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BUS240

Organisation Development and Human Resource Management

Unit Information and Learning Guide

September Trimester 2018

This information should be read in conjunction with the online learning materials which can be found on your MyUnits page.

Unit coordinator Name: David Zhang School of Business and Governance

materials which can be found on your MyUnits page. Unit coordinator Name: David Zhang School of

© Published by Murdoch University, Perth, Western Australia, November 2017.

This publication is copyright. Except as permitted by the Copyright Act no part of it may in any form or by any electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or any other means be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or be broadcast or transmitted without the prior written permission of the publisher.

Contents

Unit information

Information about the unit Contact details How to study this unit Resources for the unit Study schedule Assessment

5

7

8

10

11

12

Learning guide

Introduction

22

Topic 1

General Introduction to OD Overview of OD The Process of OD Entering & Contracting and Diagnosing The Process of OD Collecting, Analysing & Feeding Back Diagnostic Information The Process of OD Designing Interventions The Process of OD Evaluating & Institutionalising OD Interventions Human Process Interventions Techno-structural Interventions HRM Interventions Strategic Change Interventions Special Applications of OD Course Review

23

Topic 2

25

Topic 3

27

Topic 4

29

Topic 5

31

Topic 6

33

Topic 7

35

Topic 8

37

Topic 9

39

Topic 10

41

Topic 11

43

Topic 12

45

Information about the unit

Welcome to:

BUS240

Organisation Development and Human Resource Management

Unit description

This unit aims to explore organisation development which is a process that applies a broad range of behavioural science knowledge and practices to help organisations build their capacity to change and to achieve greater effectiveness. This includes increased financial performance, customer satisfaction, and organisation member engagement.

Students will be taught how organisations diagnose opportunities and problems, how to understand the need for change and how this can be implemented at the organisational, group and individual levels.

Prerequisites

BUS145 Principles of Management or BUS176 Foundations of Management and Governance.

Aims of the unit

1. Give students a broad understanding of how change and organisation development (OD) concepts affect roles and the management of human resources (HR) in modern organisations.

2. Develop a proactive orientation towards management activities and development strategies so students can contribute to quality improvement, innovation and organisation performance.

3. Develop practical generic skills that can enhance motivation, teamwork, leadership and management ability, thereby improving interactions between individuals, groups and the organisation’s work environment.

Learning outcomes for the unit

On successful completion of the unit you should be able to:

LO1

LO2

LO3

LO4

LO5

LO6

Demonstrate an understanding of Organisational Development concepts and their role in an organisation.

Demonstrate a practical understanding of the major concepts, theories and models of change and Organisational Development contributing to organisational effectiveness.

Explain and demonstrate organisational and human process change/ Organisational Development strategies that can be implemented to analyse and solve management problems and maintain employee motivation.

Integrate advanced understanding of a contemporary body of knowledge in change management to operate as a skilled professional.

Interact effectively with others in order to work towards a common outcome.

Apply the relevant Organisational Development analytical framework(s) leading to the development of solutions to resolve organisational problems.

Graduate attributes developed in the unit

This unit will contribute to the development of the following Graduate Attributes.

Communication

Critical and creative thinking

Social interaction

Independent and lifelong learning

Ethics

Social justice

In-depth knowledge of a field of study

What you need to know

Generic information which students need to know is available at What you need to know web page.

The information includes:

links to the Assessment Policy

a description of Academic Integrity

links to information about:

Examinations; Non-discriminatory language; Student appeals; Student complaints; Conscientious objection and assessment policy

determination of grades from components/marks

information for equity students

This unit was originally written by Dr. Antonia Girardi, 2009 Revised by Richa Vinod, November 2017

Contact details

Unit Coordinator’s contact details

Name:

Email: Z.Zhang@murdoch.edu.au

David Zhang

Local Affiliate contact details

You will be notified who your local affiliate will be at the beginning of the teaching period. They will provide you with their contact details directly.

Administrative contact details

If you cannot get in touch with your unit coordinator, please contact:

School of Business and Governance BGProgramSupport@murdoch.edu.au Tel: +618 9360 2705

How to study this unit

The unit is divided into seven parts:

Part 1: Overview of Organisation Development session 2-3 Part 2: The Process of Organisation Development sessions 4-6 Part 3: Human Process Interventions session 7 Part 4: Techno-structural Interventions session 8 Part 5: Human Resources Interventions session 9 Part 6: Strategic Change Interventions session 10 Part 7: Special Applications of Organisation Development sessions 11-12

It is expected that all students will prepare for each session by reading the relevant text chapter/s, answering all questions at the end of the relevant case study in the Teh and Girardi (2015) textbook and undertaking other activities as directed by your Affiliate Lecturer.

Contact time

Lecture: The 50 minute lecture explores how theories and concepts are applied to manage and develop people and organisations.

Workshops: The 90 100 minute workshop requires participation in class discussions, case analyses and group facilitations to develop practical skills, group processes and time management skills.

Workshops are a collaborative learning process and past experience demonstrates this is most effective when you are prepared, attend and participate. This allows you to perform better in unit assessments and the final exam.

At the discretion of your Affiliate Lecturer, and if required, up to 15 minutes of each workshop beginning in Session 2 will be set aside for group work related to the assessment and/or other issues.

Time commitment

As this is a 4 credit point unit, we expect you to spend on average 6-8 hours per week for the total weeks of this teaching period (or 80 hours overall) working on this unit.

Attendance requirements

Valuable knowledge and practical experience that is gained throughout the interactions in the workshop cannot be replicated. Further, because any chapter of both course texts is potentially examinable, attendance at workshops is highly recommended.

Concerns about attendance and participation should be discussed with your Affiliate Lecturer as soon as possible. Compulsory attendance is required when your assignments are due for facilitation.

Small group and interactive teaching and learning activities

Collaborative learning is an important element of the learning process. Group work is considered to be part of the normal everyday functioning of an organisation. Completion of a group case study analysis and, for internal students, an in-workshop group case facilitation is used in this unit as a means of enhancing the understanding of core Organisation Development content related to problem identification and management issues.

Unit changes in response to student feedback

Student feedback is encouraged and appreciated at all times via appropriate communication channels.

The distribution of marks across various assessments has been revised based on collective feedback.

Non-standard teaching period dates

Not applicable to this unit.

Resources for this unit

To undertake study in this unit, you will need:

Essential textbook Cummings, T.G., & Worley, C.G. (2015). Organisation Development and Change. 10 th Edition. Stamford, CT, USA: Cengage Learning. ISBN 1-133-19045-6

Teh, E.C. & Girardi, A. (2015) - PP1041 - Organisation Development & Change: Practice Manual, Readings and Case Studies. 5th Edition. ISBN - 9780170369480

Other references/recommended reading

Recommended peer reviewed journals:

Academy of Management Executive

Academy of Management Review

Academy of Management Journal

Administrative Science Quarterly

Harvard Business Review

Journal of Applied Behavioural Science

Journal of Applied Psychology

Journal of Management

Journal of Management Development

Organization Development Journal

Organizational Dynamics

The following will be provided during the teaching period:

lecture slides

lecture recordings

Assessment marking guide pro formas

Group Charter

Self and peer evaluation pro formas

Urkund

Your Unit Coordinators may use software called Urkund when viewing work that you submit. Urkund is a pattern-matching system designed to compare work submitted by students with other sources from the internet, journals/periodicals, and previous submissions. Its primary purpose is to detect any submitted work that is not original and provide a thorough comparison between the submitted document and the original sources. Urkund will be replacing Turnitin (the previous pattern-matching software used by Murdoch) from 2016.

More information about how to avoid plagiarism is contained within the Murdoch Academic Passport (MAP) unit https://moodleprod.murdoch.edu.au/course/view.php?id=2684 . University policies on academic integrity can be accessed here: http://our.murdoch.edu.au/Educational- technologies/What-you-need-to-know/

Study schedule

Session

Topic/Project/Study theme

Assessment items

Due

 

General Introduction to OD

   

1.

(BUS240 unit course outline distributed and

discussed in detail at the session)

 

Part 1 Overview of OD

   

2.

The Nature of Planned Change The OD Practitioner

 

Part 2 The Process of OD

   

3.

Entering & Contracting Diagnosing (Last session to nominate for, and be approved for, the group case study analysis and facilitation Group Charter due)

4.

Collecting, Analysing and Feeding Back

   

Diagnostic Information

5.

Designing Interventions

Assignment 1 due

By the start of session 5

 

Managing Change

   

6.

Evaluating & Institutionalising OD Interventions

 

Part 3 Human Process Interventions

Assignment 2 Group 1 Greener Pastures OR

The Case of Jennifer

 

7.

Interpersonal & Group Process Approaches Organisation Process Approaches

Session 7

Turner

 

Part 4 Techno-structural Interventions

Assignment 2 Group 2 David & Goliath OR A Smaller Slice of the Pie

 

8.

Restructuring Organisations Employee Involvement Work Design

Session 8

·

 

Part 5 HR Interventions

Assignment 2 Group 3 High Flyers OR

Well, Well, Well

 

9.

Performance Management Talent Management Workplace Diversity & Wellness

Session 9

 

Part 6 Strategic Change Interventions

Assignment 2 Group 4 The Celestial OR Big Bytes

 

10.

Transformational Change Continuous Change Transorganisational Change

Session 10

 

Part 7 Special Applications of OD

Assignment 2 Group 5 Shah Holdings OR La Bella

 

11.

OD in Non-industrial Settings

Session 11

 

Future Directions in OD

Assignment 2 Group 6 Black Swan University OR The Golden Dragon Group

 

12.

Course review

Session 12

 

FINAL EXAMS IN EXAM PERIOD

 

Assessment

Assessment for this unit is conducted in accordance with the Assessment Policy.

Schedule of assessment items

You will be assessed on the basis of:

Assessment item

Description

Aligned

Value

Due

Learning

Outcomes

Individual Memo

Choose ANY ONE and submit online before session 5

1

20%

By the start of session

5

Group Assignment

Group case study analysis and oral facilitation in assigned workshop

2, 3, 4, 5,6

40%

Sessions 7 - 12

Examination

Closed book

1, 2, 3, 4, 5,6

40%

 

Assessment details

Assessment 1 Individual Memo (20%)

The following thoughts and questions reflect key open issues or debates in the literature on managing change. Choose any one to write a response to.

The memo should be 1500 (+/- 10%) words and must be submitted online before session 5.

The word limit would not include cover page and reference list.

You may integrate material from any of the cases, from your own previous experience/intuition, and from theory developed for this or other classes.

A list of the sources/citations you used is expected to support your conclusions using the APA or Chicago style. No more than one web site may be listed as a source. That site should not be “Wikipedia”. Students should aim for at least 5 reputable references which can include the text book and case book.

Topic 1: A shift from manual HR processes to deploying Human Resource Information System (HRIS) involves a major cultural shift within the organisation. Explain the role of OD consultant in this scenario.

OR

Topic 2: Organisations are looking beyond training. There is an increasing trend to hire an Organisation Development Manager instead of a Training Manager. What is the difference between the two roles? What knowledge, skills and experience would you recommend for either roles?

ASSESSMENT 1 Individual Memo (20%)

Name:

Topic:

Assessable Components

Marker’s Comments

Weight

Structure Introduction Summary Conclusion Logical flow and structure Word count (1500 +/- 10%)

5%

Content Argument developed & relevant Evidence of critical evaluation Original thought / ideas included Acknowledges the key issues

10%

Style and Presentation Correct Grammar & Spelling Correct Citation style (APA or Chicago) Quality of References Minimum 5 References cited

5%

Mark: /20

Signed:

Date:

Assessment 2: group case study analysis and group oral facilitation (40%)

For this assessment, groups will be asked to complete a case study analysis (20%) and to conduct an in-class facilitation (20%) based on the group case study analysis. To select your case study analysis topic, choose from the relevant topics (Refer course schedule). Case study topics will be assigned on a first come, first served basis.

If you do not attend either or both the first two workshops or do not contact your Affiliate Lecturer, there is no guarantee that you will be allocated your preferred group for assessment requirements.

It is a requirement that the groups facilitate in the stated workshop only. Students must contact the affiliate lecturer or the Unit Coordinator at the earliest if there are any issues.

If a group member is absent on the day of the facilitation without sufficient cause, he/she will receive a zero mark but all others who facilitate will receive a group facilitation mark.

The written group case study analysis must be submitted online prior to the workshop in which your group facilitates or a penalty will apply.

Groups can nominate a topic from Session 1 but your Affiliate Lecturer must agree with, and confirm, the topic.

If possible, case study topics should be finalised in Session 2 with the first facilitation starting in session 7 according to the schedule below:

Session

Case Studies (Teh & Girardi, 2015)

7

Greener Pastures OR The Case of Jennifer Turner

8

David and Goliath OR A Smaller Slice of the Pie

9

High Flyers OR Well, Well, Well

10

The Celestial OR Big Bytes

11

Shah Holdings OR La Bella

12

Black Swan University OR The Golden Dragon Group

Group formation: Each class should have a minimum of six groups and a maximum of 12 groups. At least one group must facilitate in sessions 7 to 12.

Groups of three to five students are recommended for this assignment. However, if the class size is very small then even two students can form a group.

If the class size is large, the affiliate lecturer can allow two groups to facilitate in the same session. However, both groups must facilitate on different topics. Not more than two groups can facilitate in one session.

Each group gets to choose the session and one of the two topics related to that session to facilitate. Ideally, students will form their groups in the first scheduled workshop. However, if

necessary, your Affiliate Lecturer may assign you to a group. If you cannot attend either or both the first two workshops, it is imperative that you contact your Affiliate Lecturer.

Managing group performance: Sometimes, you may have other commitments which make it difficult for you to attend the university outside of scheduled class hours and/or liaise with your group members. This might have a significant effect upon your group’s performance. Please ensure you are in constant contact with your group in order to manage such time commitments.

Group charter: As future managers, group members are encouraged to resolve any differences before referring the issue/s to their Affiliate Lecturer. If group members still cannot resolve their differences, it is important that they speak to their Affiliate Lecturer as soon as possible. It is important to note that both your Affiliate Lecturer and, if necessary, the Unit Coordinator, can do very little if they are not made aware of the situation in a timely manner. Thus, prior to committing to a group, and in order to minimise the uncertainty of group work and possible conflict, rules and norms need to be established. Therefore, please complete the Group Charter (available on LMS and once accepted by all team members and your Affiliate Lecturer, this Group Charter acts as a reference point for any conflicts, concerns, or problems, which arise during the preparation of group-based assessments.

Each group must provide a signed copy of the charter to their Affiliate Lecturer during the session 3 workshop.

It is highly recommended that detailed notes (i.e., meeting minutes) be kept with respect to all group meetings. For example, who attended, was anyone unacceptably late, apologies for non-attendance, was each group member’s work submitted by the agreed date. Information such as this is invaluable should your Affiliate Lecturer have to resolve any disputes and/or make a determination with respect to awarding individual marks for either or both the group written case study analysis and the group facilitation (see next paragraph). Copies of email exchanges should also be kept.

In special circumstances, the Affiliate Lecturer reserves the right to award different marks to individual group members for either or both the written case study analysis and the group case study facilitation. If marks are adjusted, they will only be adjusted down for the group member/s who is/are deemed not to have made an equitable contribution. That is, a group member cannot appeal for a higher individual mark.

For the group case study analysis (20%)

Include the following:

Referenced information justifying the use of any tools, models and theories used to diagnose the case.

An assessment of your team’s performance using the Self and Peer Evaluation form which is on LMS.

Provide your Affiliate Lecturer with a group case study analysis that meets the assessment criteria detailed in the marking guide. A failure to adhere to the criteria will cost marks.

Supporting literature, diagnostic tool/s and recommend change strategies that marry theory and practice for your case.

For the group facilitation (20%)

Each individual in the team is to participate as a facilitator and each group member will contribute equally to the facilitation. The minimum running time for the facilitation is 45 minutes.

Clearly convey the content of the group’s written case study analysis. That is, do not omit anything and equally, do not include anything that was not part of the written component.

Diagnostic tools and the inclusion of theories are integral to the facilitation. Therefore, you must demonstrate their use and application and engage the audience in the process.

All group members must ‘scaffold’ the audience during the facilitation, that is, all group members must actively participate in assisting the audience when they are undertaking the various activities. Doing so helps clarify the objectives of the exercise and keeps the audience on track. The facilitation, therefore, is not the same as a presentation.

As facilitators, you must identify relevant questions you can ask the class. Good, open- ended questions will allow the class to explore case issues and discuss and integrate case concepts via the methodology presented in your group case study analysis. This is an essential component of the scaffolding process.

You must provide your Affiliate Lecturer with a one-page plan of how you will run the workshop a week before the day of the team’s facilitation. The plan will show team roles as well as the facilitation structure (e.g., ice-breaker, introduction, summation of the case study analysis, proposed audience involvement, aids, time allocation).

Additional information on the group facilitation

If

necessary, seek advice from your Affiliate Lecturer to clarify ideas.

Keep in mind this is a facilitation exercise not a presentation. Consider providing a brief summary of the case, ask the class to analyse evidence from the case, diagnose the problems and develop practical solutions that demonstrate an understanding of how relevant theories can underpin practice.

Check the Internet for an ice-breaker that is relevant to the case study and which engages all class members. Do not, however, spend too much time on the ice-breaker at the expense of the other elements of the facilitation.

Because scaffolding is integral to the facilitation, even if it is not your turn to facilitate, do not sit back and observe what either the audience is doing or each group is doing join in and help your fellow facilitator member keep the audience/group focussed on the topic.

Note: If you are repeating BUS240

For Assessment 2 (Group Case Study Written Analysis and Facilitation) you cannot join

a group that has nominated to analyse and facilitate a case study you have previously done.

ASSESSMENT 2 GROUP CASE STUDY ANALYSIS (20%)

Case Study:

Group members:

Assessable Components

Marker’s Comments

Weight

Assignment within 2500 word limit (+/- 10%)

 

1%

Structure and Layout Legibly and professionally presented Table of contents Clearly signposts with headings Effective paragraph structure Fluent and succinct writing Grammar & sentence structure Spelling

 

4%

Content Introduction (max. one page) Case study: discussion and identification of the issues Integration and justification of two diagnostic tools from the OD Consultant’s Toolkit to identify the primary problem and the secondary problem/s and/or to suggest solutions Recommendations: prioritised, justified and supported by relevant theories and/or OD interventions Conclusion

 

12%

References APA or Chicago style only Accuracy of in-text citations Reference list accurate & alphabetical Use of recent and appropriate references (min 10 references)

 

3%

Comments on the strengths and weaknesses of the paper:

Mark:

/20

Signed:

Date:

Note: In special circumstances, the Affiliate Lecturer reserves the right to award different marks to individual group members for the group case study analysis.

ASSESSMENT 2 GROUP FACILITATION MARKING GUIDE (20%)

Case Study:

Group members:

Assessable

Marker’s Comments

Weight

Components

One-page plan provided

 

1%

Appropriate ice-breaker Audience involvement Use of aids (e.g., PowerPoints, whiteboard) Neatly attired Minimum time met

 

4%

(45mins)

Equal participation among members

Case discussion Application of OD tools Justification of OD tools used Recommendations:

 

10%

explained and supported by relevant theories and/or OD interventions

Response to questions from the audience, e.g., Knowledge of the subject Ability to discuss and/or defend a point of view Overall impact

 

5%

Mark: /20

Signed:

Date:

Supporting documents: Students to provide either the original facilitation plan or an amended plan plus:

PowerPoints (if used)

Handouts (if used)

Butchers paper (if used)

Note: In special circumstances, the Affiliate Lecturer reserves the right to award different marks to individual group members for the group facilitation.

Examination

Revising what has been covered in the unit maximises your learning and understanding. Therefore, this unit has a final exam worth 40% which integrates all material covered in the unit. The exam is 2 hours in duration and is held during the exam period.

The exam will comprise two compulsory long applied answer questions based on specified chapters from the Cummings and Worley (2015) course text. Two questions will be worth 15% each. In addition there will be two short answers worth 5% each.

You will be advised of the focus chapters in session 12.

The exam requires students to write essay-type answers. The following points are advisable to score better marks:

1. Write a small paragraph to introduce the topic

2. Give examples where possible

3. Use diagrammatic representations where required

4. Write legibly

5. Underline or highlight key points

6. And most importantly, ensure that the question is addressed. Reproducing entire chapter unnecessarily will not help

It is your responsibility to ensure the correct date, time and venue for the exam.

Students have a right to see marked scripts. Please contact your local academic support officer if you wish to see the marked script.

Assignment submission

All work is to be submitted on LMS by due dates.

Your Unit Coordinators may use software called Urkund when viewing work that you submit. Urkund is a pattern-matching system designed to compare work submitted by students with other sources from the internet, journals/periodicals, and previous submissions. Its primary purpose is to detect any submitted work that is not original and provide a thorough comparison between the submitted document and the original sources. Urkund will be replacing Turnitin (the previous pattern-matching software used by Murdoch) from 2016.

More information about how to avoid plagiarism is contained within the Murdoch Academic Passport (MAP) unit https://moodleprod.murdoch.edu.au/course/view.php?id=2684. University policies on academic integrity can be accessed here: http://our.murdoch.edu.au/Educational- technologies/What-you-need-to-know/.

No extensions will be granted unless accompanied by medical certificates or in extenuating circumstances.

Late assignments will incur a penalty 10% will be deducted for every day the assignment is late. This penalty will be applied over weekends.

It is the student’s responsibility to retain the copy of the assignment prior to submission. This copy should remain as the original submitted form and must be available for immediate submission if the original assignment is irretrievable.

Determination of the final grade

The final grade is made up of the sum of scores achieved across all assessment components.

See in the current Assessment Policy regarding grades.

Learning Guide

Introduction

This Learning Guide contains information on how to study each topic, including:

Introductory information Learning activities/tasks Resources required for the topic How the topic contributes to the unit’s learning outcomes

Topic 1:

General Introduction to OD

Introduction

Organisational change is an evolutionary and revolutionary process which can vary from incremental, planned change (organisation development) to dramatic and unplanned change (organisation transformation). Organisation development (OD) differs from other planned change efforts such as project management on innovation, because the focus is on building the organisation’s ability to assess its current functioning and to achieve its goals. OD is the desired state for organisations that are introspective and wish to continually improve their products and services in an incremental manner.

What you need to do

Prior to your workshop, read:

Cummings and Worley (2015) Chapter 1

Reading 1 from Teh & Girardi (2015), “What’s Human Resource Management got to do with it? A look at the Convergence of HR and OD’’

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this topic, you should be able to:

Provide a definition of OD

Distinguish OD and planned change from other forms of organisation change

Describe the historical development of OD

Key concepts

OD is a planned change discipline concerned with applying behavioural science knowledge and practice to help organisations achieve greater effectiveness

Resources for this topic

To undertake study for this topic, you will need:

Essential textbooks

Cummings, T.G., & Worley, C.G. (2015). Organisation Development and Change. 10 th Edition. Stamford, CT, USA: Cengage Learning. ISBN 1-133-19045-6

Teh, E.C. & Girardi, A. (2015) - PP1041 - Organisation Development & Change: Practice Manual, Readings and Case Studies. 5th Edition. ISBN - 9780170369480

Learning activities/tasks

Class introductions

Distribution and detailed discussion of the UILG

Form groups for the group case study assessment and begin development of the Group Charter (on LMS)

The Group Charter must be submitted during the third workshop

The Self and Peer Evaluation feedback form (on LMS must be completed and submitted with the group case study analysis on the day of the facilitation

Nominate which of the two individual memo you wish to submit.

Topic 2:

Overview of OD

The Nature of Planned Change The OD Practitioner

Introduction

OD is intended to bring about planned change to increase an organisation’s effectiveness and capability to change itself and is usually implemented by a manager, often with the help of an OD practitioner from either inside or outside the organisation. All approaches to OD rely on some theory about planned change; the three major theories being Lewin’s change model, the action research model and contemporary approaches to change. In addition to the three major theories, a general model of planned change is a recent development in OD theory.

OD practitioners are change agents who require a comprehensive set of skills. Practitioners can be external to the organisation (i.e., OD specialists), managers within the organisation (i.e., internal change agents) who have OD skills, and people from related fields who have some OD competencies. OD practitioners sometimes encounter role conflicts and ethical dilemmas.

What you need to do

Prior to your workshop, read:

Cummings & Worley (2015) Chapter 2 & 3

Teh & Girardi (2015) - Beach View High School Analysis

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this topic, you should be able to:

Describe and compare three major theories on changing organisations

Describe the General Model of Planned Change

Describe how planned change can be adopted to fit different kinds of conditions

Discuss the essential characteristics of OD practitioners

Discuss the necessary competencies required of an effective OD practitioner

Delineate the roles and ethical conflicts that face OD practitioners

Key concept/s

Theories of planned change (Lewin’s change model and action research model + recent adaptations) can be integrated into a general model of planned change

OD practitioners require intrapersonal skills, interpersonal skills, general consultation skills, and knowledge of OD theory

Resources for this topic

To undertake study for this topic, you will need:

Essential textbooks

Cummings, T.G., & Worley, C.G. (2015). Organisation Development and Change. 10 th Edition. Stamford, CT, USA: Cengage Learning. ISBN 1-133-19045-6

Teh, E.C. & Girardi, A. (2015) - PP1041 - Organisation Development & Change: Practice Manual, Readings and Case Studies. 5th Edition. ISBN - 9780170369480

Learning activities/tasks

Beach View High School Analysis

Confirm group case study allocations and continue working on the Group Charter

Last session to nominate which individual memo to submit two to choose from

Topic 3:

The Process of OD

Entering and Contracting Diagnosing

Introduction

The initial OD process constitutes entering and contracting the organisation. After this, the planned change phase begins and which incorporates diagnosing, planning, and implementing change and evaluating and institutionalising it. Diagnosis is based on conceptual frameworks about how organisations function. In particular, organisations function as open systems because they interact with the larger environment and are influenced by external forces. The diagnostic model can be applied to groups within the organisation and to individuals within the organisation.

What you need to do

Prior to your workshop, read:

Cummings & Worley (2015) Chapters 4 & 5

Teh & Girardi (2015) Beach View High School Analysis Continued

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this topic, you should be able to:

Describe the steps associated with starting a planned change process

Reinforce the definition of an OD practitioner as anyone who is helping a system to make planned changes

Describe the general framework of OD diagnostic tools from a systematic perspective

Define diagnosis as it applies to OD and explain how the diagnostic process leads to a practical understanding of problems at the organisation-level of analysis

Key concept/s

An OD intervention is an example of planned change that follows pre-determined steps

When viewed as open systems, organisations can be diagnosed at three levels: the organisation-level, group-level and individual-level

Each level can be diagnosed in terms of inputs, design components and outputs

Resources for this topic

To undertake study for this topic, you will need:

Essential textbooks

Cummings, T.G., & Worley, C.G. (2015). Organisation Development and Change. 10 th Edition. Stamford, CT, USA: Cengage Learning. ISBN 1-133-19045-6

Teh, E.C. & Girardi, A. (2015) - PP1041 - Organisation Development & Change: Practice Manual, Readings and Case Studies. 5th Edition. ISBN - 9780170369480

Learning activities/tasks

Beach View High School Analysis

Six Thinking Hats and other tools

Future Search Conference

Discuss progress on assignment 1

Group Charter due this should be submitted to your Affiliate Lecturer at this workshop

Last session to nominate, and be approved for, the group case study analysis and facilitation topic

Topic 4: The Process of OD

Collecting, Analysing and Feeding Back Diagnostic Information

Introduction

Organisation diagnosis is the process of collecting information that will be shared with the client in jointly assessing how the organisation is functioning. The data can be collected and analysed using either qualitative or quantitative techniques. Regardless of the data collection and analysis approach, the results must be fed back to the client, the intent being twofold: (a) to take ownership of the data, and (b) to motivate them to solve organisational problems. Feedback is thus the most important step in the diagnostic process. Good quality data depends on its ability to create energy for change and problem solving. Central to the process is the technique known as survey feedback.

What you need to do

Prior to the workshop, read:

Cummings & Worley (2015) Chapters 6

Teh & Girardi (2015) To Be or Not to Be

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this topic, you should be able to:

Describe the methods for diagnosing and collecting data

Describe and utilise techniques for analysing data

Explain the importance of data feedback in the OD process

Describe the desired characteristics of feedback content

Describe the desired characteristics of the feedback process

Key concept/s

Data collection is a cyclical process in which the OD practitioner is an active participant

No single data collection technique can fully measure the variable the OD practitioner requires

Survey feedback is one of the most accepted processes in OD

Resources for this topic

To undertake study for this topic, you will need:

Essential textbooks

Cummings, T.G., & Worley, C.G. (2015). Organisation Development and Change. 10 th Edition. Stamford, CT, USA: Cengage Learning. ISBN 1-133-19045-6

Teh, E.C. & Girardi, A. (2015) - PP1041 - Organisation Development & Change: Practice Manual, Readings and Case Studies. 5th Edition. ISBN - 9780170369480

Learning activities/tasks

Final session to clarify doubts on Assignment 1 Individual Memo

Topic 5: The Process of OD Designing Interventions

Introduction

An OD intervention is a sequence of activities, actions and events intended to help an organisation improve its performance and effectiveness. If an intervention is to be successful, the organisation must be ready to change and this capacity is either enhanced or diminished by leadership skills, the organisation’s cultural values and the knowledge, skills and abilities of the OD practitioner.

What you need to do

Prior to the workshop, read:

Cummings & Worley (2015) Chapters 7

Teh & Girardi (2015) The Celestial

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this topic, you should be able to:

Discuss the criteria for effective interventions

Discuss issues, considerations, constraints, ingredients, and processes associated with intervention design

Identify the different elements of a successful change program

Key concept/s

1. Activities contributing to effective change fall into five categories: motivating change, creating a vision, developing political support, managing the transition, and sustaining momentum

2. Once an intervention process has been completed, its results must be evaluated (i.e., the feedback process) and institutionalised

Resources for this topic

To undertake study for this topic, you will need:

Essential textbooks

Cummings, T.G., & Worley, C.G. (2015). Organisation Development and Change. 10 th Edition. Stamford, CT, USA: Cengage Learning. ISBN 1-133-19045-6

Teh, E.C. & Girardi, A. (2015) - PP1041 - Organisation Development & Change: Practice Manual, Readings and Case Studies. 5th Edition. ISBN - 9780170369480

Learning activities/tasks

Individual Memo due for online submission before session 5

Topic 6: The Process of OD Evaluating and Institutionalising OD Interventions

Introduction

The final stages of the OD cycle are those of evaluating and institutionalising the changes. The former refers to the process by which the changes are maintained for an appropriate period of time and the latter considers both the implementation success of the intended intervention and the long-term outcomes.

What you need to do

Prior to the workshop, read:

Cummings & Worley (2015) Chapters 8 & 9

Teh & Girardi (2015)

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this topic, you should be able to:

Explain how leadership is linked to change activities

Detail the issues associated with evaluating OD interventions

Describe the process of institutionalising OD interventions and the factors that contribute to it

Key concept/s

Once an intervention process has been completed, its results must be evaluated (i.e., the feedback process) and institutionalised

Resources for this topic

To undertake study for this topic, you will need:

Essential textbooks

Cummings, T.G., & Worley, C.G. (2015). Organisation Development and Change. 10 th Edition. Stamford, CT, USA: Cengage Learning. ISBN 1-133-19045-6

Teh, E.C. & Girardi, A. (2015) - PP1041 - Organisation Development & Change: Practice Manual, Readings and Case Studies. 5th Edition. ISBN - 9780170369480

Learning activities/tasks

Clarify doubts on Assignment 2 Group Case

Topic 7:

Human Process Interventions

Interpersonal and Group Process Approaches Organisation Process Approaches

Introduction

Human process interventions are aimed at interpersonal relations and group dynamics and represent the earliest OD interventions. These change programs help people gain interpersonal skills, work through interpersonal conflicts and develop effective groups. Historically, one of the earliest interventions was the T-group but its popularity has declined in favour of process consultation interventions which improve group effectiveness and help groups learn to diagnose and solve their own problems. Third-party interventions focus on interpersonal dysfunction in social relationships between two or more individuals in the same organisation. Like process consultation, team building is intended to equip the group to handle its own ongoing problem solving. Organisation-wide approaches aim to improve organisation processes such as problem solving, leadership, visioning, and task accomplishment between groups either for a major subsystem for an entire organisation. There are three major types of intervention: the organisation confrontation meeting; intergroup conflict meetings and microcosm groups; and large-group interventions.

What you need to do

Prior to the workshop, read:

Cummings & Worley (2015) Chapters 10 & 11

Teh & Girardi (2015) Greener Pastures and The Case of Jennifer Turner

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this topic, you should be able to:

Describe the human process interventions aimed at interpersonal relations and group dynamics

Compare and contrast the application and effectiveness of various process interventions in producing change

Explain three types of system-wide, human resource process interventions: the organisation confrontation meeting, intergroup relations interventions, and large-group interventions

Describe the effectiveness of the above interventions in producing change

Key concept/s

Interpersonal interventions represent attempts to improve people’s working relationships with one another

Process consultation is a general model for carrying out helping relationships in groups

Process consultation helps managers, employees and groups to assess and improve processes such as communication, interpersonal relations, group performance and leadership

Resources for this topic

To undertake study for this topic, you will need:

Essential textbooks

Cummings, T.G., & Worley, C.G. (2015). Organisation Development and Change. 10 th Edition. Stamford, CT, USA: Cengage Learning. ISBN 1-133-19045-6

Teh, E.C. & Girardi, A. (2015) - PP1041 - Organisation Development & Change: Practice Manual, Readings and Case Studies. 5th Edition. ISBN - 9780170369480

Learning activities/tasks

First group facilitation

Topic 8:

Techno-structural Interventions

Restructuring Organisations Employee Involvement Work Design

Introduction

Techno-structural interventions apply to change programs that focus on the technology and structure of organisations. Structural design interventions include moving from more traditional ways of dividing the organisation’s overall work to more integrative and flexible forms. The two most prevalent structural interventions are downsizing and re-engineering. As with all interventions, diagnostic guidelines help determine which structure is appropriate for particular organisational environments, technologies and conditions. Employee involvement (EI) interventions are emplaced to move decision making downward to improve responsiveness and performance, and to increase employee flexibility. The major EI applications include cooperative union-management projects and quality circles; total quality management; and high-involvement organisations. Work design refers to the creation of jobs and work groups that generate high levels of employee fulfilment and productivity. Work design is approached from three perspectives: engineering, motivational and socio- technical.

What you need to do

Prior to the workshop, read:

Cummings & Worley (2015) Chapters 12. 13 & 14

Teh & Girardi (2015) David & Goliath and A Smaller Slice of the Pie

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this topic, you should be able to:

Describe the basic principles of techno-structural design

Outline the three structural choices available to organisations and each intervention’s strengths and weaknesses

Describe the purpose and process of downsizing and reengineering

Describe the principle characteristics of employee involvement (EI) interventions

Describe the three predominant applications of EI

Discuss work design as a central component of many EI interventions

Discuss work design from three different perspectives: engineering, motivational and socio-technical

Explain how different approaches align with different technical and social conditions

Key concepts

Restructuring organisations is intended to improve organisational efficiency and flexibility

Restructuring is frequently associated with either or both downsizing and re-engineering

Employee involvement (EI) interventions are intended to transfer decision making downward to improve responsiveness and performance

Work design interventions look to improve productivity and worker satisfaction

Resources for this topic

To undertake study for this topic, you will need:

Essential textbooks

Cummings, T.G., & Worley, C.G. (2015). Organisation Development and Change. 10 th Edition. Stamford, CT, USA: Cengage Learning. ISBN 1-133-19045-6

Teh, E.C. & Girardi, A. (2015) - PP1041 - Organisation Development & Change: Practice Manual, Readings and Case Studies. 5th Edition. ISBN - 9780170369480

Learning activities/tasks

Second group facilitation

Topic 9:

HRM Interventions

Performance Management Talent Management Managing Diversity and Wellness

Introduction

Human resource management interventions are concerned with the management of individual and group performance via goal setting, performance appraisal and reward systems. Human resource management interventions are also concerned with developing and assisting the well-being of employees through career planning, workforce diversity, and employee wellness. Developing talent is part of the performance management process and incorporates three interventions: coaching, career planning and development, management and leadership processes designed to transfer knowledge. A further two human resource interventions involve increasing workforce diversity and wellness strategies designed to reduce, for example, stress, obesity, and alcohol dependence.

What you need to do

Prior to the workshop, read:

Cummings & Worley (2015) Chapters 15, 16 & 17

Teh & Girardi (2015) High Flyers and Well, Well, Well

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this topic, you should be able to:

Present a model for understanding the components and relationships associated with performance management

Discuss three interventions concerned with managing the performance of human resources: goal setting, performance appraisal, and reward systems

Discuss the human resource management interventions of: coaching and mentoring, career planning and development, and management and leadership development

Explain how the above OD efforts seek to improve an individual’s personal competencies and enhance traditional human resource approaches

Discuss performance management

Discuss performance appraisals

Differentiate between career planning and career development

Discuss human resource management interventions that address increasing workforce diversity and employee wellness

Describe how OD efforts can enhance traditional human resource approaches to these issues

Key concepts

Performance management comprises goal setting, performance appraisal and reward systems, all of which align member work behaviour with business strategy, employee involvement and workplace technology

Career planning helps employees choose occupations, organisations and jobs at different stages of their careers

Career development helps employees achieve career objectives

Workforce diversity interventions are designed to adapt human resource practices to an increasingly diverse workforce

Employee wellness interventions recognise the link between worker health and organisational productivity

Resources for this topic

To undertake study for this topic, you will need:

Essential textbooks

Cummings, T.G., & Worley, C.G. (2015). Organisation Development and Change. 10 th Edition. Stamford, CT, USA: Cengage Learning. ISBN 1-133-19045-6

Teh, E.C. & Girardi, A. (2015) - PP1041 - Organisation Development & Change: Practice Manual, Readings and Case Studies. 5th Edition. ISBN - 9780170369480

Learning activities/tasks

Third group facilitation

Topic 10: Strategic Change Interventions

Transformational Change Continuous Change Transorganisational Change

Introduction

Strategic change interventions are relatively recent additions to the OD field and focus on helping organisations to relate better to their environments and to achieve a better fit with those external forces that affect goal achievement and performance. Because organisations are open systems, they must relate to their environments if they are to gain the resources and information they need to function and prosper. Strategic change takes three forms:

transformational change, continuous change, and transorganisational change. Transformational change occurs in response to, or in anticipation of, major changes in the organisation’s environment or technology. Continuous change extends transformational change into a nonstop process of strategy setting, organisation designing, and implementing change. The overall focus is on learning, changing and adapting. Transorganisational change moves beyond a single organisation to include merging, allying, or networking with other organisations. The process of transorganisational change represents a fundamental shift in strategic orientation because the strategies, goals, structures, and process of two or more organisations become interdependent and must be coordinated and aligned.

By understanding and responding to their internal and external environments, organisations can develop strategies that help them meet the challenges of the larger environment. This can be achieved by integrated strategic change interventions which help move the organisation from its present state to its desired state. When the desired tasks and problems exceed the ability of the organisation alone, transorganisational development strategies (e.g., partnerships, alliances) are emplaced and which require a different set of OD methods to that of single organisations.

What you need to do

Prior to the workshop, read:

Cummings & Worley (2015) Chapters 18, 19 & 20

Teh & Girardi (2015) The Celestial OR Big Bytes

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this topic, you should be able to:

Discuss a framework that categorises different types of organisational change efforts with an emphasis on the features of transformational change

Explain three kinds of interventions against the background of transformational change, integrated strategic change, organisation design, and culture change

Discuss the OD interventions that enable organisations to continuously change

Compare and contrast three types of OD interventions aimed at developing organisations capable of continuous change interventions: self-designing organisation interventions, organisation learning and knowledge management interventions, and built to change interventions

Discuss the rationale behind transorganisational interventions

Compare and contrast the three types of transorganisational OD interventions: mergers and acquisitions, strategic alliance interventions, and network interventions within each category

Key concept/s

Organisations are open systems that exist in environmental contexts

Open systems planning helps an organisation systematically assess its environment and develop strategic responses to it

Integrated strategic change is a comprehensive intervention for addressing organisation and environment issues

Transorganisational development is an emerging form of planned change that is aimed at helping organisations create partnerships with other organisations to perform tasks or to solve problems that are too complex and multifaceted for single organisations to carry out

Resources for this topic

To undertake study for this topic, you will need:

Essential textbooks

Cummings, T.G., & Worley, C.G. (2015). Organisation Development and Change. 10 th Edition. Stamford, CT, USA: Cengage Learning. ISBN 1-133-19045-6

Teh, E.C. & Girardi, A. (2015) - PP1041 - Organisation Development & Change: Practice Manual, Readings and Case Studies. 5th Edition. ISBN - 9780170369480

Learning activities/tasks

Fourth group facilitation

Topic 11: Special Applications of OD

OD in Nonindustrial Settings: Health Care, School Systems, the Public Sector, and Family-Owned Businesses

Organisation development may be practiced in various types of organisations in both the private and public sectors. There is some evidence that the traditional and narrow applications of OD (i.e., a largely industrial and manufacturing focus) are not readily applicable to new industries or unique organisational settings or situations. Thus, when entering into an OD relationship in nonindustrial settings, there is a need for a greater variety and diversity of diagnostic methods, interventions, and values.

What you need to do

Prior to the workshop, read:

Cummings & Worley (2015) Chapter 22

Teh & Girardi (2015) Shah Holdings and La Bella

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this topic, you should be able to:

Discuss how OD in nonindustrial settings health care, school systems, the public sector, family-owned businesses differs from traditional practice contexts

Describe how OD is practiced in four non-traditional setting

Key concept/s

OD in nonindustrial settings (health care, school systems, the public sector and family- owned businesses) differs from traditional practice contexts

Resources for this topic

To undertake study for this topic, you will need:

Essential textbooks

Cummings, T.G., & Worley, C.G. (2015). Organisation Development and Change. 10 th Edition. Stamford, CT, USA: Cengage Learning. ISBN 1-133-19045-6

Teh, E.C. & Girardi, A. (2015) - PP1041 - Organisation Development & Change: Practice Manual, Readings and Case Studies. 5th Edition. ISBN - 9780170369480

Learning activities/tasks

Fifth group facilitation

Topic 12: Course Review

Future Directions of OD

Introduction

Trends in OD fall into three categories: (a) a call for a return to OD’s traditional values and practices, (b) increasing demands for professionalisation of the field, and (c) an increasing number of people contributing to OD research. In the short term, these trends will continue to operate separately but in the longer term, there should be increasing attempts at reconciling these differences and generating a more integrative view of OD. As the field of OD evolves so, too, will its context with these contexts being the economy, the workforce, technology and the organisation. While OD has traditionally focussed on large organisations, it is likely to become increasingly involved in planned change for small entrepreneurial start- ups, government organisations and global social change organisations. It is also thought that as the economy becomes more globalised, OD will become more concerned with preserving cultural diversity. Finally, OD will most likely focus on helping organisations become more ecologically sustainable.

What you need to do

Prior to the workshop, read:

Cummings & Worley (2015) Chapter 23

Teh & Girardi (2015) Black Swan University and The Golden Dragon Group

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this topic, you should be able to:

Discuss the trends affecting how OD is likely to be practiced in the future

Discuss how OD is likely to change in the future

Key concept/s

The future of OD is likely to be the result of the interaction among the traditional, pragmatic, and scholarly trends as well as how the global economy evolves, technology develops, the workforce engages, and organisations structure themselves

Resources for this topic

To undertake study for this topic, you will need:

Essential textbooks

Cummings, T.G., & Worley, C.G. (2015). Organisation Development and Change. 10 th Edition. Stamford, CT, USA: Cengage Learning. ISBN 1-133-19045-6

Teh, E.C. & Girardi, A. (2015) - PP1041 - Organisation Development & Change: Practice Manual, Readings and Case Studies. 5th Edition. ISBN - 9780170369480

Learning activities/tasks

Sixth group facilitation

Discuss exam focus chapters