; Downs &
the why of GSW curriculum Wardle, “Teaching about
Writing, Righting
Misconceptions”
Week Two GSW 1110 Unit II Read: Adler-Kassner & Wardle
Day 1 Discuss: curriculum cont’d; Metaconcept & Concept 1, pp.
GSW 1110 project 2 15-34; “Framework for Success
in Postsecondary Writing”
Day 2 Discuss: Peer review—what, View: “No One Writes Alone”
why, how Read: “Using Peer Review to
Improve Student Writing”
Complete: Observation of a
PA by end of Week Two
Week Three Workshop: GSW 1110 Bring: GSW 1110 project 2
Day 1 project 2 materials materials for workshop
(schedule, assignments,
activities)
Discuss: Feedback Analysis
project
Day 2 GSW 1110 Unit III Read: Adler-Kassner & Wardle
Discuss: reading; GSW 1110 Concept 2, pp. 35-47; Reiff &
project 3 Bawarshi, “Tracing Discursive
Resources”
Week Four Discuss: Multimodal writing Read: Takayoshi & Selfe,
Day 1 assignments “Thinking about Multimodality;”
Discuss: Performance “Assessing Student Multimodal
Narrative project Work”
Day 2 Workshop: GSW 1110 Bring: GSW 1110 project 3
project 3 materials materials for workshop
(schedule, assignment, Complete: Goal-setting (with
activities) PA) by end of Week Four
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Week Five GSW 1110 Unit IV Read: Adler-Kassner & Wardle,
Day 1 Discuss: Identity & writing; Concept 3, pp. 48-58; Gee,
GSW 1110 project 4 “Literacy, Discourse, and
Linguistics”
Day 2 Workshop: GSW 1110 Bring: GSW 1110 project 4
project 4 materials materials for workshop
(schedule, assignment, Complete: Peer Observation 1
activities) by end of Week 5
Week Six Guest Facilitation: Dr. Read: Driscoll & Wells,
Day 1 Heather Jordan on Student “Beyond Knowledge and Skills”
Conferences Journal Spot-check

Day 2 GSW 1110 Unit V Read: Adler-Kassner & Wardle


Discuss: Revision; GSW Concept 4, pp. 59-70;
1110 project 5 Sommers, “Revision Strategies
of Student Writers and
Experienced Adult Writers”
Week Seven Guest Facilitation: Revision Read: “Teaching Revision vs.
Day 1 Workshop Editing”
Day 2 Workshop: GSW 1110 Bring: GSW 1110 project 5
project 5 materials materials for workshop
(schedules, assignments,
activities)
Week Eight No Class—Fall Break Enjoy your break!
Day 1
Day 2 GSW 1110 Unit VI Read: Adler-Kassner & Wardle
Discuss: Metacognition Concept 5, pp. 71-81;
Demonstrate: Midterm Grade “Cultivating Reflection and
Reporting Metacognition”
Submit: Midterm Grades
Complete: Peer Observation 2
by end of Week Eight
Week Nine Introduction to GSW 1120 Read: Adler-Kassner & Wardle
Day 1 Policies, project Part 2: Introduction & Ch. 6, pp.
assignments, schedule 84-104
Discuss: Learning Outcomes
Day 2 Guest Facilitation: Lauren Read: “Syllabus and
Garskie on Syllabus Design Assignment Design;”
“Converting to a More Visual
Syllabus”
Participate: GSW Fall 2017
National Day on Writing
Showcase, 4:00-6:30 p.m.
Friday, 10/20
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Week Ten No Class ☺
Day 1
Day 2 Peer Response for Due: Feedback Analysis draft
Feedback Analysis drafts Read: Adler-Kassner & Wardle
Ch. 7, pp. 105-121; Wardle &
Downs, “Reflecting Back and
Looking Forward”
Week Eleven GSW 1120 Workshop Bring: GSW 1120 syllabus
Day 1 Form themed groups for working draft
workshop sessions
Day 2 Discussion & Workshop: Read: Adler-Kassner & Wardle
GSW eportfolio & Self- Ch. 10, pp. 157-170
Reflective Narrative Continue: Drafting eportfolio &
Activity: Habits of Mind in GSW 1120 materials
GSW 1120
Week Twelve Discussion & Workshop: Continue: Drafting eportfolio &
Day 1 Teaching Philosophy GSW 1120 materials
statements
Day 2 GSW 1120 Workshop Continue: Drafting eportfolio &
GSW 1120 materials
Journal Spot-check
Week Thirteen APA Workshop Read: “Citation Styles: Why
Day 1 Guest Facilitation Are They Different?”
Continue: Drafting eportfolio &
GSW 1120 materials
Day 2 Peer Response for Due: Performance Narrative
Performance Narrative drafts draft
Continue: Drafting eportfolio &
GSW 1120 materials
Week Fourteen GSW 1120 Workshop Continue: Drafting eportfolio &
Day 1 GSW 1120 materials
Day 2 No Class—Thanksgiving Enjoy your Thanksgiving break
Break ☺
Week Fifteen Teaching Portfolio Continue: Drafting eportfolio &
Day 1 Workshop GSW 1120 materials
Day 2 Open Workshop: GSW Continue: Drafting eportfolio &
1120 materials, Teaching GSW 1120 materials
Portfolios Complete: Faculty observation
by end of Week 15
Week Sixteen Open Workshop: GSW Continue: Drafting eportfolio &
Day 1 1120 materials, Teaching GSW 1120 materials
Portfolios
Day 2 Studio Review: Teaching Continue: Drafting eportfolio &
Portfolios GSW 1120 materials